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11

. . . . . . .. .

t
'
Otte,.; Ontan"
5he

ThQ For~st HighSchool

alAGHz,Ine

~olbtn jlubiltt 1969

Foreword
The history of the first twenty-five
years of the School's existence
was presented in detail in the Silver Jubilee issue of "The Forestonian".
In this Golden Jubilee issue, therefore,
less fully and more has been written about
and 11969.

the first years are given


the period between
1944

Mr. L. D. Jones, in his foreword


to the Silver Jubilee Magazine,
expressed
the hope that the Editor of the Golden Jubilee Number
would be duly grateful to the compilers of the Silver Jubilee Number.
The Editor is indeed grateful
every issue of "The Forestonian"
confronted
with an artistic turn
them!

to them and also to the editors of


since 1920. Some of them will be
of phrase that is very familiar to

It would have been impossible to produce this issue of "The


Forestonian"
without
the help of Miss B. Murray, our excellent
Secretary. Miss Murray is an Old Pupil and has always had the interests
of the School at heart. Her knowledge
of its history, and of former
members of staff and pupils, and her exceptionally
good memory,
have been invaluable.
Her willingness, in spite of being snowed under
with her own work, to "vet" the "copy" before it reached the printer
has been greatly appreciated.
Mr. Gordon Came, who prints "The Forestonian"
every year, is
also an old pupil. His knowledge of the School is an advantage.
He
co-operates
with us and is patient with the, sometimes, tardy Editor.

The Forestonian

Mr. W. A. J. SAMMONS (Chairman)


Mr. J. W. MILDENHALL
(Vice-Chairman)
Mrs. S. B. BUCCERI (Hon. Secretary)
Mr. R. A. BLACK
Mr. e. BLAMIRE
Dr. V. BOY, M.P.e.

Mr. G. D. EVANS
Mr. e. P. e. FOURIE
Mr. J. E. G. HARRISON

Mr. R. A. JONES
Mrs. H. M. MARKS
Mr. G. V. WILKINSON

Mr.

P. A. BREDENHANN
(Acting
Principal)
Mr. H. J. SWANEPOEL
(Vice-Principal)
Mr. J. A. de V. WORSLEY
(Vice-Principal)

Mrs. R. E. ACTON
Mrs. A. A. BISHOP
Miss E. J. BRAMLEY
Mr. A. E. BRITZ
Miss R. A. BROWN
Mr. D. e. BROWNE
Mr. J. S. E. BURCHARD
Miss F. CHANDLER
Mr. K. M. COKAYNE
Miss M. I. DE AGRELLA
Miss N. DE VILLlERS
Miss J. B. GRAHAM

Mr. D. v. R. HENDRIKZ
Miss D. HERSCH
Miss J. A. HIGGINS
Miss G. A. HOLLlNGWORTH
Mr.J. LORDAN
Mr. N. J. PIENAAR
Miss S. B. STEAD
Mr. E. D. TOWNSEND
Mr. B. VAN DER SCHYFF
Mr. J. VAN DER VELDEN
Miss L. M. WALKER

Mr. R. W. BROWN
Miss M. e. CLUVER
Miss W. A. DE WAAL
Mrs. J. D. HOFFENBERG
Mrs. H. K. MAZANSKY

Mrs. e. e. MOFFAT
Miss L. J. PINSHAW
Mrs. J. PRETORIUS
Mr. S. e. STALSON
Mr. e. e. VILJOEN

Secretary:
Assistants:

Miss B. M. MURRA Y
Mrs. M. E. LAMBERT
Mrs. J. VAN DER WATH

THE HEADMASTERS

Mr. Rees was born in South Wales in 1882.


He was educated there and in England and
obtained his B.Sc. Degree at the London University. He was outstanding
at games.
After teaching for eight years in England,
he was the Senior Science Master at the
Johannesburg College (later King Edward VII
School) from 1909 to 1919, when he was
appointed Headmaster of the Technical High
School.
Mr. Rees possessed vision,
fidence in his ability to
allotted to him. His rare
lovable person within the
always efficient Headmaster.

courage and conperform the task


smile revealed a
often aloof and

He achieved much in the short time before


his death in 1923.

1919-1969

Mr. Rees was born in South Wales and


educated in England. He obtained the degree
of B.Sc. at the University of Wales and was
an Honours graduate
in the Natural Science
Tripos at the University of Cambridge.
Mr. Rees came to South Africa in 1913 and
was Senior Science Master at the Pretoria
Boys' High Schoo1 for ten years. He was the
Head of Forest High from January, 1924 until
his retirement in 1938.
Tact, a real sense of humour, a sense of
perspective, an alertness of mind and a great
understanding
of children were among the
sterling qualities he possessed - qualities that
helped to make him the quiet and efficient
heart of the School.
Mr. Rees died on 5th February,

1956.

Mr. Jones, like the two previous Headmasters.


was a native of South Wales.
His academic
qualifications
included
the B.Sc. (Hons.),
B.A.
and B.Econ.
Before his appointment
as Headmaster,
he
was the Science
Master
at Forest
High for
eleven
years.
He had previously
taught
at
Germiston
High and Commercial
High.
Mr. Jones was a man of great energy and
enthusiasm
and took a great
interest
in all
the School sports and activities.
He was the
first to introduce
rugby into the Rand high
~chools.
He worked
tirelessly
for rugby and
for teachers'
associations
for many years.
After
retiring
in 1945 Mr. Jones returned
to Wales,
where he married
again.
He continued to take an active interest in rugby and
visited South Africa several ti mes. In 1955 he
came out with the British Lions rugby team
and visited Forest High with his wife, Mr. T. J.
Rees and two members
of the Lions team the
fly-half,
Cliff
Morgan,
and
the
flank
forward,
Reg Higgins.
He died in Johannesburg
in 1961.

Front

Row: S. Ballantyne,
G. Watson,
B. van der Wait
(Capt.),
J. McCauley,
G. McCormick
(Head
Boy, 1939).
Second Row: E. Lahner, W. van der Hoven, B. Leibowitz,
V. Boy (Head Boy, 1940),
H. Juniper, W. Taylor, Mr. A. G. Wilke.
Third Row: L. Slot, D. Greve. K. Morgan, L. Rumbak,
A. Caldwell.

FOREST HIGH 1920-1944


The School opened
as the Technical
High
School in 1919 in a wood and iron building
at the Union Grounds.
It was the only school
of its kind for boys in South
Africa,
and
offered
a specialised
Matric
course
with
a
bias
towards
Applied
Science.
The
Headmaster
was Mr. J. J. B. Rees.
Two of the
original
members of staff were Mr. E. Chalmers
and Mr. D. B. Jones.
Towards
the end of 1919 the School moved
out to Forest Hill where
the buildings
were
incomplete
and the grounds
rough veld. The
pupils dug out the grass, removed
the worst
of the bumps and played
cricket
and soccer
on a slope.
Of the staff who were there in the next few
years, the following
are known to have died
since the Silver Jubilee
issue of "The Forestonian"
- Mr. E. Chalmers,
Mr. D. J. Bischoff,
Mr. T. Robertson,
Mr. P. V. W. Pougnet,
Mr.
S. S. Loubser,
Mrs. O. H. M. Crowther
(Mrs.
Watson)
and
Mr. H. W.
Beeton.
News
has been heard of Mr. R. J. Campbell,
who
resides in Johannesburg,
and Mr. J. M. Parker,
who lives in Hermanus,
has contributed
an
article to this magazine.
A Paper
Chase
to Vanwyksrust
in 1921
was the forerunner
of the Cross Country
as
we know it today,
and a Swimming
Contest
in the Village
Main Cooling
Dam was the
forerunner
to the present
Swimming
Gala.
The first school concert
was held in the
Oddfellow's
Hall, Turffontein,
in 1923, when
Mr. Robertson
produced
"Jemima
Does Her
Bit"; the first Prize Giving Ceremony
in 1922,
with
Dr. J. E. Adamson
(later
Sir J. E.
Adamson),
the Director
of Education,
as the
Guest Speaker
and the first Governing
Body
meeting
took place in 1921.
Mr. T. J. Rees was appointed
Headmaster
after the death of Mr. J. J. B. Rees in 1923.
In 1926 the Technical
College
was built in
Eloff Street and the Technical
High went out
of existence.
The School then became
Forest
High ?chool
and girls were admitted.
Two
of the original
subjects
were maintained
Mechanics
and a specialised
Manual
Training
Course,
that fell away later.
The first women on the staff, in 1926, were
Miss Mary Simpson
and Miss Maud
Baillie,
succeeded
later
by Mrs. Watson
and
Miss
Maclaren.
Members of staff at the time were
J. M. Parker, D. B. Jones, S. S. Loubser, L. D.

Jones,
E. Chalmers,
R. J. Campbell,
D. J.
Bischoff, E. H. B. Worthington,
H. G. Durand
and D. E. Kriel.
The first Athletics
Sports Meeting was held
in 1925 and Cross Country
in 1927. The Hall
was built in 1928. At the official opening,
the
Old Forestonians
presented
"The
Tempest".
The Hall was used for many plays produced
by Mrs. Watson,
Miss Maclaren,
Miss Bowditch and Mr. Robertson
- all of whom often
performed
in them,
and
for the
excellent
operettas,
produced
and conducted
by Mr.
D. B. Jones.
These were presented
annually
from
1929 to 1937. Miss Maclaren
was the
pianist
at all the concerts
and operettas.
The number
of pupils at the Schoo1 fluctuated
with the introduction
of and, later, the
withdrawal
of an Intermediate
School in the
area.
In 1929 the lower
portion
of the ground
was levelled.
The ground
on both sides of
the School
had already
been
levelled
and
grassed
and
four
tennis
courts
had
been
placed on the East side. The West side was
later
made
into a girls' hockey
ground.
The Forest soccer teams were always
keen
and the First XI won the Konigsberg
Trophy
in 1938, the year before the School switched
over to rugby.
Dr. Vincent Boy was a member
of the team.
The Old Pupils who have won
Springbok
colours for various
sports over the
fifty years are listed elsewhere in the magazine.
Mr. L. D. Jones became the Headmaster
in
1939 and
had to overcome
the difficulties
created
by war
conditions
shortage
of
staff,
an increase
in the number
of pupils,
many of whom lacked parental
control
with
their fathers
on Active Service.
There was a
lack of adequate
accommodation
and an increase
in extra-mural
activities.
The grounds
were improved.
A major task in those years
was
the
raising
of money
for war
and
charitable
funds.
The free book system
was brought
in in
1939, but from 1940 difficulty was experienced
in obtaining
text books.
In 1941 the Junior
Certificate
Examination
became
an internal
school
examination.
In the same year
Dr.
Muller formed
the School Orchestra
and the
Young
South
African
Concert
Party,
which
entertained
soldiers
in camps
and hospitals,
consisted
mainly of Forest
High scholars.

Front

Row: Mr. L. D. jones. Mr;. E. Chalmer~. Mr. H. W. Beeton.


Mr. J. McK. Parker,
Mr. S. S. loubser.
Mr. D. B. lanes.

Second

Row: Mr. D. E. Kriel. Mr. T. Robertson.


Miss V. M. Frewin.

Third

Row: Mr. A. R. Lemmer.


Miss E. Jones. Mr. A. G. Wilke,
Durand,
Miss L. M. ~owditch,
Mr. A. A. Black.

In 1939 two grounds were placed under


Kikuyu grass and the rugby teams used the
Transvaal Rugby Union grounds at Springfield.
Two grounds were available at the School in
1940, the third in 1941 and the fourth in 1943.
Two netball fields and two cricket pitches were
also provided.
Before any of this could be
done, the forty acres of ground had to be
terraced.
The terrace above the rugby fields
is now used for hockey and athletics.
The
ground above that was eventually used for
the Voorbrand
Laerskool, which opened in
June. 1959.
The School was renovated in 1932, externally
in 1943 and internally in 1944.

Mr. j. H. M. Hopkins,

Mr. T. j. Rees
Miss j. Barnett.

(Headmaster),
Mr. D. j. Bischoff.

Miss M. E. Maclaren.

Mr. H. G.

In 1944. Mr. E. Polak. who had been a parttime Physical Training teacher at the School
for six years. was appointed
full time and
remained in that post until his promotion to
Vice-Principal of the Jewish Government School
in 1962. He has now retired and has just enjoyed a trip to Australia and the Far East. In
1944 Mr. Beeton retired after twenty-three
years service in the School, and Mr. Chalmers,
who had been on the staff for twenty-five
years. was appointed Vice-Principal.
Mr. L. D. Jones retired in 1944 when the
School had been in existence for twenty-five
years .. He was asked to stay on for a further
two terms and left in June. 1945.

A JUMBLED RETROSPECT
When
I look back to the beginning
of my
eriod of service, the only High School in the
Transvaal
which had an engineering
bias was
-he Technical
High School.
At the time
I
became
a member
of its staff,
it had been
moved from the Tin Temple to a two-storeyed
uilding and a well-equipped
engineering
lab
in 35 acres of open veld in Forest
Hill. It
continued
to be called
the Technical
High
School until the Transvaal
lost control
of its
echnical
education.
Mr. D. B. Rees was its first headmaster;
but
before I had been on his staff for a year, he
had a fatal
attack,
of appendicitis
and was
succeeded
by Mr. T. J. Rees from Pretoria
Boys'
High. Mr. Rees was Head until his retirement
in 1938, and at the beginning
of 1939, I was
transferred
from
the School
after
eighteen
years service.
While
the
School
remained
a Technical
School, we were allowed to accept pupils from
anywhere
in South Africa, so there was never
any difficulty
about
numbers;
but when we
became an ordinary
high scfroolJ we were re-

stricted
to pupils whose
homes were in our
own district.
This resulted
in Forest
High
becoming
a mixed school.
During
my time
at Forest,
the
English
Master, Mr. D. B. Jones, did outstanding
work
for the School( 1) He produced
School magazines
which
were literary
models.
(2) His Welsh
musical
traditions
coupled
with his dramatic
gifts, manifested
themselves
in the delightful
operettas
his pupils performed
annually.
(3) He was in charge of School sports and
trained
the School first eleven soccer teams,
with great success in both functions.
When the Schoo1 became an ordinary
high
school, Mr. T. J. Rees re-organized
the House
system,
and
at this stage
dnother
of our
artistic
Welsh
masters,
Mr. James,
designed
the School badge in its present form. It gives
me pleasure
to remember
that
the
word
"thorough"
was my contribution.
I expect each House has preserved
a record
of its achievements;
but I seem to remember

that Newton House won the Tug-of-war event


for several years in succession, largely due to
Mr. Kriel's interest therein.
My recollections
of Mr. Kriel awaken again the admiration
I
had for him, both as a teacher and a man.
And so this hoary-headed
octogenarian
brings his rambling meanderings to a tardy
close.
(Signed) Cogo ergo sum.
J. M. PARKER,
Senior Mathematics Master,
1921-1938.

Dr. Milne was born in Pretoria and educated


in the Cape. He was an athlete, played First
XI cricket and soccer and was an active
member of the Debating Society.
The First World War interrupted his university career and he served under General
Northey in East Africa until the conclusion of
hostilities.
In 1919 he trained as a teacher and, while
teaching,
completed
his B.A. Degree, the
Preliminary and Intermediate
LL.B. examinations and obtained
the Associate Teachers'
Diploma of the College of Preceptors, London.
While in Benoni Dr. Milne took the National
Commercial
Diploma
and was awarded
a
National Exhibition. He passed, with distinction, the
National
Com mercial
Teachers'
Diploma, became a Fellow of the Faculty of
Teachers in Commerce, England and an Associate of the Chartered Institute of Secretaries.
He returned to Cape Town and took the B.Ed.
Degree by Research and in 1936 obtained his
Doct~rate of Philosophy at the University of
Pretoria.
Dr. Milne was an examiner to the Transvaal and to the Union education departments
for many years. He taught at every type of
school and was Head of a Primary, an Intermediate and a Commercial High School.
He worked actively for various societies and
his publications include text books on vocational guidance, scholastic tests and commercial
arithmetic.
Refused permission to go on active service
during the Second World War, he joined the
National Vo'lunteer Brigade and was second

in command of the 3rd Battalion.


awarded the Efficiency Decoration.

He was

Dr. Milne's scientific, legal, commercial and


military training, his keen sense of humour, his
exceptional ability to impart knowledge and
his teaching experience made him an outstanding
Headmaster.
Honesty of purpose,
method and accuracy in procedure, moderation in speech and action, fairness and finality
in judgment were important to him.
His headmastership at Forest High was fruitful but, unfortunately,
of short duration.
Impro,ved conditions tempted him to go back
to the commercial side of education, where he
was most needed.

MR. E. CHALMERS, Acting Headmaster


1946-1947
Mr. Chalmers, Vice-Principal of the School,
acted as Headmaster
from July, 1946 until
July, 1947. It is no easy task to be in charge
of a school in the interval between the going
of one Head and the coming of the next. Mr.
Chal mers experienced no difficulty. With his

Returning
to South Africa he taught
at the
Commercial
High School, Athlone
High Schoo,1
and was the Principal
of Hillcrest School and
then the Sir John Adamson
Junior High School.
For many years
in French and was
mental committees.
Rand Branch
of
Association
and
Association
and
Committee
of
Association.

Mr. Bovet was an examiner


a member of various departHe was Chairman
of the
the High School Teachers'
the Johannesburg
Principals'
a member
of the Executive
the
Transvaal
Teachers'

In addition,
he was Chairman
of the Schools'
Amateur
Swimming
Association,
the Johannesburg Child Guidance,
a member of the Executive Committee
of the Transvaal
Swimming
Association
and the Bantu Men's Social Centre,
Treasurer
of
the
Witwatersrand
Mental
Hygiene
Society and an Elder of St. George's
Presbyterian
Church.
Mr. Bov.et was the Headmaster
of Forest
High for eleven years - a period when experienced
members
of staff were
leaving,
who
were difficult
to replace
and when a change
in educational
policy increased
the number of
quiet
confidence,
his sense of humour,
his
understanding
of pupils,
staff
and
parents,
with his eagerness
to help others in their difficulties,
he undertook
an arduous
task with
enthusiasm
and accomplished
it with success.
An M.A. of London University,
Mr. Chalmers
specialised
in French at the Lycee at Laon,
France,
before
he came to South Africa
in
1914. He taught
at the Rosettenville
Central
School and joined
the Forest
High staff
in
1928.
He was
appointed
Vice-Principal
in
1944.
Mr. Chalmers
retired in December,
returned
to teach for a short while
after the death of his wife. He was
England when he died in November,

1950 but
in 1956,
living In
1964.

Mr. Bovet, who was born in Grey town, Natal,


matriculated
at
the
Johannesburg
College
(later
King Edward
VII School).
Proceeding
overseas
he studied Latin, Greek, Hebrew and
modern
languages
at
the
universities
at
Neuchatel
and Lausanne.
A summer
course
at Oxford
and
a post-graduate
course
at
Edinburgh
completed
his overseas
studies.

pupils at the School.


To provide and organise
for them
and to control
them was not an
easy task.
Mr. Bovet met all the demands
made on him
and much was accomplished
during
his time.
He found time to attend
sports matches
and
encourage
the
staff
and
pupils
with
his
presence.
By his bearing,
his innate dignity,
his associations
with Rotary
and other public bodies
and by his high standing
in the Education
Department,
he brought
many
benefits
to
Forest
High.
Mr. Bovet is characterised
by a deep-roo'ted
sense of justice,
a sense of humour
and his
calm dispassionate
judgment.
For five years after leaving Forest High, Mr.
Bovet was Headmaster
of King Edward
VII
School the school of which he is an Old
Boy.
Since his retirement
he has been elected
a
Member
of the Provincial
Council,
where
he
is still working
in the interests
of education.

Mr. Stead spent the first ten years of his life


in India, where his father
was the InspectorGeneral
of the Police.
When the First World
War ended, he was
able to reach Britain and attended
the Clifton
Preparatory
School and College in Bristol.
He
was an outstanding
pupil at Clifton
College
and student
at the University
of Cambridge,
where he obtained
his B.A. Degree with History
as a major, B.A. Honours and his M.A. Degree.
While
there
he took
a special
course
in
English.
Mr. Stead was the Senior History Master at
Reigate
Grammar
School in Surrey until the
outbreak
of war in 1939. For six and a half
years he was an officer in the Ack-Ack Section
of the Royal Artillery
in Britain,
the Middle
East and the Anzio Beach-head
operation.
In 1948 Mr. Stead came to South Africa.
He
spent four and a half years at Krugersdorp
High, teaching
History
and English and four
years as the Vice-Principal
of Athlone
Boys'
High.
While
there
he acted
as Headmaster
in 1955.
He was appointed
Headmaster
of
Forest
Hill Primary
School
in 1956 and of
Forest
High
in January,
1958.
He was an
active mem ber of teachers'
associations.
Mr. Stead
had an equally
fine record
of

achievement
on the sportsfield.
Following
on
his successes
as a high school pupil, he won
his colours at Cambridge
for hockey, cricket,
tennis and rugby.
In South Africa he played

hockey for Transvaal


and he played
league
tennis and cricket.
He WClS Secretary
of the
South African
Hockey
Association,
President
of the Transvaal
Hockey Association,
a member of the Olympic Council and of the Tennis
Umpires'
Association.
He also took a great
interest
in swimming.
During
the eleven years Mr. Stead was at
Forest High he endeared
himself to everybody
he was a gentleman
in the true sense of
the word.
Not only did the School
benefit
from his academic
ability and his experience
but also from his great interest in all the sporting .acti\/.ities.
The boys' hockey, particularly,
prospered
and many of the players were chosen
to represent
the South African
and Transvaal
Schools teams.
Mr. Stead died suddenly after returning
from
a trip overseas,
just before the com mencement
of the fourth term in 1968.

FOREST HIGH, July, 1945 to July, 1946


Mr. F. T. Milne's reign at the School was
f short duration
but, in that time V.J. Day
las celebrated
and it was decided at a meeting of Governi ng Body, staff and parents
to
uild a War
Memorial
to those Old Fores-onians who had died for their country.
Licuts.
Lane and
Hopkins
returned
after
eing away for the duration
of the war.

FOREST HIGH, July, 1946 to July, 1947


Mr. E. Chalmers,
the Vice-Principal,
was the
cting Headmaster
for a year.
In July, 1946 four prefabricated
huts were
Juilt,
which
made
the
Hall
available
for
hysical Training,
the library for the purposE'
~ I' which
it had been intended
and the Lecture
={ om as a temporary
Biology laboratory:
Lieut. Attridge
and Capt. Robertson
returned
- m Active Service.
Major Lemmer
had also
~e-urned.

FOREST HIGH,

1947;.1957

By A. N. BOVET
In "The Forestonian"
of 1957, the circum:L nces
of these
years
are
descri bed
as
"arduous",
the difficulties
as those
"expericed by no Head
before"
and the whole
_cri od as an intricate
navigational
exercise on
";:rou bled waters".
But looking
twelve years into the Dast, the
-ind
dwells
mainly
on happy
me~ories
emories
of enriching
personal
relationships
',i h pupils who' were proud of their school,
- d are now contributing,
with the same pride,
the destinies
of our country;
with parents,
ny of whom had a traditional
love for the
- hool and who
inspired
others
with
their
ve; with
staff,
a loyal team
with varied
-:::Ients, many of whom
have since achieved
-- h position
in the profession
as teachers,
~incipals
and inspectors
of education;
with
-..: verning
Body, a body of wise counsellors
hose
support
was
invaluable;
with
Old
= ~estonians, some of them parents or mem::ers of staff or Governing
Body, and others
.' hose continued
interest
always
acted
as a

=.

le.

These relationships
were formed
not only
,',i-hin the walls of the School,
but on the
! ying fields, on the parade
ground,
at the
mpressive
Remembrance
Day
services,
at

Speech
Days, at fetes, including
the famous
motor
show in 1956, at mannequin
displays,
at concerts,
dramatic
performances,
school
parties and dances, at Doe's school camps and
many other occasions
too numerous
to list.
What of the "troubled
waters"?
These were
mainly connected
with the sudden change
in
education
policy by the Department
of Education, in the course of these years, when the
idea
of schools
with
well-defined
purposes
(academic,
com mercial,
practical,
etc.) were
abolished
in favour
of so-called,
unplanned,
comprehensive
schools, where
pupils were to
find their own level in the mass, sometimes
with
humiliation
and frustration
all of
which could have been avoided
by an interim
of careful planning
and preparation.
. The statistical
effect was a rapid
increase
I", the
enrolment
of pupils
from
550
in
1947, of whom
nine per cent were matriculants to 950 in 1957, of whom less than five
per cent
were
matriculants.
The teaching
staff also increased
from 27, of whom 92 per
cent were permanent,
to 40, of whom 47 per
cent were
permanent.
With
the assistance
of experienced
temporary
teachers
and recruits
from overseas, a complete collapse was averted
on more than one occasion.
These
in-creases,
of course,
called
for expansion
in all directions
and so builders were
with us most of the ti me, erecting
pre-fab.
accommodation
and permanent
additions.
It
was with regret
that we saw the closing of
the attractive
East quadrangle.
This, together
with the welcome completion
of the East Wing,
were necessary
to accommodate
the additional
c1GSses.
It was fortunate
that the available
extent
of ground
made it possible to develop
more
p'ayin~
fields to the South
of the existing
rugby fields, where hockey and athletics
found
a permanent
home.
Cricket
received
its fair
share of attention
when turf wickets were laid
down in 1953 and' a permanent
score box was
built in 1955. New tennis courts and netball
fields were provided
and this was the period
when the trustees
of the War Memorial
Fund
erected
the swimming
bath
complex
as a
last! ng memorial.
Other
improved
manent
tuck
shop,
system
of providing
throu~h
laboratory
fied drive-way
for

amenities
were the perwhich
replaced
the old
"tuck",
during
breaks,
windows,
and the dignicars
under
the
stately

Inspection

cedars. now
building.

sadly

of the Memorial Swimming Bath after the Dedication


on Sunday, 4th March, 1956.

missed.

in front

of the

Naturally
considerable
change had to be
made to the curriculum. and in 1957. Forest
provided what was considered to be the widest
choice of su bjects in any school in the
Transvaal.
Amongst the new or less common
subjects were Mechanics (Applied
Maths.).
Biology as well as Physical Science. French.
Latin (and even Greek and Hebrew to selected
groups) as well as a full range of commercial
and practical subjects, with a well-developed
Domestic
Science course catering
for all,
including matriculation students.

Service

served to impress on all senior pupils their


special responsibilities as seniors; and in 1947
the white summer dress was replaced by the
existing yellow summer frock.
Attempts were made to preserve the past
tradition of the School, notably by erecting
in the Hall a board bearing the names of
Head Boys and Head Girls. which include some
names that have since become well-known in
the community. and the Roll of Honour, which
is now permanently enshrined in the Memorial.
Before the end of 1957. plans were well
advanced for the new School hall and the
extensive alterations
which have since been
incorporated
in the School.

It was also found desirable to experiment


(in those days experimentation
was aHowed
in the schools) with a system of accelerated
courses to ensure that the brighter pupils did
not suffer from "dragging",
whilst it was
made possible for less endowed pupils to proceed at a slower pace suited to their requirement, to avoid the discouragement of "failing".

Amongst the many inspiring speeches delivered at Speech Day year after year. the
one probably best remembered was an exciting preview of the trip to the moon by Dr.
Bleksley in 1956. And So Forest High visualised
that famous first step thirteen years before
it was made.

Two changes were made as far as the School


uniform was concerned: In 1954 the attractive
honours blazer became a seniors blazer and

Between 1947 and 1957 some new activities


were started in the School. These included the
Military Band, a Red Cross Detachment,
an

Front

Row: Mr. J. E. Johnsen, Mr. H. Kroes, Miss K. J. A. Brabazon,


Mr. G. K. Green (Vice-Principal),
Mr. A. N. Bovet,
(Headmaster),
Miss E. L. McGillivray (Second Vice-Principal),
Mr. H. Muller, Miss A. Frie!, Mr. T. Lowenstein.

Second

Row: Miss Y. Huskisson, Miss E. I. Cloete, Mrs. C. C. Moffatt, Miss B. M. Murray,


Cordes, Miss E. Taylor, Miss S. B. Stead, Miss L. M. Kenny, Miss M. M. Manson.

Third

Row: Mr. A. W. Wilby, Mr. J. van der Velden, Mr. J. S. Swart,


Mr. A. Carson, Mr. J. C. Brink, Mr. T. J. A. Kieser.

Fourth

Row: Mr. E. Polak,


Mr. C. C. Groenewald,

Mr. H. J. Swanepoel,
Mr. S. R. Mortimer,
Mr. I. J. Pelser, Mr. R. M. Noyles-Lewis.

Annual Hobbies Exhibition, a Girls' Choir,


Fencing and Hebrew classes which were held
before school. From 1948 the Annual Memorial
Services were held in the open.
New prizes donated during this period were:
For Diligence Sir Ernest Oppenheimer
Awards.
For Leadership - Rotary Cup.
For Good Citizenship - Badenhorst Durrant
Cup.
For Bilingualism - Robertson Cup.
For French - French Government Prize.
Some names have come readily to mind in
the short time made available to me for looking back over the years.

Mrs. L. Martyn,

Mr. D. J. Petterson,
Mr.

B. B. Bootha,

Mrs. L. A.

Mr. P. F. S. Mulder,
Mr. W.

I. B. Steyn,

MAJOR C. H. MARAIS, who trained the


Cadet Band to the point where it was not
only the best band in the Transvaal, but in
the Republic.
MISS E. L. McGILLlVRAY, the Second VicePrincipal, who proved that a woman in a position of authority
in a co-ed school is
invaluable.
In addition to her duties as a
Vice-Principal,
Miss McGillivray
introduced
Typewriting
into the School with great success, organised
a system whereby no child
could avoid attending assembly and controlled
the girls with sympathy and firmness. While
she was at Forest High, every social function
was a delight. It was Miss McGillivray who
instituted
the Annual Prefects' Party a

"thank
you" from the staff for the assistance
given tO them by the prefects during the year.
I

MISS M. E. MACLAREN,
who knew every
girl better than anyone alse and who, at this
time, designed
the new summer
uniform
for
the girls.
MISS B. MURRAY,
our excellent
Secretary
who also did all the work in connection
with
the boards
in the Hall bearing
the names of
the Head Prefects,
and who compiled
a complete and accurate
Roll of Honour of the Old
Forestonians
who lost their lives in the war.
The latter
took three years to compile
and
involved
visits to the War
Records
departments in South Africa and overseas.
MR. H. KROES with his boundless
energy
and efficiency
in so many activities,
but particularly
in the swimming
organisation
and
training
after
the opening
of the Memorial
Bath
to

MISS K.
improve

J.

M. BRABAZON,
the library.

who

did so much

MR. A. KICHENBRAND,
who served
the
pupils for all time when he started
the Tuck
Shop and organised
the building of the kiosk.
MR. A. F. D. MAXWELL, the Vice-Principal,
is remembered
for many things, including
the
erection
of the cricket score box, wh ich MR.
BOND helped to build.
DR. H. MULLER and
Camps.

his ever popular

MRS. E. L. TARNOW,
music at our dances and
our fund-raising
functions.

School

who provided
the
worked
at many of

All the wonderful


people
who, for years,
raised
funds
for the School
and the War
Memorial,
with mannequin
displays, fetes, the
vintage
car exhibition
and other
functions.
Foremost
among
these were MR. and MRS.
L. D. CAME, MR. and MRS. G. McCORMACK,
MR. F. HACKNEY,
MR. H. W. WHITTAKER,
MR. J. W. MILDENHALL,
MR. D. LAHNER,
MR. H. HITCHCOCK,
MR. and
MRS. C.
TREGURTHA,
MRS. N. COWARD
and MR.
and MRS. MEREDITH.
There
were
many others
who served
the
School equally well - members of the Governing Body,
members
of staff,
parents
and
during this period there were two outstanding
caretakers,
MR. BUTLER and then MR. FOWLER,
who made life easier
for everybody
else.

FOREST HIGH SCHOOL


1958 to June, 1968
I

Mr. Stead's
years at Forest High were not
easy ones. In his first year, Differentiated
Education was introduced
into the School, and no
new system works smoothly
without
a great
deal of effort.
In the same year the builders moved in and
the alterations
to the School were not completed
until 1961.
The old hall was renovated
and converted
into an imposing
library
and an extra
classroom; above this new cloakrooms,
a kitchen
and two bookrooms
were added; the administration
section
was altered
to provide
extra
offices for the Vice-Principals
and Secretaries
and sickrooms
for the boys and girls; the old
classrooms
were renovated;
the old Manual
Training
Centre
was converted
into a classroom and an additional
office; new additions
included
two laboratories
(closing
the West
Quad.),
two typing rooms, a Home Economics
complex
and an Industrial
Arts block, a hall
and entrance
gate, cloakrooms,
a cycle shed
and four new tennis courts.
Finding accommodation
for displaced
pupils,
while their classrooms
were being renovated
was a major problem,
and teaching
above the
roar of pneumatic
drills and hammers,
sanding
machines
and concrete
mixers made sergeantmajors of us all.
After
the extensions
to the School
were
completed
it became
necessary
to install an
intercom.
system.
This was done in 1961.

Later four prefabricated


huts were erected
on the West side of the School and, in 1962,
four old prefabs on the East side were removed.

McGillivray, Mr. Johnsen and Mr. Bredenhann


who, each in turn, did So much when there was
no second Vice-Principal.

The Garden of Remembrance,


next to the
Memorial Swimming Bath, was completed in
1960 and the Roll of Honour was unveiled by
Mr. Dudley Lahner, at the Remembrance Day
Service on Sunday, 13th November. The creation of this lovely Memorial Garden was
largely due to the efforts of Mr. Lahner, an
Old Forestonian and former Chairman of the
Governing Body, whose brother was one of
the fifty-six old boys who lost their lives in
attle.

In 1961 the Transvaal


Education Department introduced a certain number of senior
posts into every school, to lighten the work of
the Headmaster
and Vice-Principals, and to
create more opportunities
for promotion for
suitable teachers.
Up to 1968 senior posts
were awarded
to Forest to the following
heads of departments:
Mr. J. S. Swart (Industrial Arts), Miss M. E. Maclaren (Senior
Woman in charge of the girls), Miss A. Friel
(Latin, French and Senior Woman),
Mr. J. J.
Raubenheimer (Industrial Arts), Mr. J. R. Hart
(Accountancy),
Mr. H. H. Lamont (History),
Mr. M. H. O. Preller (Afrikaans),
Mr. N. J.
Pienaar
(Vocational
Guidance),
Mr. D. P.
Campbell (Geography),
Mr. J. Lordan (Industrial Arts), Miss S. B. Stead (Senior Woman).

The decision to cut down all the lovely old


rees in the grounds was a hard one to make.
They had become dangerous and, in 1965, they
had to go. New trees have been planted to
-ake their place.
In his annual reports, Mr. Stead always exressed his appreciation
of the support and
help he had received from the Governing
Body, his Vice-Principals and other members
f staff, the Secretaries, the Caretaker
and
the hardworking
members of the Parents'
Association.
At the Prize-Giving Ceremony in 1965, Mr.
Lahner made a presentation, on behalf of the
Governing Body, to three of its former memers, Mr. G. McCormick, Mr. D. Came and
r. F. Hackney, in recognition o,f their long
nd invaluable service - Mr. McCormick from
1939 to 1963, Mr. Came from 1942 to 1963 and
r. Hackney from 1948 to 1964.
The death of Mr. P. W. Payne in April, 1968
is greatly regretted.
Mr. Payne had been assoriated with the School since 1956, as a member
the Parents' Association and from 1960 as a
-nember of the Governing Body.
Mr. Stead was fully appreciative
of the
yalty and efficiency of his Vice-Principals:
58, Mr. G. K. Green, Miss E. L. McGillivray;
59, Miss E. L. McGillivray; 1960, Mr. J. E.
hnsen; 1961/62, Mr. J. E. Johnsen, Mr. P. A.
edenhann;
1963, Mr. P. A. Bredenhann;
64/65/66, Mr. P. A. Bredenhann, Mr. H. J.
- .vanepoel; 1967/68, Deputy-Headmaster,
Mr.
:0. A. Bredenhann,
Vice-Principals:
Mr. H. J.
:::'ttanepoel, Mr. J. A. de V. Worsley.
e expressed his gratitude to them for their
service to the School, especially to Miss

= eat

Of these Senior Assistants only Mr. Pienaar,


Mr. Lordan and Miss Stead are still at the
School. Other senior posts have not been
filled and the Headmaster and Vice-Principals
have had to add the control of subject departments to their many other duties.
After thanking all the members of his staff
every year for their support and hard work in
the classroom, Mr. Stead always mentioned
the teachers who were concerned in extramural activities such as: Cadets, the Cadet
and Military Bands, the various sporting and
cultural activities, the stock rooms and the
catering for all fixtures and functions.
Staff changes have occurred so frequently
here during the last twenty years, that it is
impossible to mention the outstanding
work
done by so many of the teachers.
Miss Maclaren (35 years at Forest High
School) taught many different subjects, took
a large share in extra-mural
duties including
sports duties, catering, production
of plays,
was the accompanist at concerts and operettas
and was Senior Woman on the staff for many
years.
Mr. Polak (24 years) taught
many
different subjects, but was concerned mainly
with Physical Training and sport.
Dr. Muller (19 years) taught Mathematics,
was the Director of the School Orchestra' and
ran the School Camps.
Miss Friel (17 years) taught
Latin and
English, coached netball, was in charge of the

E. Moppett,

one of the sentries

standng guard over the Roll of Honour at the Unveiling Ceremony


on 13th November, 1960.

harities Committee and was Senior Woman


n the staff before she left.
Mr. Kroes (14 years) w'as Head of the Afriaans Department, O.e. Cadets and in charge
of swimming.
Mrs. Chester-Browne
(14 years) was an
i valuable
member of the Mathematics
and
ccounting Departments.
She ran the staff
-ea club.
Mr. Noyes-Lewis (11 years) taught various
subjects, including Music, was in charge of
ricket and will long be remembered for his
excellent productions of "The Mikado", "The
irates of Penzance", "The Gondoliers" and
"H.M.S. Pinafore".
Mr. Stead never failed to express his gratitude to the office staff, especially Miss Murray,
thom he described as "a real gem of a
ecretary".
The caretakers, Mr. E. W. Fowler, Mr. S. R.
altman and Mr. A. J. Smith, came in for
-heir share of appreciation,
particularly
Mr.
owler who, in addition to his normal duties,
ran the Tuck Shop very successfully, coached
nd umpired cricket and kept the swimming
ath in tip-top order.
Mr. Stead took a great interest in all sport
at the School, and was appreciative
of the
ork done by the members of staff who
oached teams. He introduced Boys' Hockey
in 1960 with great success and many of the
layers were selected to play in combined
schools teams.

1964, SA Schools: R. Black (Vice-Capt.);


E.
Sequeira;
Transvaal
Schools:
R. Black,
H. Krause, E. Sequeira,
J. Dingley, G.
Mawhinney.
1965, S.A. Schools: H. Krause; S.A. Schools
"B": G. Mawhinney, D. Woods; Southern
Transvaal
Schools: H. Krause, G. Mawhinney, D. Woods;
Southern
Transvaal
Schoo,ls "B": N. Willemse.
1966, S.A. Schools: D. Woods; Southern Transvaal Schools: A. Gebhardt, A. Welthagen,
L. Martle.
1967, S.A. Schools: L. Martle, D. Woods;
Southern Transvaal Schools: D. Woods.
1968, S.A. Schools: A. Welthagen; S.A. Schools
uB": L. Martle (Capt.).

1958, Transvaal
Schools: Joyce van Rooyen.
1959, Transvaal Schools: Clare Guenther.
1962, Southern Transvaal Schools: Pat van Zyl.
1963, Southern Transvaal Schools: Pat van Zyl.
1964, Southern Transvaal Schools: Pat van Zyl
( Capt.).
1965, Southern Transvaal
Schools: Kathleen
Peters.
1966, Southern Transvaal
Schools: Lorraine
Preston.
1967, Southern Transvaal Schools:; Kathleen
Peters, Lorraine Preston; Reserve: V. Massey.
1968, Southern Transvaal Schools: V. Massey.
GIRLS' HOCKEY

BOYS' HOCKEY
1960, Southern
Transvaal
Schools "A": K.
Stevenson, R. Lautenbach;
Southern Transvaal
Schools
"B":
N. Williamson,
E.
Matthews, T. O'Halloran.
1961, S.A. Schools: K. Stevenson; S.A. Schools
'B": R. Lautenbach, T. O'Halloran; Southern
Transvaal Schools: K. Stevenson (Capt.), R.
Lautenbach,
T. O'Halloran,
R. Rutter;
Southern Transvaal Schools "B": N. Williamson, J. Walker.
62, SA. Schools "C": R. Black; Southern
Transvaal Schools: R. Black, W. Kopelowitz;
Southern Transvaal "B": W. van Gils.
63, SA Schools: R. Black; SA Schools "D":
W. Kopelowitz
(Vice-Capt.),
G. Payne;
Southern Transvaal Schools: R. Black, W.
Kopelowitz, T. Roberton, G. Payne.

1958, Johannesburg Schools: Melody Whiteford


1959, Johannesburg Second XI: Carroll Taylor.
1960, Johannesburg Second XI: Carroll Taylor,
Valerie Wadge.
1967, Southern
Transvaal
Schools:
Avril
Eksteen.
CRICKET
1959, Transvaal
Nuffield Side, Reserves: F.
Ferreira, B. Oelschig.
1963, Co-ed. Schools Side: e. Renney, R. Black,
E. Sequeira (Capt.).
1965, George Wheeler Cup (Best Junior in
Southern Suburbs): A. Gebhard.
CADETS
A. Wedd was selected in 1957, 1958, 1959
and 1960 to represent Witwatersrand
Command in its team of four at the South African
Cadet Bisley.

We were not surprised when Wendy Campbell, Head Girl in 1964, was chosen as an
American Field Scholar in 1965. She attended
the Skaneateles Central School in New York
and regarded her stay in America as a magnificent experience.
The maintenance of the extensive grounds at
Forest has always been difficult, but Mr.
Bredenhann, who believes in removing difficulties, waved his wand in the direction of the
Parents' Association.
They provided.a
large
mower, a tractor to pull it, a smaller mower
and sprinklers. Mr. Lordan, who, in So many
ways, is an invaluable member of staff, made
a trailer for .theJractor,
which is a very useful
acquisition.
The hard work executed by the members of
the Parents' Association to raise funds to keep
us supplied with all our needs, has always
been appreciated.
They have also improved
our staff room for us recently.
Mr. Bredenhann's
request for a school bus
to overcome the difficulty of transporting
teams to their away matches, was met with
enthusiasm from the staff, the pupils (especial'ly the 1965 Form Ilia class) and the parents.
The money was raised in record time and the
bus was delivered early in 1966. The most
popular men 011 the staff now are the ones
with heavy duty licences.
The bus has more than justified the money
spent on it. Though used mostly for sports
fixtures, it has made other trips. Mr. Swanepoel took groups of senior pupils on technical
visits to numerous factories. Mr. D. Campbell
used it for geographical
tours, and in 1967
joined nine other schools in "Operation Wildflower".
Pupils from these schools rescued
thousands
of aloes in Sekukuniland,
before
they were covered by the waters of the new
Ngwaritzi Dam, and replanted them at their
schools.
The School has enjoyed regular visits from
the S.A.B.C. Orchestra and the P.A.C.T. Ballet
and Drama Companies.
The whole staff took the Civil Defence First
Aid Course in 1967. We were fortunate
in
having Mr. J. Hart, an expert, as our instructor. He was a member of our staff at the
time.
So much was achieved by Mr. Stead that,
inevitably, there must be omissions in this
report. His untimely death is deeply regretted
by us all.

Mr. Bredenhann was born in the Norther


Cape but grew up in the Transvaal.
He was
educated in Pretoria and obtained
his B..
degree at the University there.
He taught at various schools until the commencement of the Second World War.
He
was on active service with the South Africa
Artillery for five and a half years - in East
Africa, the Desert, Madagascar
and Italy.
In 1942 he joined the staff at Parktown Boys
High, where he was the Senior Mathematics
Master f.or many years, until his appointmen
in 1961 as the Second Vice-Principal of Fores
High.
When Mr. Bredenhann
arrived
here the
standard of mathematics
in every class fro
Form I to Form V was very low - constan:
staff changes had been disastrous.
In charge
of Mathematics,
Mr. Bredenhann immediatel
took steps to improve matters and before long
the situation changed completely.
Since the
the School's mathematics
results have bee
outstandingly
good.
In 1963 Mr. Bredenhann was appointed VicePrincipal of the School. There was no Secon
Vice-Principal
that year and although
the
duties were onerous, he met the demands made
on him with efficiency and good humour. He
was in command of the Cadet Detachmen
from 1963 to 1967.
The Forest teams have benefited greatl
from Mr. Bredenhann's knowledge of, and interest in rugby. At his suggestion the school
leagues have been chanCJed. There are no
separate rugby leagues for the boys' schools
and the co-ed schools on the Rand, ensuring
enough fixtures for everybody with more evenly
matched teams. This arrangement
is working
well and the boys are enjoying their games.
Mr. Breednhann was promoted to Deputy
Headmaster in 1966. In 1967, when the shortage of staff was more acute than usual, he
made sure that instruction
in mathematics
continued.
To achieve this in the senior
classes, he taught
large combined classes.
often two classes at the same time, each doing
different work. With virtually no non-teachin~
periods, he continued to do all the duties
which fall to the lot of a Deputy Headmaster.
In July, 1968 Mr. Stead took a term's leave
and Mr. Bredenhann acted in his place. After
Mr. Stead's death, the fourth term opened wit

Mr. Bredenhann
ill, but still in charge.
He
conducted an impressive Memorial Service for
Mr. Stead during the first week and was then
forced to take sick leave, handing the reins
over to Mr. Swanepoel for the rest of the term.
Mr. Bredenhann returned in January and has
acted as Headmaster
of the School all this
year. In the nine years he has been at Forest,
he has achieved a great deal in every sphere
of school life, he has never spared hmiself and
has always found time to help and advise the
staff and pupils. His speciality is finding a
solution to any administrative
or other problem, no matter how insuperable it may appear
to be - his success in this is no doubt due to
the fact that he is a mathematician.
Mr. Bredenhann has been appointed to open
the new high school in Sandown. We have
enjoyed working for him and regret his going,
but wish him every success in his new post. To
Mrs. Bredenhann, too, go our very best wishes.
JULY, 1968-December, 1969
During the eighteen months that Mr. Bredenhann has been Acting Headmaster of Forest
High, the School has continued to run on oiled
wheels.
Mr. Bredenhann's inspired Memorial Service
for Mr. Stead, at the beginning of the fourth
term in 1968, will not be forgotten.
The School has reverted to the old system,

where ~c1asses remain in their own classrooms,


except for special subjects, while the teachers
move around between periods. This system
has many advantages.
During 1968, Miss Murray, our Secretary,
was honoured at a function held in Pretoria.
She was the only woman among seven secretaries, selected after a rigorous inspection, for
giving sustained outstanding
service to the
Education Department.
The Director of Education, Mr. Koen, thanked and congratulated
them. They were given promotion.
The erection of new cricket nets, started at
the end of 1968, was completed at the beginning of this year.
Cadet Detachment 434 no longer exists at
the School. With insufficient officers to train
the cadets, the Detachment
had to be disbanded early this year. It has had a proud
record since 1920.
Acting Senior Posts were awarded, in 1969,
to Mrs. A. Bishop (Biology)
and Mrs. C.
Moffat (Afrikaans).
Mr. B. van der Schyff's
promotion to Head of the English Department
will take effect from 1st January, 1970.
An American Field Scholar, Johanna Kendall,
spent her eleven-week summer vacation
at
Forest High.
When Mr. Bredenhann was on sick leave
during the fourth term 1968, Mr. H. J. Swanepoel,~ one of the Vice-Principals,
acted as

Headmaster.
He and Mr. Worsley,
appointed
as Vice-Principal
here not long before,
dealt
successfully
with all the end of year work.
At a tree-planting
ceremony
held on 13th

November,
Mr. D. Lahner planted the last of a
hundred
trees
given
to the School
by the
trustees
of the Old Forestonian
Association
Funds.

The many
teachers
who gave
good
service
to the School
for two years
or less are,
unfortunately,
not listed here.
Mr. A. G. Wilke
1947
1933
Retired Head of Florida High.
1943
Lecturer, College of Education.
1950
Miss M. E. Gillooly .....
1947
Lecturer, College of Education.
1950
Mr. J. G. Blumberg
Miss J. L. McGregor
....
1950
1940
Retired.
Mr. A. A. Attridge
1939
1951
In the Cape.
Mrs. I. A. McCann
1948
1952
Deceased.
1952
Mr. J. H. Hopkins (O.F.)
. 1932/3
Inspector of Education.
Mr. A. D. Kichenbrand
1947
1952
Head of Bramley Primary.
Mr. C. H. Marais
1952
1947
Returning
shortly from New Zealand.
Lecturer, College of Education,
retiring 1969.
1952
Mr. W. Waldman
(O.F.) .. 1937
Mr. H. Mendelsohn
1950
1952
Resigned.
. ~l).S5
M iss I. Johansen
Mrs. R. Bryant, resident Highlands
North .
1953
1939
1953
Mr. J. Lane
Head of Greenside
High.
1954
Mr. T. Robertson
1920
Deceased
1962.
Mr. M. Rubinowitz
1951
1954
Resigned.
Mr. E. R. Eybers
1954
1951
Chief Librarian,
College of Education.
Mr. A. R. Lemmer
1934
1954
Head of E. P. Baumann
Primary.
Mr. A. W. Venables
1954
1952
Northview
High.
1954
Miss D. E. Jones (O.F.)
1952
Mrs. H. Lesser.
Miss D. L. Moreby
(O.F.)
1952
Mrs. W. Payne, Germiston
High.
1954
Miss I. Barnett
1955
1936
Port Elizabeth.
Natal.
1955
1952
Mrs. B. J. Cattell
1955
1947
Mr. V. J. Richards
Jeppe Boys' High.
1955
1950
Miss M. Fenwick
.....
1952
Mr. F. Holden (O.F.)
Lecturer, Witwatersrand
University.
1955
Mr. A. F. D. Maxwell
Retired Inspector of Educat. attached
to Wits. Univ.
1951
1956
Miss A. Wilson .
1955
1950
Retired.
1956
1951
Mr. M. Leeuwenberg
Head of Cape Town High.
1952
Mr. T. Lowenstein
Head of Fairmount
Primary.
1957
Mr. C. C. Groenewald
1957
1955
Resigned.
1956
Mr. S. R. Mortimer
Died suddenly 1958.
Miss E. L. McGillivray
1959
1953
Retired Head of Jeppe High Preparatory.
1946
Mr. H. Kroes
Head of Germiston
High.
1959
Vice-Principal,
Greenside
High.
1959
1955
Mr. B. Bootha
1959
1955
Mr. P. Mulder
Technical Colleqe (Commercial
Art).
Florida High School.
Mr. D. Pettersen
1959
1954
1959
1942
Dr. H. Muller
St. Michaels-on-Sea,
Port Shepstone
High.
Mrs. L. Martyn
1959
1956
Pretoria.
Miss E. I. Cloete
1951
Deceased
1964.
1960
Mr. A. Carson
Rhodesia.
1961
1955
Mrs. L. Lovius
1959
London.
1961
1959
Miss R.Lighton
Rhodesia.
1961
Mr. A. Romer
Died suddenly 1961.
1959
1954
Mr. T. J. H. Kieser
1962
Deceased
1966.
Miss L. M. Kenny
Mrs. E. Erasmus, Blyvooruitzicht.
1956
1962
1958
Mrs. H. Joh nson
1962
Mayfair High.
Mr. W. A. McHendrie
1961
Vice-Principal,
Randfontein
High.
1962

Mr. L. Shirley (O.F.)


Mr. L. Polak
Mr. J. Hill ....
Miss B. Clulow .....
Mr. E. Leibbrandt
Miss H. Kropp
Mrs. H. M. Lombard
Miss M. I. Edwards
Miss V. Stead
Mrs. H. H. Chester-Browne
Mr. C. A. Wilke
Miss N. Measroch
Mr. J. S. Swart
Mr. A. Campbell
.
Mr. R. Ralph (O.F.) .....
Miss M. F. Prinsloo
Mr. A. Anagnostu
Miss M. A. Buckland
Miss J. M. Roger
Miss Z. Liversage
Mr. H. H. Lamont
Mr. T. J. Kleyn .. _
Miss M. E. Maclaren
Mr. G. A. Bishop
Miss J. Palmer (O.F.)
Mr. W. J. Morgendaal (O.F.)
Miss M. G. Griffiths
Mrs. H. C. J. Dusse
Miss G. P. Liebetrau
Mr. R. M. Noyes-Lewis
Miss A. Friel
Mr. D. P. Campbell (O.F.)
Miss G. M. Hulbert .
Mr. I. A Damhuis
Mr. j. Hart
Miss R. L. Seeff
Miss E. L. Matthews
Miss M. E. Lipschitz ....
Miss M. G. Moore
Miss W. A. Griffiths
Miss A. Rowlinson
(O.F.)
Mr. M. H. O. Preller
Miss E. J. Barmley
Miss J. A. Higgins
_
Miss R. E. Henning
.
Miss A. A. Pringle
Mr. N. J. Pienaar (O.F.) ...
Mr. J. van der Velden
Mr. A. E. Britz .....
Mr. J. Lordan
Mrs. c..c. Moffat
Miss S. B. Stead
Mr. P. A. Bredenhann
Mr. H. J. Swanepoel
Mr. J. A. de V. Worsley

1958
1938
1959
1959
1960
1962
1958
1961

1961
1951
1960
1958
1951
1961
1962
1962
1961
1962
1963
1960
1963
1961
1932
1963
1962
1963
1965
1962
1965
1957
1951
1963
1962
1964
1963
1966
1966
1964
1965
1967
1966
1964
1967
1967
1966
1963
1959
1955
1967
1962
1956
1954
1961
1952
1967
1967

1962
1962
1962
1962
1963
1963
1963
1963
1963
1964
1964
1960
1964
1964
1964
1965
1965
1965
1965
1965
1965
1965
1966
1966
1966
1966
1967
1967
1967
1967
1967
1967
1967
1967
1967
1968
1968
1968
1968
1968
1968
1968
1969
1969
1969
1969

1969
1962

S.A.B.C.
Retired. Was Vice-Principal, Jewish Government.
Financial Editor, Sunday Express.
Mrs. Mackenzie-Cameron,
Evander.
Returned from London.
Mrs. H. Basel, Port Shepstone.
Sen ior Post, Barnato Park Preparatory.
Westerford
High. Cape Town.
Mrs. S. Francis, Britain.
Belgravia Convent.
Retired.
Vice-Principal,
Malvern West Primary.
Greenside High.
Teaching in johannesburg.
Rustenburg.
Resign~d.
Senior Mathematics
Post, Hill High.
Mrs. jacques, johannesburg.
Mrs. Fletcher.
Cape.
Retired.
Damelin Colleqe.
Mrs. D. Hillen,-College of Home Ecoonmics.
Senior Maths. Post, Roosevelt High.
Mrs. G. Till, Randburg.
Mrs. j. Strauss.
Overseas.
Resigned.
Vice-Principal,
Roosevelt High.
Senior GeoClraphy Post, Roosevelt High.
Mrs. S. du Sautoy, Vanderbijlpark.
Holland.
Senior Accounting Post, Kempton Park High.
Mrs. A. Fait
Edenvale High.
Edenvale High.
Hill High.
New Zealand.
Overseas.
Damelin College.
Resigned, going overseas.
Resigned to marry Mr. F. Ellis-Williams.
Mrs. C. Acton. Resigned.
Mrs. G. A. Bishop; going to Damelin College.
Still at Forest Hiqh School.
Still at Forest High School.
Still at Forest High School.
Still at Forest High School.
Still at Forest Hiqh School.
Still at Forest High School.
Acting Headmaster
of Sandown High.
Vice-Principal,
Vice-Principal,

still at Forest High School.


still at Forest High School.

CADET DETACHMENT
1920
COMMANDING

OFFICERS

1920:
Capt. J. J. B. Rees.
1921-1924: Capt. J. J. Young.
1925-1934: Capt. R. J. Campbell.
1935-1936: Capt. T. Robertson.
1937:
Capt. A. R. Lemmer.
1938:
Capt. T. Robertson.
1939 to June, 1946: Capt. L. D. Jones.
June, 1946 toJune, 1947: Major F. T. Milne.
1947-1948: Major C. H. Marais.
1949-1954: Lt.-Col. A. R. Lemmer.
1955-1956: Capt. A F. D. Maxwell.
1957-1959: Capt. H. Kroes.
1960-1962: Major J. E. Johnsen.
1963-1967: Major P. A. Bredenhann.
1967-1968: Capt. H. J. Swanepoel.
Cadet Detachment 434 was formed in 1920.
It was affiliated at first to the 1st Transvaal
Scottish Regiment, then to the 2nd Transvaal
Scottish and later to the I.L.H. - now the
Light Horse Regiment.
By 1921 the Detachment
had 'had its first
official inspection, the cadets had competed in
the Imperial Challenge Shield Competition and
there was the nucleus of a band. There was a
setback in 1922 when the rifles were commandeered because of the strike.
The fortunes of the cadets varied over the
years. The mem bers of staff, who trained
them, came and went, but for the most part
the officers were excellent and the cadets were
good.
The cadets were divided into companies and
were inspected annually by the Officer Commanding the regiment to which they were
affiliated.
On special occasions they attended
public parades in Johannesburg.
In 1943, to relieve the deadening effect of
constant
parade
ground drill, a signalling
corps, an ambulance unit and a Bren gun unit
were started.
Some of the cadets in these
units were sent for special training.
When Capt. A. F. D. Maxwell was the
Commanding Officer in 1955, the cadets were
divided into Houses. An Annual: Inter-House
Competition
was organised and this led to
keen competition between the six Houses.
Capt. Maxwell also initiated a special Guard
of Honour, consisting of thirty cadets, who

434

1968
were trained
by Lieut. C. C. Groenewald.
These cadets underwent special training at a
Cadet Camp. For the first time the Retreat
Ceremony
was performed
at the Annual
Memorial Service.
The cadets took a prominent part in the
Annual Remembrance Day services and also in
the Annual Republic Day Ceremonies.
The
Remembrance Day services were not held on
the parade ground until 1948.
In 1960, the School was deprived of the use
of rifles under the emergency regulations, and
the parade
ground drill lost much of its
interest.
It became increasingly difficult to muster the
number of officers required to train the cadets
and at the beginning of this year, 1969, Cadet
Detachment 434 was disbanded.
MUSKETRY
As far back as 1921 the School com peted in
the Imperial Challenge
Shield Competition.
Lieut. R. J. Campbell was in charge of musketry
in 1924, Lieut. W. F. Campbell 1925-1929, and
Lieut. D. E. Kriel 1930-1941.
In 1930, Forest won the Transvaal
Bisley
with a score of 94.4 and P. Lambooy won
the Individual Competition
with the rare
"possible".
In 1931, K. Duncan and W. S.
Ashley won Bronze Medals at the Transvac!.l
Bisley with scores of 98. Forest was runner-up
in the Inter-District
Competition
and the
Transvaal Bisley in 1933.
A new rifle range was built in 1939 and in
the same year the Bisley Competitions
were
cancelled.
No reference is made of shooting
activities in the following few years. The rifle
range was extended in 1943.
From 1948 Capt. A. A. Attridge took charge
of the Musketry and was soon joined by Capt.
J. H. Hopkins. After they left the School, 2nd
Lieut. J. S. Swart was in charge from 1952
until he left in 1964. He was helped at one
stage by 2nd Lieut. B. Bootha.
B. Richards and A. Wedd were selected in
1957 to represent Witwatersrand
Command at
the Inter-Command
Bisley. In 1958, A. Wedd
won the a.c. Cup for the highest individual
score, 99 per cent. He was again selected to
represent Witwatersrand
Command that year
and in 1959 and 1960.

Awards Won by the Cadet Band


An attempt was made to start the Cadet
Band in 1920. but with a shortage of instruments for many years. very little was achieved.
In 1924. Mr. Dove took over the Band and in
1925. Lieut. T. Robertson.
When Capt. A. R. Lemmer was O.e. Cadets
in 1937, he went to the Drill Hall, selected
instruments
and enlisted the help of Mr.
Beresford to train the Band. From then on the
Band improved steadily.
Officers who trained
Mr. Beresford were:

the Cadet

Band after

1946-1948: 2nd Lieut. J. A. de Villiers.


1949-1952: Major C. H. Marais.
1953-1961: Lieut. H. J. Swanepoel.
1962:

A/Fd. Ct. J. F. Hill.

1963-1967: Fd. Ct. D. P. Campbell.


1968:

Lieut. H. J. Duvenhage.

1940: Best Trumpeter.


P. Wolkin.

W. Rimmer; Best Bugler.

1941: The Band was placed seCO'nd. The DrumMajor was E. H. F. Steinhobel.
1942: Best Trumpeter. W. Rimmer;
Cadet on Parade. F. Carrington.
1944: Band
G. White.

placed

second.

Smartest

Best Trumpeter,

1947: Smartest Cadet on Parade, G. Hall; Best


Tenor Drummer. B. Richardson; Runner-up,
Smartest
Drum-Major.
B. Bezuidenhout;
Silver Drum for best corps of drums.
1948: Band placed
Parade. G. Hall.

third;

Smartest

Cadet

on

1949: Band placed second; Best Dru m-Major,


G. Hall; Smartest
Cadet on Parade. K.
Walker; Best Tenor Drummer. B. Richardson; Best Bass Drummer. R. Leschinsky; Best
Junior Side-Drummer.
E. Prout-Jones; Best
Cornetist.
L. Winter;
Cups awarded
by
Lt.-Col. Wepener, a.c.. I.L.H. for service

Cadet Band 1950, led by Drum-Major Brian Richardson, when Forest High won the Cadet
Band Competition for the first tme.

and skill. G. Botoulas


F. Butler (Bugle-Major).

(Sgt.

Drummer)

and

1950: Forest's
Band won the Band Competition for the first time; Smartest
Cadet.
K.
Walker;
Best Bass Drummer.
R. Leschinsky;
Best Tenor Drummer.
P. Woods;
Runner-up.
Best Drum-Major.
B. Richardson;
Best Corps
of
Drummers;
Witwatersrand
Command
Award
for
Best
Band
(Witwatersrand);
Cups
awarded
by Cmdt.
Wepener.
O.c..
I.L.H..
for
proficiency
and
service.
B.
Richardson
(Band).
D. C. Smith (Signals).
(Brian
Richardson.
the Drum-Major
of this
victorious
Cadet
Band
(see
photograph).
was the Head Boy of the School and the
Victor
Ludorum.
He was practising
as a
dentist
in Durban
when he was killed in an
accident
in- 1964.)
1951: Band was placed first (the Drum-Major
was J. Merson.
Head Boy of the School);
Smartest
Cadet.
K. Walker;
Best Junior
Bugler. C. Williams;
Best Cadet
Band.
1952: After winning the Transvaal
Band Competition
in 1951. the Forest High Band was
selected
to represent
the
Witwatersrand
Command
against
the best bands
of the
other commands
in the Van Riebeeck
Centenary
Celebrations
in Cape Town.
It was
adjudged
the best band in the Republic and
returned
triumphantly.
with the Van Riebeeck Floating
Trophy.
J. Merson. the 1951
Drum-Major
had matriculated
and left the
School.
so C. Schreiber.
the
1952 DrumMajor led the Band to victory in Cape Town.
Later.
in the third
term. the Band was
beaten
into second
place in the Transvaal
Competition
by the St. George's
Home Band.
Before the end of the year L. Marais became
the Dru m-Major.
1953: Forest won the competition
(St. George's
Home was second);
Smartest
Drum-Major.
L. Marais;
Best Corps of Drummers;
Best
Band in the Transvaal.
1954: The Band was placed second (the Dru mMajo,r was C. Williams
and the Bugle-Major,
D. Reynolds).
1955: The Band was
again
placed
(The Drum-Major
was D. Reynolds.)
1956:

Runner-up.

Best

Corps

sceond.

of Buglers.

1959:

Runner-up,

Best Drum-Major.

Although
the Band continued
it never reached
winning
form

D. Lovell.

to work
again.

hard.

The Military Band was formed in 1951 under


Capt. N. Roe and Mr. A. R. Rimmer.
In 1952.
A. White was the best solo trumpeter
at the
Annual
Band Competition.
From 1953 to 1958. 2nd Lieut. T. Lowenstein
was in charge
of this Band and Mr. N. J.
Pienaar
from
1959 until
the
cadets
were
disbanged
this year.
This
well at
Cadet
and at

Military
Band always
played
its part
Remembrance
Day Services. the Annual
Inspections.
the Republic
Day Services
other special services.

The Signals Corps was started


in 1943 and
competed
annually
in the Collins Shield Competition
for
the
Transvaal.
There
is no
mention
of who trained
them initially.
They
were
placed
second
in the
Collins
Shield
Competition
in 1947.
From 1948 until 1952, Lieut. H. Kroes was
in charge of this corps. They were placed third
in the Competition
in 1948 and 1950. A Cup
awarded
in 1950 by Comdt.
Wepener.
o.c..
I.L.H . for proficiency
and service was won by
D. C. Smith (Signals).

This training
was introduced
in 1943. Capt.
D. S. Huskisson.
of the Ambulance
Brigade of
the Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem. trained
fifty boys' and all of them passed
the Junior First Aid examination.
At the Annual
Inter-High
Drill Competition
in 1947. the Cup for the best officer was won
by R. Luml'ey. and a detachment
of sixteen
won the Stretcher
Drill Cup. Lieut.-Col.
D. S.
Huskisson
was still their trainer.
Lieut.-Col.
Huskisson
had to give up this
cadet work at the end of 1948. for business
reasons.
Cadets
he had trained
did First Aid
duties
at all School
functions
and
sports
fixtures.

Members of staff who were on Active


Service:
Sub-Lieut. A A Attridge, Royal Navy.
Staff-Sgt. J. H. Hopkins. RAF.
Lieut. J. Lane, South African AA Defences,
Cape Town.
Capt. T. Rebertson, instructor at the Air
School, Roberts Heights.
Lieut. J. van Zyl. arranging Afrikoens programmes for the troops.

Sgt. A N. Boyce was badly wounded at Sidi


Rezegh and later released from the Army.
Capt. (later Major) A R. Lemmer, S.AAF.
was captured in 1940 in Abyssinia; released
by our troops seven months later; Chief
Ground Instructor. Flying School, Bloemfontein; chosen under the Empire Training Scheme
to study latest training methods in Britain;
Chief Ground Instructor, 24 Group Training
Command. Swartkop.

Forest High had a proud record during the war, when hundreds of old pupils were on Active
Service. Some were decorated for exceptional gallantry, many were wounded and many spent years
in P.O.W. camps. Fifty-six of them made the supreme sacrifice.
J. Anderson
e. Batchelor
F. W. Begbie
A J. Bloom
J. V. Carmichael
E. P. Carter
J. e. Dadd
G. G. Davidson
1...-W.-Douglas
K. A Duncan
A J. Dyer
T. Evans
I. G. Greeff
D. A. Green

D. e. Harrowsmith
W. D. Hermon
N. Heyneke
J. Jeffries
B. Katz
G. H. Keatley
H: N. Kerruish
E. B. e. Lahner
J. S. Lawrence
R. T. M. Lee
T. Liebenberg (Korea)
F. Lobban
W. K. Macp,onald
H. M. Mathew

G. F. McCormick
A e. Mitchell
K. e. M. Morgan
R. G. Moroney
R. Murray
H. Nichelson
R. H. e. Papenfus
D. F. Pearman
P. A Pieterse
J. W. Potgieter
J. Powell
e. K. Ross
I. Rowe
R. Ryan

G. D. Saunders
T. e. Scott
K. A Shaw
A L. Spafford
E. H. F. Steinhobel
E. J. Steyn
J. H. Steyn
R. J. Tait
D. T. Turnbull
B. Webster
W. J. Wheeler
G. Woolley
e. A Wright
V. K. Yeo

The School Swimming Bath and the Garden


of Remembrance
are a lasting
memorial,
honouring the memory of these Old Boys who
gave their lives in war.

Flying-Officer
J. H. Steyn.
(killed in action).

DJ.e..

RAF.

Lieut. J. Shaw, M.e., SAE.e.


Lieut. R. S. Munton.
Bombardier

D. J. Noble, M.M.

Major S. Finney,
Squadron. S.AAF.
Capt.

G.

M.M., R.L.1.

O.

D.F.e.,

Watson,

e.O.

Cheetah

D.F.e.,

Cheetah

Squadron. S.AAF.
Lieut. A L. Turner, M.e. (with Bar).

Pilot-Officer
Forestonian

W. D. Hermon, R.A.F., first Old


to be killed in action
in the
Second World War.

HEAD PREFECTS
BOYS
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923

1924 1925
1926
J927.
1928
1929
1930
1931

1932 1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946

1947. 1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957

1958 1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

L. N. Jackson
L. N. Jackson
L. N. Jackson
A. Honeyborne
M. Weir
H. A. Leigh
R. King
E. Steele
J. S. Miller
W. H. Moore
C. H. Rowe
L. Hawthorne
D. Williams
O. J. Swan
P. Abrie
A. Lobban
R. Adendorff
E. J. Jackson
J. H. Carstens
W. J. Wheeler
G. F. McCormick
V. V. Boy
J. A. Jooste
R. B. Rees
D. A. Diack
H. Levin
M. Jooste
D. M. Transell
J. F. Ralphs
R. D. Mynhardt
G. R. Hall
B. W. Richardson
J. B. Merson
P. J. Hitchcock
R. C. Alien
C. D. Williams
D. Jackson
F. R. Strathern
A. I. Ball
F. E. Ferreira
B. W. McCracken
I. Stewart
L. Tonkin
A. Abdinor
N. Greeff
R. Black
N. Willemse
A. Vlok
G. Swan
L. Martle
D. Eatwell

Noncy Currie
NC1ncy Currie
Noncy Currie
Noncy Currie
Nancy Currie
Gwendoline
Krog
Jean Anderson
~1argaret Ritchie
Jeanne Evans
Evelyn BI ieden
Marjorie
Kee
Mary Golub
Rhoda Reid
Julia Franklin
Phyllis la Grange
Lillian Quilliam
Gloria Hand
Catherine Tanner
Myrtle Quilliam
Noela I(nowles
Kathleen Herbst
Yvonne Huskisson
Ruth Miles
Ilse Trieb
Patricia Glover
Phyllis Collett
Marjorie Merson
Myrna Schoeman
Megan Hewitt
Lorraine Taylor
Ethel v. d. 'VVesthuizen
Gladys Bredenkamp
Melanie Witte
Pamela Bond
Denise Sinclair
Audrey van Rensburg
Joan Wills
Audrey Knudsen
Wendy Campbell
Marguerite de Agrella
Ion ice Campbell
Shulamith
Kopelowitz
Beryl van Rensburg
Lou ise Swanepoel

THE SCHOOL TREES

When the Technical High School moved out


to Forest Hill in 1920. the new building stood
on bare veld.
Hundreds of pines and deodars were planted
around the extensive grounds while Mr. J. J. B.
Rees, the first Headmaster. was at the School.
The planting was done by the pupils.
The avenue of trees. which lined the back
of the School, was planted in 1926. the six
deodars
in the centre commemorated
the
Fiftieth Anniversary of the City of Johannesburg, 1936. the single deodar in the West
Quadrangle commemorated
the Coronation of
King George VI. 1937. and the other in the
East Quadrangle
was planted at the same
time. Samson, who planted these trees, is still
with us after fifty years of service. i
In 1940. while Mr. L. D. Jones-was the Head,
another avenue was planted between the two
main grounds twenty-four.
deodars and
eight pinus longifoliae. The quadrangles were

grassed and hydrangeas


were planted.
Ten
Lombardy poplars in the front of the School,
which were destroying everything near them.
had to be uprooted.
They were replaced by'
flowering and privet shrubs, cannas. roses and
dahlias.
In 1965. all the old trees. which had 'lent
dignity and beauty to the School. were cut
down. They were diseased and had become a
danger.
The Old Forestonian Association is in recess.
but still has a fund held in trust. Some of this
money was used by Mr. Dudley Lahner to give
the School a hundred trees.
These were planted last year. and at a TreePlanting Ceremony, held on 13th November.
1968 Mr. Lahner planted the last one a
beautiful pin oak. At this ceremony, after he
had been introduced to the staff and pupils
by the Acting Headmaster,
Mr. H. J. Swanepoel, ,Mr. W. A. J. Sammons. Chairman of the

Governing
Body, told the School about
Mr.
Lahner.
Mr. Lahner,
Mr. Sammons
said, was a pupil
at Forest High from 1931 to 1936. He was a
prefect and the captain
of the First Soccer XI.
During
the war
he fought
with the Natal
Carbineers.
He joined
the Old Forestonian
Association
in 1946 and was elected Chairman

in 1947. He became a member of the Governing Body in 1948 and was Chairman
of the
Governing
Body for a number of years.
This gift of trees from the Old Forestonians
will give pleasure
to many for a very long
time. We have missed the old trees and look
forward
to the time when the new ones will
have restored
Forest High to its former beauty.

GOLDEN JUBILEE BALL FOR OLD FORESTONIANS


Two hundred and fifty Old Forestonians
and
friends
gathered
in the Wanderers
Ballroom
on the evening
of Saturday,
12th April, 1969
to renew old acquaintances,
to relive schoolday memories,
to enjoy the four-course
dinner
and the top quality
music, and to savour the
wonderfully
warm atmosphere
that prevailed.
Mr. Neville Pienaar,
Chairman
of the Organising
Committee,
welcomed
those
present
and said that there were representatives
from
1919, the twenties,
the thirties,
the forties, the
fifties and the sixties.
The present
pupils of
the School were represented
by the Head Boy,
Do'uglas
EatweH, and the Deputy
Head Girl,
Athalie
Buchholtz.

Mr. Pienaar
tendered
the apologies
for nonattendance
of: Mr. A. N. Bovet former Headmaster),
The Hon. B. J. Schoeman
(Minister
of
Transport,
an old boy of the School)
and
Professor
C. N. Jackson (first Head Boy of the
School).
He then
welcomed
the 'following
honoured
guests: Mr. P. A. Bredenhann
(Acting
Headmaster)
and Mrs. Bredenhann,
Mrs. R. C.
Stead and her son, Mr. Richard Stead, Mr. A.
Sam mons (Chairman
of the Governing
Body
and old boy of the School) and Mrs. Sam'mon~,
Mr. F.
Hackney(foundaition
pupil of the
School and -former Chairman
of'theGoverning Body), Mr. D. L. Lahner (forTher Chairman
of the Governing
Body, former
Chairman
bf

the Old Forestonian Association and Old Boy


of the School) and Mrs. Lahner, Professor
Fassler (former mem ber of the Governing Body
an Old Boy of the School) and Mrs. Fassler
Miss M. MacLaren (retired former member of
staff) and Miss B. M. Murray (Secretary of the
School and an Old Girl of the School).
Mr. Pienaar then called upon Mr. Leon
Shirley, Vice-Chairman
of the Organizing
Committee, to present a leather desk set to
Miss Betty Murray on behalf of all Old
Forestonians in appreciation of her twenty-five
years devoted service to Forest High as School
Secretary.
Professor Fassler reminisced about the early
days of the School, Mr. Bredenhann
spoke
about coming events at the School, and all
too soon the evening was over. Over an hour
after the dancing had stopped, people were
still standing in the hall chatting about "the
good old days".

months in hospital.
He married his first wife, Lena, in Zululand
before coming to Johannesburg in 1912. After
working as a domestic servant in Parkview,
for Medical Research and in a shop in La
Rochelle, he went into domestic service in
1917 with Mr. Chalmers, who became one of
the original staff members of the Technical
High School, which later became Forest High.
Mr. Chalmers brought Samson to work at
the School when it opened in 1919. He alone
has seen every Headmaster,
member of staff
and pupil who has been at the School over a
period of fifty years.
The staff and pupils collected for him when
he had served the School for forty years and
Mr. Fowler, the then caretaker,
assisted him
to obtain a home at Dlamini, Kliptown. The
money was used to pay the deposit.
Over the years Samson's duties have been
varied. For years, when there was no caretaker, he was the janitor.
He controHed the
African
staff
and
ordered
the cleaning
materials and equipment.
After every function he organized the clearing up and, when
the staff arrived the following morning, there
were
no traces
of the previous
night's
festivities.
Every day, until the electric bell was installed,
Samson rang the hand bell punctually, in spite
of the efforts of the pupils to delay him at the
end of the breaks.
Latterly he has served the staff with tea quite a fo>rmidable task in this SchooL His
long service is beginning to tell on him and
his health has not been good.
Samson has always been cheerful and courteous and a willing worker - never late and
never absent without good reason. His record
of fifty years of service is an outstanding one.
We appreciate everything he has done for us.

OUR AFRICAN
Mr. Mhlanganni
Mathenjwa, known to us
all as "Samson", was born in Maputa, Zululand. He moved to Durban in 1906.
After leaving school he worked on fishing
ships and then worked the winches on whalers.
He became a Io-uder on cargo ships and visited
England, China, India, Singapore, Japan, the
East Coast of Africa and Australia.
His sea career ended when he fell down a
hatch and broke his shoulder, resulting in six

STAFF

There are members of our African staff,


besides Samson, who are giving loyal service
to the School.
Shorty came in 1939, Richard in 1950, Benson
in 1953, Johnson in 1955 and Johannes in 1960.
All these men are courteous, pleasant and
efficient.
When others come and go, they
remain and we are appreciative of their loyalty.
Paul Mabena was anbtirermember
of this
staff of the same calibre.
He came to the
School in 1950 and died after a short illness
in 1965.

The first magazine


of this School, "The
Tec", appeared annually from 1920 until 1925.
There was no issue in 1926 or 1927. Since
1928 it has been produced regularly every
year as "The Forestonian".
Mr. D. B. Jones, the English Master, was
the editor from 1920 to 1937. His productions
were literary
masterpieces
and the pupils'
contributions were of a high standard.
After
leaving Forest High Mr. Jones settled
in
Jamaica.
In 1938 Mr. W. Waldman
succeeded Mr.
D. B. Jones as Senior teacher of Engl'ish and
- Editor of "The Forestonian".
Each magazine
he produced
from. then until 1952, is an
eloquent tribute to his wit and to his mastery
of language.
Mr. Waldman
left us to take
up an appointment
at the Johannesburg
Teachers' Training College (now the College
of Education) and he is retiring from there
at the end of this year.
Mr. J. E. Johnsen joined the staff in 1952
as the Senior English Master and edited "The
Forestonian"
from 1953 until 1957. He, too,
is known for his wit and mas~. of langauge.
He will be returning to Forest High as Headmaster in January.
In 1958 and 1959 Miss K. Brabazon and
Mr. L. Shirley were co-editors and in 1961
and 1962 Mr. Shirley, the Senior English
teacher, carried on the good work.
Miss Brabazon, with her English qualifications, was a teacher for over fifty years. She
came to South Africa in 1921 and taught
until 1963 in lohannesburg
schools. These
include Jeppe Girls' High, Parktown
Girls'
High, Jeppe Boys' High and Forest. Retired
now, she is still living in Johannesburg.
Mr. Shirley left Forest High to teach in
hodesia. After returning to the Transvaal,
he lectured at the Goudstadse
Onderwysollege for a short period before joining the
staff of the S.A.B.C.
It is interestjn9 to note that, as pupils of
-he School, Mr. Waldman was taught English
'y Mr. D. B. Jones, Mr. Johnsen by Mr.
aidman and Mr. Shirley by Mr. Johnsen.
For the past eight years Miss S. Stead has
edited "The Forestonian".
The chief purpose of a school magazine is
o keep a record, year by year, of everything
ertaining to the School and the chronicles
f Forest High make fascinating reading.

According to the "Concise Oxford


Dictionary", to "administer"
is to: 1. Manage
(affairs,
business); 2. dispense (justice);
3.
furnish, give (thing to); 4. apply (remedies
to); 5. contribute to (one's comfort, etc.).
Our Administrative
Staff does all that and
more, remaining cheerful and pleasant in spite
of constant interruptions.
The variety of tasks that come the way of
our secretaries, and the labour involved in the
execution thereof,
leaves them unperturbed
and they evince no surprise at the strangest of
requests. A request for space in the strongroom to house a sloth would, in all probability,
be greeted with a calm: "Certainly.
Has it
two toes or three?" - or, if the temptation
proved irresistible, with: "Certainly.
What
class is he in ?" The life of the Caretaker
is
also spiced with variety.
It is freely admitted that without its administrative
staff, Forest High would cease to
function.
THE ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, 1920-1969
Mr. R. Guinea was the Secretary/Caretaker
of the School from 1920 until 1928. He was
succeeded, in 1929, by Mr. J. J. Doran, who
became ill in 1938 and died shortly afterwards.
The post then became purely secretarial and
there was no caretaker
for ten years. The
Head master, members of staff (particularly
Mr. J. A. de Villiers) and Samson shared the
caretaker's
work. The Headmaster, Mr. L. D.
Jones, described
himself as "groundsman,
gardener, coach and general whipper-in and
rounder-up".
The Secretaries
were: Miss E. M. Codd
(fourth
term, 1938), Miss C. Rouse (1939,
1940), Miss J. Stickells (January to June, 1941)
and Miss P. la Grange, later Mrs. Simon (July,
1941 to December, 1944).
Our present Secretary, Miss B. Murray, was
appointed at the beginning of 1945. While she
was overseas in 1949 and 1952, Mrs. D. Steele
and Miss B. Harlen deputised for her.
It became essential to have a Caretaker as
well as a Secretary, and Mr. Ronald filled the
post in 1949. Mr. T. Butler was Caretaker from
1950 to 1952. By the time Mr. E. W. Fowler
joined the staff as Caretaker/Groundsman
in
1953 the work had increased. With his iron
constitution
and a good African staff, he
worked miracles.

Mr. Fowler left at the end of 1962 and was


succeeded by Mr. S. R. Waltman, who was in
turn succeeded in 1965, by our present Caretaker, Mr. A. J. Smith. With newly acquired
mechanical
aids, the maintenance
of the
grounds is easier, but the constant shortage
of African staff is a problem.
The office work was also increasing steadily
and Mrs. M. Forsman was appointed
as
Assistant Secretary at the beginning of 1963.
She left after a term and Mrs. M. E. Lambert
took her place. Before long it became necessary to have more help and, in 1966, Mrs. J.
van der Wath joined Miss Murray and Mrs.
Lambert.

There are sa few parents who help with the


running of the Tuck Shop, that we wish to
record the names of those whose service has
been outstanding.
A!t different times the following parents
have each assisted at the Tuck Shop, daily, for
a number of years and some of these have
been entirely in charge: Mrs. E. C. Wadge
(since deceased),
Mrs. C. Ferguson, Mrs. E.
Jacobs, Mrs. V. Jones, Mrs. D. Jeffrey and Mrs.
G. Woods. A few others have helped one, two
or three days a week. These are Mrs. I.
Evans, Mrs. D. Cochrane, Mrs. H. Sammons
and Mrs. S. Cunning ham.
Mrs. McCraw, Mrs. Price, Mrs. Porter, Mrs.
Stewart and Mrs. Wedd were also helpers of
long standing.
With no records of the early
years, the names of some of the helpers may
have been omitted.
In addition to her sustained service in the
Tuck Shop, Mrs. Ferguson coached hockey at
the School for a number of years.

Wherever there are children there are bound


to be dogs, So it is natural for sociable dogs to
gravitate to the nearest school.
In the
few dogs
pupils of
ready to

old days this was no problem. The


that attended regularly were like the
those days - well disciplined and
conform to the rules.

Not much is known of the original Forest


High dogs. Mr. Butler, the Caretaker
from
1950 to 1952 was accompanied everywhere by
his alsation, Prince.
Sandy, a scruffy
white terrier type
held sway here
for many years.
His
henchman
was Blackie, a
neat
smooth
black
model,
with
a
curly
tail, who could
always
be reduced to tears
if enough sympathy was lavished on him..
Sh
These two were
aggy
very useful, they
allowed no other dogs to come on the premises,
but when Janie arrived in 1954 with her owner,
Cynthia L1oyd, they were overcome by her
charm and allowed her to enrol in Std. VI.
Janie was a white and brown fox terrier
type, with an expressive face and a curly tai I,
who entered into all the School activities,
especially cooking, with great enthusiasm. She
was the foremost cheerleader
at every gala
and athletics meeting and never missed any
other sports fixture or party.
She did not neglect her schooling and
attended every lesson from Form I to, Form V,
with Cynthia L1oyd's class. Her school reports
made'- it dear that she worked only at the
subjects she enjoyed. Her English was' poor she preferred growls to vowels, she was apt
to drop off to sleep in Maths. classes and
waste her time chewing pencils in the art room.
Her Latin suffered because she thought the
Subjunctive Clause was used for scratching.
However, she was highly commended in History for her research work on prehistoric
bones, for her diligence in Domestic Science
and for her interest in the practical side o,f
Biology. She spoke French like a poodle.
After Janie had matriculated, she joined the
staff and proved to be a conscientious and
pleasant colleague, who enjoyed her tea at
the breaks. She was lost for three weeks in
January,
1961, but given publicity in "The
Star",
where
a photograph
of her had

Mr. W. J. Morgendaal, Mrs. D. Hillen (Miss J. A. Palmer),


Mr. D. P. Campbell with "Janie Lloyd-Jones".
appeared
restored

some ti me
to the Lloyds

before,
she was
and Forest High.

soon

She retired
to Nelspruit
for a short while
with the Lloyds, but felt she was needed here
and joined
the Jones household
in Diering
Street.
It was then that she changed
her name
to L1oyd-Jones.
When she returned
to teaching she took things
more quietly she was
beginning
to feel' her age. She delegated
some
of her work, particularly
the security
side of
it, to other dogs in her department.
This work
fell to the lot of Snippie Lordan,
an efficient
and good looking ~om, who was later poisoned
by a so-called
human being, and to Popski, a
small black rough
haired
dog with bristling
whiskers,
and a very busy manner.
He is kept
at home now.
After
Janie
had been at the School
for
thirteen
years, the Jones' moved to Meredale
and Janie retired.
Not long afterwards,
in
May,
1967 she was
lost and
in spite
of
strenuous
efforts to find her was never heard
of again.
In January,
1954 when Janie came to Forest
High, three
of the new Standard
VI pupils
were
June
Palmer,
Darryl
Campbell
and
Willem
Morgendaal.
In the course
of time
they became teacfiers
and joined Janie on the
staff in 1963. The accompanying
photograph
was ,;aken then by a photographer
from "The
StC1r .
Blitz was an alsation
whose owner, a pupil
called Lindeque,
was transferred
to the Hope

Home.
After that
he adopted
Vernon
Cory
and later Sandras.
Blitz had no ambitions
as
far as education
was concerned
and waited
outside
the classroom
door each period.
He
has since died.
Shaggy
has been attending
the School for
very many years, originally
from Turffontein
and latterly from his home near Hill' High. He is
old now, uippled
with arthritis
and deaf but
insists on limping all the way to school every
day.
His conduct
has always
been exemplary
and there is no dog in the world with a nicer
temperament.
He and Kim, affecionately
known as "Slob"
both belong to the Tea Club. Slob is a wellcovered, sleek cross alsation,
who is not above
nipping
off with an unguarded'
lunch packet.
He and Shaggy
have evaded
all efforts
to
keep them at home.
A large
cross Great
Dane,
Chippy,
who
adopted
Form la in 1967, believed
in subduing all other dogs. His owners didn't want
him and Mr. Baragwanath
took him to Pietersburg at the end of the year.
Bruiser, a beautiful
and well-behaved
cross
Boxer was sent to the Municipal
Pound last
year, when the School was being inspected.
He disappeared
from there
under
mysterious
ci rcu mstances.
There are now far too many dogs coming
to the School and every effort must be made
by the owners to keep them away.

The Headmaster
Elect is not a stranger
to
orest High School.
Mr. Johnsen was a pupil
ere and after matriculating
with distinction,
completed
two years of his B.A. Degree course
t the University
of the Witwatersrand
before
joining the Army.
After
the war, while teaching
at Clifton
':>reparatory
School in Durban,
he completed
is degree
course,
majoring
in English
and
atin.
Returning
to Johannesburg
he gained
is Teaching
Diploma
with distinction
at the
Johannesburg
Training
College.
Mr. Johnsen taught
for a brief period at the
Orange
Grove Primary
School, for four years
at a tutorial
college and then, in 1952, joined
he staff at Forest High School, where he became the Senior English Master and Editor of

"The Forestonian"
from 1953 to 1957. At one
time he was on the committee
of the Old
Forestonian
Association.
In 1958 he assu med the Vice-Princi palship
at the Troyeville
High School,
returning
to
Forest High as Vice-Principal
in 1960. He' was
the Com manding
Officer of the Cadet detachment until his appo,intment
as the Headmaster
of Malvern High School in 1963.
Mr. Johnsen
is known for his thoroughness,
his devotion
to duty, his organising
ability, his
command
of English and his wit.
He is a
member
of the Executive
Committee
of the
South African
Council
for English Education.
We congratulate
him on his appointment
as the Headmaster
of Forest High and wish
him many happy and successful
years at the
School. We look forward
to seeing his charming wife at our functions.

Row: W. Reaney, H. Alien, P. Sullivan, C. Michaelides,


J. Morris (Vice-Head Bay), L. Swanepoel (Head
Girl),
Mr. P. A. Bredenhann
(Acting
Headmaster),
D. Eatwell
(Head
Boy), A. Buchholtz
(Vice-Head
Girl), P. Hinkley, L. Barnes, N. Uys.
Standing:
M. Brown,
N. MacLucas,
R. Robertson,
A. Tennant,
A. van der Merwe,
C. Read,
M. Kruger,
R. Cruickshank,
G. Preston,
D. Roe, M. Squier.
Absent:
S. Sharp and M. Erasmus.
Front

ANNUAL SPEECH DAY


On Monday,
5th May, our
Giving Ceremony
opened
with
the School Song.

Annual
Prizethe singing of

Mr. P. A. Bredenhann,
the Acting Headmatser,
said that this, the Forty-Sixth
Speech Day, was
being held in the School's Golden jubilee Year.
Each of the six School Houses had staged
a play and three of the plays had been entered
in the RAPS Play Festival.
Nine
different
schools
took part,
producing
fourteen
plays.
We reached
the finals with one of our plays
and came second.
Awards
were given for the
best boy and best gi rI actors and one for the
best decor.
We won two of these awards.
Mr. Bredenhann
issued an invitation
to those
present to hear our five finalists
in the junior
Chamber
of Commerce
Speech Communication
Competition
in the School Hall on 8th May.
An Extra-Mural
Honours
Day will be held,
Mr. Bredenhann
said, on Saturday,
14th june,
when 1:wo iJoards
bearing
the names of all
Old Boys and Old Girls who had gained Springbok colours, woultd be unveiled
by Mr. Frank
Hackney.
Mr. Hackney
was a pup.il here in
1923 and a past Chairman
of the Governing
Body.
Tennis,
rugby,
hockey
and
netball
matches
would
be played
between
present
pupils
and
past
scholars,
foilowed
by a
braoivleis.
Mr. Bredenhann
said that we were honoured
to have the Director
of Education
and called
on Dr. Kotzee to address
the gathering.
Dr. Kotzee expressed
his thanks for the invitation to be present and offered his congratulations
on the fiftieth
birthday
of the School
which,
though
young
in age,
had reached
maturity
as far as educational
standards
were
concerned.
On behalf of the Education
Department
Dr.
Kotzee congratulated
the Headmaster
and his
staff, the Governing
Body, the parents and the
pupils and wished Forest High School a happy
and bright future.
Speaking
about
"the
School
as an institution
signifies.
From a humble

School"
meant
the
with everything
it
start, paying atten-

tion only to reading,


writing
and arithmetic,
the content
of education
had widened
to embrace
the whole
of the human
being
and
destination.
The School is a powerful
agency for culture
and
has
co:ntributed
largely
towards
the
development
of a Christian
civilization
and
towards
the fact that
the pattern
of our
civilization
is becoming
more technological.
The real test of civilization,
however,
is not
in the
prod uction
of our
agricu Iture,
the
strength
of our army or "'the- power
of our
machines,
but in the character
of our men
and women.
The high standard
we maintain
is due to the fact that the School of today
is an educational
institution
where
potential
is developed,
where
merit is sought
and promoted and where pupils are prepared
for the
complicated
society of today.
Spiritually,
morally
and
intellectually
the
School is becoming
a stronghold
of the nation,
and everyone
who helps a school, helps in the
world struggle
between systems and ideologies.
The School is a beacon of I'ight in its environment and it is the task of everyone
to help,
particularly
in spreading
truth.
Basical'ly the
struggle
in the world today
is a struggle
of
truth
against
falsehood.
The School
has a
special task to help the pupils to develop critical minds, so that they can learn to think for
themselves
and distinguish
between
falsehood
and truth.
Dr. Kotzee then spoke about teaching
and
teachers.
Teaching,
he said, is a calling
followed by those people who help to form the
future of nations.
A teacher's
services extend beyond his school
work - he serves the local community
and, in
a wider sense, he serves mankind.
He believes
in the potential
of youth and its right to a
full education.
Things are taught
which never
appear
on a time-table
a sense of justice
and responsibility,
regard
for the truth, faithfulness,
punctuality,
self-control,
courtesy,
charity,
diligence
and perseverance.
These are the spiritual
qualities
which every
teacher
values highly and on which his teach-

ing is founded. Spiritual values are essential


if civilization is to survive in this atomic age,
in which results are measured in numbers,
money or mechanical efficiency and where the
rich are sometimes esteemed more highly than
men and women of character.
Western civilization faces a supreme test in
which teachers must play a decisive role, and
this role should be motivated by that charity of
which Scripture says:
"Charity suffereth long and is kind, charity
seeketh not her own, thinketh not evil, is
not puffed up, but rejoices in the truth."
The teacher has a high sense of responsibility.
He is a leader witl<\!:liseye on the future, fully
conscious of his human and educational duties
towards those entrusted to his care.
As long as the parents and the community
support the principal and the teachers, the
foundation will have been laid for success in
education.
An educated young lady, Dr. Kotzee continued, should be an exampre:\ of all that is
noblest
in womanhood.
She " is of vital
importance because she is the vehicle in which
biological life is handed down from generation
to generation.
She must be educated to nurture, not only the physical child, but also the
culture of the spirit.
She is destined to play a womanly role and
to create and lo,ve - her chiI'd, her husband,
her family, her people and her country. With
her love she helps her husband to be a
gentleman.
In its women

lies the strength

of a nation.

The responsibility of making a success of our


young state, rests on the young men. Every
boy should be led to become a man of deeds
with a steadfast character.
He should be true
to himself and not be led astray by anything.
Attaining personal integrity will help him to
experience real joy in life especially when,
through experience, he has grown into full
manhood.
The basic moral values should be
asserted with vigour.
Every girl should be able to rely on respect
and protection from every boy.
Every boy, who is sound in body and mind,
seeks romance, and this is to be found in his

home, his culture, his school, in wisdom and


in creative work. In his quest for romance and
adventure, he develops his manhood and his
integrity.
He becomes a source of strength
and he enjoys caring for his family.
He
acquires possessions and will defend that which
is dear to him, if it should be threatened.
Through integrity he achieves true freedom,
because it gives self-confidence it is the
nobleness of the soul, the clarity of the brain
and the purity of the character.
In conclusion Dr. Kotzee offered his congratulations
to the prize winners and said it
was fitting that their achievements should be
rewarded.
Addressing all the pupils present,
Dr. Kotzee said that if, during their school
career, they could attain steadfastness
and
integrity of character, and if they could learn
to pursue in life that which is true and
honest, and which would lead to joy and
freedom, then they would have won a prize
rich and desirable beyond any other.
Mr. W. A. J. Sammons, Chairman of the
Governing Body, thanked
Dr. Kotzee. In a
territory as large as the Transvaal, there were
bound to be problems, but the Education
Department had Dr. Kotzee as its Director an outstand ing educational'
character,
who
was dedicated to his work. Mr. Sammons expressed his appreciation
that Dr. Kotzee had
given up his time to come to Forest High
School.
Mr. Sammons thanked the Governing Body,
the Acting Headmaster, the Vice-Principals, the
staff and administrative
staff for all they do
for the children and he thanked Mr. Stead
posthumously
for all he had done for the
School.
Mrs. Kotzee graciously presented the trophies
and prizes and the new trophy, donated by
Mr. Mildenhall, for the House Play Competition. This trophy was won by Milton Ho,use.
Two presentations were made to Miss Betty
Murray, the Secretary of the School, in recognition and appreciation
of her outstanding
service to the School for twenty-five years.
Mr. Sammons presented her with a travelling
handbag bearing her initials, on behalf of the
Governing Body. Mrs. McClelland, Secretary
of the Parents'
Association,
gave her an
inscribed Parker pen set, from the parents.

Douglas Eatwell, the Head Boy, thanked Dr.


Kotzee on behalf of the School and presented
him with a set of gold cuff links bearing his
initials. Mrs. Kotzee received a bouquet from
the Head Girl', Louise Swanepoel.
During the evening the guests enjoyed
several English and Afrikaans songs, which
were rendered by Mr. Brown's School Choir.
The able accompanist was Dianne Nichols.
The Speech Choir in "The Creation"
was
impressive under the direction of Mr. Sloman.
The leading parts were taken by Nicholas Uys,
Stanley Ebel and Philip Joubert.

First Oass.-Marie
Mathematics ).

Harker

SCHOOL

(distinction

In

CERTIFICATE

EXAMINATION
Pass.-Doreen
Botha, K. J. Bouwer, Alice
Cardosa, S. F. Cormack, A. A. Dean, P. M. D.
Dias, Helena Duarte, R. C. Farrell, Maria Fernandes, F. P. Girodo, Carol Gray, Gale Greyvenstein, M. C. O. Guedes, C. Hanekom, D. J.
Hardman, Heather Hastings, G. R. Jolly, I. G.
Jones, Sandra Kearns, W. Kerr, Pamela Knipe,
Susan Kruger, Susanna Labuschagne,
H. G.
Lamprecht,
Marianna
Manefeldt,
S. Meyer,
PhyUis Parken, Gemma Ridderhof, M. C. Searle,
Lorraine Stephens, N. J. Street, Clarice Tomaz,
Louise van der Wolf, T. van Zyl, E. P. Veenhof,
A. Vermeulen, J. F. Viegas, A. J. Welthagen,
CoHeen Wilkinson.

Dux Medals:
Martle.

Beryl van

Rotary Leadership
poel, D.: Eatwell.

Awards:

Old Fm'estonian Award for Thoroughness:


Athalie Buchholtz, J. G. Morris.
Mildenhall Award for Inter-House
Milton House.

Dramatics:

Lo,uise Swane-

1968

Pass.-A.
M. M. da Silva, M. T. Hunkin, A.
Murdoch, D. C. Phillips, ~Iizabeth Rowlinson,
D. P. Schorr, Anne Taylor,'Beryl van Rensburg.

SECONDARY

for Mathematics

Robertson Cup for Languages:


poel.

UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE
EXAMINATION

Netherlands
Bank Award
and Science: Marie Harker.

Rensburg,

Form 5 Prizes: Marie Harker (First Class), .


A. M. M. da Silva, M. C. Searle, S. F. Cormack.
Form 4: D. Eatwell, P. J. Hinkley, Louise
Swanepoel, M. G. Hendry, Mary-Ann de Groot,
Dawn Herron.
Form 3: M. J. Bywater, J. F. G. de Carvalho,
B. P. Devenish, B. E. Harrison, S. Scott, G. K.
Sinclair, Winnifred McDonald, Evelyn Sandison,
Gillian Wilkinson.
Form 2: G. M. Hepburn, M. B. Schoeman,
L. E. van der Merwe, I. S. WiHiams, Amelia
Ferreira, Anna Hennop, Margaritha
Meyer,
Carol Nichols, Jennifer Paull.
Form 1: P. G. Crowe, G. P. Wilkinson, G. E.
Woodgett,
Barbara Sandison, D. H. Landaur
Linda Karczewski
Sir Ernest Oppenheimer
Awards for Diligence: Rona Robertson, Catherine
Coertze,
Diane Baggott, J. Moreira, Odete Silva, Rita
Marques, J. C. T. do Silva, C. P. Faulkner,
Lynette Underwood, A. G. Ribeiro, G. R. W.
Sizer, Jenny MacDonald,
Dawn
Card,
P.
Jackson, Alana Smit.

L. R.

Louise Swane-

Certificates
of Merit: Amelia dos Santos,
Alexandrina
Ferrao, Debra Hassett, Evelynne
Klopper, Diane Lewis, Unda Meyer, Marie
Wil'liams.

Front Row: Mr. K. M. Cokoyne,


Miss B. M. Murroy,
Mr. J. von der Velden,
Mrs. C. C. Moffot, Mr. N. J. Pienoor,
Mr. H. J. Swonepoel
(Vice-Principol),
Mr. P. A. Bredenhonn
(Acting
Heodmoster),
Mr. J. A. de V. Worsley
(Vice-Principol),
Miss S. B. Steod,
Mr. J. Lordon,
Mrs. A. A. Bishop, Mr. A. E. Britz.
Second
Row: Miss L. J. Pinshow,
Miss E. J. Bromley,
Miss D. Hersch,
Miss F. Chondler,
Mrs. H. K. Mozonsky,
Miss
W. A. de Wool,
Mrs. R. E. Acton,
Miss M. C. Cluver, Mrs. J. von der Woth,
Miss J. A. Higgins,
Miss L. M.
Wolker.
Third Row: Miss M. I. de Agrello,
Miss G. A. Hollingworth,
Miss R. A. Brown,
Miss J. B. Grohom,
Mr. D. v. R.
Hendrikz,
Mr. E. D. Townsend,
Mrs. J. Pretorius,
Mrs. M. E. Lombert,
Miss N. de Villiers,
Mrs. J. D.
Hoffenberg.
Fourth Row: Mr. S. C. Stolson,
Mr. B. von der Schyff, Mr. C. C. Viljoen, Mr. D. C. Browne, Mr. J. S. E. Burchord,
Mr. R. W. Brown.

STAFF
Apart
from those mentioned
in last year's
magazine,
temporary
members
of staff who
served us well in 1968 and who did not return
this year, were
Mrs. Cameron,
Mrs. Emary,
Mrs. Mitchell,
Mrs. Pienaar,
Mrs. Smith,
Mr.
de Beer and Mr. Marais.
They have our thanks
and best wishes.
We regret the death, at the
end of last year, of Mr. Schutte,
who became
ill during
the third term, while he was with
us.

Newcomers
in January
were Miss Chandler
(French),
Miss de Agrella an ex-Head
Girl
of the School
(Home
Econom ics), M iss de
Villiers
(Art),
Miss Graham,
Miss Brown
(Mathematics),
Miss Hollingworth,
Mr. Hendrikz
(PT),
Mrs. Ma.zansky,
Mr. Townsend
(English),
Miss Wiegmink,
Miss de Waal,
Mr.
Browne
(Afrikaans),
Miss Hersch
(History),
Miss Pinshaw
(Latin),
Mr. Viljoen
(Science),
Mr. Stalson
(Bookkeeping),
Mrs. Pretorius

(Typing),
Miss Baillie (Geography),
Miss Walker
(H)story)
and Mr. Sloman (Adaptation
Class).
Very few staff changes
occurred
during the
year.
Mr. Sloman went on six months'
leave
at the end of the second term.
Mrs. Moffat
had the misfortune
to break
her hip during
the July holidays
in Durban,
but with
her

First

usual indomitable
will and courage,
she was
back teaching
the matrics at the beginning
of
the fourth term. We congratulate
her on her
record recovery
and on her appointment,
for
this year, as Head of the Afrikaans
Department a well-earned
promotion.
Mr. van
der Schyff is also to be congratulated
on his

Row: D. Thomson.
M. Scheepers.
E. van Rensburg,
H. Pcdro,
D. Hodge.
N. MacLucas,
A. Cousins,
C. van Wyngaard.
W. Dick, F. jarman.

D. Tesh,

Second

Row: C. Read, M. Brown. W. Reaney. H. Alien, P. Sullivan. C. Michaelides.


L. Swanepoel
(Head Girl), Mr. Bredenhann
(Acting
Headmaster),
D. Eatwell
Vice-Head
Girl), P. Hinkley, L. Barnes, N. Uys. M. Squier, D. Roe.

Thira

Row: G. Gianchino,
S. Tesh, D. Lewis,

Fourth

Row: K. Hunter. D. Nicholls, C. Roux. P. Erasmus. L. Vlok, A. Vilas, N. Welthagen.


I. Leonard,
R. Deutschmann.
B. Zeiss, A. Moreira, G. da Silva. G. Morrissey.
Row: G. Chalmers,
C. Carlson,
R. Ellish, j. West-Evans.
H. Spprk. R. Trollip, R. Cruickshank.

Sixth

Row: P. joubert,
Row:

Absent:

S. Sharp,

G. Walker,

j. Morris (Vice-Head
Boy).
(Head
Boy). A. Buchholtz

L. Meyer, M. Williams,
A. Ferr;,o. C. McDonald.
R. Robertson.
A. dos Santos, j. Adams.
L. Redman-Evans.
D. Herron, M. Kruger. G. Preston,
K. Parsons.
M. de Groot.

Fifth

Seventh

T. Seegers,

T. Grace.

A. Tennant.
P. Pawson.

P. Blyth. C. Longueira,

R. Olver,

R. Matthewson.

M. Erasmus,

A. van der Merwe,

P. jalloul,
M. Otto,

P. McDougall,

D. Ferreira,
R. Fourie.

H. Meintjies.

R. Harvey,

B. Gambarana,

M. Watt.

T. Bouwer,

I. Vidulich,

W. Meyer,

j. Nell,

L. Baptista.

romotion
to Head of the English Department.
At the end o,f the third term Miss Wiegmink
and Miss Baillie
resigned.
Miss Baillie was
married to Mr. T. Pinkney in November
and will
be living in Salisbury.
We wish them well.
Mrs. Hoffenberg
took over from Miss Wiegmink and Miss Cluver from Miss Baillie.
During
the year Miss Higgins
became
engaged
to Mr. F. Ellis-Williams.
After
their
wedding
in December,
they will be resident
in
Natal.
Miss de Agrella
is engaged
to Mr. F.
Veloza.
tvlr. Townsend
was married
in April to
Miss A. Burke, Mr. eurchard,
in September,
to
Miss D. Goul'd, Mr. Duvenhage,
who was at
Forest in 1968 and is now in Britain,
to Miss
Lamb, and Mr. Anagnostu,
who left us in 1965,
to Miss A. Kapousoglou.
We wish all these
young people
happiness
and success.
Mr. and Mrs. Britz are to be congratulated
on the birth of a son.
Mrs. Smith (Brenda
White)
with
her son Scott john,
and Mrs.
Boltman
(Przychodzka),
with her son David,
visited us recently.
Both babies are fine specimens and we look forward
to enrolling
them
in 1981. Dr. Muller, a staff member for many
years, and Mr. Damhuis,
who is now living in
Holland,
both looked fit when they visited us
briefly.
Miss Rowlinson
is enjoying
her stay overseas
and Miss Griffiths's
letters from New Zealand,
where she is teaching,
are interesting
and highly
entertaining.
Several of our valued
members
of staff are
leaving.
Mrs. Bishop came to Forest in 1963 as
Miss Pringle
and in December,
1965 married
Geoff. Bishop, then teaching
at Forest.
Her
subject
is Biology and her laboratory
bears
testimony
to the interest she has inspired in her
pupils.
Every year, for several years, she has
taken a group of senior pupils to Inhaca Island
to do field work. She was recently promoted
to
a senior post at the School'. She has, unfortunately, decided to' transfer
to a tutorial
college,
where her husband is teaching.
Mrs. Acton has been with us for four years.

She has been one of the mainstays


in the Arithmetic Department.
In her we are losing a very
pleasant
and energetic
teacher and her invaluable help in the library will be greatly
missed.
Miss Higgins, whose marriage
will be taking
her out of our reach, has been in charge of the
Home Economics
Department
for two, of the
three years she has been at Forest.
She, too,
will be greatly
missed both as a colleague
and
for all -she has done. In addition
to her many
arduous
duties, the catering
for functions
and
sports
fixtures
has
fallen
mainly
on
her
shoulders
a time-consuming,
never ending

task.
Miss Bram ley has also spent three years on
the staff. Her subjects are English and History.
Latterly
she has taught
only English and her
classes
have included
matric
pupils.
She has
been in charge
of swimming
and netball
and
has carried
out these duties with enthusiasm.
She will be missed, not only for her capabilities, but for her lively personality
and sense
of humour.
Miss Bramley
intends
spending
some time overseas,
teaching
and touring.
Five other
pleasant
staff
members
who
joined us in january,
are leaving.
Miss Pinshaw,
who is going overseas,
Miss Graham
to teach
at Redhilf
and
Mr. Viljoen
in Middelburg.
Miss Brown and Mrs. Pretorius
are also transferri ng to other schools.
Best wishes
and our thanks
to all these
mem bel's of staff.
Our three secretaries
Miss Murray,
Mrs.
Lambert
and Mrs. van del' Wath,
get through
an incredible amount of work cheerfully in spite
of constant
interruptions.
Mrs. van del' Wath,
a Springbok
softball
player,
had
enough
energy left to make history in a recent league
match
she hit three
home runs in three
successive
innings a fact which makes me
nervous
when
I interrupt
her typing
to ask
for a line! We thank them for all they have
done to help us duri ng the year.
Mr. Smith, the caretaker,
is aho deserving
of
our thanks.

HONOURS DAY
A Golden jubilee Honours
Day was held on
Saturday,
14th june, when boards
boori.o.g the
names of the past Headmasters
of the School
and the Old Pupils, who have won Springbok
co,iIours were unveiled.
Among the guests of honour were Mr. A. N.
Bovet, the only living ex-Headmaster
of Forest

High, and Mrs. Bovet, Mrs. P. A. Bredenhann,


many of the Springboks
who have won honour
for South Africa and for the School; past and
present
members
of the Governing
Body and
past and present
mem bel's of staff.
Mr. P. A. Bredenhann,
the Acting
Headmaster,
welcomed
the guests
and called
on

Mr. F. J. Hackney to address the gathering and


unveil the boards bearing the names of the
Springboks.
Mr. Hackney was a pupil of the
School in 1919 and was, for many years, a
member of the Governing Body and also its
Chairman for a long period.
Addressing Mr. Bredenhann, Mr. Bovet, the
Springboks, the Governing Body, Old Forestonians, parents, teachers, pupils and friends,
Mr. Hackney said that it was an honour to
have been chosen to unveil the boards. He
had been one of the original pupils of the
Technical High School, which was then housed
in military wood and iron buildings at the
Union Grounds and where there was no
organised sport.
When the new School was opened on its
present site in 1919, it was surrounded by a
large expanse of veld. The first sport organised was soccer and the teams were good,
later producing seven soccer Springboks.
In 1939 the School changed to rugby with
all the other high schools. The ground was
developed
and eventually
all sports were
played, and many Old Pupils had contributed
to international
honours. There were very few
international occasions before 1960 and it was
a great achievement to represent South Africa
in those days.
Mr. Hackney said that he knew very little
about the sports, with the exception of tennis.
Colin Eedes was the first tennis Springbok to
represent South Africa; Sid Levy, always a
good sportsman and a gentleman, was selected
three times and Mrs. Summers (Sheila Piercey)
was the National
Champion
and the only
South African woman ever to have won an
event at Wimbledon
the mixed doubles
with Eric Sturgess.
Players from the School who have represented South Africa are am bassadors
and
people of whom we can be proud.
Mr. Hackney thanked
Miss Betty Murray
and Mr. Neville Pienaar for compiling the
names of the Springboks.
This had involved
a great deal of work.
Unveiling the boards, Mr. Hackney said that
they paid a tribute to achievements
in the
past and would be an inspiration to present
and future pupils.
Mr. Bredenhann then called on Mr. Bovet
to unveil the Headmasters'
board. Mr. Bovet,
he said, had been the Headmaster
of Forest
High for eleven years and was now a Member
of the Provincial
Council. where
he was

looking after our interests.


Mr. Bovet said that for a number of years
when he had been the Headmaster,
Mr.
Hackney
had been the Chairman
of the
Go'verning Body.
The still covered board was to immortalize
the Heads, Mr. Bovet said, and added that
he was happy to have his name among them
and proud of being connected with the School.
He thought
it fitting that the board had
been placed next to the Head Prefects' board.
Mr. Bovet unveiled the board, congratulated
the School on fifty fine years and thanked
Mr. Bredenhann.
After thanking Mr. Bovet, Mr. Bredenhann
announced the programme for the afternoon
and everybody joined in the singing of the
School Song before dispersing.
A trampolining
exhibition
was given by
Bernard Cross and two other Transvaal tram-'
polinists. This superb demonstration
was very
much enjoyed and appreciated.
Matches were held during the afternoon
between present pupils and Old Pupils. The
women's hockey resulted in a 2-2 draw, the
Old Boys won their hockey match 2-0, the
rugby result was 14-3 in favour of the present
pupils and the School team won the netball
with a score of 21-6. The Old Pupils' tennis
team was so strong that the idea of a match
was abandoned
in favour of friendly tennis.
Refreshments
were served throughout
the
afternoon
and the festivities ended with a
braaivleis.
The parents responsible for the
catering and to whom we wish to express
our thanks were Mr. Fourie, Mr. and Mrs.
McClelland, Mr. and Mrs. Paull, Mr. and Mrs.
Peres, Mr. and Mrs. da Silva, Mr. and Mrs.
MacLucas, Mrs. Basterfield, Mrs. Guy and Mrs.
Benard. We are grateful to Mrs. Benard for
making the effective red, black and gold curtains for the unveiling of the boards.
An announcement
that a photograph would
be taken of the Springboks was made in the
Hall, but unfortunately
the gathering
had
begun to disperse. The editor apologises to
tho,se Springboks who attended the function,
but who did not know about and were not
included in the phot09r9ph.
Old Forestonian Springboks:
Association Football:
C. Burnett, 1934.
T. N. Bell, 1935, 1936.
D. H. WaHace, 1937 (also capt. Scotland).
A. G. Falconer, 1947.

R. Ferriman, 1947.
G. A. Frew, 1950.
A. C. Jacques, 1950.
Cycling:
E. King, 1964.
Athletics:
A. S. Burton-Durham, 1928, 1935.
S. Luyt, 1948.
Badminton:
Sandra Bartlett, 1967.
Boxing:
H. Isaacs, 1928.
Golf:
R. Mullan, 1967.
Ice Skating:
I. G. Jones, 1960.
Marion Sage, 1960.
Margaret Betts, 1968.
B. O'Shea, 1968.
Rugby:
D. Devine, 1924, 1928.
Softball:
A. W. van der Wath, 1968.
G. Dean, 1968.

Front

Sky Diving:
D. Devenish, 1966.
Tennis:
C. Eedes, 1937.
Sheila Summers, 1938.
S. Levy, 1949, 1951, 1952.
Ice Hockey:
J. B. Pretorius, 1955, 1961, 1966.
R. E. Lucas, 1961, 1966.
Rowing:
D. Munton, 1958.
Shooting:
D. Wolf-Coate, 1948.
Trampolining:
B. Cross, 1968-1969.
Water Polo:
W. A. J. Aucamp, 1952, 1959, 1960.
F. M. Butler, 1952, 1959, 1960.
R. A. Meredith, 1952, 1959, 1960.
G. Knapp, 1963.
J. H. Otto, 1963, 1964, 1966-1969.
The School would be pleased to receive the
names of any Springboks who were pupils here,
and whose names do not appear on this list.

Row: R. Mullin, F. M. Butler. S. Levy. B. Cross. Glenda


Bredenhann
(Acting
Headmaster.
Forest High School).
T. N. Bell.

Back Row:

R. E. Lucas.

J.

B. Pretorius.

B. OShea.

A. W. van

O'Shea (not
SandraBartlett
der

Wath.

O.F. partner
(Tote).
.

to B. OShea).
Mr. P. A.
D. Munton,
R. Ferriman.

~hituar!,
The death occurred, tragical'ly, this year
of two of our former pupils:
RAYMOND ALAN FERGUSON, aged
23 years, on 5th September. Raymond was
employed at Speedy's Engineering at the
time of his death.
JOHN STEPHEN GEORGE CLAYTON,
aged 19 years, also on 5th September.
John was apprenticed as a printer.
To the fa'rhmes of these two young men,
we offer our deepest sympathy.
We also wish tooHer our sincere sympathy to Mrs. C. M. Scrimgeour on the
sudden death in May of her husband.
Mr. Scrimgeour
had been the photographer for "The Forestonian"
for some
years, and our association
was always
pleasant. His sons, Ken and Rob, are still
taking photographs
for us, and to them,
too, we extend sincere sympathy.

Masters in Charge: Messrs. van der Schyff


and Townsend.
Chairman: Philip Joubert.
Secretary: Nicholas Uys.
During the course of 1969 no debates were
held under the auspices of this society. Unfortunately
chief debaters, Louise Swanepoel,
Denis Preston, Stanley Ebel and Nicholas Uys,
were all involved in House plays and speech
festivals. We had only the occasional' music
meeting, but we hope that next year members
will have more time to devote to this society.

JA YCEES PUBLIC SPEAKING

COURSE

The Johannesburg
North Chapter
of the
Jaycees (Junior Chamber of Commerce) ran a
very successful public speaking course for Form
IV and V pupils at Forest High.
The course began with two lectures on the
art of public speaking and an exercise 'known
as an "ice-breaker",
which proved to be
amusing and enjoyable. The pupils were then
call'ed upon to speak and their speeches were

criticised by the organizers.


The criticism was
constructive
and by the third week, when
pupils made prepared speeches, the standard
of speaking had improved greatly.
After the speeches made at the third meeting were assessed, Louise Swanepoel, Gillian
Wilkinson,
Stanley Ebel, Phil'ip Joubert and
Gordon Stewart were selected to enter the
finals of the competition.
At the finals the excellence of the five
speeches must have made it difficult fo'r the
judges to' reach a decision. Finally, the beautiful floating trophy, donated by the Jaycees
was presented to Stanley Ebel for his speech,
"Is God Dead?" Louise Swanepoel, who spoke
on "The Best of Both Worlds" was runner-up
and Philip Joubert with "Telekinetic Communications", came a close third. A special trophy
was awarded to William Reaney for the person who had made the greatest progress during'
the course.
The course was most interesting, instructive
and amusing. John Duffy, Keith Downs and
Brian Parker are to be thanked for the many
hours they devo,ted to their attempt to improve
the standard of public speaking at the School.
That they also considered the course' a success
was shown by their invitation to Stanley Ebel
and Philip Joubert to speak at a Jaycee dinner.
It is to be hoped that this interest in public
speaking at Forest High will grow and that
we will soon be producing some of the best
public speakers in Johannesburg.

Excellent speeches were the order of the day


when Forest was host school to Belgravia Convent in August. The Forms I, In and IV teams
endeavoured
to match the "A" and "B+"
grading attained
by the Form V team at
Roosevelt High, with their prepared speech
on "Bilingualism" and the impromptu speech
on "Careers'.
The evening was part of the Non-competitive Speech Festival arranged
by the South
African Guild of Speech Teachers, and gave
the'pupils the chance not only, to gain experience in the art of public ,speaking, but also
to air their views. This is exactly what the
Form I and Form III teams did when they
amused the audience
with "Why
I Hate
Schoo"" and "Understanding
Parents'.
The girls from Belgravia spoke on various

aspects of the then recent "Moon Landing",


spiced with speeches on "Witchcraft"
and
'Customs".
Our Form IV team, which had opened the
evening with "The Evils of Advertising",
rounded off with a fluent impromptu on " ...
the world teaching us, not us the world".
The Forms I, II and IV gradings added an
"A+", two "A's" and a "B" to Forest's credit.
A not unexpected
conclusion to what had
proved to be a most enjoyable necessity in the
School's life.
The teams were:
Form V: N. MacLucas,
Swanepoel, W. Ramsay.
Form IV: B. Harrison,
Wilkinson.
Form Ill: I. Williams,
Fo'rm
I: Iris Runkel,
Bekker and F. Roll.

P. Joubert,
G. Stewart,

Gillian

J. McDowall, M. Black.
Jennifer

Teachers: Mr. Swanepoel,


van der Schyff.
Chairman:

Louise

Poulter,

Mr. Sloman,

B.

Mr.

Lou ise Swanepoel.

Committee:
Kim
Hunter,
Constantia
Michaelides, Nicholas Uys, Philip Joubert.
The Dramatic Society has been very active
this year. We took part in the School's House
Play Festival, which was held as part of the
Golden Jubilee Celebrations.
A full account of
this Festival appears in this magazine.
Three of the pupils, who took part in these
plays, Philip Joubert, Billy Temblett and Dudley
Hendrikz, were among those considered for
the R.A.P.S. award of an Acting Scholarship.
After the Festival members of R.A.P.S. came
to the School and, gave a demonstration
on
stage make-up.
They were pleased that so
many of our members attended.
Next year the School hopes to present
"Arsenic and Old Lace" during the first term.
Our society has taken part in choral speaking and at the Prize-Giving Ceremony our
Speech Choir performed "The Creation".
We
also
had
readings
of "Murder
in the
Cathedral".

The zeal that was to spread throughout


the School' was felt as early as February this
year when, in the early part of that month,
special House meetings were called to deal
with some of the extra-mural
activities for
the year. This enthusiasm was largely directed
into the Drama Festival that was organized
originally on an inter-House
basis and developed into an inter-school affair when three
Dlays were entered in the RAPS Competitive
One-Act Play Festival for the B.P. Floating
Trophy.
On the evening of the 25th March three
plays were presented to a capacity audience
in the School Hall, and were enthusiastically
received!
A highly popular comic piece - "The Bathroom Door", staged
by Ruskin Housestarted the evening on a mo,st promising and
humorous note. The play was produced by
Miss F. Chandler and Miss D. Her5eh, and
directed by Mr. N. Pienaar. The cast induded
Louise Swanepoel, a most "Prima Donna-ish"
Prima Donna; Denis Preston, a "natural"
at
comedy; Dudley Hendriks, convincingly doddery; William
Temblett,
a saucy bit of
bravado; Jennifer Poulter; and Alan (Bennie)
Leo'nard, who gave a fine "cameo" rendering
of the part of Boots - sheer insolence! It was
good entertainment
from Ruskin House, and a
high standard was set.
"The Dear Departed" by Stanley Houghton
was produced by Mr. E. D. Townsend for Whitworth House. Anne van der Merwe played
Mrs. Slater and looked the part thanks to
make-up
apd
padding.
Heather
Nichols,
Johannes
Morris, Dougl,as Ryce and John
McDowall all gave of their best and the play
was well received.
The best came last when the' play, that was
to win the floating trophy donated by Mr.
J. W. Mildenhall, was staged. This was ''The
Laboratory"
by David Campton,
produced
by Mr. B. Sloman for Milton House. Philip
Joubert gave an outstanding
performance
as
Gabriotte and was ably supported by Martin
Erasmus, Elizabeth Botha, Dawn Herron and
Merryl Kruger. The production and decor were
notable for the almost professional finish, and
the School as a whole has benefited from this
production.
On the evening of Thursday, the 29th March,

Front

Row: Po' Joubert, K. Hunter, Mr. R. W. Brown, Mr. B. van der Schyff, Miss D. Hersch,
Miss L. Pinshaw,
Mr. E. Townsend,
Mr. D. Browne, L. Swanepoel,
D. Preston.

Second

Row: L. Simon, B. Leonard, J. Bento,


Vuuren, M. Black, J. McDowal1.

Third

Row: K. Parsons, C. Roux, A. Buchholtz,


Merwe,
D. Perhat.

Fourth

Row: J. Morris,

A. Johnstone,

E. Botha,

M. Kruger,

J. Poulter,

C. Michaelides,
D. Hendriks,

Newton House presented "Riders to the Sea"


by J. M. Synge - an ambitious undertaking!
A substantial
and realistic set was designed
and built by A. Johnstone and R. Jones, and
earned much praise. The lead in this play was
taken by Kim Hunter, who was well supported
by Dale Wilsonand
Melanie Liversage. Others
in the cast were Isabel Bento, Debbie Perhat,
Marlene van Vuuren, Priscilla Fagan, Ana
Valente, Nicholas Uys, Robert Jones and Alan
Johnstone.
The other two plays staged Were "The Young
Duchess" by Janet Dunbar, produced by Mr.
R. W. Brown for Faraday House. The cast
included Scotty Scott, Constantia
Michaelides,
Athalie
Buchholtz,
Margaret
Watt,
Cathy
Carlson, Gail Chambers, Suzanne Sharp and
Linda Barnes.

G. Chalmers,
M. Watt,

C. Carlson,

L. Barnes,

Miss F. Chandler,
D. Wilson,

D. Herron,

M. van

A. van

der

S. Ebel, R. Jones, D. Ryce, N. Uys, M. Liversage.

The .last play, presented by Kelvin House,


was "The Monkey's Paw" by W. W. Jacobs,
produced by Miss S. Baillie and Mr. D. C.
Browne.
The cast included Michael Black,
Carol Ro>Ux, Gordon Stuart, Gordon FlackDavison and Stanley Ebel.
On the final night, amidst tense excitement,
the winner was announced.
The adjudicators
Mr. A. de Villiers of the Johannesburg College
of Education,
and our Mr. H. Swanepoel,
judged "The Laboratory"
as the best play of
the Festival. And a popular choice it was! The
Mildenhall Trophy was presented to the representative of Milton House on the night of
Monday, May 5th, by Mrs. Kotzee, wife of the
Director of Education,
during the Annual
Prize-Giving Ceremony at the School. A crowning evening to a highly successful event.
B.v.d.S.

THE RAPS DRAMA FESTIVAL OF


ONE-ACT PLAYS FOR THE B.P.
FLOATING TROPHY

at Mondeor. Louise, the daughter of Mr. and


Mrs. Swanepoel, is the Head Girl of Forest
High this year and Johanna was placed in
the same class as Louise, Form Va.

The enormo'us success of the Drama Festival


released a further flush of enthusiasm among
the. pupils and we decided to enter no less
than three of our House plays in the InterSchool Play Festival which was organized by
RAPS. This took place at the Library Theatre
towards the end of Apri I.

After repeated
requests from the other
Form V classes, Form Va reluctantly allowed
her to spend a week in each of the other
Matric. classes.

The plays were up against the stiffest competition from several high schools. We entered
"The Bathroom Door", "Riders to the Sea"
and "The Laboratory".
The last named play
got through to the finals which took place
on Saturday evening, 3rd May.
To our great credit, our play "The Laboratory" came second, beaten only by a magnificent presentation
from Johannesburg
Girls'
High School. The best actor award came to
Forest when Philip Joubert won this distinction,
and the School' was awarded the prize for
the best decor.
Our 1969 Golden Jubilee Year will be remembered fo'r its Drama. Everybody was involved.
Staff rolled up their sleeves and came forward
and Mrs. Bishop helped throughout
the Festival with make-up. Most of all we are indebted
to Mr. Swanepoel for polishing the production,
helping with transport and for his experienced
help and calming presence backstage at the
Library Theatre.
Finally, the School is grateful to our Acting
Principal, Mr. Bredenhann, for his interest in
this sphere of our work. At all the Library
Theatre performances of our three entries, and
on the final night, he was there, to cheer
us on.

For the first time Forest High has had an


American Field Scholar and the experience has
been an enjoyable one.
Johanna Kendall, a senior pupil of Kokomo
High 5<11001, Kokomo, Indiana,
spent her
su m mer vacation here.
She was the guest of Mr. H. J. Swanepoel,
one of our Vice-Principals, and Mrs. Swanepoel

Our pupils enjoyed having her here as much


as she enjoyed being here, and absorbed avidly
everything she told them about the American
way of life.
What she did not know, was that the Va
boys painted their classroom, specially for her,
during the Easter holidays.
The
accompanying
article,
written
by
Johanna, appeared in the Kokomo High School
newspaper, "Red and Blue".

JOHANNA KENDALL 'SAFARIES' TO


SOUTH AFRICA THIS SUMMER
By JOHANNA

KENDALL

Last winter a dream came true for me when


I was selected as a 1969 A.F.S. Su m mer
Programme Student and this past summer I
spent almost 11 weeks living in Johannesburg,
South Africa.
By the end of those 11 weeks, I had gained
a wonderful family, many lasting friends, and
an insight into a country that seems to be
very misunderstood
by mo-st Americans.
When I first arrived in South Africa, the
schools were having their three-week winter
holiday.
My family has a cottage
on the
Indian Ocean, so they arranged for us to go
there during the first 10 days of vacation. The
part of the country their cottage is in, known
as the Transkei, was given back to the natives
so that they could govern themselves.
It was fascinating to me to travel through
there and see how the native tribes live and
to learn of the customs and ceremonies they
still use today. It is completely different from
the bustle of modern day life in Johannesburg.
Then we travelled to South Africa's Kruger
National Park, which is a large game reserve
in the north-eastern
corner of the country,
covering 8,000 square miles.

All of the animals have been kept in the


wild state and roam over this vast area at
will. By spending an entire week there, travelling in the car looking for the animals, I was
able to see just about everything from the tiniest
impala to a huge herd of African elephants.
I also saw lion, leopard, hippopotamus, cheetah,
and my favourite,
the giraffe, along with
many others. They were beautiful and so different from the animals found in zoos.
The remaining five to' six weeks I spent
going to school in the city. The school I
attended,
Forest High School, is one of the
oldest schools in Johannesburg
and much of
the discipline and attitudes are based on the old
English strictness.
All schools have a school uniform and girls
are not allowed to wear make-up or' jewellery
with their uniforms. Actually, it was fun wearing a uniform, at least you don't have to worry
about what to wear to school every day!
The school' system is a lot different from
ours. The students spend the last two years
in high school preparing for the Matriculation
exam. that is given at the end of their twelfth
year of school. This one exam. determines
whether or not a student has passed high
school.
All of my experience this summer were
things I'll never forget, but to me becoming
a member of another
family and another
school were the two most wonderful factors.
I gained a set of parents, a brother, a sister,
and through school I established some lasting
friendshi ps.
A year ago all of this was just a dream I
thought would never come true, but somehow
it did and I'll never forget it. It was a
tremendous experience!

The Co"'ege of Education has awarded a


R4DO a year bursary to Rona Robertson, who
wishes to train as a teacher. Louise Swanepoel
has been awarded
a RSOO a year C.S.I.R.
Bursary and will toke her B.Sc. Degree while
Douglas Eatwell's R8DO per year bursary has
been gran~ed by the S.AR. He will take an
Electrical
Engineering
Degree.
Congratulations to tllese three worthy Matriculants we expect to hear more about them in the
future.

It is interesting to note that twelve of this


year's Matriculants
wish to make teaching
their career. This is an excellent response to
the plea for more English-speaking
teachers.
The boys will have to complete their military
training first.
We wish them happiness and success.

William Dick, one of our Matriculants, has


not missed a day's schooling in ten years.
We congratulate
him on this excellent
record. He should prove popular with would-be
employers.

The Forest High School Branch of the


Students' Christian Association is celebrating
its Tweny-Fifth Anniversary this year - it is
just half the age of the School. We hope that
it will continue to prosper.
We did not have many talks this year, but
those we did have were well attended.
Speakers and their subjects were: Mr. Glen
Gold - "Jesus and Me"; Mr. Wilfred Ralph, an
Old Boy - "What Christ has Meant to Me";
Mr. Alf Friend, the S.C.A.'s Travelling Secretory, gave a talk, a camp slide and tape show;
the Rev. R. Attwell, of the Methodist Church,
gave two talks on "Is There a God?"
We held a number of interesting Bible Study
periods.
Our best wishes go to Mavis Nicolas and
Yernon Ward, who have just become engaged.
Both held the position of Chairman of the
S.C.A when they were at Forest and are still
engaged in youth work.

Miss Chandler and Mrs, Mazansky have revived the interest of the pupils in working to
help people less well off than themselves. They
have organised
collections, cake sales and
other fund-raising activities for Children's Day,
Poppy Day, the Easter Stamp Fund and for
victims of malnutrition
in our country. After
an appeal from S.AN.C. for the welfare of
the aged, jumble was coltette'd-and the pupils
have sold Christmas cards.
The School is always asking the S.P.C.A for
assistance with animal problems. Their prompt

and efficient
service at all ti mes, is a great
help. It is a long time since the School did
anything
for the S.P.CA.
and, this year, Miss
Stead was asked for donations
for a cake sale.
The parents
generously
supplied
nearly eighty
cakes and over R20 in donations
for this good
cause.
The girls and members of their families have
again dressed nearly two hundred dolls for the
Alexandra
Health
Clinic Christmas
Party for
children.
Our thanks
are due to all the parents
who
have helped financially,
with contributions
of
jumble
and
cakes
and
with
the
beautiful
outfits
they made for the dolls.

Staff: Mr. van der Schyff, Mr. Viljoen.


Captain:
I. Vidulich.
Vice-Captain:
David Ferreira.
Secretary:
D. Ferreira.
Our team entered
the "Du Division of the
Johannesburg
High Schools' Chess League and
had a successful
year.
Players
deserving
mention
are those
who
played
boards
l-S and who won constantly.
They were I. Vidulich, L. Baptista,
N. MacLucas,
W. Reaney
and D. Ferreira.

We
junior
game.

are doing
all we can
pupils to take a greater

We are grateful
who gave up their
ported the team.

To
tion
task,
year

to encourage
interest
in the

to the members
of staff,
time for us and who trans-

serve refreshments
at every School funcand spons
fixture
is a time consuming
with nothing
to show at the end of the
for all the hard work involved.

There is, however, a measure of consolation


in the fact that pupils taking
part in sports'
competitions,
and
those
people
who
have
cttended
functions
at the School,
have not
been allowed
to grow faint with hunger and
thirst.
Miss Higgins,
Miss de Agrella
and
Miss
Walker
have
done
excellent
work
in this
department,
assisted
by the following
pupils,
who have given up most of their afternoons
to
help:
Melanie
Liversage,
Marlene
van
Vuuren,
Martha
Williams,
Patricia
Kennedy,
Barbara
Molloy and Carol Wewege.
We are grateful
done, and to the
refreshments.

to them for all they have


parents
who have supplied

SWIMMING

Front

Row: J. Snegg, E. Sandison, M. Kruger, L. Barnes, L Swanepoel


(Capt.),
W. Dick, G, Morrissey,
F Jarman, c. Faulkner.

Second

Row: B. Richardson,
K. Guy, S. du Plessis,
J. Poulter,
W. Levin.

Third

Row: J. Johnstone,
M. van Metzinger,
P. de Klerk, L. Burden.

Fourth

Row:

Back Row:

F. Perrins,
M. Schoeman,

A. Mladovan,
K. Wailer,

Swimming at Forest has been


this year. Although we have
enthusiastic swimmers, many of
there were others who did not
larly to practices.

D. Basterfield,

(Capt.),

A. Harvey,

C. Eis, V. Blake-Shepherd,

P. Sammons,
C. Swart,

E. Schoeman,

D. van Vliet,

disappointing
a number of
them juniors,
turn up regu-

We participated
in two Inter-High Galas
and, in each scored the lowest number of
points.
However, our swimmers are to be
congratulated
on their fine spirit and their

Miss E. J. Bramley,
A. Parken,

I. van Aardt,

H. Santillon,

R. Jensen,

A. Tennant

M. Weise,

J. Ferreira,

D. McDonald,

M. Cesare,

J. Pawson.

K. Stewart.

variant swimming, even when they knew they


were beaten. Next year, with our promising
juniors and more training, we hope to start
our climb to the top.
Those who were awarded
Colours were:
Full: A. Tennant (re-award).
Half: C. Faulkner,
R. Jensen, Jaclyn Snegg. Very highly commended: Amber Harvey.
Thanks are due to Louise Swanepoel and

Alan Tennant
for their loyal support
and to
iss Hollingworth,
Miss de Villiers
and Mr.
van der Schyff for all their help.
Miss Bramley
has been in charge
of the
swimming
for two
years
and the
marked
improvement
in the team spirit of the swimmers is due to her great
enthusiasm.
She
is leaving
to spend some time overseas
and
although
we say good-bye
to her with regret,
she goes with our best wishes.

Butterfly,
Boys:
Open, 50 yards: C. Faulkner
(K), F. Jarman
(W),
A. Tennant
(R), D. Preston
(R), R. Wailer
(K), I.
Ferreira
(N).
Time: 31.0 secs. (Record:
29.6 secs.).
Under
Schoeman
Sammons
record.

IS, 25 yards:
G. Flack-Davison
(K),
M.
(K), H. Santillan
(W), K. Stewart
(M), P.
(R), I. Ferreira (N). Time: 15.5 secs.; equals

Under 14, 25 yards: P. de Klerk (N), D. van Vliet


(K), J. Pawson (N), E. Schoeman (K), L. Clayton (M),
A. Leonard (R). Time: 18.8 secs. (Record:
17.3 secs.).
Butterfuly,
Girls:
Open, 25 yards:
M. Weise
(W),
L. Fitchett
(M),
A. Parkin (N), L. Barnes (F), I. van Aardt (K), P.
Pawson (N).
Time: 17.7 secs. (Record:
16.0 secs.).
Under IS, 25 yards: J. Snegg (R), M. Weise (W),
A. Parken
(N), I. van Aardt (K), D. Bossenger
(F),
N. Doyle (R).
Freestyle,
Boys:
Open, 500 yards:
R. Jensen (M), A. Tennant
(R),
C. Faulkner (K), E. Lane (N), I. Ferreira (N), P. Sammons (R). Time: 6 mins. 56.6 secs. (Record:
6 mins.
12.2 secs.).
Open, 100 yards: A. Tennant
(R), C. Faulkner (K),
F. Jarman
(W),
R. Jensen (M), R. Dexter
(M), G.
Matthewson
(N).
Time: 64.6 secs.
(Record:
59.2
secs.).
Under
IS, 50 yards:
G. Flack-Davison
(K),
M.
Schoeman
(K), K. Stewart
(M), F. Perrins
(R), F.
Branco
(K),
P. Sammons
(R).
Time:
31.8 secs.
(Record:
26.3 secs.).
Under
14, 50 yards:
E. Schoeman
(K), J. Pawson
(N), H. Santillan
(W),
D. van Vliet (K), J. Walker
(M), L. Simon (R).
Time: 33.1 secs. (Record:
27.6
secs.).
Under 13,25 yards: P. de Klerk (N), M. Cesare (F),
D. Jones (K), M. Ugrin (R), L. Schubach
(W),
T.
Spence
(M).
Time: 15.5 secs.
(Record:
14.2 secs.).
Freestyle,
Girls:
Open, 500 yards: J. Snegg (R), A. Harvey
Parken
(N),
J. Ferreira
(N),
C. Nicholls
Poulter
(R).
Open, 50 yards: L. Swanepoel
K. Hunter
(N),
J. Fick (W),
Sandison
(M). Time: 34.6 secs.

(K),
(W),

A.
J.

(R), M. Kruger (M),


L. Penning
(W),
E.
{Record:
30.4 secs.).

Under IS, 50 yards: J. Snegg (R), M. Weise (W),


A. Mladovan
(R), C. Nicholls (W), I. van Aardt (K),
D. Dunn (K). Time: 33.5 secs. (Record:
29.6 secs.).
Under 14, 50 yards: G. Prout-Jones
(K), C. Eis (M),
M. van Metzinger
(W), J. Poulter (R), J. MacDonald
(W),
P. Phillips (K). Time: 35.0 secs. (Record:
30.8
secs.).
Under 13, 25 yards: A. Harvey (K),
(K), W. Levin (M), J. Poulter
(R),
H. Nicholls
(W).
Time:
16.1 secs.
secs. ).

D. Basterfield
K. Guy (K),
(Record:
14.4

Backstroke,
Boys:
Open, 100 yards: A. Tennant
(R), C. Faulkner
(K),
D. Preston
(R), R. Dexter
(M), R. Jensen (M), W.
Dick (K). Time: 74.6 secs. (Record:
69.8 secs.).
Under 15,50 yards: R. Wailer (K), G. Flack-Davison
(K),
P. Sammons
(R)
and
M. Pawson
(N),
R.
Kennedy
(M),
R. Pereira
(N).
Time:
36.9 secs.
(Record:
35.0 secs.).
Under
14, 50 yards: J. Pawson
(N), E. Schoeman
(K),
H. Santillan
(W)
and D. van Vliet (K), G.
Woodgett
(F), A. Leonard
(R).
Time: 40.5 secs.
(Record:
34.5 secs.).
Under 13,25 yards: P. de Klerk (N), M. Ugrin (R),
D. MacDonal<'!> (.W). W. Reece (F), I. Myers (R),
M. Cesare (F). Time: 20.1 secs. (Record:
17.8 secs.).
Backstroke,
Open, 50
K. Hunter
K. Blignaut

Girls:
yards: L. Swanepoel
(R), L. Fitchett (M),
(N),
J. Snegg (R), J. Robertson
(W),
(N). Time: 37.9 secs. (Record:
35.5 secs.).

Under IS, 50 yards: J. Snegg (R), M. Weise (W),


A. Mladovan
(R), I. van Aardt (K), A. Parken
(N),
J. Ferreira (N). Time:s 40.0 secs. (Record:
36.6 secs.).
Under 14, 50 yards: J. Poulter (R), P. Phillips (K),
C. Eis (M), V. Blake-Shepherd
(N), M. van Metzinger
(W).
Time: 46.3 secs. (Record:
36.9 secs.).
Under 13,25
D. Basterfield
(W),
K. Guy
secs.).

yards: J. Poulter
(R), W. Levin (M),
(K), B. Richardson
(M), W. Motley
(K).
Time:
19.0 secs.
(Record:
17.6

Breaststroke,
Boys:
Open, 100 yards: A. Tennant
(R), G. Palmer
(R),
G. Morrissey
(N), M. Koch (M), I. Leonard
(R), I.
Ferreira
(N).
Time: 83.4 secs. (Record:
75.3 secs.).
Under 15,50 yards: P. Sammons (R), R. Wailer (K),
F. Branco
(K), K. Stewart
(M), F. Perrins
(R), R.
Pereira
(N).
Time: 40.8 secs. (Record:
36.5 secs.).
Under 14, 50 yards: H. Santillan
(W), D. van Vliet
(K), P. de Klerk (N), G. Wilkinson
(W), J. Pawson
(N), L. Burden (K).
Time: 42.1 secs. (Record:
34.1
secs. ).
Under 13, 25 yards: P. de Klerk (N), D. MacDonald
(W),
W. Shaw (W),
R. Constable
(M). Time: 19.4
secs. (Record:
19.0 secs.).
Breaststroke,
Girls:
Open, 50 yards: M. Kruger (M), L. Penning (W),
P. Pawsen
(N), and A. Parken
(N), L. Barnes (F),
D. Bossenger
(F).
Time: 44.0 secs.
(Record:
42.0
secs.).

Under
15, 50 yards: C. Williams
(W),
A. Parken
(N), I. van Aardt
secs. (Record:
43.2 secs.).

(R),
(K).

C. Nicholls
Time: 45.8

Under 14, 50 yards: A. Harvey


(K), M. van Metzinger
(W),
C. Eis (M),
G. Prout-Jones
(K),
J.
Johnstone
(N).
Time: 41.6 secs.; new record.
Under 13, 25 yards: A. Harvey (K), B. Richardson
(M), K. Guy (K), W. Levin (M), H. Nicholls
(W),
J. Greyvenstein
(K). Time: 18.5 secs.; new record.
RELAYS,
Open,
Newton,

4 x 25 yards:
Milton.

Kelvin,

Whitworth,

Ruskin,

Newton,

Kelvin,

Under 14, 3 x 25 yards:


61.8 secs.

Newton,

Under 13,3 x 25 yards:


rime: 61.1 secs.

Kelvin,

Newton,

Faraday.
Whitworth.

Whitworth.
Newton,

Time:

Whitworth.

Ruskin,

Newton,

Freestyle:
Milt,,".

8 ){ 25 yards:

Ruskin,

Kelvin,

Whitworth,

Ruskin,

Newton,
Kelvin, Whitworth,
Time: 55.7 secs.

Under
13, 3 x 25 yards:
Kelvin. Time: 66.7 secs.

3 x 25 yards:

Under 15, 3 x 25 yards:


Time: 59.5 secs.

BOYS

Ruskin,

Under
15, 4 x 25 yards:
Kelvin, Milton,
W!"-itworth,
Newton.
Time: 63.6 secs.
Under 14, 3 x 25 yards:
Ruskin, Milton, Faraday.

Open,

Milton,

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

2341-

Kelvin
Ruskin
Newton
Whitworth
Milton
Faraday

no-/,

192.f
159+

not
32

ATHLETICS
The cross-country
was once again a big
attraction.
Miss Hollingworth
arranged
a
.9irls' cros~-country
(once around Wemmer
Pan) and this was a great success. Congratulations to the winners - both from Kelvin:
Antonio Moutinho and Amber Harvey, who is
still under 13.
A high standard was set during the InterHouse meeting which was held on a Saturday
afternoon and well supported by parents. Ten
records were broken and one equalled. Congratulations
to the
winners,
Whitworth
(second last year) and runners-up, Kelvin.
Trophy Winners.
Governing
Body House
Cup, Whitworth;
Boys' Shield, Kelvin; Girls'
Shield, Faraday; Victor Ludorum, Jose Paulzeen
(Whitworth);
Victrix
Ludorum:
Marlene
Squ ier (Kelvin); Athalie Buchholtz (Faraday);
Cooper
House Relay Trophy, Whitworth;
Chalmers Trophy, Junior Victor Ludorum, John
Dickens (Kelvin);
Chalmers
Trophy, Junior
Victrix Ludorum, Irene Blackburn (Faraday);
Cross Country Trophy (Boys), Whitworth;
Cross Country Trophy (Girls), Kelvin.
In Inter-High competition the School entered
three meetings where Hill High, Greenside and
Roosevelt were h~ts. The results weYe:
1. Triangular:
1. Hill High; 2. King David High; 3. Forest
High.

2. Triangu lar:
1. Greenside;

2. Forest; 3 De la Salle.

3. Trangular:
1. Roosevelt;

2. Northview;

3. Forest.

Our most successfu I race was the 800 metres


we were placed as follows: 1. Joe Morris; 2.
Martin Erasmus; 3. Norman Welthagen.
At the conclusion of the season Full Colours
awards were made to: James Antonie, Joe
Morris, Jose Paulzeen (Carl Read already has
Full Colours) and Half Colours to: Athalie
Buchholtz, Martin Erasmus, Daphne Shekyls,
Marlene Weise and Jo-se Alves (Suzanne Sharp
already has Half Colours).
Hearty congratulations!

Boys' Cross-Country:
Individual:
A. Moutinho
(K), A. T. da Silva (M),
J. A. da Silva (N), J. Morris (W), L. Wainstein
(W),
A. M. da Silva (F). Time: 22 mins. 13.1 secs. (Record:
19 mins. 54 secs.)_
Team.
Milton.

Whitworth,

Faraday,

Ruskin,

Kelvin,

Girls' Cross-Country:
Individual:
A. Harvey
(K),
J. Johnstone
Paul (M), M. Albino (F), A. Hennop
(M),
den (K).
Time: 14 mins. 14.7 secs.
Team:
Ruskin.

Kelvin,

Milton,

Whitworth,

Faraday,

Newton,

(N),
J.
T. BawNewton.

Front

Row: j. Antonie, G. Preston,


D. Ferreira,
M. Squier,
A. van der Merwe, N. Welthagen,
D. Wilson.

Second

Raw: j. Heuvel, H. Futcher,


D. Shekyls,
D. Loukakis,
T. Bawden,
D. MacDonald,

Third

Row: L. Steyl, I. Blackburn,


E. Burgess, j. Alves.

Fourth
Back

Row: S. de Groot,

L. Melvin,

M. von Metzinger,

Row: L. Wainstein,
A. johnstone,
j. Dickens, P. jalloul.

C. Read,

Mr. j. Worsley,

V. Marich,
M. Weise,
j. Paul, I. Myers.
S. Buchholtz,

M. Cosme,

D. Blackburn,

High jump, Boys:


Open: C. Read (R), A. johnstone
(N), A. Tennant
(R), D. Blackburn
(K), G. Morrissey
(N),
M. van
Zyl (K).
Height: 5 ft. Tt ins.; new record.
Under 15: j. Dickens (K), j. Carvalho
(K), G. Bitter
(F), R. Pereira (N), j. Guimaroes
(R), N. M. Almeida
(K). Height: 4 ft. 4 ins. (Record:
5 ft. 5 ins.).
Under
14: E. Schoeman
(K), H. Santillan
(W),
j.
Pawson
(N),
D. van Vliet (K), S. Pienaar
(F), R.
Manefeldt
(N).
Height: 4 ft. 2 ins. (Record:
4 ft.
lIt ins.).
Under
13: W. Shaw (R), D. McDonald
(W),
C.
Saayman
(N), M. Ugrin (R), L. Kiloh (M), D. Brooks
( M). Height: 4 ft. 2 ins. (Record:
4 ft. 8 ins.).

E. Sizer,

A. Buchholtz,

F. Harris,
j. Coelho,

G. McClelland,

j. Paulzen,

R. McDowall,

G. Sinclair,

L. Rossouw,
W.

Shaw,

j. Morris,
D. Owen,

G. da

Fonseca,

C. Alves, j. Gomes.
D. Moreira,

j. de

Carvalho,

High Jump, Girls:


Open: A. van der Merwe (W), j. West-Evans
(M),
M. Kruger (M), P. Pawson (N), A. Buchholtz
(F), G.
,"reston
(R).
Height:
4 ft. It ins. (Record:
4 ft.
6t ins.).
Under
15: A. Parker
(N), E. Botha (M), S. Buchholtz (F), G. Ward (W), A. Hennop (M), M. Weise
(W).
Height: 3 ft. 10 ins. (Record:
4 ft. 8t ins.) ..
Under
14: I. Blackburn
(F), S. Brooks
(W),
N.
Doyle (M), B. Zinn (K), M. Bucceri (F), K. ~teyn
(M). Height: 4 ft. 4 ins. (Record:
4 ft. 6 ins.).
Under
Ceronie
Futcher
3 ins.).

13: S. de Groot
(R), D. Nienaber
(R), B.
(F), L. Hunkin (M), A. Harvey (K) and H.
(K).
Height:
3 ft. 10 ins. (Record:
4 ft.

Long Jump, Boys:


Open:
A. johnstone
(N),
j. Paulzeen
(W),
D.
Ferreira
(R), I. Vidulich
(M), G. Morrissey
(N), j.
Morris (W).
Distance:
18 ft. 7t ins. (Record:
20 ft.
6t ins.).
Under 15: j. de Carvalho
(K), j. da Costa (F), j.
Dickens
(K), G. Bitter
(F), G. Cosme (M), N. de
Almeida
(K).
Distance:
15 ft. 4t ins. (Record:
19
ft. 11 ins.).
Under 14: M. de Aguiar
(W), L. Rossouw (M), F.
Nunes (F), H. Santillan
(W),
D. van Vliet (K), A.
Kleu (K).
Distance:
14 ft. 4t ins. (Record:
17 ft.
4 ins.).
Under 13: D. McDonald .(W), D. Loukakis (M), L.
Kiloh
(M),
D. Owen
(R),
L. Woods
(M),
O.
D'Oliveira
(N).
Distance:
13 ft. 2 ins. (Record:
17 ft. 4 ins.).
Long joump, Girls:
Open: A. van der Merwe
A. Buchholtz
(F), F. Harris
Gianchino
(F).
Distance:
15 ft. 10 ins.).

(W), j. West-Evans
(M),
(M), P. Pawson (N), G.
13 ft. It ins.
(Record:

Under
15: T. Bawden
(K), S. Buchholtz
(F), M.
Weise (W), G. Ward
(W), M. van der Merwe (K),
M. Moreira
(K).
Distance:
14 ft. 6 ins. (Record:
15
ft. 6 ins.).
Under 14: I. Blackburn
(F), M. van Metzinger
(W),
M. Bucceri
(F), B. Ramsden
(R), B. Zinn (K), j.
Heuwel (K).
Distance:
14 ft. 11 ins.; new record.
Under 13: A. Harvey (K), L. Steyl (R), P. Meadows
(N),
S. de Groot
(R), L. Hunkin
(M), C. Burger
(M). Distance:
12 ft. It ins. (Record:
14 ft. 10 ins.).
Discus, Boys:
Open: j. Antonie
(F), R. Olver (W), j. Nell
P. Sullivan
(M), j. Paulzeen
(W),
C. Read
Distance:
117 ft. 9 ins.; new record.

(M),
(R).

junior: T. Dickens (K), R. Kennedy (M), G. FlackDavison (K), A. Loukakis


(M), E. Schoeman
(K), j.
de Carvalho
(K).
Distance:
95 ft. 6 ins. (Record:
121 ft. 7 ins.).

(M), F. Harris
(M), L. Barnes
Distance:
26 ft. 3 ins. (Record:

(F), S. Sharp
27 ft. 10 ins.).

(F).

junior:
M. Weise (W), E. Botha (M), I. Blackburn
(F), S. Buchholtz
(F), T. Bawden (K), A. Parken (N).
Distance:
24 ft. 0 ins.; new record.

Boys, Open:
1500 metres: j. Morris (W), N. Welthagen
(W), A.
Moreira
(F), A. da Silva (M),
H. Pedro
(K), j.
Rabordao
(W).
Time: 4 mins. 38.2 secs.
(Record:
4 mins. 25.5 secs.).
800 metres:
j. Morris
A. Moreira
(F), j. Alves
Silva (M). Time: 2 mins
1.5 secs.).

(W),
N. Welthagen
(W),
(F), I. Vidulich (M), A. da
11.1 secs. (Record:
2 mins.

400 metres:
M. Erasmus (M), j. Paulzeen
(W), D.
Ferreira
(R), M. van Zyl (K), j. Antonie
(F). Time:
52.8 secs. (Record:
52.2 secs.).
200 metres:
j. Paulzeen
(W),
C. Read
(R), j.
Antonie
(F), A. johnstone
(N),
D. Blackburn
(K).
Time: 23.5 secs.; equals record.
100 metres:
j. Paulzeen
(W),
C. Read
Erasmus
(M), D. Ferreira
(R), A. johnstone
Antonie
(F). Time: 11.2 secs.; new record.

(R),
(N),

M.
j.

Boys' Under
15:
1500 metres:
A. Diana (W),
E. Burgess (W),
M.
Coelho
(F), j. Pinto
(K),
M. D'Oliveira
(K),
C.
Coelho (F). Time: 4 mins. 51.1 secs. (Record: 4 mins.
44.7 secs.).
800 metres:
A. Diana (W),
j. Dickens (K), j. de
Carvalho
(K), C. Coelho (F), N. de Almeida
(K),
M. Carazedo
(F). Time: 2 mins. 22.2 secs. (Record:
2 mins. 21.5 secs.).
400 metres: j. Dickens (K), M. Coelho .(F), A. Diana
(W).
Time: 59.2 secs. (Record: 56.4 secs.).
200 metres:
j. de Carvalho
(K), G. Bitter (F), E.
Burgess
(W),
M. Pereira
(N),
j. Guimaroes
(R).
Time: 2S."1 secs. (Record:
24.2 secs.).

Discus, Girls:
Open:
M. Squier (K), A. Buchholtz
(F), P. Pawson (N), D. Shekyls (R), A. van der Merwe (W),
F.
Harris (M).
Distance:
67 ft. 7 ins. (Record:
76 ft.
10 ins.).

100 metres:
j. de Carvalho
(K), G. Cosme
(M),
j. Dickens (K), A. Diana (W),
E. Burgess (W),
G.
Flack-Davison
(K).
Time:
12.6 secs.
(Record:
12.0
secs.).

junior:
E. Botha (M), I. Blackburn
(F), S. Buchholtz (F), M. Weise
(W),
T. Bawden
(K), M. va'n
Metzinger
(W).
Distance:
66 ft. 2 ins. (Record:
69
ft. 7 ins.).

Boys, Under 14:


200 metres:
j. Gomes (F), D. MacLucas
(W),
L.
Rossouw
(M), R. Manefeldt
(N),
S. Russel (R), j.
Ribeiro
(K).
Time: 27.5 secs. (Record:
27.2 secs.).

Shot Putt, Boys:


Open: j. Antonie
(F), C. Read (R), A. johnstone
(N),
P. Sullivan
(M), j. Costa
(F), j. Nel (M).
Distance:
34 ft. 11 ins. (Record:
36 ft. 4 ins.).

100 metres:
D. MacLucas
(W),
j. Gomes (F), F.
Nunes (F), L. Rossouw (M), H. Santillan
(W), M. de
Aguiar (W).
Time: 13.6 secs. (Record:
12.5 secs.).

junior:
R. Kennedy
(M),
E. Schoeman
(K),
j.
Dickens (K), j. de Carvalho
(K), M. Schoeman
(K),
G. Cosme
(M).
Distance:
34 ft. at ins. (Record:
36 ft. 2 ins.).
Shot Putt, Girls:
Open: P. Pawson

(N),

M. Squier

(K),

M. Kruger

Boys, Under 13:


200 metres:
G. da Fonseca (W), W, Shaw (R), C.
Saayman
(W), C. jatho (F), L. Kiloh (M), M. Zinn
(K).
Time: 28.6 secs. (Record:
25.7 secs.).
100 metres:
G. da Fonseca (W), D. Loukakis (M),
W. Shaw (R), D. Owen (R), D. MacDonald
(W), L.
Kiloh (M). Time: 14 secs. (Record:
12.8 secs.).

Girls,
800
(K).
record

Open:
metres (I nvitation):
H. Futcher (K). A. Harvey
G. Ward
(W).
Time: 2 mins. 43 secs.; new
).

200 metres:
M. Squier
(K).
D. Shekyls
(R),
F.
Harris (M), A. Buchholtz (F). L. Melvin (N), C. Raath
(W).
Time: 29.5 secs. (Record:
27.1 secs.).
100 metres:
Shekyls
(R),
Pawson
(N).

A. Buchholtz
(F). S. Sharp
(F). D.
M. Squier
(K),
G. Preston
(R).
P.
Time: 14.4 secs. (Record:
13.2 secs.).

Girls, Under 15:


200 metres:
M. Weise
(W),
T. Bawden
(K),
Buchholtz
(F). J. Poull (M), P. Meadows
(N).
Kennedy (R). Time: 28.3 secs. (Record: 28.1 secs.).
100 metres:
Buchholtz
(F),
Coetzee
(W).

S.
L.

M. Weise
(W),
T. Bawden
(K), S.
J. Paull (M), M. Mount joy (K), C.
Time: 13.6 secs. (Record:
13.0 secs.).

Girls, Under 14:


200 metres:
I. Blackburn
(F).
j. Heuwel
(K), V. Blake-Shepherd
secs.; new record.

S. de
(N).

Groot
Time:

(R).
27.8

Open:
Ruskin.

RELAYS, BOYS
Whitworth,
Milton, Newton.
Kelvin,
Time: 48.0 secs.; equals record.

Under
15: Kelvin,
Whitworth,
Faraday,
Time: 51.1 secs. (Record:
50.6 secs.).
Under
Newton,
Under
Faraday.

Girls, Under
13:
100 metres:
S. de Groot (R), P. Meadows
(N), L.
Steyl
(R),
H. Futcher
(K),
A. Harvey
(K).
H.
Duarttee
(F). Time: 14.7 secs. (Record:
14.6 secs.).

Ruskin.

14: Faraday,
Milton,
Kelvin.
Whitworth,
Ruskin. Time: 57.5 secs. (Record: 53.3 secs.).
13: Ruskin,
Milton,
Whitworth,
Kelvin,
Time: 59.5 secs.
(Record:
58.4 secs.).

RELAYS, GIRLS
Open: Ruskin, Faraday. Newton, Whitworth,
Milton,
Kelvin. Time: 58.6 secs. (Record:
55.3 secs.).
Under
Newton.

1S: Whitworth,
Kelvin,
Milton,
Faraday,
Ruskin. Time: 58.4 secs.; new record.

Under
14: Faraday,
Kelvin, Milton. Time:

Newton.
61.0 secs.

Ruskin,
(Record:

Whitworth.
60.4 secs.).

Under 13: Ruskin, Kelvin, Newton,


Milton,
Whitworth.
Time: 61.2 secs.; new record.
Tug-a-War:

100 metres:
I. Blackburn
(F), J. Heuwel
(K), L.
Melvin (N), C. Joanides (N), M. van Metzinger
(W),
J. Johnstone
(N). Time: 13.8 secs.; new record.

Faraday,

1. Whitworth;

HOUSE
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

POSITIONS

2.
AND

Faraday,

Newton.
POINTS

Whitworth
Kelvin
Faraday
Milton
Ruskin
Newton

RUGB~~
The 1969 season saw rugby at Forest in its
rightful place - at the top. Forest was able
to hold its own against the Johannesburg and
Germiston co-ed schools and the First XV in
particular
had a tremendously
successful
season.
The First XV's second match was against
Roosevelt, who were considered to be unbeatable, but such was the team spirit that Forest.
brilliantly led by Nicky Uys. rose to the occasion and defeated Roosevelt 5-3. This gave
the Firsts all the confidence they might have
lacked and they welded themselves into a wellnigh unbeatable combination.
The fighting spirit was again in evidence
against Northview.
With ten minutes to gOI,
Northvi'ew
led by six points to nil. Then
Wainstein snapped over a drop, Roe scored
a try. which was converted and Northview
lost their chance of spoiling our unbroken
record.
This was only achieved in the last game when
the team, badly hit by injuries, succumbed to
Hyde Park. but not without a tremendous fight.

Uys was an exceptionally good captain and


was sadly missed after being injured in the
match against Dawnview. Praise must go to
Car I Read for taking over the captaincy
successfu lIy.

FIRST XV
P. Sullivan, D. Roe, J. Antonie. N. Uys,
(Capt.),
C. Read (Vice-Capt.);
J. Nell. R.
Harvey. E. Zeiss. A. Tennant, R. Olver. L.
Wainstein,
J. Sinclair, R. Labuschagne,
N.
Nienaber. A. Johnstone. W. Dick. G. McClelland. M. Erasmus. Also, played: G. Matthewson.
R. Ward, W. Reaney.
These players played as a team and it would
be unfair to single out any of them for special
comment.
It should
be mentioned
that
Nienaber scored 42 points (four penalties, 15
conversions) and those who scored tries were
Read (9). Johnstone (4). Sinclair (4). Harvey
(2) and Roe, Reaney, Labuschagne. Wainstein
and Tennant (1 each). Two drop kicks from
Wainstein and one from Dick completed the
scoring.

Front
Second
Back

Row: D. Roe, j. Antonie,


W. Dick.
Row:
Row:

E. Labuschagne,
A. johnstone,

Mr. A. Britz,
L. Wainstein,

R. Harvey,

C. Read

(Vice-Capt.),

G. McClelland,

E. Zeiss,

A. Tennant,

Colours Awards. Full: P. Sullivan, J. Antonie,


E. Zeiss, A. Tennant, R. Harvey, R. Olver, L.
Wainstein,
G. Sindair,
A. Johnstone,
N.
Nienaber.
Re-awards: N. Uys, W. Dick, C.
Read, D. Roe.
Results. vs. Greenside, 29-6; vs. Roosevelt,
5-3; vs. de I'a Salle, 29-6; vs. Northview, 11-6;
vs. Germiston, no game; vs. Dawnview, 6-3;
vs. St. Martin's, 26-8; vs. Queen's, 3-3; vs. Hyde
Park, 0-19.
Played 8; won 6; lost 1; drawn 1; Points:
for 109; against 54.

SECOND XV
D. Preston, H: Meintjies, J. Pereira,
G.
Matthewson, B. Waterson, K. Fourie, P. Orpen,

N. Uys (Capt.),

N. Nienaber,

P. Sullivan,

Mr. j. Lordan,

R. Olver,

G. Sinclair.

j. Ne!.

D. Eatwell, W. Reaney, M. Herbst, p. Hinkley,


H. Pedro, D. Blackburn, H. Spark, M. Otto, M.
Koch, M. Scheepers, R. Ward, W. Meyer.
This team was captained at different times
by Matthewson, Orpen and Reaney.
Results: vs. Greenside, 20-0; vs. Roosevelt,
3-21; vs. de la Salle, 34-0; vs. Northview, 0-5;
vs. Germiston, no game; vs. Dawnview, 6-9;
vs. St. Martin's, 5-3; vs. Queen's, 6-3; vs. Hyde
Park, 0-5.
Played 8; won 4; lost 4; points for 74;
against 46.

UNDER 15
The Under 15 team of 1969 did not attain
the same high standard
of performance
as

its predecessors.
The Under 15's were apathetic and it was
ifficult to maintain two teams throughout the
season. There was also a lack of enthusiasm
at practices so" when they did take the field
in matches, they were an untried combination
playing against
the well-oiled machines of
other schools.
The line-out technique and scrummaging of
the forwards was not bad, but in the tightloose they pl'ayed too loosely. In the loose they
were beaten mainly because of lack of fitness.
The backs lacked "Cohesion and did not pass the
ball quickly enough to the wings. The tackling
was usually of a fair standard until they were
a few points down and then they seemed to
lose spirit.
Players to catch the eye were:
Jose Carvalho - a hooker who should establish himself in the senior ranks next year. His
backing up of the player in possession was
very good.
John Carvalho - would probably be better
suited to wing play, if only he would learn
to run straight. A fair captain.
Errol Burgess
a strong and determined
wing.
Marius Schoeman - should develop into a
very good loose forward.
Tommy van Vuuren - a lock who was never
beaten in the line-out.
Jose da Silva - a good reliable full-bacl(' who
did extremely well in his first season of rugby.
Also played: J. de AImeida, R. Bender, S.
Step hens, B. Groenewald, J. Dickens, G. Palmer,
A. Loukakis, M. Pereira, K. Klopper, K. Gouws,
R. McDowall, G. Sumares, R. Kennedy, F.
Diana, J. Pinto" C. Wewege, L. Fitchett, J.
Lewis, M. Cosme, K. Sartini, V. Rugg, V. Gobey,
D. Gough, D. Ryce, J. Costa, R. Gladwin, A.
Kiloh, G. Cornish, H. Bayes, J. Coelho, D.
Dean, H. Pfeiffer, G. Booth, E. Engelbrecht.

Results:

Results:
vs.
vs.
vs.
vs.
vs.
vs.
vs.
vs.

Greenside
Roosevelt
de la Sal'le
Northview
Dawnview
St. Martin's
Queen's
Hyde Park

UNDER 14
The Under 14 teams enjoyed a season of
great success. The "A" side won all their
matches, scoring 20.1 points while only nine
points were scored against them.
This team depended largely on its formidable
pack, not only for possession of the ball but
also for points, as the forwards scored as often
as the backs.
The front row was never
matched- by any opponents and, at lock, the
jumping of Pate and Nunes ensured a clean
ball from all line-outs. While the tight forwards were strong and mobile, they were
surpassed by the loose forwards, especially
Schoeman, van Vliet and Pienaar.
The backs were individually good but never
operated as a unit. Santillan and Diana combined well. Froneman was an excellent fullback.
Diana was a good captain of a winning
team, while the laconic Pienaar led his forwards by shining example.
"A" team players: V. Pettit, C. Froneman, A.
Kelly, R. Manefeldt,
L. Hogan, A. Diana
(Capt.),
H. Santillan, A. Meintjies, B. Tribelhorn, I. Hensley, A. Leonard, G. Woodgett, S.
Pienaar, S. Pate, F. Nunes, D. van Vliet, E.
Schoeman,
L. Clayton,
R. da Silva, M.
Magalhaes, A. Ribeiro.
The Uncfer 14 "B" team was also very successful, losing o'nly one game. Here the backs
and forwards were of a comparable standard
and played well together.
Pawson was a good captain who scored a
prodigious number of points with his accurate
kicking. Wilkinson, Pretorius, da Silva, Magalhaes and van Os were all unlucky not to find a
permanent place in the "A" side.
"B" team players: J. Pawson (Capt.),
L.
Russouw, V. Veloza, M. Magalhaes, P. Hall,
V. Moraites, H. Pretorius, R. da Silva, L. van
Os, B. Clarke, B. Temblett, R. Jones, G. Wilkinson, K. Ziemons, M. de Aguiar, T. Groenewald,
C. Groenewald, C. Ferrao.

"A" Team "B" Team


0-6
0-23
0-24
11-6
27-0
no game
0-23
3-9
9-0
9-3
no game
0-16
46-0
16-3
6-16
6-26

vs.
vs.
vs.
vs.
vs.
vs.
vs.
vs.
vs.

Greenside
Roosevelt
de la Salle
Northview
Dawnview
St. Martin's
Queen's ......
Hyde Park
Sir Jo,hn Adamson

"A" Team "B" Team


12-6
14-5
16-0
20-16
22-0
5-3
3-16
23-0
3-3
15-0
46-0
21-0
24-0
6-3
38-0

UNDER 13
There were only fifteen Under 13 players
avai lable this year.
These fifteen
boys,
although
small and. light, played well and
usually held their heavier opponents.
Outstanding players were W. Shaw, the Captain,
and M. Zinn. The latter frequently brought

down players twice his size with magnificent


crash tackling. D. MacDonald and P. de Klerk
are promising players.
The team: A. Fourie, M. Liversage, D.
MacDonuald, W. Shaw (Capt.),
P. de Klerk,
C. Saayman,
R. Constable,
M. Cesare, L.
Schubach, D. Brooks, M. Vieira, W. Sartini, M.
Zinn, L. Kiloh, M. Ugrin.

NETBALL

Front Row: P. Diesel,


Back

Row:

L. Fitchett,

P. Erasmus
C. van

(Capt.)., Miss E.

Vuuren,

Netball continues to be of a high standard


and there is tremendous enthusiasm in every
age group.
The two teams which did extremely well
were the Under 15A, unbeaten until the last
match, when they lost a hard game by one

J.

J.

Bramiey,

D. Herron,

D. Shekyls.

Snegg.

point to a strong Waverley team and the


Under 13A, who reached the semi-finals of
the league, but were beaten by Sandringham
High. The other teams also played well.
Half colours were awarded to Priscilla Diesel
and Daphne Shekyls (re-award).

TEAMS
Open A: J. Snegg,
P. Diesel, D. Shekyls.
mus (Capt.).

L. Fitchett,
D. Herron,
C. van Vuuren.
P. Eras-

Open 8: M. da Silva or C. Blignaut,


A.
Mladovan.
A. Jatho, M. Hodge or E. Henriques.
N. Cristofoli
or M. Hodge.
C. Botes.
M.
Brown (Capt.).
Under 15A: C. Nicholls. C. Booysen, S. Vermeulen (Capt.).
A. Valentine
or D. Mount joy.
T. Bawden
or N. Cristofoli.
E. Botha.
C.
Coetzee.
Under
158: L. da Silva, M. da Silva, E.
Henriques
or A. Valente,
C. Squier. N. Cristofol'i or B. Molloy (Capt.).
D. Mount joy. B.
Molloy or W. da Silva.

Front
Back

Row: G. Morrissey,
G. Walker,
N, Welthagen,
I. Vidulich.
Row: E. Duncan,
R. Pires, P. Blyth, D. Moreira,

Under 14A: G. Knipp (Capt.)


or D. Malan.
M. van Metzinger,
P. Ledwick. I. Blackburn,
M.
Bucceri. C. Eis, A. Nel.
Under 148: D. Malan, C. Avis, C. Joanides,
B. Ramsden.
P. Phillips. G. Prout-Jones
(Capt.).
W. da Silva.
Under
BA: D. Tame or G. Poulter,
B.
Ceronie.
M. Kitzler
(Capt.),
M. Groenewald,
A. Harvey,
H. Futcher.
J. Poulter.
Under
138: B.
Guy. J. Robinson.
Meadows.

Richardson.
L. Hunkin.

A. Wood.
E. Hunter.

K.
P.

The teams
were coached
by Miss Bramley.
Miss Graham.
Miss Hollingworth
and
Miss
Hersch.
They are grateful
to the members
of
staff who drove the
earns to other
schools
in the School bus.

Mr.

J.

A. Worsley,

G. da Silva.

R. Cruickshank,

D. Ferreira.

With expert coaching from Mr.Worsley and


Mr. Roy Dinsdale, the present Southern Transvaal Senior goalkeeper, and the determination
of the players, the inexperienced
First XI
became a strong team.
Our defence was very strong.
The goalkeeper, R. Cruickshank, was hard to beat when
the opposition managed to break through our
excellent
half-line
of N. Welthagen,
G.
Walker and D. Ferreira.
The full-backs, E.
Duncan and P. Blythe, were very good. E.
Duncan is a promising young player. Our
forward line was not as strong as we relied
mainly on much solo effort from I. Vidulich,
G. da Silva and F. Moreira.
Cruickshank was the only player chosen to
represent Southern Transvaal Schools this year.
For the first time in many years, no players
were chosen from Forest or from Southern
Transvaal to play in the South African Schools
team and yet Southern was the only team,
out of teams which include the South African
Schools team, to beat the Rhodesian Schools
tourin,.g team.
First XI: R. Cruickshank (Capt.), P. Blythe,
E. Duncan, G. Walker, N. Welthagen
(ViceCapt.), D. Ferreira, R. Pires, F. Moreira, G. da
Silva, I. Vidul'ich, G. Morrissey. Also played:
T. Grace, R. Fenske, J. Morris, F. Jarman, A.
Dean, M. Black, C. McDougal1.

Colours Awards, Full: R. Cruickshank,


I.
Vidulich, N. Welthagen,
G. Walker.
Half: P.
Blythe, D. Ferreira, A. F. Moreira, G. da Silva,
E. Duncan.
Results. vs. St. John's, 0-0; vs. Athlone, 1-0;
vs. Northview, 2-3; vs. Parktown Boys', 2-0; vs.
Jeppe Boys', 3-1; vs. K.E.S., 2-1; vs. Roosevelt,
1-2; vs. Boksburg, 1-1; vs. Pretoria Boys', 0-3;
vs. Hyde Park, 1-1; vs. St. Martin's, 2-1.
Schools Tournament. vs. Hyde Park, 2-0; vs.
Sandringham,
1-0; vs. St. Martin's, 4-0; vs.
Florida, 0-0.
Second XI: This team was as successful as the
first team, and lost only two games. There are
several players with potential.
McDougall'
captained the side very well.
Players: E. Webster, R. Fenske, M. BI'ack, J.
Newnham, R. McDowall, R. Bohler, E. Dean,
R. Trollip, L. Raubenheimer
(Vice-Capt.),
C.
McDougall (Capt.),
J. Moreira.
Third XI: R. Thysen, D. Alien, G. Bitter, R.
Tuck, F. Jarman, A. Tymvios, S. Marais, J. Morris
(Capt.), J. de Freitas, S. Webster, N. MacLucas.
Fourth XI: A. Kyle, C. Shaw, K. Henry, G. da
Fonseca, G. Stewart (Capt.),
J. JaHoul, D.
Thompson, J. Carrazedo, A Cuyler, J. Pereira,
P. Sammons. Also played: B. Bekker, B. Wood,
C. Myers, J. de Klerk, S. Hamilton, L. Simon,
R. Jones, J. Havenga, F. Roll, J. van Niekerk.

GIRLS~ HOCKEY
We started the season with a few stalwarts
from last year and a number of new players.
The new players formed the second team
but, in spite of great efforts, never succeeded
in winning a match. However, some of them
showed promise.
The First XI struggled to establish itself as
a scoring team, but failed through lack of
teamwork
and poor positional play. Better
attendances
at practices would have ensured
better hockey .. Seven of these players are leaving the School and we wish them good luck.
Both our teams have been relegated to the
"C" Section.

Our First XI players attended the Schools


"B" trials. Suzanne Sharp and Merryl Kruger
were selected to play in the "A" Section trials.
Because of the high standard at the trials, two
extra teams were created and Suzanne played
for the Johannesburg "B" side and Merryl for
the "C" side. Suzanne received her Johannesburg Schools Hockey colo,urs for playing for
the Johannesburg side against Rhodesia. Conqratulations
to these two -girls and to Lindo
Barnes who was awarded half colours for the
School hockey.
First XI: S. Sharp, L. Barnes, F. Clarke, P.
Pawson, S. Buchholtz, B. Fick, M. Weise, A.

Front
Second
Absent:

Row: B. Fick. L. Barnes.


der Merwe. A. Squier.

M. Kruger.

Row: E. Sandison.
M. Weise.
P. Pawson. S. Sharp.

(Vice-Captain.),

G. Wilkinson,

Buchholtz (Capt.),
M. Kruger (Vice-Capt.),
G. Wilkinson, A. van der Merwe, M. Squier.
Also played: E. Sandison, G. Wilkinson.
Played 11. Won 1. Drew 1. Lost 9.
Second XI: B. Molloy, F. Walker, S. jackson,
B. Sandison, E. Sandison, T. de Korte, H. Buchholtz, j. Ferreira (Capt.), J. Adorns (Vice-Capt.),

Mi.ss D. de Wool.

S. Buchholtz.

A. Buchholtz
.'

(Captain),

A. van

F. Clarke.

M. Buaermeister, E. Sizer. Reserve: E. Trove'


Rizo.
Third XI: P. L1o'yd, L. jackson, S. Houliston,
K. Forrester, M, Visser, J. van Brandis, R.
Pienaar, C. Hume, H. Duarttee,
W. Levin
(Capt.), G. Birk, H. McGregor.
W. de W.

BOYS~ TENNIS
The most satisfying aspect of this years's tennis
was the performance of our "A" team in the
Boys' High Schools League. In the first term the
boys played determined
tennis to win the
fourth section and ensure promotion back into
the third section of the league. In the third

term the team secur.ed its place in the third


section. Those who played for the team were:
R. Ward (Captain),
j. Newnham, B. Harrison,
M. Bywater, G. Sinclair, M. Koch and E.
Webster.
.
The "B" team is at last beginning to provide

stronger and more determined opposition for


its opponents.
This improvement should result
in the team actually winning some matches
next year! Those who played for the team
were: D. Ryce (Captain), M. Koch, E. Webster,
E. Engelbrecht, G. Palmer, M. Ugrin, J. Dickens,
B. Britz and B. Devenish.
Due to the long week-end we did not enter
a team in the Inter-High Competition at Ellis
Park this year.
We did, however, assist
administratively
as our coach was present to
organize the tournament
on a revised basis
which proved to be far more satisfactory than
the pr<evious method of play.
TIl~';Senior Tennis Championships were once
agairf';. keenly contested.
Congratulations
to

"A"
"8"

John Newnham on his fine uphill battle to win


the final against the experienced Rodney Ward.
Results, Semi-finals:
R. Ward
beat M.
Bywater 7-5, 6-8, 6-1; J. Newnham beat B.
Harrison 6-2, 7-5. Final: J. Newnham beat R.
Ward 5-7, 6-4, 6-0.
Our two resurfaced courts were used for the
first time on Honours Day. We are grateful
to the team of Old Forestonians (Margaret van
Rensburg, Lesley de Bruyn, Stan Taylor, Norman Fick, Roger Ross and Brian Vermeulen)
for giving our boys and girls the thrill of
pl'aying against first league players.
Colour Awards: Half colours were awarded
to John Newnham.
Rodney Ward was previously awarded half colours.

Team (sitting):
M. Koch, G. Sinclair, B. Harrison,
R. Ward (Captain),
Mr. N. J. Pienaar,
J. Newnham,
M. Bywater,
E. Webster.
Teqm (standing):
B. Britz, G. Palmer, E. Engelbrecht;
B. Devenish, J. Dickens, D. Ryce (Captain).

GIRLS' rrENNIS
Our players found all the other teams too
strong for them th is year and lost every
match. They were, however, a very pleasant,
co-operative team, who showed good sports-

manship and enjoyed their tennis. They hope


to be more successful next year. Beryl Fick
captained the team with great efficiency.

Front Row: Miss D. Hersch, B. Fick, (Capt.),


Back Row: T. de Korte, P. L1oyd, J. Poulter.

W.

MacDonald,

F. Clarke.

CRICI(ET
FIRST XI
This was not a highly successful season due
to' the lack of experience of most of the first
team players. This results from the fact that
both the batting and the bowling has been
dominated in the last two seasons by a few
players who left at the end of last year.

During that period, the other players had little


match practice.
Bywater proved to be a most capable and
conscientious captain, as well as dominating
both the batting and the bowling. His bowling against De la Salle and Hill High was
particularly impressive. He was missed in the

~ront

Row: L. Wainstein,
R. McDowal1.

W. Dick, M. Bywater

Back

Row:

G. Morrissey,

D. Blackburn,

(Capt.),

B. 5eegers,

last term when he was unable to play as a


result of an arm injury. Wainstein took over
the captaincy.
Morrissey had a good innings against De la
Salle while Wainstein showed promise against
Northview and St. Martin's. Hinkley's bowling
was fairly consistent.
Regular Players. M. Bywater (Capt.),
N.
Welthagen
(Vice-Capt.),
L. Wainstein,
R.
Cruickshank.
R. McDowall. P. Hinkley, T.
Seegers. N. Klue. D. Dick. D. Blackburn. G.
Morrissey. N. Nienaber and M. Herbst.
Also played: D. Fraser, E. Webster. B. Harrison. R. Ward. J. Pettit, B. Devenish and J.
Antonie.

Mr. A. Britz,

N. Nienaber,

N. Welthagen

M. Herbst,

(Vice-Capt.),

N. Klue,

P. Hinkley,

R. Cruickshank.

ttesults of Matches
ifS. Dawnview:
Forest, 79 for 7 declared (N.
Welthagen
23, Cruickshank
25); Dawnview.
147 for 7 (Blackburn 2 for 7, Fraser. 2 for 34).
Forest lost by three wickets and 68 runs.
vs. De la Salle: De la Sal le, 110 for 7 declared
(Bywater 5 for 23); Forest. 105 for 5 (Morrissey
38, Bywater 29). Match drawn.
vs. Hill High: Hill High. 72 (Bywater 6 for
24, Herbst 3 for 8); Forest, 13 for 1. Rain
stopped play (Wainstein 9 not out, Bywater 3
not out). Match drawn.
vs. Northview: Forest. 79 (Wainstein
35);
Northview. 81 for 4 (Hinkley 3 for 38). Forest
lost by six wickets.

vs. Queen's: Queen's, 104 (Hinkley 6 for 26,


Bywater 3 for 31 ); Forest, 104 for 5 (Bywater
41, Dick 17 not out). Match drawn.
Fourth Term
vs. Dawnview: Dawnview, 162 for 5 decl.
(McDowall 3 for 42); Forest, 33 all out (Herbst
14, Webster 7 not out). Forest lost by five
wickets and 129 runs.
vs. St. Martin's: Forest, 73 (Wainstein
29,
Ward 21); St. Martin's, 41 for 2 (McDowall 2
for 7). Rain stopped play. Match drawn.
Leading Averages
BATTING
Innings

N.O.

H.S.

Total

4
3
7

1
1
1

41
38
35

78
52
100

26
26
16.6

M. Bywater
G. Morrisey
L. Wainstein
BOWLING
M. Bywater
P. Hinkley
At the
an Under
were too
teams, so

Ave.

Overs

Maid.

Runs

Wkts.

Ave.

53
57

18
16

104
152

15
10

6.9
15.2

UNDER 14 AND UNDER 13


beginning of the season Forest had
14 and an Under 13 team. There
few players to maintain the two
only the Under 14 team continued

to play, using players from both the original


teams.
The players were: R. Fenske, .L Clayton, J.
Walker, C. Groenewald, L. Hogan, L. van Os,
W. Temblett, A. Kelly, T. Booysen, B. Clarke,
R. da Silve, M. Ugren, C. Jatho, L. Sham, C.
Froneman, G. Woodgett,
B. Tribelhorn, A.
Kirkby, A. Theunissen, K. Ziemons, S. Webster,
L. Lamb .
S. Webster was the captain of the Under 13
team and R. Fenske and L. van Os were captains of the Under 14 team, at different times.
Results
vs. Dawnview: Forest, 67 for 4 wickets decl.;
Dawnview, 43 for 10 wickets. Forest won by
six wickets and 24 runs.
vs. De la Salle: De la Salle, 181 for 5 wickets
decl.; Forest, 20 all out. De la Sall'e won by
six wickets and 161 runs.
vs. Northview:
Northview,
100 all out;
Forest, 67 all out. Northview won by 33 runs.
vs. Queen's: Forest, 138 for 9 wickets decl.;
Queen's, 131 for 9 wickets. Forest won by
seven runs.
vs. St. Martin's: St. Martin's,
155 for 5
wickets decl.; Forest, 32 runs for 6 wickets.
Match drawn. Rain stopped play.

YOUR SAFETY IS OUR TASK


DURING 1968:
We gave 3,435 ROAD SAFETY Lessons and Filmshows to 181,097 pupils.
We gave 283 ROAD SAFETY Lectures and Filmshows to 34,740 adults.
We trained 52,080 pupils at our three Traffic Training Centres at Milner Park,
Rhodes Park and Rotunda Park.
Our 93 smart and efficient Scholar Patrols conducted 6,221,000 pupils safely across
our busy Johannesburg streets.
We ran SEVEN ROAD SAFETY COMPETITIONS at our Educational Institutions for
cash prizes to the value of R950.
We conducted very successful Easter and Christmas ROAD SAFETY Campaigns.
We gave a very large number of ROAD SAFETY interviews to members of the
Public, the Press and Radio.
We distributed many thousands of items of ROAD SAFETY Publicity Material to
the Public.
ALL OUR

SERVICES ARE ALWAYS COMPLETELY FREE OF CHARGE


PLEASE DO NOT HESITATE TO CONSULT

US!

THE JOHANNESBURG ROAD SAFETY ASSOCIATION


(REGION

I REGION

12)

101/109, SAAMBOU BUILDING, 78, RISSIK STREET, JOHANNESBURG


P.O. BOX 9173
TEL. 23-1951/2

HOWLERS

(1920)

"DREAMS"

We found some papers


that were scarcely
edible.
A granulated
measuring
jar.
Tie a stone to a piece of cotton.
They gesticulated
loudly.
William
the Conquerer
fell off his horse and
injured
his feudal
system.
This caused
his
death.
Howlers
which delighted
Mr. G. A. Bishop
( 1966):
I put my smoke in my mouth and my girl
friend' too.
Their prices were exuberant.
Agatha
Christie's
detective
is Tom Sawyer
or Lord Carnarvon.
I want to live where it is open, with beautiful mountain
rangers
in the distance.
Lack of education
is a great
pullback.
While
we were chasing
a rabbit
suddenly
it grew dark.

Illusion! Lap the mind with fancy's lore,


And dreaming,
wander down the golden time.
Forget today and make tomorrow's
clime
A land where rancours pass for evermore.
Let fancy weave its fli msy webs secure
And woo her dreaming
empires into rime;
Or live forever in the muse sublime
Life swelling echoes on a distant shore.
Are there no dreamers
in our Southern
land
To play upon the silvery chords of years;
Or voices that might lure Zimbabwe
grand
Into some wild romance and silent tears?
Awaken Homer of this land, and light
The veld with words like meteors in the night.
W. Waldman

(1922).

Mr. Waldman
was afterwards
the Senior
English Master
at Forest High from 1937 to
1952. He has just retired from the College of
Education.

Call on your gods that sleep among the


pine trees,
Seek for your nymphs that dwell beneath
the pool.
Then shall the Forest and its kindred hold youJasmin, the green moss, and the honey-bees.
They take your life, and, softly-speaking,
mould you,
Though men shall call you a poor-witted

fool.

Yet in your soul, shall the wild rose flower,


And in your eye, the sunlight ever dwell:
Night

shall be your footsteps,


golden
dower,
Music in your ear from the songsters

e.
e. N. Jackson
1920 and
1921.
Astronomy
at the
rand and was a
Governing
Body
now retired
and

your
of the dell.

N. Jackson

(1921).

was the Head Boy in 1919,


He became
Professor
of
University
of the Witwatersmember
of the Forest High
from 1949 to 1951. He has
is living in Haenertsberg.

Forest High: we sing thy praises,


As from day to day we find
Knowledge,
Wisdom, Truth and Justice
All in love and faith combined.
We, the bearers of thy standard,
March in unity of mind.
Forest High: our one endeavour,
Whether
in our work our play,
Is to prove our motto "Thorough",
And fulfil it day by day:
Ne'er to let our courage fail.us
As we march upon our way.
Forest High: thy name shall ever
In the memory remain;
And when tasks are all forgotten
This shall be our glad refrain:
Forest High, dear Alma Mater,
Praise and Honour to thy name.
Form

4B (1929).

NAG
Wonderlik,
sti! en misteries
Kom die nag.
Onpeilbaar,
sag en geleidelik
Vestig sy alles, verleidelik
In haar mag,
Orals is 't anders, eteries.

Oh let me go down to the sea again:


I feel I'm forgetting
its roar,
Its sparkle and song Does it still dance along
To romp on the sunlit shore?

Skad'wees
gewerp deur d'maanlig
wat
Flikker in straal,
Spookgedaantes
van die duisternis
Bewe en tril in die geheimnis
Van aWQnd praal,
Stilswyend:
alles deur maanlig omvat.
Maanstrale
val deur die lower
Van donkere bome
Op tuine en blommetjies
dalend:
Blommegeur
hang weifelend,
dralendDie tyd van 'n dromer:
Nag, in haar omhulsel van silwer.
Beatrice

Perry (1930).

Yes! Let me go down to the sea again,


Where waves all venturesome
rise
From stillness and sleep
In the silent deep A myriad twinkling
eyes.
If ever I go to the sea again,
I think I'll be sure to stay.
The tang of the breeze
And the galloping
seas
Would lead even Prudence astray.
j.P. (1933).
j.P. is Mr. Parker
who
contributed
jum bled Retrospect"
to this "Forestonian",
who is living within sight of the sea.

"A
and

THE SPORT OF KINGS


What is this new - this magic toy,
That fascinates
each girl, each boy,
And makes once dull life now a joy?
The yo-yo.
What is it that turns masters grey,
What do they confiscate
each day,
Yet furtively each night they play?
The yo-yo.
What makes the staffroom,
once so still,
A buzzing
hive makes laughter
shrill,
What makes each man work with a will?
The yo-yo.
What game so gripped the Prince of Wales,
That now at it he never fails,
And makes him scorn us all for snails?
Why, yo-yo.
What makes strong men grow pale and thin,
To work all night with visage grim,
To draw their misery in ... ?
The yo-yo.
Games from the Stone Age to our day,
Have been the rage but passed away,
But what for aye will hold full sway?
The yo-yo.
Doris Maudlen
(1932).
This could have been written
this year.
Doris Maudlen,
afterwards
Doris Leigh, contacted
the School in 1962 and kept in touch
with us until her sudden death in 1965.

The sun came up with a wink and a grin.


And laughed as he scattered
the dark of night.
He danced on the sea as the tide came in,
The sun that rose with a wink and a grin.
He twisted and turned like a Harlequin,
In golden shoes on a floor of light.
The sun that rose with a wink and a grin
Laughed as he scattered
the dark of night.
A. Lawrence,

SA (1939).

Walk with me a little way


Before the sun goes down.
The stillness of the dying day
Lies heavy on the town.
Talk with me before yo'u go
And listen with your heart.
There's that which you alone must know
When we are far apart.
G. van

Blerk,

se

(1948).

BA, B.Sc.
Wasted
Success seldom
Tasted
Words
unheeded
Frustration
Fru itless
Preparation
Ideals
Shattered
Ego
Battered
Right or
WrongHope still
Strong
Gallant
CreatureTeacher

Uniform

On
Freedom
Gone
Endless work
Depression
Countless
Rules
Repression
Sarcastic
Retorts
Withering
Reports
Badgered
Haunted
But never
Daunted
Million-dollar
Scholar
S.B.S.

(1962).

geriewe,
teen 'n geringe
verblyfkoste.
Saans
as jy terugkeer
na 'n volmaakte
dag van
opwindende
gebeure,
kan die awe~dkoor
~an
miljoene voels en die gebrul van die leeus JOU
salig na droomland
voer.
In 1891 was daar in die Oranje-Vrystaat
'n "Wetboek"
opgestel
vir die beskerming
va.n
al die wildediere.
Streng
wette
is deur die
Parksraad
neergele
en moet stiptelik
deur die
besoekers
uitgevoer
word.
Daar
is byvoo~beeld die wet wat neerle dat geen persoon U1t
sy motor
mag klim nie.
Dir is re danke
aan die oorlede
Professor
Pearson,
dat die Kirstenbosch
Botaniesetuine
vandag
wereldberoemd
is. Hier kan .ens nog
wilde vygies van duisende
kleure,
die swart
lelie, Bethlehem-Ster
en talryke
rare wasplante
te si en kry. Hierdie rare soort sou jare gelede
al uitgeroei
gewees het, as dit nie was vir .die .
sorgvuldige
bewaring
van
die
plante-Ilefhebber n ie.

THE COUNTRYMAN AND THE SNAKE


DIE BESKERMINGVAN ONS WILD
EN PLANTEGROEI
In ons wonderskoon
Suid-Afrika
tref ons
seker die grootste
verskeidenheid
van wildediere in die wereld aan. Wild, die sieraad van
die veld, het deur die eeue heen as inspirasie
gedien
vir
digters,
skrywers
en
allerlel
kunstenaars.
'n Troppie
wildebokkies
wat vreedsaam
wei
teen
die hange
van die berge,
of 'n le~umannetjie
wat vorstelik
en fier sy opwagtmg
maak
om die eerste
strale
van 'n wintersonne~jie,
lui-Iekker
te staan
en geniet,
bly
steeds een van die mooiste
natuurtonele.
Dit is noodsaaklik
om ons wildediere
te
beskerm,
om sodoende
ons nageslag
ook in
staat
te stel om ons wildediere
in hulle
natuurlike
agtergrond
te bewond.er.
Dit .het
dus gelei tot die aanle van ~erskdlende
wddtuine
soos,
byvoorbeeld
die
Etosha
Pan,
Hluhluwe
Windtuin,
Addo
Nasionale
Park,
Berg-Zebra
Nasionale
Park. en die K:uger
Wildtuin,
wat seker een van die mees gewddste
bly.
'n Mens kan 'n heerlike
rustige vakansie
in
een van die wildtuine
deurbring.
Hier vind jy
die ruskampe,
toegerus
met al die moderne

There was once a farmer called Patrick, who


loved animals,
and who could not bear people
who mistreated
animals.
Day after day he would walk in th~ woods,
caring
for any sick or wounded
animals
he
could find.
One day he found a Boa Constructor,
whose
name
was
Ssera,
lying
half dead
on the
ground .. He saw that the snake had a terrible
wound,
and he cured it.
Several days later, he found that one of his
sheep was missing, and later he found Ssera
di~esting
a sheep.
'The farmer
now saw what
had happened,
and how Ssera had paid back evil for good.
However,
the farmer
just left him.
The next week Ssera had a terrible
wound
on his back.
Ssera pleaded
with Patrick
to
help him, but his pleas landed on deaf ears.
Ssera kept on begging,
and eventually
the
farmer
gave in.
Ssera was terribly
sorry about
the sheep,
and the farmer
told him, "Those who return
evil for good
cannot
expect
to be treated
wel!!"
B. Bekker, 1A (1969).
This

has

been

printed

as it was

handed

in.

LE LONG VOYAGE EN CHEMIN


DE FER
C'etait
minuit.
Le bruit sourd des roues sur
les grilles continuaient
dans la nuit.
Je me
tenais
pres
de la fenetre;
autour
de moi
mon compartiment
e'tait
noir.
fevais
ete
eveille dans mon lit depuis
longtemps
et je
m'etais
leve pour
appeler
le sommeil.
Je
regardais
par la fenetre aux petites lumieres et
aux
formes
som bres
des
fermes
et
des
habitations
qui passaient
rapidement.
Je pensais
de mon voyage
en chemin
de
fer de Paris a Marsei lies et quand j'y arriverais,
quand
tout a coup j'ai senti que quelqu
'un
ou quelque chose me regardait.
Je me souviens
que j'ai cru que c'etait
une idee stupide parce
que j'etais
la seule personne
dans
le compartiment
...
n'est-ce
pas?
Mais pour nulle raison
apparent
j'ai senti
les petites
cheveux
sur mon cou se dresser.
fai ete sur le point d'allumer
la lumiere quand
la porte
s'est ouverte
mysterieusement.
Elle
s'est ouverte tres lentement
...
mais personne
n'est paru ...
le portail etait vide!
Puis j'ai senti une chose inexpliquable
...
une espece de vent a passe par mon corps,
un vent glace et terrible.
Cela m' a laisse froid
et tremblant.
fai
allume
la lumiere.
Je suis alle a la
porte
mais tout etait
cal me, la porte
etait
encore ouverte
mais le vent avait arrete.
Tout
etait
en silence.
fai appele.
"Qui
est la?"
une ou deux fois mais je n'ai pas recu une
reponse.
Je ne su is pas su r ce qui s' est passe cette
nu it dans mon compartiment
est ce que
j'ai ete dans la presence
d' un espirit?
Je ne
sais pas mais je suis sur que si je raconte cette
histoire a quelqu'un,
il ne me croira pas.
Apres
cela
j'ai
ferme
la porte.
Je suis
retourne
a la fenetre
et j'ai entendu
encore le
bruit sourd des roues sur les grilles.

than a joke.
As you realise,
it is bitterly
cold at night,
and when I try to snuggle
under the blankets,
you come along
and pull them
off!
Don't
you think that's
carrying
the joke a bit far?
When I am told to make the tea, my mother
shouts
at me because
it is taking
so long.
How can I help it, when you keep turning
the
gas off, stopping
the kettle from boiling.
And
another
thing, stop pulling my cat's tail when
I pass her, because
I get the blame.
Yes, you may laugh,
as I know you will
when you read this letter, just as you laughed
when my mom asked me to pass her a slice
of bread,
and you threw
it into her soup.
Boy! Did I get it then!
If you remember
when
you moved
in with us, I was so frightened
of you, but you consoled
me and told me you
only wanted
to be my friend, and did not mean
to frighten
me.
It has been lovely having you, as my friend,
but what
a friend
you turned
out to be,
getting
me into hot water all the time.
Please, have your fun by all means I like
fun but don't have it at my expense!
Don't forget the midnight
feast we planned
for next week, but for goodness
sake behave
yourself,
because if I get into trouble
through
you again,
there
will be no more midnight
jaunts for us.
I hope you will not be offended
when you
read this letter.
Your human

friend,
Sharon.

MY SIGN. MY SIGN!
By Nicholai

Dear

Smokey,

I'm taking
it for granted
that you like our
house,
because
you have been with
us for
some time now. I am sorry I have to complain,
but really
your pranks
are becoming
more

Romanoff,

U.S.S.R.P.A.

A Great
Discovery
has been made which
shows that an animal was the first to land on
the moon and has living quarters
there.
This
shows that the Americans
were wasting
their
time, as the moon already
has life.
In a private
interview
with
cosmonaut
Rudolph Reckovitch,
we obtained
the full story.

When asked how this venture first started, he


replied that as he was trying to land the
Luna J 5, which the fool Americans thought
was empty,
he found
that
his steering
mechanism was faulty and that he could not
control the craft.
He crash-landed
on an
outcrop of rock and managed to get a supply
of oxygen, food and water out, to last him for
a few days. Just as he clambered out, the
first man on the moon, the landing craft exploded and cosmonaut Reckovitch was thrown
a good 350 Kilometres because of the light
gravity.
The interviewer said that Rudolph
Reckovitch turned pale as he remembered the
awful fate that awaited him.
He went on to say that his food soon ran
low and that he could not sleep for fear of
his oxygen supply running low. He thought
he was really going to die. The sweat rolled
down. His eyes burned and were sore and
red. He had travelled thousands of metres
over this strange dry planet and his clothes
were torn and dirty. He then went on to say
that something fantastic happened. "1'11never
forget that moment," he added.
There in the distance was an oasis for the
weary traveller hot and tired. A little
white rabbit was standing there. No, he did
not imagine it. The rabbit was there!
It
spoke to him saying that it was not a pink
rabbit nor a blue one, nor a green rabbit, but
a clean white rabbit and that he mustn't just
stand there, but get moving to the CAL TEX
big R rest rooms. And so our comrade was
saved.

School Magazines: Jeppe High School for


Girls, Athlone High School for Girls, The SA
Roedean, The Jeppe High School, The Capetonian, King Edward VII, Parktown Girls' High,
Hyde Park High School, Krugersdorp
High
School, Matieland,
The Johannian,
Malvern
High School, Suid-Afrikaanse
Akademie vir
Wetenskap
en Kuns, The Hill, Roosevelt

They all stood in a row now, on a dusty


shelf. How many years had they been lying
there? When were they last used - two, three
or five years ago? Who knows? Of all sizes,
colours and shapes each of the bottles served
some purpose. Perhaps the small purplish vial
held the venom in the immortal
story of
"Romeo and Juliet", or the dizzying liqueur
that helped mankind to forget. Perhaps the
small intriguing bottle, easy to conceal, held
the drug addicts' heroin which satisfied his
wanting. But now what purpose do they serve
on the dirty, dusty shelf?
Demetra. Koukeas, 2B (1969).

Mater, pater et ursulus in casa parva


habitat.
Olim mater cenam parat sed calidissima est.
Pater dicit: "Desideramus
ambulare."
Pater,
mater et ursulus ambulant.
Puella parva per
silvam ambulat et haec puella desiderat cibum
devorare.
Puella in casam ambulat et cibum videt.
Puella parva cibum devorat.
Puella ursae
lectu m videt et dorm it. Tarde tres ursi
ad casam ambulant
sed cibum non vident,
quod patella vacua est. Cathedra fracta est.
Pater dicit: "Desideramus domire," et Goldilocks vident. Quando Goldilocks tres ursos
videt, ex ianua currit quod terret.
Nescit
ursulum parvum ludare cum puella desiderat.
ELZA TRAVE RIZO, 1B.

High School, Northview


High School, The
Adamsonian,
The
Parktonian,
Hoerskool
Fakkel, Die Stellenbosse Student, Commercial
High School Pretoria, Skakelblad (Universiteit
van Pretoria),
Studentegids (Universiteit
van
Stellenbosch),
The Cloak (St. Martin's), The
Pretorian,
Universiteit
van
Potchefstroom,
Afrikaanse
Hoer Handelskool,
Parktown.

HOUSE NOTES
House
Staff:
Agrella.House
Antonie.

Master:

Mr. Cokayne.

Mr. Brown, Miss de Villiers,


Mr. van der Velden.
Captains:

Athalie

Miss de

Buchholtz,

Prefects: Athalie Buchholtz


(Vice-Head
Linda
Barnes,
Suzanne
Sharp,
Hazel
Constantia
Michaelides.

J.
Girl),
Alien,

Colours
Awards,
Full: J. Antonie
(Rugby,
Athletics),
Suzanne
Sharp
(Hockey).
Half:
Linda Barnes, P. Blyth, A. Moreira
(Hockey),
J. Newnham
(Tennis),
Athalie
Buchholtz,
C.
Alves, Suzanne
Sharp (Athletics).
The year
got off to a very inauspicious
start when Faraday
did not do too well in the
. Annual
Swimming
Gala.
After
this
the
prophets
of doom were plentiful,
but the indomitable
spirit of the House members
soon
silenced them, and Faraday's
march to honours
began.
It was only team spirit that won us
these honours
as we had very few individual
stars in any of our teams.
Came
the
Boys'
Hockey
and
Faraday
managed
to take
second
place (which
they
shared
with
Milton)
a noteworthy
performance.
Then we marched
on to see our victorious
Girls'
Hockey
team
of the past few years,
again emerge victorious.
Our Senior Rugby team did not distinguish
itself, but not through
lack of effort.
Faraday
Tigers
(the Junior team)
covered
themselves
with glory, by sweeping
aside all opposition
like a giant
sweeping
aside
an annoying
mosquito.
They were great.
Then some of our hockey girls decided that
Netball
was a relatively
simple game and, to
a certain extent, proved that this was so, when
they won the final!
And so to the major event of the year the Athletics
Meeting. Faraday
was a bunch of
no-hopers,
after last year's performance
- or
so the pundits
thought.
However,
Faraday's
admirable
spirit again
took a hand and we
finished third.
This may sound relativel.y poor

but predictions
are that we will be fighting
it
out for first pl'ace next year.
But let us have
a look at the honours
we took
that
day:
Victrix
Ludorum:
Athalie
Buchholtz
(jointly
with Marlene Squier of Kelvin); Junior Victrix
Ludorum:
Irene Blackburn,
who also established three new records.
James Antonie
broke
the Shot Putt record which had stood for a
number
of years.
To these people
heartiest
congratulations
Faraday
is proud of you.
Faraday
also won the Girls' Shield.
A special word of praise
to the Athletics'
captains.
Athalie
Buchholtz
and J. Antonie,
whose untiring
efforts were responsible
for our
good showing
in the Athletics.
Congratulations
to John
Newnham
who
won the School Tennis Championship.
We should like to say goodbye
to our five
Matriculants.
When it comes to raising tip-top
teams next year. we are going to miss Athalie
and Suzanne.

House

Master:

Mr. Lordan.

Staff:
Miss Hollingworth,
Burchard,
Mr. D. Browne.
House

Captains:

Prefect:

Marlene

Marlene

Miss
Squier,

Cluver,

Mr.

M. Bywater.

Squier.

Colours
Awards,
Full: W. Dick, R. Harvey
(Rugby).
Half: C. Faulkner (Swimming).
Very
highly commended:
Amber Harvey.

Swimming. Our swimmers


are to be congratulated
on winning
the House Gala this
year a triumph
after
coming
fifth
last
year.
Deserving
special
mention
are:
C.
Faulkner,
R. Wailer,
G. Flack-Davison,
M.
Schoeman,
D. van Vliet, A. Harvey,
I. van
Aardt, G. Prout-Jones,
B. Basterfield,
P. Phillips.
The results of the relay races show how many
others did their share.
We won three relays
and were placed second in three others.
Netball.
Netball

team

Athletics.
Meeting
winners.

Pamela
which

Erasmus
captained
came third.

the

We came second at the Athletics


and were only eight points behind the
We won the Boys' Shield.

Congratulations
to Marlene Squier, who was
joint Victrix Ludorum with Athalie Buchhohz
of Faraday, and to John Dickens who, was the
Junior Victor Ludorum. We also won the Girls'
Cross Co,untry Trophy.
Congratulations
to
Antonio Moutinho who won the Boys' section,
to Amber Harvey, who won the Girls' Race
and to Thelma Bawden who came sixth.
Apart from the star athletes already mentioned Thelma Bawden, J. de Carvalho,
D.
Blackburn, E. Schoeman, G. Flack-Davison and
M. van Zyl were valuable members of the
team. Our Under 15 boys won their relay and
the Under 13 and Under 15 girls' teams came
second. We thank Mr. Lordan for spending
so much time coaching the teams.
Although not one of the best performances
at the Play Festival, our play "The Monkey's
Paw" was well received.
Hockey. Without many first team players,
we didn't survive very long in the House
matches. We look to our juniors for a bright
future.

Beryl Richardson
and Christina
Eis. Our
Under 15 boys came second in their relay.
Athletics .. Captains: Jennifer West-Evans, M.
Erasmus (also Captain of the School team).
Congratulations
to A. T. do Silva, who came
second in the Cross Country and to Jennifer
Paull and Anna Hennop, who came third ond
fourth respectively in the Girls' Cross Co'untry.
Athletes who shone were Elizabeth Botha,
Jennifer West-Evans,
Merryl Kruger and M.
Erasmus.
The promising
juniors
are
L.
Rossouw, A. Loukakis, R. Kennedy and L.
Kiloh.
Hockey.

Girls' Hockey. Captain: Merryl Kruger (who


was selected to play in the Johannesburg
Schools Team).
The girls came second, beaten narrowly by
Faraday. Most of our team were juniors, which
promises well for the future.

Captains:

Mr. Britz.

Secretaries:

Merryl

Kruger,

Mrs.
Martin

Diane Lewis, Phi lip Joubert.

Prefects: Marion Brown, Merryl Kruger,


Hinkley, P. Sullivan, M. Erasmus.

P.

Colours Awards, Full: P. Sullivan (Rugby),


Merryl Kruger, I. Vidulich (Hockey), P. Joubert
(Dramatics).
Half: G. do Silva (Hockey), R.
Jensen (Swimming), M. Erasmus (Athletics).
Cricket.
year.

There were no House matches this

Swimming.
Jensen.

Captains:

Captain:

Peter Sullivan.

With very few rugby players in the team,


we did well to get into the semi-finals. We
were knocked out by Ruskin.

Staff: Mrs. Mazanski, Mrs. Pretorius,


Moffat, Mr. Sloman, Mr. Stalson.
House
Erasmus.

I. Vidulich.

Our players acquitted themselves well but


were beaten into second place by a strong
Whitworth
team, and tied with Faraday.

Rugby.

House Master:

Captain:

Merryl

Kruger,

Dramatics.
Under Mr. Sloman's excellent
direction, Milton won the Inter-House
Play
Festival and was awarded
the Mildenhall
Trophy for Dramatics. Our play, "The Laboratory", was placed second at the R.A.P.s. Play
Festival at the Library Theatre, where we won
the best decor award. Philip Joubert won the
award for the best actor. Those who, took
part were Hizabeth
Botha, Merryl Kruger,
Dawn
Herron,
Philip Joubert
and Martin
Erasmus.
We are losing a number of Matriculants who
will all be badly missed next year. We wish
them good luck.

R.

Although we came only fifth in the Gala,


some of our swimmers did well, notably R.
Jensen, Merryl' Kruger, K. Stewart,
Louise
Fitchett and of the juniors - Wendy Levin,

House Mistress: Miss Stead.


Staff: Mrs. Acton, Mr. van der Schyff, Mrs.
Hoffenberg, Miss Brown, Miss de Wool.

House
Prefects:
Colours
( Rugby).

Captains:
D.

D. Eatwell,

Eatwell

Awards,

(Head

Pat
Boy),

Full: A. Johnstone,

Pawson.
N.

Uys.

N. Uys

In the Swimming
Gala, where we came third,
and the Athletics,
where
we came last, our
few active
great-hearted
members
achieved
wonders.
They were Pat Pawson, Alice Parken,
G. Morrissey,
R. Pereira,
J. Pawson,
Valerie
BI'ake-Shepherd
and Joan Johnstone.
Others
who did well at the Gala were I. Ferreira,
Kim
Hunter,
G. Matthewson,
Kathy
Blignaut
and
P. de Klerk (who was outstandi ng) and at the
Athletics
Meeting - A. Johnstone,
L. Melvin, R.
Manefeldt,
C. Saayman,
Pamela
Meadows
and
M. Pereira.
Our Swimming
and G. Matthewson
were Pat Pawson
athletes
had some
members,
for the
better placed.
In
not fare badly.

Captains
were Pat Pawson
and our Athletics Captains
and A. Johnstone.
Had our
support
from other
House
relays, we would have been
the individual
events we did

Congratulations
third in the Cross
who came second

to J. A. da Silva who came


Country,
and Joan Johnstone
in the Girls' Cross Country.

In the Inter-House
Play Festival
we tied
third with our play "Riders to the Sea", which
was produced
by Mr. van der Schyff.
This
entailed
a lot of hard work,
for which we
thank
him. Those who took part were Kim
Hunter,
Nicky Uys, Melanie
Liversage,
Dale
Wilson, Allan Johnstone
and Robert Jones.
Kathie
Marnewick
captained
the
Netball
team,
Pat Pawson
the Girls' Hockey and G.
Morrissey
the Boys' Hockey.
N. Uys was the
captain
of our Rugby team,
but was badly
injured in a league
match.
We hope he will
make a complete
recovery.
Newton
has suffered
from a lack of senior
girls
for years.
Our
three
stalwarts,
Pat
Pawson,
Kim Hunter
and Kathy
Marnewick
are leaving.
Pat Pawson's
energy,
proficiency
and enthusiasm
have been largely responsible
for everything
our girls have achieved.
To
Pat, Kim and Kathy
and to D. Eatwell,
N.
Uys, G. Morrissey
and G. Matthewson---go
our
thanks
and best wishes.
Another
great loss to Newton
is Mrs. Acton,
who is leaving
us after four years.
She has
our very best wishes.

Housemaster:
Staff:
Graham,

1.

Pienaar.

Miss Bramley,
Miss Chandler,
Miss Hersch and Mr. Viljoen.

House

Captains:

Secretaries:
Prefects:
D. Roe,
Preston.

Mr. N.

C.

G. Sinclair,
C. Read,

Louise

Read,

Gayle

Preston.

Lyn Hawkins.

A. T ennant,

Swanepoel

Miss

(Head

W.

Reaney,

Girl),

Gayle

Colours
Awards,
Full:
Louise
Swanepoel
(Dramatics,
Swimming);
C. Read (Athletics,
Rugby);
A. Tennant
(Rugby,
Swimming);
D.
Roe (Rugby);
G. Sinclair (Rugby);
N. Nienaber
(Ruskin);
E. Zeiss (Rugby).
Half: Gayle Preston (Hockey);
Jaclyn Snegg
(Swimming);
D. Ferreira
(Hockey);
Daphne
Shekyls (Netball,
Athletics).
General:
On the whole Ruskin House enjoyed
a fair year, excelling
in Senior
Rugby
and
Dramatics.
Altho,ugh
we did not emerge
as
the top house this year, we managed
to keep
our spirit high.

Swimming. Captains:
A. Tennant
and Jackie
Snegg. We congratulate
Kelvin on their magnificent
win in this year's
gala.
Although
we did not retain
first place our swimmers
put up a good performance.
Those who, impressed
Sammons,
Jackie Snegg

were: A. Tennant,
P.
and Jennifer
Poulter.

Athletics. Captains:
C. Read
and
Gayle
Preston.
Our athletes
were very keen but we
did not have sufficient
"stars"
to do really
well. This point was underlined
in the crosscountry
race where we had at least as many
competitors
as the winning
house, yet only
managed
to secure third position.
Rugby.
Under
the inspiring
captaincy
of
Donald
Roe, our team again won the Senior
Inter-House
Competition.
Congratulations
on
a fine effort.
.
Our juniors,
led by A. Leonard,
but were unplaced.

Hockey.
Preston.

Captains
The girls

D. Ferreira
pl'ayed some

tried

hard

and Gayle
constructive

hockey, the boys tried


met with any success.
Netball.
our

Our

juniors,

seniors

led by

up to Kelvin.

hard,

Jackie

Well

but

neither

side

did not do well but


5negg, were runners-

done.

Dramatics.
In the Inter-House
Play Festival,
Ruskin's
entry,
"The
Bathroom
Door",
was
adjudged
the second best play. This play was
also entered
in the RAPS Play Festival at the
Library
Theatre.
We congratulate
the cast
(Louise
Swanepoel,
Dennis
Preston,
Dudley
Hendriks,
William
Temblett,
Jennifer
Poulter
and Alan Leonard)
on a very fine performance.

House
Staff:
Higgins,

Mistress:

House Captains:
Cru-ic1<.shank.

Anne

Miss Pinshaw,
Mr. Hendrikz.
van

Hockey.

der

Prefects:
J. Morris
(Vice-Head
Cruickshank,
N. MacLucas,
Anne
Merwe, Rona Robertson.

Miss

Merwe,

R.

Boy),
van

R.
der

Colours
Awards,
Full: R. Cruickshank,
N.
Welthagen,
G. Walker
(Hockey),
J. Morris, J.
Paulzeen
(Athletics),
R. Olver,
L. Wainstein
(Rugby).
Half: E. Duncan
(Hockey),
Priscilla
Diesel' (Netball),
Marlene
Weise
(Athletics).
R. Ward
(iTennis).
Athletics.
This year Whitworth
won the
Athletics
Sports and were awarded
a number
of trophies - the Governing
Body House Cup,
the Cooper
House
Relay Trophy,
the Boys'
Cross Country
Trophy and Jose Paulzeen
was
the Victor Ludorum.
Our star athletes
were
J. Morris, J. Paulzeen,
N. Welthagen,
D. Ward,
M. Weise,
M. van Metzinger,
M. Nel and P.
Diesel. There were a number of very promising
juniors.
Anne van der Merwe
deserves
our
thanks
for raising
such a strong
girls' team.
She won the Open High Jump and Long Jump.
Girls'
Hockey.'
Our
main
pla~ers'
were
Marlene
Weise
(Capt)
and Anne
van der
Merwe.
The others were inexperienced
so we
failed to come out on top.

Captain:

R. Cruickshank.

As expected
the Boys' Hockey
team won,
fielding
as they did, six First Team
players,
including
the Southern
Transvaal
Goalkeeper,
R. Cruickshank.
Welthagen,
Walker
and
Du ncan are to be congratu l'ated on the part
they played
in this victory.
The team
also
included
the School's
star Third Team
Captain,
P. Jalloul
and
Larry
Wainstein
who
played hockey for the first time and excelled.
Rugby. The scratch Whitworth
Rugby Team
won through
to the finals thanks
to the excellent ploy of Larry Wainstein.
In the final
we were narrowly
beaten
by a strong
Ruskin
team, which managed
to convert
a try during
extra time at the end.
Netball.
Robertson,
finals and
hardly any

Mrs. Bishop.

Miss Walker,
Mr. Townsend,

Boys'

This team,
captained
by Rona
did well to go through
to the
come second,
as Whitworth
has
netball
players.

Swimming.
Beryl Fick and F. Jarman
captained
our team which did fairly well.
Our
best swimmers were Beryl Fick, Marlene Weise,
Margaret
van Metzinger,
F. Jarman
and N.
Welthagen.
Dramatics.
We tied third in the Play Festival
and thank Mr. Townsend
and Miss Pinshaw for
all their hard work.
The actors
were Anne
van
der
Merwe,
Carol
Nichols,
Heather
Nichols, J. Morris, D. Ryce and J. MacDonald.
We should like to thank our stage hands.
Forest High's Golden
a great
one for us House Competition.

Jubilee year has been


we won the over-all

Tennis.
Congratulations
to
was runner-up
in the School
pionship.

R. Ward
who
Tennis
Cham-

Bursary.
The
College
of Education
has
awarded
a R400 a year
Bursary
to Rona
Robertson,
who wishes to train as a teacher.
Congratu lations
Rona.
Soccer.
for South

Larry Wainstein
African Schools.

was selected

to play

We are sorry to lose Mrs. Bishop, Miss Pinshaw and Miss Higgins and our Matriculants.
We are grateful
for all they have done and
wish them all good luck.

NEWS OF PAST PUPILS


Valerie

Wadge

to Mr. E. Bayley.

Cheryl

Brussow

to Mr. A. James.

Annabel

MacMillan

Mavis Nicolas
Blanche

Thompson
Coertze

Priscilla

Brenda

Marguerite

Basterfield.

de Agrella

Otto

Mr. and
a daughter.

N. Jesson

Mrs,

Mr.
and
Przychodzka),
Mr. and
daughter.
Mr.
Grey),

a
Mrs.

and Mrs.
a son.

Mr. and

van

Mrs.
son.

der

(Hazel

Freddie

(Margaret

(Dawn

Stephenson

Morrissey,

(Lynette

Whateley),

Boltman

B. Berman

Mrs. Eddie

Merwe

Hiles),

(Sandra

a second

son.

Theunissen.

to Mr. F. Veloza.

to Mr. J. Veloza.
Sharp.

to Mr. J. Eis.

Bowring

C.

to Mr. J. Wolff.

to Raymond

Store to Arnod

Christina
Stan

to William

de Agrella

Diane

to Mr. N. Schoeman.

van Vuuren
Malan

Teresa

Mr. G. Massey.

to Mr. R. Penino.

O'Neale

Petronella

Ward.

to Mr. J. Hooks.

Krugerto

Cynthia
Cathy

to Vernon

Ennion

Susan-Ann

to Mr. M. Harding.

Mr. and Mrs.


Peens), a son.

to Miss P. Roberts.

A number
of 1968 Matriculants
are undergoing
their
military
training.
Of
these
Anthony
Welthagen,
Neville
Street,
Stephen
Meyer
and
Anton
Vermeulen
finished
in
November,
Lawrence
Martle, Robert Marshall,
Kenny Beattie,
Dominic Philips, Douglas
Hartman,
Milton
Hunkin
and Arthur
Dean
are
among
those
who
haven't
completed
their
training
yet.
Cynthia
Ferguson,
Sandra
Kearns,
Manuel
Rodrigues
and Stuart
Cormack
are all on the
staff of the Prudential
Assurance
Company.
Freddie Stephenson,
who is married
to Sandra
Grey, is in the Permanent
Air Force training
to
be a pilot.

Glenys

Noble

to Grenville

Payne.

Jennifer

Armstrong

Wendy

Roper to Mr. R. Lawson.

Helen Gander
Thelma

to Mr. T. Tagliatti.

to Lou is Peters.

Thompson

to Mr. M. Standing.

Leslie de Bruin to Mr. A. Durose.


Veronica

Pitzer

to Mr. A. J. le Roux.

Arnold
Sharp,
who is engaged
to Diane
Store, is an auto sheetmetal
worker.
Diane is
on the staff of the Standard
Bank.
Mrs. Van
der Vywer
(Beryl' Morrissey)
is working
at
Escom.
David Uys is now Assistant
Manager
at Woolworth's
African
Life and Peter Uys is
Merchandise
Manager
at Steel and Barnett's.
Ekrem Atala
I.G.1. Insurance
mine
official

is Assistant
Branch Manager
of
Company.
Errol Fourie is a
at West
Rand
Consolidated.

Frank Williamson
is the Manager
of National
Pump Services
in Swaziland.
He is married
and has a daughter.
Carol Marshall,
now Mrs.
Ken McCleod, has a daughter,
Michelle.
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald
Underwood
have a
daughter.
Mr. and Mrs. Alfredo
de Castro
(Joy Underwood)
have two daughters.
Patrick
Losper and Step hen Dunbar
are doing their
millwright
apprenticeship
with the S.AR.
in
Germiston.
Baron Schoeman
and Evert Veenhof are both apprentice
aircraft
mechanics
at
Jan Smuts Airport.

an

Anne Rowlinson
has returned
after spending
interesting
and enjoyable
year overseas.

There is some news of pupils


in the 1920's - Freddie Lean
Long, Alan Middleton
is with
Ltd. in Estwurt
and G. Ogilvie
near Walkerville,
where
he
many years.

who were here


is with Dorman
Masonite
Africa
is still living out
has farmed
for

will be leaving
on an indefinite
trip around
the
world
in May.
Malcolm
Bauermeister
studied
Medical Technology
at the S.A Institute for Medical Research.
He wrote his finals
six months
ahead
of schedule
and qualified
at the end of 1968. He is now studying
further
and doing research work at the Glaxo Research
Laboratories
in Middlesex,
England.
Stan Bowring
is an architectural
draughtsman with C. J. Fuchs Ltd. and Barry Bowring
is a paper
representative
with Press Su pplies
Ltd.
Fred
Natal.
Henry
at the
kamp)
(Martin)

Wilford
is in Telec0mmunications
in
He is married
and has two daughters.
Wilford
is a Senior Commercial
Pilot
Rand Airport.
Gladys Wilford
(Bredenis living in Welkom.
Thelma Lamprecht
is now living in Rynfield. Benoni.

Cynthia
Peterson
hall Park, Dorothy
in Nelspruit.

(L1oyd) resides in CraigCockhead


(L1oyd)
is still

Rosemary
Dunn
is a hairdresser
and has
recentlybecome
engaged.
Sandra
Bauermeister.
started
work in the Transfer
Department of the Anglo American
Corporation
and
is now with a large firm of stockbrokers.
She

T. Penhalligon.
who left Forest in 1946. and
his brother. A J. Penhalligon,
who left in 1937,
are both company
secretaries,
the former with
Norma
Asbestos
Mine and the latter
with
Oppenheimer
and Rosenthal.
Insurance Brokers.

The 1967 Matric Grou p provided


the School
with a tennis ball machine.
a vacuum cleaner.
designed
to keep the thousands
of books in
the library
free of dust and four attractive
wooden
stands for sets of books in the library.
In addition
they gave the library
a complete
set of excellent
articles
in pamphlet
form.
reprinted
from World
Encyclopaedia.
These
gifts are proving
very usefu I.
The 1968 Matric
Group
have donated
two

honours
boards
for
the
names
of
Old
Forestonian
Springboks
and two
boards
for
recording
the names of the Headmasters
of
the School, and future
Head Boys and Girls.
These boards have all been erected in the Hall.
This group has also made a generous
contribution towards
the cost of producing
this Golden
Jubilee issue of "The Forestonian".
All these generous
and thoughtful
gifts from
both Matric Groups are very much appreciated.

Miss Jennifer
Hopkins,
who left Forest
in
1966, is now Mrs. J. Clarke.
She is on the staff
of the Meat Board.

Miss
Colleen
Shepperson
was
married
recently
in Cape Town to Mr. D. Monk.
She
is working
at the Trust Bank.

Miss G. Wiegmink.
is living

in Florida.

now

Mrs. Graham-Boyd.

Miss A Rowlinson
seas and is already
next trip.

has returned
from overlooking
forward
to her