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Neo-classicism

Neo-Classicism
Neo-Classicism is a movement in art,
architecture, and design in Europe and
North America about 1750-1850,
characterized by the revival of classical
Greek and Roman styles.
It superseded the Rococo style and was
inspired by the excavation of Pompeii and
Herculaneum.

Rococo - Neoclassicism
American Revolution,
1775-1783

Louis XV ascends to
French throne, 1715

French Revolution,
1789-99

1789

1687

The Enlightenment
Rococo style
Neoclassical style

1750
Rousseau, Social
Contract, 1762

David, Oath of
the Horatii, 1785

The United States Capitol Building

The Apotheosis of Washington and was painted by an


Italian Painter, Constantino Brumidi,

The apotheosis of Washington literally means the


deification of President George Washington, or the
exaltation of Washington to the status of a god.

Neo-Classical Architecture

Painting and Sculpture


Neoclassic artists used classical forms to
express their ideas about courage,
sacrifice, and love of country.

Nicolas Poussin
Poussin is a French
painter who was the
founder and greatest
practitioner of 17thcentury French
classical painting.
His work
predominantly
features clarity, logic,
and order, and favors
line over color.

The Adoration of the


Golden Calf
1633-36
Oil on canvas

Rape of the Sabine


Women
1637-38

Jacques Louis David


Jacques-Louis David, French painter. He
was a supporter of the French Revolution
and one of the leading figures of
Neoclassicism.

The Oath of the Horatii (1784)


Three sons swear to their father to defend their country,
while their sisters lament helplessly.

The Death of Socrates 1787

The Death of
Marat
1793

Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres


Davids pupil and
successor was Ingres
who specialized in
portraits
characterized by an
admirable purity of
line and aristocratic
elegance.

La Grand Odalisque
1814

Ingres
The Turkish
Bath

Antonio Canova
(1757 1822)
Italian sculptor who became
famous for his marble
sculptures that delicately
rendered nude flesh.
The epitome of the neoclassical style, his
work marked a return

Psyche Revived by Cupid's Kiss

This exemplifies the Neoclassical obsession with


love and emotion. It represents the God Cupid in
the height of love and tenderness, right after
awakening the lifeless Psyche with a kiss,

The Three Graces is a sculpture, in


marble, of the mythological three
goddesses, daughters of Zeus

19th Century
Napoleon
declared
emperor, 1804

French
Revolution,
1789-99

1850

Neoclassicism
Romanticism
Realism
1800
Goya, The
Third of May,
1808, 1814-15

Delacroix,
Liberty
Leading the
People, 1830

J.M.W. Turner,
The Slave
Ship, 1840

1848
Courbet, Burial
at Ornans,
1849

1870s

Romanticism

Romanticism
In literature, the visual arts and music,
Romanticism is a style that emphasizes the
imagination, emotions, and creativity of the late
18th and early 19th century European culture
Inspired by the ideas of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
and by the contemporary social changes and
revolutions (US and French), Romanticism
emerged as a reaction to 18th-century values,
asserting emotion and intuition over rationalism,
the importance of the individual over social
conformity, and the exploration of natural, and
psychic wilderness over classical restraint.

Major themes
Major themes of Romantic art and literature
include:
A love at atmospheric landscape;
Nostalgia for the past, a love of the
primitive, including folk traditions;
The cult of the hero figure, often an artist
or political revolutionary;
Romantic passion;
Mysticism; and
A fascination with death.

Eugene Delacroix (deh-lah-krwah)


The last of the great artists of the
Renaissance and the first modern -Baudelaire

The Barque of Dante


1822

The Death of Sardanapalus


1827-28

Liberty leading the People


1830

Theodore Gericault (zh-r-k')


A number of painters in the Romantic
period, and some before it, believed
imagery should present situations, states
of suffering, and outrage in forms that
were extreme and compelling in
themselves. These images, they thought,
would stimulate the sympathy and
satisfaction that were regarded as salutary
and sublime

French frigate Mduse (1810)

Raft of the Medusa


1819

Caspar David
Friedrich (1774-1840)
- German romantic
landscape Painter.
He is best known for his mid-period allegorical landscapes
which typically feature contemplative figures silhouetted
against night skies, morning mists, barren trees or Gothic
ruins. His primary interest as an artist was the contemplation
of nature, and his often symbolic and anti-classical work
seeks to convey a subjective, emotional response to the
natural world.

Caspar David Friedrich


Wanderer above the Sea of Fog
1818

Chalk Cliffs on Rugen


1818 - 19

Cloister Cemetery
1817-19

Sea of Ice
1823-25

Joseph William
Mallord Turner
_______________
English Romantic landscape Painter,
Water Colorist and Printmaker.
Known as the Painter of Light.

Joseph William Mallord Turner

Rise of the Cathaginian Empire


1815

Ulysses deriding Polyphemus Homer's Odyssey


1829
Oil on canvas

The Burning of the Houses of Lords


and Commons,
16th October, 1834
1835
Oil on canvas

The Grand Canal, Venice


1835
Oil on canvas

The Slave Ship


1840

Henry Fuseli
original name Johann
Heinrich Fssli
bFeb. 7, 1741, died April 16,
1825, Putney Hill, London,
- famous for his paintings
Eng. and drawings of

nude figures caught in strained and violent


poses suggestive of intense emotion.

Henry Fuseli
The Nightmare
1781

Francisco Jos de
Goya y Lucientes
(1746-1828)
Spanish artist whose paintings, drawings, and
engravings reflected contemporary historical
upheavals and influenced important 19th- and
20th-century painters.

Saturn devouring his Son


1821

Peter Paul
Rubens' more
refined Saturn
Devouring His
Son (1636) may
have inspired
Goya.

19th Century
Napoleon
declared
emperor, 1804

French
Revolution,
1789-99

1850

Neoclassicism
Romanticism
Realism
1800
Goya, The
Third of May,
1808, 1814-15

Delacroix,
Liberty
Leading the
People, 1830

J.M.W. Turner,
The Slave
Ship, 1840

1848
Courbet, Burial
at Ornans,
1849

1870s