Sei sulla pagina 1di 103

Self-Evaluation and Improvement

Planning
A Resource for Schools in Dubai
2014-15
School name: WELLINGTON
INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL - DUBAI

Characteristics of the School


A - Please outline the main characteristics of the learners in your school
GEMS Wellington International School [GWIS] is part of the GEMS group and was
formed in 2007. It is in its 8th year. It was last inspected by the DSIB in January
2014.
GWIS currently supports 2430 students in their learning. The school roll has
developed significantly in the last four years. Students come from generally
professional backgrounds as children of mainly expatriate families. 22% of the
students on roll for this academic year are from British backgrounds. Students
come from a limited range of socio-economic backgrounds, employment and/or
affluence being a pre-requisite for residence. We presently have 54 (2.2%) Emirati
students across the school - 21 Emirati students in Secondary and 33 students in
Primary
Mission Statement - Success for all as life-long learners
Vision Statement - At GEMS Wellington International School we recognise the
uniqueness of each child through a programme of learning that promotes
challenge and personalised learning at all levels and by providing an enabling,
inclusive environment which empowers all children to achieve. We encourage
creative and critical thinking within the context of meaningful and stimulating
experiences. Our curriculum celebrates the diversity within our school and
strives to create a nurturing environment with a strong, open and positive
partnership between all stakeholders and the wider community. We endeavour to
equip our children with the skills and attributes required to become respectful,
proactive citizens in our international community that ensures wellbeing for all.
GWIS has been inspected by the DSIB six times. The previous
judgements are outlined below.

Key strengths from our DSIB Inspection 2014

The school had maintained its established record of students' outstanding


academic progress, attainment and learning skills in English, mathematics
and science;
Students' personal and social development was outstanding, especially
their understanding of Islamic values and local, cultural and global

awareness;
Confident, high quality teaching was supported by accurate assessments;
Curriculum quality and design were outstanding;
The school's protection and support for its students was outstanding;
Outstanding leadership and management had guided this highly effective
school to continued success.
Recommendations from our Inspection 2014

Improve further students' attainment, progress and learning skills in Islamic


Education and Arabic by ensuring higher quality teaching, learning and
assessment;
Complete the work to refine assessment in the Foundation Stage and so
smooth the children's transition to Key Stage 1 and further improve
progress in Year 1.

Leadership and Staffing at WIS comprises

An Executive group consists of the Principal / CEO, two Vice Principals &
three Assistant Heads and one Senior Leader. This group meets weekly.
The two phases have their own Leadership Teams made up of a Vice
Principal & two Assistant Heads and three Senior Leaders.
Middle Leaders meet weekly in their phases as well as through school with
their 3 18 partners on a regular basis.
Curriculum Leaders in Secondary and Year Leaders in Primary meet
fortnightly with their line managers for Accountability meetings.
There are numerous student leadership groups across all year groups. They
operate both vertically and horizontally and cross phase.
Curriculum and Year Teams meet regularly in line with a published school
meeting cycle.
Leaders across the school support other schools through networks and
outreach work.

There are currently 179 teachers employed in GWIS. 78% of teachers come from
the UK, with the remainder coming predominantly from Ireland, NZ, Australia,
Canada and the Middle East. A high quality recruitment plan has led to the
appointment of staff with a wealth of expertise. A positive environment for
sharing outstanding practice has been established due to the wide range of
experience amongst our staff.
Over the past three years the school has raised attainment for all students and
achieved a positive three year trend in all examination results.
The School Improvement Plan - Strategic Plan for the whole organisation is
regularly reviewed.
Wellington International School is a truly International School welcoming over 85
different nationalities into our school population. WIS is a non-selective school.
Baseline testing takes place on entry.
The AEN profile of the school has increased over the last three years - the current
AEN profile across the school is 20%. Alternative support is put in place for our

Gifted and Talented students which comprise another approximate 20% of the
school population. There are 333 SEN students in the school which equates to
14%. Across the school there are 48 students / 2% accessing Wave 3 provision
which is our highest level of support.

The most significant nationalities being educated at Wellington are listed below
Nationality
British
Indian
Other Arab
Other European
Pakistan
American

%
21%
15%
12%
11%
6.5%
5%

In common with many International schools, especially in Dubai, student


population is mobile. Current changes in the economic environment have
increased this percentage mobility with some year groups experiencing student
mobility of over 30%.
At present 2014-15 the whole school Muslim cohort is 42%. In 2013-14 830
41% of students studied Islamic Education. Here the curriculum is divided into
two strands with Islamic A being taught in Arabic and Islamic B being taught in
English. There are 293 Islamic A students and 537 Islamic B students.
There are 54 (2.2%) Emirati students across the school - 21 Emirati students in
Secondary and 33 students in Primary. Their progress is carefully monitored and
regularly reviewed.
A large percentage of our students (over 60%) operate in more than one
language and English is often not their home language or their native language.
A register is kept of our ELL learners and staff are very clear about how to support
these learners.
Our students are eager to learn and extremely motivated. They are adaptable to
change and are aware of the transient nature of the country we live in. They are
respectful and empathetic of all people and the cultures they represent. Our
students understand the behavioural standards of the school and set themselves
high expectations for their personal conduct. Through the student body a WIS
Charter has been developed which is based upon the UN Rights and
Responsibilities Charter.
The Learner Profile was introduced in 2009 and is embedded across the school.

Wellington learners have a clear understanding of, and commitment to, the
learning process. They are confident and independent learners.
We are continually developing our Wellington curriculum to ensure that our
students are stretched and challenged and encouraged to be IT literate,
confident, self-managers, risk taking and problem solving learners who contribute
to Dubai and the community as a whole. As we are an inclusive school our
students are sensitive to the needs of others.
To meet the needs of our more able learners, a number of students are fast
tracked at Key Stage 4 particularly in Maths and Science. Lower attaining
learners have personalised programmes to support their needs and progress.
B - Does the school have any distinctive aims or special features?
Our school aims are to provide a high quality learning experience to all of our
students without discrimination of race, culture, gender or ability. Our school
actively promotes, encourages and celebrates a respect for the beliefs, culture
and language of the UAE.
In Foundation Stage we follow the EYFS curriculum, ensuring an appropriate
balance between teaching and play to ensure each individual is prepared for
future learning and healthy development. In Key Stage 1 - 3 our school
Curriculum is based on the English National Curriculum with adaptations to
contextualise learning within our international setting and promote skills
development through cross curricular teaching and our learner profile.
Alongside the National Curriculum [NC], GWIS delivers the Ministry of Educations
curriculum for Islamic Education and Arabic Studies and is compliant.
At Key Stage 4 we offer GCSEs and IGCSEs, selecting the most appropriate
syllabus for our students. Emphasis is put on ensuring that the syllabi taught at
KS4 best prepare our students for the demands and rigor of the IB DP at KS5.
From 2012 and to further meet the learning needs of students, Level 2 BTECs
were introduced.
Our Post 16 students study the IB Diploma and IB Certificate programmes. The IB
programme is in its fifth cohort. An IB co-ordinator leads on the development of
the IB Programme. The move away from A Level examinations was in direct
response to our International cohort and the global nature and differentiated
levels of courses provided by the IB qualification.
The WIS Learner Profile was created in December 2009 by the Learning Group
both staff and students, which amalgamates a variety of teaching strategies and
learning concepts Learning2Learn, Building Learning Power and the IB Learner
Profile. This forms our school aims and learning policy. The Learner Profile is on its
journey to becoming totally embedded and there are clear examples of how
Curriculum and Year Groups are working to encourage students to become more
responsible for their own learning. This links directly to the philosophy of the IB
programme and ensures that all staff focus much more on students taking
responsibility for their own learning.
Our parent body are highly motivated and engaged with their childrens
learning. The school provides ongoing and regular opportunities to engage

parents with their childs learning.


Alongside our aims we embrace each of the cultures that are present in its
student body. As a very charitable orientated school, we aim to encourage each
student to contribute to the many charity fundraisers that have been established
through our VGF initiatives, not just through fundraising, but through the
promotion of civic responsibilities involving sustained action. Last year alone over
150000 AED was raised. This year we have expanded our charitable work to
support local charities and sponsoring rainforests.
C - Are there any contextual issues which are aids or barriers to raising
performance?
Our on-going commitment to ensuring that we maintain the lowest student to
teacher ratio of a GEMS Premium School in Dubai enables us to ensure that each
individuals needs are being addressed appropriately, that all students make
progress above expectation and that we can effectively demonstrate value
added.
Although teaching within our school is delivered through the medium of the
English language, a number of our children do not have English as their first
language. Provision is made for students who need support to access their
learning.
The mobility of students joining part way through the school year does impact
upon the process of data analysis and provision mapping. Our three year mobility
average is 12%.

D - What are the current priorities for development?


The school continues to maintain and develop its Outstanding school self-review
and development systems.
The DSIB Priorities have been strategically targeted since January 2014.
Incorporated into our School Improvement Plan our targets are;
1.Leadership and Management. To enhance the quality of Leadership
throughout the school to ensure a genuine distributive model, the embedment of
a seamless through school structure and ensuring the effective distribution of
authority and accountability to leaders at all levels. Enable the whole school
community to effectively contribute to the strategic direction of the school.
2.Standards of Attainment and Progress. To develop a rigorous and robust
systems and processes for data analysis and intervention planning at all levels to
ensure high quality student outcomes and progress. To implement strategy to
fully support the UAEs National Agenda targets for 2021 ensuring that we exceed
the schools targets in PISA and TIMMS.
3. Curriculum and Assessment. To enhance the current curriculum offer to
ensure consistent high expectations across the school and support and challenge
students of all abilities. Embed diagnostic assessment procedures to empower
staff to plan and deliver outstanding lessons and students to be clear of their
current levels of achievement and how to move to next sub level or grade.

4. Teaching and Learning. Further increase the amount of outstanding


teaching within the school by disseminating excellent practice, developing
students creativity and nurturing highly effective independent learning.
5 .Protecting and Supporting Students. Ensure all staff have an overview of
the whole child and provide high quality of information, support, guidance and
learning / enrichment opportunities. Develop systems and processes to maximize
student attendance, performance and engagement.
6. Arabic and Islamic Studies. Empower staff through curriculum review,
highly focused CPD and performance coaching to ensure that the quality of
learning and teaching, student progress and attainment is at least good
throughout all phases of the school.

E - What are the parents' views of the school?

Feedback from parent interviews, report evaluations, parents evenings,


questionnaires, coffee mornings and workshops show that parents at Wellington
are very happy about the quality of education within our school. Their children
enjoy being at Wellington and are happy to come to school. Parents appreciate
the variety of opportunities offered to their children in order to make outstanding
progress. They believe that they are regularly informed about their childrens
targets, next steps in their learning and progress towards those targets. A WIS
Council which comprises parents, staff and school leaders was formed last year
and continues to meet monthly.

F - What are your students' views of the school?


Feedback from student interviews, student groups and questionnaires show that
students at Wellington are happy to come to school and enjoy their learning. We
have recently undertaken trial attitude surveys in years 3, 6, 9 and 11. In a recent
questionnaire over 96% of students said that they enjoyed their lessons. They
appreciate the quality of their learning environment and the teachers who
support and guide them in their learning. They enjoy the wide range of
opportunities to participate and learn beyond the classroom through visits,
visitors into school, clubs, teams and other enrichment opportunities. The
Principal regularly meet with groups of students to gain their views.

ISLAMIC EDUCATION
Enter your judgement for the phase(s) in your school

Attainment

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

N/A

Good

Acceptable

Acceptable

Emirati students' attainment


Progress

Good
N/A

Good

Good

Emirati students' progress

Good

SEN students' progress

Good

Good

Attainment
Continuation of the development work with the National
Curriculum levels that are used to track students progress alongside the MoE
grading system. These levels have been moderated at the Dubai Islamic
Education Network meetings. Data Capture, Learning Conversations, Observations,
Evidence sources:

Monitoring Evaluating and Review cycle

Our Reflection:

Attainment at Phase 2 ( Key Stage 1 and 2)


In the 2014 Inspection Attainment in Islamic was found to be Good.
We believe that this judgement is still Good. Supporting evidence includes:
Islamic at Key Stage 1
End of Ks1

50% +

80% +

Total (90)

100%

19%

50% +
100%

80% +
25%

Islamic at Key Stage 2


End of Ks2
Total (70)

In the Primary phase all students consistently meet the expected curriculum
standards for their year groups (50% or above).
There is a trend of students showing accelerated higher level standards ( A and
A*) going from Key stage 1 to 2 as a result of developing students maturity and
capacity for learning. 60% of students achieved MOE B grading (70-80%) which is
above the MOE expectations and this indicates a grading of GOOD.
Internal Observations by senior staff indicated that the teaching in Phase 2 was
consistently Good and in some cases Outstanding in the May 2013 and during
the Autumn term 2014.
A new levelling system has enabled teachers to identify and target learner groups
and track their progress.
Standards in Quran recitation have continued to improve as a result of a new
graded set of expectations in terms of Quran Recitation from Y1 onwards. These
have been assigned levels so that we can track the progress in this area and
celebrate the talents of students whose memory of the Surahs far exceeds age
expectations. This has been developed through the Dubai Islamic Education
Network meetings.
The curriculum at all phases was reviewed to ensure there were higher levels of
challenge along with units that stimulated and interested the pupils. The updated
Year 6 MOE book was implemented in September 2013 and we predict ongoing
higher outcomes for end of phase 2 as a result of this resource being used.
SEN
All SEN students achieved a grade 50% or above and met their predicted levels in
phase 2.

Emirati Students
All Emirati students reached or exceeded expected targets in phase 2.
Attainment in Phase 3 ( Key Stage 3 and 4)
In the 2014 Inspection Attainment in Islamic at Phase 3 was found to be
Acceptable. Whilst there have been improvements in standards we believe that
this judgement remains Acceptable.
End of KS3

50% +

80% +

Total(75)

100%

48%

All students in Years 7 9 consistently meet the minimum expected curriculum


standard for their year groups, (MOE 50% Grade or above) which is above the
KHDA grading for Acceptable.
80% of students achieved the MOE C Grade (60-70%) which is the average MOE
expectations and this indicates a grading of Acceptable but with the increasing
numbers of students achieving the higher levels (MOE 80%+) we feel that we are
close to the overall GOOD grading for Phase 3. We predict that in the 2016
Inspection this grade will be GOOD.
As a result of professional development carried out on effective classroom
differentiation and improved assessment systems, there has been an upward and
consistent trend for our highest achieving students and this has supported our
attainment reaching the boundaries of the GOOD category.
Teaching in Phase 3 was consistently Good and in some cases Outstanding in the
Oct 2013 and once again in September 2014.
End of Ks4

50% +

80% +

Total (77)

100%

41%

All students in Years 10 and 11 are meeting the expected curriculum standards
for their year groups.
As mentioned above there has been an increasing trend of achievement for
our highest performing students and again it is predicted the in the 2016
Inspection standards at the above average level (70-80% MOE) will be over 51%
and therefore GOOD across Phase 3.
Emirati Students
All Emirati students reached expected targets.
SEN Students

All SEN students achieved 50% or above.


Attainment in Phase 4
End of year12
Total (32)

50% +
100%

80% +
47%

The picture of ongoing improvement in attainment continues in Phase 4 and


enables us to be close to the GOOD boundary due to the reasons mentioned in
phase 3 above.
Emirati Students
All Emirati students reached expected targets.
SEN Students
All SEN students achieved 50% or above.

Progress
Evidence sources: A new levelling system has enabled teachers to identify and target

learner groups and track their progress. Data Capture, Learning Conversations,
Observations, Monitoring Evaluating and Review cycle

Our Reflection:

Progress in Phase 2 ( Key Stage 1 and 2)


In the 2014 Inspection progress in Islamic at Phase 2 was found to be Good. We
still believe that this judgement is Good. Supporting evidence includes:
Islamic at Key Stage 1

KS1

% - 1.5 sub
levels + of
progress

Total (173)
85%
Islamic at Key Stage 2

KS2

% - 1.5 sub
levels of
progress

Total (318)

58%

% - 2 sub
levels of
progress

43%

% - 2 +sub
levels of
progress

58%

The overall progress of phase 2 is above 50% for above average progress, which
is a GOOD level of progress.
Emirati Students
All Emirati students are making beyond expected progress.
SEN Students
All SEN students are making at least expected progress.
Progress in Phase 3 ( Key Stage 3 and 4)
In the 2014 Inspection progress in Islamic at Phase 3 was found to be
Acceptable. We believe that this judgement is now Good. Supporting evidence
includes:
Key Stage 3
Ks3

% - 1.5 sub
levels of
progress

Total (302)

100%

% - 2+ sub
levels of
progress

62%

All students in Years 7 9 consistently meet the expected curriculum


standards for their year groups 50% or above.
All students make at least 1.5 Sub levels of progress in line with curriculum
Standards.
All SEN students achieved 50% or above.

The quality of Learning and Teaching in Islamic is consistently good and


good with outstanding features.

Ks4

% - 1 Grade
% - 2+ Grades
of progress
of progress
or more

Total (121)

100%

64%

Progress at Key Stage 4

The Majority of students in Years 10 and 11 are consistently making


expected progress.
There has been an increasing trend of achievement for our highest
performing students.

The majority of the students (62% in KS3 and 64% in KS4) make better than
expected progress.
Emirati Students
All Emirati students are making beyond expected progress.
SEN Students
All SEN students are making at least expected progress.
Progress at Phase 4
Year 12
No
Year 12
Overall

0 Grade of
progress
0

% - 1 Grade of
progress or
more

No - 2 Grades
of progress

100%

66%

All students in phase 4 made expected progress which is one grade at year
12.
Above 50% made higher than expected curriculum progress.

Emirati Students
All Emirati students are making beyond expected progress.
SEN Students
All SEN students are making at least expected progress.

ARABIC AS A FIRST LANGUAGE


Enter your judgement for the phase(s) in your school

Attainment

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

N/A

Good

Acceptable

Acceptable

Emirati students' attainment


Progress

Good
N/A

Good

Good

Emirati students' progress

Good

SEN students' progress

Good

Good

Attainment
Evidence sources: Data Capture, Learning Conversations, Observations, Monitoring Evaluating
and Review cycle
Our Reflection:

Attainment in Phase 2
In the 2014 Inspection Attainment in Arabic was found to be Acceptable and we
feel we have moved into the Good category.
Attainment at Key Stage 1
We believe that this judgement is Good. Supporting evidence includes:
Year KS1
2013/14

Number of
MOE 50%
students

MOE 75%+
(above
average)

1
42
100%
66%
2
37
100%
62%
(data is combined reading, writing, speaking and listening)

80%+
52%
38%

The Majority of Arabic A children are working at or above the age expected level
in Writing at Key Stage 1.
Most students are working at or above the age expected level in Reading at Key
Stage 1.
Attainment at Key Stage 2

Year

KS2

3
4
5
6

Number of
students

49
46
37
39

MOE 50%

100%
100%
100%
100%

MOE 75% +
(above
average)

43%
60%
65%
65%

80%+

16%
34%
29%
27%

The Majority of Students are working at or above the age expected level in
Reading at Key Stage 2.
SEN Students in Phases 2 - 4

All SEN students met or exceeded their target grades in Arabic A.

53% of Arabic A children are working at or above the age expected level in
Writing at Key Stage 1.
Using an international first language comparison of English, it can be seen that
93% (Almost all) students achieved Level 2 in Reading and 100% achieved L2 in
Writing. In 2012 the UK figures for English were 87% for reading and 83% for
Writing. This represents at least Good attainment by the end of Year 2.
At the end of Phase two Writing scores at Level 4 are just below UK KS2 SATs
outcomes, however, of the L3 students in writing, 10% have achieved a 3a which
was recognised by the Head of Arabic at GEMS as an acceptable outcome for end
of Y6; making a total of 75% of students achieving an age appropriate level.
The context of this Y6 cohort is that 66% have only had at most 2 years of Arabic
A teaching at WIS which is a further illustration of the accelerated attainment the
students have made.
Arabic A - Attainment in Phase 3 KS3
In the 2014 Inspection Attainment in Arabic was found to be unacceptable.
We believe that this judgement is now acceptable. Supporting evidence
includes:
MOE
70%
Year KS3 MOE 50%
(above
2013/14
+
average)
+
7 (total 40)
100
65%
8 (total 22)
100
54%
9 (total 21)
100
80%

MOE
80%+
35%
36%
38%

All students attain 50% or above.

At KS3 the majority of students attaining 75% or higher is above 50% which
is in the GOOD category. Overall we know we have made progress in
attainment and would want to consolidate
Year KS4

Number
of
students

Grade C

Grade B

Grade A+

10

30

19

10

11

15

At KS4 all students attaining at or above average UK GCSE grade (C).


There is a significant increase in the number of students attaining above a
grade B.
All students gained a grade C or above at IGCSE a significant improvement
on previous years.
Intervention and additional classes for students to improve at GCSE is in
place.

Attainment at Phase 4

Arabic is part of our IB Curriculum offer for 2014 16


Attainment

Level
>90%
>70%
>50%
<50%

Year 12
30%
70%
100%
0%

Year

13

IB Studies

Progress
Evidence sources: Data Capture, Learning Conversations, Observations, Monitoring Evaluating
and Review cycle

Our Reflection:

Progress at Phase 2 [ Key stage 1 and 2]


In the 2014 Inspection Progress over time in Arabic A at Phase 2 was found to be
Good.
We believe progress in Arabic A continues to be Good.
End of Key Stage 1
Area

Number of % achieving at Least


Students
1.5 sub level

Y1
42
Y2
37
End of Key Stage 2

21%
24%

% achieving 2
+sublevels
79%
76%

Area

Number of % achieving at Least


% achieving 2
Students
1.5 sublevel
+sublevels
Y3
49
49%
51%
Y4
46
55%
45%
Y5
37
49%
51%
Y6
39
21%
79%
Most students in KS 1 (77%) and the Majority at KS2 (58%) have made better
than expected progress by achieving 2 sublevels (expected progress based on UK
standards is 1.5 sublevels which is defined as Good progress).
Progress of Emirati Students

All Emirati students achieved beyond expected progress. All


Emirati students exceeded their target levels and grades set.

Progress of SEN Students

All SEN students achieved a minimum of expected progress. All SEN


students either met or exceeded their target levels and grades set.
Data is captured 6 times a year across the school.
Intervention planning is part of the school cycle of review.

Progress at phase 3
KS3
In the 2014 Inspection Progress in Arabic A at Phase 3 was found to be
Acceptable.
We believe that this judgement is now Good. Evidence includes:

Year and
cohort 2013/14

No 1.5 sub
levels of
progress

7
8
9

3
4
5

% of pupils
No - 2 sub
achieving
levels of
1.5
progress
Sublevels
100%
37
100%
18
100%
16

% - 2 sub
levels+ of
progress
80%
73%
71%

The majority of students consistently make 2 sub levels of progress a year GOOD progress.
The standards of progress in lesson observations were 75% good or better.

Progress of Emirati Students

All Emirati students (4) achieved expected progress. All Emirati students
met or exceeded their target levels.

Progress of SEN Students

All SEN students met their target levels and grades set.

Phase 3 KS4
%-0
Year and
No - 0
Grades
cohort
Grades of
of
2013/14 KS4 progress
progress
10 ( 26)
11 ( 23)

0
2

0
13.4%*

No
1 grade
progress
26
13

No - 2

1 Grade of Grades of
progress progress
100%
86%

14
8

%2 Grades
of
progress
46 %
53.3%

*The 2 students not making expected progress are new to the UAE and have not
studied Arabic prior.

At Key Stage 4 there was a significant increase in the number of students


taking Arabic as an option and is indicative of the high levels of motivation
that exists.
At GCSE most students made good progress.

The standards of progress in lesson observations were 80% good or better.


Progress of Emirati Students

All Emirati students achieved beyond expected progress. All Emirati


students met or exceeded their target levels.

Progress of SEN Students


2 SEN students at KS4 achieved the minimum expected progress. All SEN

students met their target levels and grades set.


Progress at Phase 4
In the 2014 Inspection Progress over time in Arabic A at Phase 4 was found to be
acceptable.
We believe progress in Arabic A is now Good.
Year and
cohort 2013/14

1 grade of
progress

12

1 sub % levels No - 2 Grades % - 2 Grades


of progress
of progress of progress

20 %

80%

Arabic is part of our IB Curriculum offer for 2014 16.


The current quality of learning and teaching is 100% good or better
showing a clear improvement from the previous year. 20% of lessons were
outstanding.
Levels of Progress are recorded as good or better in 100% of lessons
observed.

ARABIC AS AN ADDITIONAL
LANGUAGE
Enter your judgement for the phase(s) in your school

Attainment

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

N/A

Acceptable

Acceptable

Good

Good

Good

Emirati students' attainment


Progress
Emirati students' progress
SEN students' progress

N/A
N/A

Good
N/A
Good

Attainment
Evidence sources: Data Capture, Learning Conversations, Observations, Monitoring Evaluating
and Review cycle

Our Reflection:
Attainment at Phase 2 Key Stage 1 and 2
In the 2014 Inspection Attainment in Arabic as an additional Language at Phase 2
was found to be Acceptable. We still believe that this judgement is Acceptable.
Supporting evidence includes:
Attainment at Key Stage 1
Year KS1

MOE 75%+
MOE 50%+
(Above
expectations)
READING
100%
42%
100%
39%
WRITING
100%
43%
100%
44%

2013/2014
1
2
1
2

MOE 80% +

8%
11%
7%
6%

Attainment at end of Key Stage 2


KS2 2013/2014
READING
Year 3
Year 4
Year 5
Year 6
WRITING
Year 3
Year 4
Year 5
Year 6

MOE 50%

MOE 75%

MOE 80% +

100%
100%
100%
100%

32%
33%
34%
33%

18%
17%
16%
17%

100%
100%
100%
100%

38%
40%
34%
32%

12%
10%
16%
18%

At the end of phase 2 MOST students have achieved the expected level ( MOE C
grade 60-70%) based on the time they have studied Arabic and we are working
towards 51% achieving higher than the expected outcomes ( B Grade 70-80%)
which would take us to GOOD. We expect to be good in 2016.

The percentage of children identified as having SEN, including one-to-one


LSA support was 10 %.
Years at
Wellington

Student
numbers

25

39

20

14

12

12

16

14

Progress
Evidence sources: Data Capture, Learning Conversations, Observations, Monitoring Evaluating
and Review cycle
Our Reflection:

In the 2014 Inspection Progress over time in Arabic as an additional language at


Phase 2 was found to be Good.
We believe progress in Phase 2 continues to be Good as greater than 50% have
KS2 Progress in
% achieving at Least
% achieving 2+ subReading and Writing
1.5 sub- level progress
levels of progress
Reading
89%
68%
Writing
75%
67%
achieved 2 sublevels progress which is greater than expected curriculum
standards.

KS1 Progress
% achieving at Least % achieving 2+ subReading and Writing 1.5 sub- level progress
levels of progress
( expected)
(exceeding expected)
Reading
96%
67%
Writing
88%
52%

Progress of SEN Students

All SEN students met their target levels and grades set.

Progress Arabic as an additional Language at Phase 3


In the 2014 Inspection Progress over time in Arabic as an additional language at
Phase 3 was found to be Good.
We believe progress in Phase 3 continues to be Good.
KS3 Progress
KS3 Progress

7 (149)
8 (144)

% achieving at Least % achieving 2+ sub1.5 sub- level progress


levels of progress
( expected)
(exceeding expected)
66%
49%
77%
54%

9 (150)

71%

52%

Students making limited progress in KS3 are new to Arabic learning.

KS4 Progress
Year and
No - 0
% -0
%1 grade No 2
% -2
No 1 grade
cohort
Grades of Grades of
of
Grades of Grades of
progress
2013/14 KS4 progress progress
progress progress progress

10
(9
students)
11
(11
students)

11%

89%

18%

55%

27%

Whilst our Y11 pupils made acceptable progress the overall picture for Phase 3 is
that they have made GOOD progress.
Progress Arabic as an additional Language at Phase 4
In the 2014 Inspection Progress over time in Arabic as an additional language at
Phase 4 was found to be N/A
We believe progress in Phase 4 is Good. Please note that 1.5% represents an
exceptional level of progress in IB and that 80% achieving 1 grade of IB progress
is GOOD.
Year and
cohort
2013/14

12 (5
students)

No - 0
Grades % - 0
%1
No 1.5 % - 1.5
No 1 grade
of
Grades of
Grade of Grades of Grades of
progress
progres progress
progress progress progress
s

80%

20%

In the Summer 2014 cohort all students gained a level 5 at IB, this is above world
average.

ENGLISH
Enter your judgement for the phase(s) in your school

Attainment

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

Outstanding

Outstanding

Outstanding

Outstanding

Emirati students' attainment


Progress

Outstanding
Outstanding

Outstanding

Outstanding

Emirati students' progress

Outstanding

SEN students' progress

Outstanding

Outstanding

Attainment
Evidence sources: Data Capture, Learning Conversations, Observations, Monitoring Evaluating
and Review cycle, DSIB Data Sheets.

Our Reflection:
Attainment at Phase 1
In the 2014 Inspection, Attainment in English was found to be Outstanding.

We believe this judgment continues to be secure.


The Attainment in the EYFS is Outstanding.
Data identifies that at the end of the year, through a process of in-house
assessments, most children in the EYFS consistently attain significantly higher
levels compared to that of the UK. These results have been compared to the UK
Statistical First release (Oct/Nov) 2013 where possible or the original pilot data
where information is not available.
All staff complete on-going assessment, in line with the new EYFS curriculum.
Childrens level of development has been measured as emerging, expected or
exceeding within the appropriate age related band and has been recorded
against a 1, 2, 3 point score.
In 2014 the number of children at WIS achieving a Good Level of Development
was 65% compared to the UK Statistical Release of 52% (GLD = children
achieving the 12 ELGs in CL, PD, PSED, Literacy and Mathematics).
In 2014 the average point score for all of the children that achieved a GLD at WIS
was 39 compared to the UK Statistical release of 32.
In 2014 the number of children at WIS who achieved the expected level of
development at WIS was 70% compared to the UK pilot data average of 61%
(Children achieving the 8 ELGs in the prime areas of CL, PD and PSED).
In 2014 the percentage of all children that achieved expected(2) and
exceeded(3) in the areas of:
o Literacy at WIS 72% compared to the UK statistical release of 61%.
o Reading at WIS 73% compared to the UK pilot data average of
71%.
o Writing at WIS 70 % compared to the UK pilot data average of 59%.
In 2014 the percentage of all children that achieved exceeded(3) in the areas of:
o Reading at WIS 60% compared to the UK pilot data average of
17%.
o Writing at WIS 53% compared to the UK pilot data average of 10%.
Emirati Students
There were 4 Emirati children in the cohort.

In 2014 the average point score for Emirati children over the GLD
categories at WIS was 35 compared to the UK Statistical Release of 30.
In 2014 the percentage of Emirati children that achieved expected(2) and
exceeded(3) in the areas of:
o Reading at WIS 100% compared to the UK pilot data average of 71%
for all children and 61% for EAL children.
o Writing at WIS 75% compared to the UK pilot data average of 59% for
all children and 49% for EAL children.

Boys and Girls

In 2014 62 % of girls and 63% of boys achieved a GLD compared to the UK


Statistical Release where 34% of girls and 31% of boys achieved a GLD.
In 2014 the Average point score for girls was 39 and for boys was 38 across
the GLD areas compared to the UK Statistical Release where girls achieved
an average score of 34 and boys achieved an average score of 31.
In 2014 the percentage of girls that achieved expected(2) and exceeded(3)
in the areas of:
o Literacy at WIS 76% compared to the UK Statistical release of 69%.
o Reading at WIS 77 % matched the UK pilot data average of 77%.
o Writing at WIS 75% compared to the UK pilot data average of 68%.
In 2014 the percentage of boys that achieved expected (2) and exceeded
(3) in the areas of:
o Literacy at WIS 65% compared to the UK Statistical release of 53%.
o Reading at WIS 69 % compared to the UK pilot data average of 65%.
o Writing at WIS 60% compared to the UK pilot data average of 50%.

SEN Students

In 2014 26% of WIS SEN students achieved a GLD compared to the UK


Statistical Release where 14% of SEN children achieved a GLD.
In 2014 the Average point score for WIS SEN children was 38 across the
GLD areas compared to the UK Statistical Release where all SEN children
achieved an average point score of 25.
In 2014 the percentage of SEN children that achieved expected(2) and
exceeded(3) in the areas of:
o Reading at WIS 40% compared to the UK pilot data average of 34%.
o Writing at WIS 33% compared to the UK pilot data average of 23%.

Evidence Source Phase 1


Revised assessment procedures in line with the newly revised EYFS curriculum.
Moderation of Teacher observations.
Observations demonstrating 100% of teachers providing consistent good or
above practise.
Curriculum
Teaching journal scrutiny took place regularly in order to ensure effective
planning took place within and between both year groups.
Literacy was further developed in FS2 through the introduction of Action Words
and a revised Phonics programme as part of the reading provision.
FS1 and FS2 were also introduced to Dough Disco and Squiggle whilst you
wiggle. All children were encouraged to use the challenge table during Literacy
sessions also.
Phonics teaching was in line with the Letters and Sounds model. Most children

had completed Phase 3 by the end of FS2.


Moderation of all teachers assessments took place at each data capture across
the full range of strands.
SPARKLE (Sensory, Physical, Auditory, Real and Kinaesthetic Learning) approach
has been used throughout the Foundation Stage.

Phase 2
In the 2014 Inspection Attainment in English was found to be Outstanding.
We believe this judgment continues to be secure.
Attainment at end of Key Stage 1

Reading
Writing

% Level
2+
% Level
2+

WIS 2013
85%

WIS 2014
94%

UK
86%

81%

92%

83%

Emirati Students
There were three Emirati students within this cohort. Two children made expected
or above progress in Reading and Writing.
SEN Students
21 students were identified as having Special Educational Needs in this cohort.
90% of SEN students made expected progress in both Reading and Writing.
Phonics screening check
In the first year of WIS completing the phonics screening check 63% of the Year
One cohort achieved the required standard despite these children only
completing one year of the two year phonics cycle.
Attainment at the end of Key Stage 2
Results at the end of the year show that in-school based assessments; most
students consistently attain significantly higher levels compared to UK standards
(2013) in English.

Readin % Level
g
4+
% Level

WIS
2011
96%

WIS
2012
95%

WIS
2013
95%

WIS
UK
2014
96% 86%

63%

66%

63%

64%

45%

5+
Writing % Level
4+
% Level
5+

82%

86%

80%

86%

83%

39%

30%

18%

35%

31%

UK 2014 WIS 2014


% Level
SPAG 4+
% Level 5

UK

74%

89%

74%

48%

62%

48%

Analysis of data at level 4 indicates 79% of students achieved a 4a in reading and


76% achieved 4a in writing. This is above international curriculum standards and
therefore demonstrates Outstanding attainment by the end of phase 2.
UK Key Attainment Indicator
At Wellington 86% of students achieved L4 combined Reading and Writing against
a UK average of 75%.
Emirati Students
There were four Emirati students within this cohort. All children made above or
expected attainment in English.
SEN Students
29 students were identified as having learning needs in this cohort. 90% of SEN
students made expected progress in both Reading and Writing.
PIRLS 2011
WIS score
Other UK Curriculum
Schools
Dubai Average Score

Reading
577
534
476

WIS average score is significantly higher than the PIRLS centre point in relation to
Dubai and the UK.
Reading Purposes and Comprehension purposes
Within both of these areas WIS Significantly out performs Dubai. All Dubai
averages sit at approximately the high 400s whereas WIS averages sit at
approximately the high 500s in all areas.
Curriculum

Curriculum updates in line with the SIP.


Cross phase Writing Moderation.
Spelling and Grammar.
Introduction of new assessments in Year 1 and Year 6.
Moderation of all teachers assessments took place at each data capture
across the full range of strands.

Phase 3
Attainment at Key Stage 3 (end of Year 9)

% Level
5+
% Level
6+

WIS

WIS

WIS

WIS

UK
Average

2011
89

2012
93

2013
97

2014
98

84

70

82

85

74

52

Whilst there has been a decrease in those achieving a Level 6+, this is still
significantly above National UK baselines. Creation of more challenging schemes
of work and intervention programmes has been introduced to increase Level 6+
attainment for the 2014-2015 academic year.
Emirati
There were 6 Emirati students in KS3- 2013-2014. All students attained or
exceeded their CATs target predictions.
SEN
In 2014 100% of SEN students attained or exceeded their CATs target predictions.
Attainment at Key Stage 4 (end of Year 11)
WIS 2011
% A* - C

96

WIS 2012 WIS 2013


93

89 (124)

WIS 2014 International


Averages
92
80

Language
Whilst there has been a slight fall from 2011, this is clearly a consequence of
grade boundary rises and changes in exam board specification. Achieving 92%
A*- C in 2014 is significantly above UK National and International averages.
PIRLS Analysis: Please see Phase 2 above
PISA Analysis
WIS Score

499

Other UK Curriculum Schools


Dubai Average Score

510
468

WIS Average score is broadly in line with the OECD Scaled Average and above
Dubai averages.
Emirati
There were 6 Emirati students in KS3- 2013-2014. All students attained or
exceeded their CATs target predictions.
SEN
In 2014 100% of SEN students attained or exceeded their CATs target predictions.
Phase 4
Attainment at Key Stage 5 (end of Year 13)
English: Literature HL

Level 4+
Level 5 +
English: Literature SL

Level 4+
Level 5 +
Emirati Students

Actual
13 (100%)
9 (69%)

Predicted
13
7

Actual
9 (100%)
5 (56%)

Predicted
9
5

There were no Emirati students in the Literature cohort


SEN Students
There were no SEN students in the literature cohort.
English: Language and Literature HL

Level 5 +
Emirati students

Actual
17 (100%)

Predicted
17

There were two Emirati students within the cohort. Both students achieved a
point score of 5 or above.
SEN students
There were no SEN students within the cohort.

English: Language and Literature SL

Level 4+
Level 5 +

Actual
21 (100%)
20 (95%)

Predicted
21
20

There were no Emirati Students or SEN students.

Progress
Evidence sources: Data Capture, Learning Conversations, Observations, Monitoring Evaluating
and Review cycle

Our Reflection:
Progress at Phase 1
In the 2014 Inspection, progress in English was found to be Outstanding.
We believe this judgment continues to be secure.
2 sub levels
of progress
Reading
Writing

4
6

% 2 sub
levels of
progress
2.63%
3.94%

No 3+ sub
levels of
progress
147
142

% 3+ sub
levels of
progress
96.71%
93.42%

Data indicates that in Reading and Writing almost all students make at or above
expected progress.
Progress in lessons
In recent internal observations 100% of lessons in Literacy were judged as good
or above with 73% of those lessons being outstanding. Of those lessons judged as
outstanding 100% demonstrated outstanding progress within the lesson
measured against their learning objective.
Emirati Students
In the EYFS all Emirati students (four students) made Outstanding progress in
Reading and Writing from their baseline as well as attaining at levels above the
pilot data national average for Reading and Writing.
SEN students
Most SEN students within Reading and Writing make and continue to make

Outstanding progress linked to their on entry to FS2 data.


Within Reading 40% of SEN children recorded attainment at the end of EYFS as
either achieving expected or exceeding within the ELGs against the UK pilot
average of 34%. The average starting point for these children on entry to FS2 was
30-50 emerging. Therefore demonstrating outstanding progress.
Within writing 33% of SEN children recorded attainment at the end of EYFS as
either achieving expected or exceeding within the ELGs against the UK pilot
average of 23%. The average starting point for these children on entry to FS2 was
30-50 emerging therefore demonstrating outstanding progress.
Evidence Source
During this academic year we have further developed our progress measures by
assessing students within the Early Years Outcomes through an on-going
continuous approach as well as capturing the data 5 times per year.
Notably higher achievement compared to entry level indicates high student
progress in Writing and imaginative language.
Regular assessment by class teachers and by designated adults within free flow
zones as well as in class time. These assessments are used against the Early
Years Outcomes alongside supplementary evidence recorded in a Learning Journal
for each individual.
The FS Leader compiles free flow tracking regularly to look at trends, attainment
and monitor the relative usage of the different learning zones. This information is
used to ensure the further raising of standards and progress.
Individuals can be targeted and supported as a result to ensure all children are
making outstanding progress.
Data is analysed from mid-year teacher assessment to inform provision mapping
and planning for the rest of the year against targets. This ensures that all groups
of learners made Outstanding progress.
At the beginning of FS2 we increase our forms of entry from 4 to 7, this means at
least 40% of children are new starters to WIS. A minority of these students come
to us with no prior school experience.
Fingertips Online Tracking system.

Progress at Phase 2
In the 2014 Inspection, progress in English was found to be Outstanding.
We believe this judgment continues to be secure.
Key Stage 1 - Progress has been Outstanding from their baselines.

No - 2+ sub
% - 2+ sub
levels of
levels of
progress
progress
Reading
181
95%
Writing
173
90%
Almost all students make at or above expected progress in Reading.
Almost all students make at or above expected progress in Writing.
Evidence Sources
Through significant development work in Phonics, Speaking and Listening, Writing
and Reading as part of the 2013-14 School Improvement Plan.
Focused intervention by way of enrichment provision, significantly enhanced the
attainment of lower attaining students, ensuring that most children made above
expected progress.
Key Stage 2 Progress has been Outstanding from their baselines.
No. 2+ sub Levels Students
Reading
166
Writing
153
UK Key Progress Indicators:

% 2+ sub Levels of
progress
88%
81%

At Wellington 89 % students have made expected or above progress in Writing


from KS1 to KS2.
At Wellington 98% students have made expected or above progress in Reading
from KS1 to KS2.
Emirati Students
There are 4 Emirati Students within this cohort.
All Emirati students made expected or above progress in Reading.
The Majority of Emirati students made expected end of year progress in Writing.
SEN Students
Almost all SEN students achieved above expected progress in Writing and
Reading.
Evidence Source
Focused intervention by way of enrichment provision, significantly enhances the
attainment of lower attaining students, whilst More Able students provision is
extended and enriched through focused groups and opportunities, with all gifted
students attaining at level 5 or above.

Rigorous enhanced tracking ensures that interventions are matched to all groups
of learners and are constantly adapted and reviewed.
Progress at Phase 3
Year 7:
%
2+
sublevels

of cohort
96

Almost all students made 2+ sublevels of progress from Dec 2013 to June 2014.
Year 8:
%

of cohort
76

2+
sublevels
Most students made 2+ sublevels of progress from Dec 2013 to June 2014.

Year 9:
%

of cohort
2+ sublevels
71
Majority students made 2+ sublevels of progress from Dec 2013 to June 2014.
Progress at Key Stage 4
Year 10
Data
Data
Capture 1
Capture 3
A*- B
52 (51%)
62 (61%)
A* - C
86 (85%)
86 (85%)
The trend here suggests that there has been a significant rise (10%) in the
number of students making the progress necessary to achieve an A* - B.
Likewise, 86% of students sustaining their attainment of an A* - C demonstrates
provision to be outstanding.
Year 11

A*- B
A* - C

Data
Capture 1
67 (66%)
97 (96%)

Data
Capture 3
82 (81%)
92 (91%)

Progress at Key Stage 5


Year 12
Data
Capture 1
4+
62 (98%)
5+
34 (54%)

Level
Level

Data
Capture 3
60 (95%)
46 (73%)

Year 13

Level
Level

Data
Data
Capture 1
Capture 3
4+
38 (100%)
38 (100%)
5+
37 (97%)
37 (97%)

Both tables illustrate outstanding progress in both cohorts with all students
making continued progress throughout the year. Particular success is highlighted
in Year 12 where a significant proportion of students moved into Level 6. Likewise,
with Year 13, no student achieved below a Level 4 with two students moving into
Level 6 and 7 respectively.
Emirati students
At KS3, 4 & 5 all Emirati students are making a minimum of Expected Progress.
Detailed attainment and progress data for our Emirati students shows that this is
consistent over time. There were 2 Emirati students at KS5 who were part of the
cohort who gained 100% World Average or better.
SEN students
SEN students in English continue to make Outstanding progress by almost all
making at least 2 levels of progress.
There was 1 SEN student in KS5 who met their ALIS prediction and was part of the
statistic achieving a Level 4+.
Progress in lessons
The quality of learning and teaching is outstanding. There is clear evidence to
show that almost all students make better than expected progress as measured
against their targets.

MATHEMATICS
Enter your judgement for the phase(s) in your school

Attainment

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

Outstanding

Outstanding

Outstanding

Outstanding

Emirati students' attainment


Progress

Outstanding
Outstanding

Outstanding

Outstanding

Emirati students' progress

Outstanding

SEN students' progress

Outstanding

Outstanding

Attainment
Evidence sources: Data Capture, Learning Conversations, Observations, Monitoring Evaluating and
Review cycle, DSIB Data Sheets

Our Reflection:
In the 2014 inspection Attainment in Maths was found to be Outstanding.
We believe this judgement continues to be secure.
The attainment in the EYFS is Outstanding.
Data identifies that at the end of the year, through a process of in-house
assessments, most children in the EYFS consistently attain significantly higher
levels compared to that of the UK. These results have been compared to the DFE
Statistical First Releases in October/November 2013 where possible or the original
pilot data where information is not available.
All staff complete on-going assessment, in line with the new EYFS curriculum.
Childrens level of development has been measured as emerging, expected or
exceeding within the appropriate age related band and has been recorded
against a 1,2,3 point score.
In 2014 the number of children at WIS achieving a Good Level of Development
was 65% compared to the UK Statistical Release of 52%. (GLD = children
achieving the 12 ELGs in CL, PD, PSED, Literacy and Mathematics)
In 2014 the average point score for all of the children that achieved a GLD at WIS
was 39 compared to the UK Statistical Release average point score of 32.8.
In 2014 the percentage of all children that achieved expected(2) and exceeded(3)
in the areas of:

Number at WIS 74% compared to the UK Statistical Release of 58%.


Shape, Space and Measure at WIS 75% compared to the UK Statistical
Release of 73%.

Emirati Students

There were eleven Emirati students in this cohort.


In 2014 the average point score for Emirati children over the GLD categories at
WIS was 35 compared to the UK Statistical Release of 30.
In 2014 the percentage of Emirati children that achieved expected(2) and
exceeded(3) in the areas of:

Number at WIS 100 % compared to the UK pilot data average of 49% for
EAL children.
Shape, Space and Measure at WIS 100% compared to the UK pilot data
average of 59% for EAL children.

Boys /Girls
In 2014 62% of girls and 63% of boys achieved a GLD compared to the Statistical
Release where 60% of girls and 44% of boys achieved a GLD.
In 2014 the Average point score for boys was 38 and 39 for girls across the GLD
areas compared to the UK Statistical Release where girls achieved and average
score of 34 and boys an average score of 31.
In 2014 the percentage of boys that achieved expected(2) and exceeded(3) in the
areas of:

Number at WIS 73 % compared to the UK Statistical Release of 55%.


Shape, Space and Measure at WIS 73% compared to the UK Statistical
Release of 70%.

In 2014 the percentage of girls that achieved expected(2) and exceeded(3) in the
areas of:

Number at WIS 75% compared to the UK Statistical Release of 61%.


Shape, Space and Measure at WIS 77% compared to the UK Statistical
Release of 76%.

SEN Students
In 2014 26% of WIS SEN students achieved a GLD compared to the UK Statistical
Release where 14% of all SEN children achieved a GLD.
In 2014 the Average point score for WIS SEN children was 38 across the GLD
areas compared to the UK Statistical Release where all SEN children achieved an
average point score of 25.
In 2014 the percentage of SEN children that achieved expected(2) and
exceeded(3) in the areas of:

Number at WIS 40% compared to the UK Statistical Release of 28%.


Shape, Space and Measure at WIS 49% compared to the UK Statistical
Release of 42%.

Evidence Source

Revised assessment procedures.


Observations.
Students learning journals.
100% of teachers providing Good or Outstanding practice.
Casual drop ins from the Year Leader.
Moderation of assessments.
SPARKLE approach to teaching.
Teaching journal scrutiny.
Differentiation during Numeracy through the use of challenge tables.
Higher attaining students targeted during free flow time.
FS1 timetable audit led to increased maths provision.

Phase 2
The overall grade for attainment in Phase 2 was Outstanding in 2014.
These results have been compared to the DFE Statistical First Releases in
October/November 2013. We believe this judgement continues to be secure.
Supporting evidence includes:
Key Stage 1
L2 or above
WIS 2013
90%
WIS 2014
95%
UK Average
91%
The number of children achieving Level 2 is above the UK average in Maths.
As a result of increased pitch and expectation in KS1 there has been a 9%
improvement in our level 3 attainment this demonstrates the trend over two
years showing an upward trajectory.
Emirati Students:
There are 3 Emirati students in Key Stage One. 100% of the Emirati students
achieved at or above International age related expectations at the end of KS1.
SEN students
In 2014, 15 students (8% of the cohort) were recorded as having Special
Educational Needs. 100% achieved their IEP targets.
Key Stage 2
WIS 2014
WIS 2013
WIS 2012
WIS 2011
UK 2013 Average

Level 4+
91%
94%
92%
89%
85%

Level 5+
56%
56%
62%
52%
41%

Results at the end of the year indicate that most students consistently attain
higher levels than UK standards in Maths. This can be demonstrated within our
results at both Level 4 and Level 5. WIS KS2 significantly outperforms the UK
National Average in Maths at level 5 and above by 15%.
As a result of increased pitch and expectation in KS2, and a robust partnership
with our secondary maths department, 17% of students in Year 6 achieved Level
6.
At the end of Key Stage 2 and Phase 2 79% of students achieved 4A or above
curriculum standards which means attainment is outstanding.
TIMSS Analysis
Maths
565
526

WIS score Year 5


Other UK Curriculum
Schools
Dubai Average Score
468
WIS average score is significantly higher than the TIMSS centre point in relation to
Dubai and the UK.
Performance in content and cognitive domains
Within all of these areas WIS Significantly out performs Dubai. All Dubai averages
sit at approximately the high 400s whereas WIS averages sit at approximately
the high 500s in all areas.
Performance across all areas was broadly similar therefore indicating
performance wasnt stronger in one area over another.
TIMSS Targets
TIMSS score of 565 is significantly above TIMSS centre point. As a result of the
TIMSS analysis we have had an increased focus on Geometric Shapes and
Reasoning in KS2 in order to reach our 2015 target of 585 with the ultimate aim
of reaching the threshold of the Advanced International Benchmark.
Emirati Students
There were four Emirati students in Year 6. Of these students, 75% were at or
above curriculum related expectations, this indicates Outstanding attainment.
SEN Attainment
6 students are identified with a special educational need. Of these 6 students,
100% have achieved their IEP targets.

Attainment at Phase 3 [ Key Stages 3 & 4 ]

In the 2014 Inspection Attainment in Maths at Phase 3 was found to be


Outstanding.
We believe this judgement is secure. Supporting evidence includes:
Attainment at Key Stage 3
WIS 2012
WIS 2013
WIS 2014
UK Average
% Level 5+
91
95
100
84%
% Level 6+
84
78
93.8
62%
Trends in KS3 Maths over 3 years show 9% improvement at L5+ and a 9.8%
improvement at L6+.
Student outcomes over the last 3 years have been consistently and significantly
above UK Averages.
TIMSS Analysis
Maths
596
527

WIS score Year 9


Other UK Curriculum
Schools
Dubai Average Score
478
WIS average score is significantly higher than the TIMSS centre point in relation to
Dubai and the UK.
Performance in content and cognitive domains
Within all of these areas WIS Significantly out performs Dubai averages. All Dubai
averages sit at approximately the high 400s whereas WIS averages sit at
approximately the high 500s in all areas.
Performance across all areas were broadly similar therefore indicating
performance wasnt stronger in one area over another.
TIMSS Targets:
TIMSS score of 596 is significantly above TIMSS centre point. As a result of the
TIMSS analysis we have had an increased focus on Geometric Shapes and
Reasoning in KS3 in order to reach our 2015 target of 606 with the ultimate aim
of reaching the threshold of the Advanced International Benchmark.
Emirati Students
There were 6 Emirati students in KS3 - 2013 14. All students attained or
exceeded their CATs target predictions.
SEN students
In 2014 100% of SEN students attained or exceeded their CATS target predictions.
Attainment at Key Stage 4

% A* - C
PISA Analysis

WIS 2012
98 (85)

WIS 2013
95

WIS 2014
97 (151)

National
68.7%

Maths
WIS score
514
Other UK Curriculum
526
Schools
Dubai Average Score
468
WIS average score is higher than the OECD Scaled Average and the Dubai
average.
Problem Solving
This was a focus for PISA in 2012. WIS scored 557 which was significantly higher
than OECD scaled average. This data demonstrates that in this particular area we
are progressing towards the National Agenda targets which state that the UAE will
be among the 20 highest performing countries in PISA in 2021.
PISA Targets
As a result of the PISA analysis we have had an increased focus on Shape and
Space and Formulating in KS3 and KS4 in order to reach our 2015 target of 534
with the ultimate aim of reaching the threshold of the Advanced International
Benchmark. This builds on our TIMSS Target for KS3.
Emirati students

There was one Emirati student in Year 11 who achieved his CATs target
prediction.

SEN Students

91% of SEN students attained on or above their IGCSE CATs target

Attainment at Phase 4 [ Key Stage 5 ]


In the 2014 Inspection Attainment in Maths at Phase 4 was found to be Good.
We now believe that this judgement is Outstanding. Supporting evidence
includes:
A full process of moderation has taken place both externally and internally to
ensure consistency in marking and accuracy in levelling. The outcomes of lesson
observations, learning walks and conversations with students indicates that the
majority of students levels of knowledge, skills and understanding are above
International standards. Ref - table 1.
Table 1: IB results 2014

Maths HL
Achieved level 4 or above
WIS Average grade 4.29.

71% (5)

Worldwide Average grade 4.41.


Maths SL
Achieved level 4 or above
WIS Average grade 4.75.

94% (15)

Worldwide Average grade 4.48.


Maths Studies
Achieved level 4 or above
WIS Average grade 4.63.

78% (27)

Worldwide Average grade 4.51.


The average point score of the 2014 external examinations are outlined in the
table below.

APS Higher
APS
Standard
APS
Studies
Emirati Students

WIS
2012
3.4
3.8

WIS
2013
4.20
4.38

WIS
2014
4.29
4.75

4.2

4.66

4.58

World APS Increase


2014
in APS
4.41
0.89
4.48
0.95
4.51

0.38

There were 2 Emirati students in the 2014 IB Cohort. Both students attained their
ALIS target.
SEN
66% of SEN students attained at their ALIS target or above.

Progress
Evidence sources: Data Capture, Learning Conversations, Observations, Monitoring Evaluating
and Review cycle

Our Reflection:
Phase 1
Progress in the EYFS is Outstanding

Whole year
performance
Progress in lessons

No - 2 sub
levels of
progress

% - 2 sub
levels of
progress

No 3+ sub
levels of
progress

% - 3+ sub
levels of
progress

3.89%

148

96.10%

The Standard of teaching and learning within the EYFS has remained consistently
high with observations demonstrating 100% of teachers providing consistent
good or above practise. In order for this to further develop peer teaching and
casual drop ins from the Year Leader took place throughout the year to improve
teaching standards. This has also continued to take place during this year with
our Maths leader. Within the sessions observed no lesson was judged with an
overall outstanding grade unless progress within lessons was deemed to be
outstanding.
Progress of Emirati students
In the EYFS there are 7 Emirati students in FS1 and 4 in FS2. All Emirati students
made Outstanding progress in Number and Shape, Space and Measure from
their baseline as well as attaining at levels above the UK Statistical Release for
these areas.

Progress of SEN Students.


Most SEN students within Mathematics make and continue to make Outstanding
progress linked to their on entry to FS2 data.
Within Number 40% of SEN children recorded attainment at the end of EYFS as
either achieving expected or exceeding within the ELGs against the UK Statistical
Release 28%. The average starting point for these children on entry to FS2 was
30-50 emerging. Therefore demonstrating outstanding progress.
Within Shape, Space and Measure 49% of SEN children recorded attainment at
the end of EYFS as either achieving expected or exceeding within the ELGs
against the UK Statistical Release of 42%. The average starting point for these
children on entry to FS2 was 30-50 emerging therefore demonstrating
outstanding progress.
Supporting evidence includes:

In 2014 all SEN students achieved their target predictions.


Introduction of targets for all children.
Increase in challenge within all areas of learning.
Timetable audits.

Moderation of assessments and learning journeys.


Teacher observations.
Provision mapping for SEN.
Increased differentiation.
Higher attaining students targeted during free flow.

In the 2014 Inspection Progress in Mathematics at Phase 2 was found to be


Outstanding.
Key Stage 1
Sub levels of

progress No - 2+ sub levels % - 2+ sub levels

Whole year
170
89%
performance
Most of the Year 2 cohort made two sub levels of progress or more from
their baseline.

Emirati Students
There were three Emirati students within the cohort, 100% made outstanding
progress from the baseline data.
SEN Students
9% of the cohort had identified Special Educational Needs. Of those children with
a Special Educational need 83% of students made 2 or more sub levels progress.
Key Stage 2
Sub Levels of
Progress

No - 2 + sub levels of % - 2+ sub levels of


progress
progress

Whole Year
151
80%
Performance
Most students made 2 or more sublevels of progress across year 6 and 40% of
the cohort made double the amount of progress compared the UK expectations.
This indicates Outstanding progress.
91% of students made expected progress in maths compared to 88% in the UK.
WIS Expected progress measures are those students that have made two levels
of progress between KS1 and KS2.
Progress was equal across gender groups with both girls and boys making the
same rates of Outstanding progress in Maths.
Progress of Emirati Students

There were four Emirati students within the cohort. Two students made
Outstanding progress from their baseline in Year 6.

Progress of SEN students

7 students are identified with Special Educational Needs. Of these students


71% made at least expected progress between KS1 and KS2.

Phase 3
In the 2014 Inspection, Progress in Maths at Phase 3 was found to be
Outstanding.
We believe this judgement remains secure. Supporting evidence includes:
Year 7 Progress 2013/14

2+ sublevels

% of cohort
95%

Most students made 2+ sublevels of progress.


Emirati
100% of Emirati students in Year 7 made expected progress or above.
SEN
100% of SEN students in Year 7 made expected progress or above.
Year 8 Progress 2013/14
% of cohort
2+ sublevels
89%
Most students made 2+ sublevels of progress in Year 8.
Emirati
100% of Emirati students in Year 8 attained on or above their target grade.
SEN
100% of SEN students in Year 8 made expected progress or above.
Year 9 Progress 2013/14
% of cohort
2+ sublevels
86%
Most students made 2+ sublevels of progress in 9.
Emirati
100% of Emirati students in Year 9 attained on or above their target grade.
SEN

100% of SEN students in Year 9 made expected progress or above.


KS4 Progress
Year 10 Progress 2013/14

% A*-A
% A*-B
% A*-C
The trend shows outstanding

June 2013 June 2014


19%
34%
27%
72%
68.5%
93.5%
progress in all categories A*-A, A*-B and A*-C.

Year 11 Progress 2013/14

% A* - C

WIS 2012

WIS 2013

WIS 2014

National

98 (85)

95

97 (151)

62.4%

% A*- A
% A*- B
% A* - C

June 2013

August 2014

33.6%
60.5%
89.5%

53.5%
78.1%
97.4%

The trend shows outstanding progress in all categories A*-A, A*-B and A*-C.
Progress of Emirati students in Maths at KS4
100% of Emirati students made expected progress.
Progress of SEN students in Maths at KS4
SEN students in Maths continue to make Outstanding progress.

100% of SEN students made expected progress or above.

Progress at Phase 4 [Key Stage 5 ]


In the 2014 Inspection Progress in Mathematics at Phase 4 was found to be
Outstanding.
We believe that this judgement continues to be secure. Supporting evidence
includes:
Progress at Key Stage 5

Year 12 Progress 2013-14


Year 12 HL
Level
% Level 7+

December 2013
0%

June 2104
14.3%

% Level 6+

14.3 %

28.6%

% Level 5+

57.1%

85.7%

% Level 4+

100%

100%

December 2013
0%
11.5%
50%
80.8%

June 2104
7.7%
11.5%
38.5%
88.5%

Year 12-SL
Level
Level 7+%
Level 6+%
Level 5 %
Level 4+%
Year 12-Studies
Level
% Level 7+
% Level 6+
%Level 5+
% Level 4+

Dec

2013
0%
3.6%
30.4%
50%

June 2014
44.6%
5.6%
21.4%
73.2%

Progress of Emirati students in Maths at KS5


100% of Emirati students made expected progress.
Progress of SEN students in Maths at KS5
SEN students in Maths continue to make Outstanding progress.
100% of SEN students made expected progress or above.

Year 13 2013/14
Year 13-HL
Level
% Level
% Level
% Level
% Level

4+
5+
6+
7+

DC1 (Dec 2013)


80%
30%
0%
0%

Actual results (July 2014)


71.4%
57.1%
0%
0%

Year 13-SL
Level
% Level 4+
% Level 5+
% Level 6+
% Level 7+

DC1 (Dec 2013)


56.3%
43.8%
12.5%
0%

Actual results (July 2014)


93.8%
56.3%
18.8%
6.3%

Year 13-Studies
Level
% Level 4+
% Level 5+
% Level 6+
% Level 7+

DC1 (Dec 2013)


69.4%
44.4%
5.6%
0%

Actual results (July 2014)


77.8%
52.8%
30.1%
0%

SCIENCE
Enter your judgement for the phase(s) in your school

Attainment

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

Outstanding

Outstanding

Outstanding

Outstanding

Emirati students' attainment


Progress

Outstanding
Outstanding

Outstanding

Outstanding

Emirati students' progress

Outstanding

SEN students' progress

Outstanding

Outstanding

Attainment
Evidence sources: Data Capture, Learning Conversations, Observations, Monitoring Evaluating
and Review cycle, DSIB Data Sheets

Our Reflection:
In the 2014 DSIB report the attainment grade for Phase 1 science was
Outstanding.
We believe this judgement remains secure.
The attainment at Phase 1 is Outstanding.
Data identifies that at the end of the year, through a process of in-house
assessments, most children in the EYFS consistently attain significantly higher
levels compared to that of the UK. These results have been compared to the DFE
Statistical First Releases in October/November 2013 where possible or the original
pilot data where information is not available.
All staff complete on-going assessment, in line with the new EYFS curriculum.
Childrens level of development has been measured as emerging, expected or
exceeding within the appropriate age related band and has been recorded
against a 1,2,3 point score. To identify attainment for science within the revised
EYFS we have focussed on The World strand that sits within the specific area of
Understanding the World.
In 2014 the percentage of all children that achieved expected(2) and exceeded(3)
in the areas of:
o The World at WIS 65% compared to the UK Statistical Release of
52%.
In 2014 the percentage of all children that achieved exceeded(3) in the areas of:
o The world at WIS 13% compared to the UK Statistical Release of
10%.
Emirati Students

There were 4 Emirati children represented within this cohort.


In 2014 the percentage of Emirati children that achieved expected(2) and
exceeded(3) in the areas of:
o The World at WIS 75 % compared to the pilot data of 44% for all
children and 68% for EAL children.
Boys /Girls
In 2014 the percentage of boys that achieved expected(2) and exceeded(3) in the
areas of:
o The World at WIS 83% compared to the UK Statistical Release of
78%.
In 2014 the percentage of girls that achieved expected(2) and exceeded(3) in the
areas of:
o The World at WIS 84% compared to the UK Statistical Release of 84%.
SEN Students
In 2014 the percentage of SEN children that achieved expected(2) and
exceeded(3) in the areas of:

The World at WIS 49% compared to the UK Statistical Release of 50%.

Assessment procedures that have taken place have been in line with the newly
revised EYFS curriculum.

Observations are used as daily practise within the EYFS to support these
judgements and this is evidenced within the childrens learning journals.
Standard of teaching and learning within the EYFS have remained
consistently high with observations demonstrating 100% of teachers
providing consistent good or above practise. In order for this to further
develop peer teaching and casual drop ins from the Year Leader took
place throughout the year to improve teaching standards.
Teaching journal scrutiny took place regularly in order to ensure effective
planning took place within and between both year groups.
All children within the EYFS were encouraged to visit the Understanding the
World zone during their free flow twice a day.
Students were provided with a specific Understanding the World lesson on a
weekly basis and teachers were encouraged to provide a wider range of
activities out during the staggered start during the mornings.

Attainment at Phase 2
In the 2014 DSIB report the attainment grade for Phase 2 Science was
Outstanding.

We believe this judgement remains secure.


Supporting evidence includes:
Attainment at Key Stage 1
Level 2+
92%
89%

WIS
UK Average

These standards exceed the UK National averages at Level 2+.


Emirati Students
There were 3 Emirati students in Year 2, all students attained at expected levels.
Key Stage 2 Attainment
In the 2013 DSIB report the attainment grade for Phase 2 science was
OUTSTANDING. We still think this is the appropriate grade.

% Level
4+
%
Level 5

WIS
2011
95%

WIS
2012
98%

WIS
2013
91%

WIS
2014
97%

UK
Average
88%

57%

58%

56%

47%

43%

These standards exceed the UK National Averages at Level 4+.


Emirati students
Most Students achieved internationally expected levels of attainment in Science.
SEN
There were 34 SEN pupils in Year 6. Almost all of these students achieved their
target levels.
TIMSS Analysis
Science
WIS score
550
Other UK Curriculum
520
Schools
Dubai Average Score
461
WIS average score is significantly higher than the TIMSS centre point in relation to
Dubai and the UK.
Performance in content and cognitive domains

Within all of these areas WIS Significantly out performs Dubai averages. All
Dubai averages sit at approximately the high 400s where as WIS averages
sit at approximately the in the low 600s in all areas.
Performances across all areas were broadly similar therefore indicating
performance wasnt stronger in one area over another.

TIMSS Targets
TIMSS score of 550 is significantly above TIMSS centre point. As a result of the
TIMSS analysis we have reviewed our curriculum so that it is more skills based.
Since 2011 we have introduced sub-levels to achieve a more robust and refined
assessment process. Each of these developments will help us to achieve our 2015
target of 570 with the ultimate aim of reaching the threshold of the Advanced
International Benchmark.
Attainment at Phase 3 [Key Stages 3 & 4]
In the 2014 Inspection Attainment in Science at Phase 3 was found to be
Outstanding.
We believe that this judgement remains Outstanding. Supporting evidence
includes:
Attainment at Key Stage 3
WIS
2011
88

WIS
2012
96

WIS
2013
99

WIS
2014
100

UK
Average
85

% Level
5+
% Level
80
82
90
98
54
6+
In 2014 at the end of Key Stage 3 attainment was 11% higher at level 7
compared to UK averages (28%).
Level 7 CAT performance indicators for the year group stated 11% level 7s
however they actually achieved 39% which is 3 times higher than expected.
TIMSS Analysis
Science
WIS score
609
Other UK Curriculum
542
Schools
Dubai Average Score
485
WIS average score is significantly higher than the TIMSS centre point in relation to
Dubai and the UK.
Performance in content and cognitive domains
Within all of these areas WIS Significantly out performs Dubai averages. All Dubai
averages sit at approximately the high 400s whereas WIS averages sit at
approximately the in the low 600s in all areas.

Performances across all areas were broadly similar therefore indicating


performance wasnt stronger in one area over another.

TIMSS Targets
TIMSS score of 609 is significantly above TIMSS centre point. As a result of the
TIMSS analysis we have reviewed our curriculum so that it is more skills based.
We believe this will help us to achieve our 2015 target of 619 with the ultimate
aim of reaching the threshold of the Advanced International Benchmark.
PISA Targets
Science
WIS score
561
Other UK Curriculum
527
Schools
Dubai Average Score
478
WIS average score is significantly higher than the OECD Scale and Dubai
averages.

Emirati
Attainment of Emirati students was in line with targets and the high attainment of
the entire cohort.
SEN
Students with SEN provision perform as well as others in the cohort and 88% of
students exceed their CAT predictors at the end of Key Stage 3.
Improvements at Key Stage 3 over the last 6 months are in part due to a focus on
developing skills in Investigative Sciences and a more robust and focussed
assessment programme that allows significant assessment for learning to take
place. Tracking systems have allowed quick and effective intervention at all
levels.
Attainment at Key Stage 4
Collated Data from GCSE Additional Science and Science and iGCSE Biology,
Chemistry and Physics - students who have achieved 1 or more GCSE Science
grades - percentage

% A* - A
% A* - B
% A* - C

WIS
2013
51
76
95

UK
Average
13
34
64

Collated Data from GCSE Additional Science and IGCSE Biology, Chemistry and
Physics students who have achieved 2 or more A/A* grades. Students are

offered three different pathways in Science leading to up to three GCSE grades in


the subject. Students take either Biology, Chemistry and Physics GCSEs or they
take Science and Additional Science GCSEs. While the students who are higher in
ability are guided towards the triple science pathway neither pathways are
selective. The results below are the collated results for all Science GCSEs and
reflect the percentage of students who have achieved two or more GCSE Science
grades at each level or above.

% A* - A
% A* - B
% A* - C

WIS
2013
46
71
92

UK
Average
13
34
64

IGCSE Chemistry
WIS 2014
% A* - A
% A* - B
% A* - C

65
90
98

EDEXCEL World
Average
42
71
90

IGCSE Biology

% A* - A
% A* - B
% A* - C

WIS
2014
69
84
98

EDEXCEL World
Average
41
70
90

IGCSE Physics
WIS 2014

EDEXCEL World
Average
% A* - A
72
42
% A* - B
85
71
% A* - C
98
91
IGCSE results should be seen in the context of the student cohort compared to
the EDEXCEL World Average. The students at WIS have chosen the course as an
option and although the majority are more able students there is a significant

group who are B/C grade target students. The EDEXCEL data is generally taken
from groups of more able, selected students taking Triple Science.
IGCSE results are all above the average for the entire cohort taking the exam
internationally.
All the data places the school significantly above international standards.
There was one Emirati student in Year 11 in 2012-2013. The student attained a B
grade against a CAT prediction of C grade
GCSE Science
WIS 2014
% A* - A
% A* - B
% A* - C

39
60
82

UK
Average
8
27
59

GCSE Additional Science


WIS 2014
% A* - A
% A* - B
% A* - C

35
61
89

UK
Average
12
34
66

GCSE Science and Additional Science results should be seen in the context of the
students taking the course. 102 students out of 150 took the GCSE. The data
above therefore does not include the Triple Science iGCSE students who are
generally more able. There was a much larger cohort doing triple science in this
year group than ever before. Despite this 61% of those students taking the
course achieved 2 A*/B GCSE grades.

Attainment at Phase 4 [Key Stage 5]


In the 2014 Inspection Attainment in Science at Phase 4 was found to be
Outstanding.
We believe that this judgement is Outstanding. Supporting evidence includes:

Attainment at Key Stage 5 in Science


Biology HL

Working at level 7
Working at level 6
Working at level 5
Working at level 4
In Biology IB HL 95% (20 out of 21)
Average.

2012
2013
2014
24% (5) 5% (1) 5% (1)
48% (10)50% (10) 38% (8)
19% (4) 35% (7) 33% (7)
5% (1) 10%(2) 24% (5)
students achieved above HL Biology World

Biology SL

Working
Working
Working
Working
Working

at
at
at
at
at

level
level
level
level
level

7
6
5
4
3

2012
2013 2014
0%
0%
0%
40% (4) 38%(3)
0%
40% (4) 38%(3) 50% (3)
10% (1) 25%(2) 33% (2)
17% (1)

In Biology IB SL 67% of students (4 out of 6) achieved above SL Biology World


Average.
Chemistry HL
2012 2013 2014
Working at level 7 23% (3) 8%(1) 13 (1)
Working at level 6 46% (6) 31%(4 25 (2)
)
Working at level 5 31% (4) 15%(2 25 (2)
)
Working at level 4
0% 23%(3 13 (1)
)
Working at level 3 or
0% 23%(3 25 (2)
below
)
In Chemistry IB HL 86% of students (6 out of 7) achieved above HL Chemistry
World Average.
Chemistry SL
2012 2013
Working at level 7
0% 33%(1
)
Working at level 6 75% (3) 66%(2
)
Working at level 5
0%
0
Working at level 4
0%
0
Working at level 3 or 25% (1)
0
below

2014
11 (1)
0
11 (1)
56 (5)
22
(2)

In Chemistry IB SL 79% (7 out of 9) of students achieved above SL Chemistry


World Average.
Physics HL

Working
Working
Working
Working
Working

at
at
at
at
at

level
level
level
level
level

7
6
5
4
3

2012 2013 2014


25% (2) 0
11% (1)
25% (2) 25%(2) 22% (2)
38% (3) 38%(3) 11% (1)
0%
0%
11% (1)
12% (1) 38% (3) 45% (4)

In Physics IB HL 67% of students (4 out of 6) achieved above HL Physics World


Average.
Physics SL both of these students are certificate students
2012 2013 2014
Working at level 7 0%
0
0%
Working at level 6 0%
25%(1)0%
Working at level 5 75% (5) 25%(1)0%
Working at level 4 0%
50%(2)50%
(1)
Working at level 3 25% (1) 0
50%
(1)
In Physics IB SL 50% (1 out of 2) of students achieved above SL Physics World
Average.
Sports, Health and Exercise SL
2014
Working at level 5
25%
(2)
Working at level 4
63%
(5)
Working at level 3
12%
(1)
In IB Sports, Health and Exercise 63% of students (5 out of 8) achieved above
World Average.
Environmental Systems and Societies SL

Working at level 7
Working at level 6

2013
0
8 (1)

2014
0
8 (1)

Working at level 5
Working at level 4
Working at level 3

38 (5) 8 (1)
31 (4) 38 (4)
23 (3) 46 (4)

In IB ESS diploma, 40% of students (4 out of 10) achieved above World Average in
ESS.
ESS has been transferred into the Science faculty this year completely rather
than being a Group 3 subject and taught by Geography teachers.

Progress
Evidence sources: Data Capture, Learning Conversations, Observations, Monitoring Evaluating
and Review cycle

Our Reflection:
Progress at Phase 1
In the 2014 Inspection Progress in Science at Phase 1 was found to be
Outstanding.
We believe that this judgement is still secure.

% 2+ levels of progress
The
World

97%
Data indicates that
all students make at or above expected progress.

in Science almost

Results at the end of the year show that students achieve significantly higher
than the UK Statistical Release data. Notable high achievement compared to
entry level indicates high student achievement and progress within The World,
which is the main science focus strand within Understanding the World.
During this academic year we have further developed our progress measures by
assessing students within the Early Years Outcomes through an on-going
continuous approach as well as capturing the data 6 times per year. Within this
system in order for us to further identify student progress we are assessing each
Early Years Outcome age band as a sub level by distinguishing if a child is either
emerging, expected or exceeding, which will enable us to measure in closer detail
levels of student progress.
Progress of Emirati students
In the EYFS all Emirati students (4 students) made Outstanding progress in The
World from their baseline as well as attaining at levels above the UK Statistical
Release averages for this area.
Progress of SEN Students.
Most SEN students within The World make and continue to make Outstanding
progress linked to their on entry to FS2 data. Within The World 60% of SEN
children recorded attainment at the end of EYFS as either achieving expected or
exceeding within the ELGs against the UK Statistical Release of 50%. The
average starting point for these children on entry to FS2 was 30-50 emerging.
In 2013 all SEN students achieved their target predictions.
In the Early Years Foundation Stage almost all children progress at the rate
expected of them or beyond.
Attainment has been consistently above curriculum based expectations for a
consistent number of years. This is evidenced through the newly developed
investigative areas in the Foundation Stage and the development of free flow
Understanding the World activities.
Contributing factors also included students provided with a specific

Understanding the World lesson on a weekly basis and teachers were encouraged
to provide a wider range of activities out during the morning staggered start.
Progress at Phase 2
In the 2013 Inspection Progress in Science at Phase 2 was found to be
Outstanding.
We believe that this judgement is still secure.
Key Stage 1
Science

No - 2 +sub levels of
progress
166

% - 2+ sub levels of
progress
89%

Whole year 2
performance
Data indicates that in Science most students make at or above expected
progress.
Emirati Progress in Science

In 2012-2013 there were 6 Emirati children in Key Stage 1


All Emirati children in Key Stage 1 were working at age related expectation
throughout 2012-2013.
All Emirati children made at least expected progress.

Key Stage 2
Science

No - 2 +sub levels of
progress

% - 2 +sub levels of
progress

Whole year 6
177
96%
performance
Data indicates that in Science almost all students make at or above expected
progress.

84% of KS2 pupils made expected of beyond expected progress.


30% of KS2 pupils made beyond expected progress.
Consistent outstanding progress in all year groups.

Progress of Emirati students


Most Emirati Students made expected or above expected progress.
Progress of SEN students
6 Students are identified with a Special Educational Need. Of these 6 students,
100% achieved their IEP targets.
Progress at Phase 3 [Key Stage 3 & 4 ]
In the 2014 Inspection Progress over time in Science at Phase 3 was found to be

Outstanding.
We believe that Progress over time remains Outstanding. Supporting evidence
includes:

Year 9 Progress in Key Stage 3


Overall Data Year 9 2013-2014
Cum
%
8.18 8.18
14.47 22.65
16.35 39.007+
28.30 67.30
18.77 86.17
11.95 98.126+
1.89 100
100% 100%

%
7a
7b
7c
6a
6b
6c
5a

100% of students achieved level 5+ at the end of KS3 against CAT target of 89%.
CAT performance indicator levels said 11% to achieve level 7 or above therefore
WIS results represent 3 times better than predictions achieved.
Average CAT performance indictor level was 5a for this cohort. WIS actual
achievement average was 6a a value added of 1 level on performance
indicators.
Year 7 Progress in Key Stage 3
Progress from Year 6 TA levels
Science
% of 2+ Sublevels progress
Year 7
78
Year 7 Progress towards WIS target
86% met or exceeded ambitious WIS target.
This is the first year students have been assessed mainly on their skills levels
with a knowledge based assessment at the end of each three topic cycle. This has
been to enhance their skills for final examination GCSE preparation and great a
more rigorous examination procedure.
92% of SEN students are progressing towards their CAT performance indicator
level at a rapid pace. 15% of SEN children have already met or exceed their CAT

performance indictor level 2 years early.


Year 8
Science
Year 6-8

% of 4+ Sublevel Progress
100

Science
Year 9

% of 2+ Sublevels Progress
75%

Year 9

Progress at Key Stage 4


Results from June 2014 GCSE Science shows Outstanding progress from KS3
data with results significantly higher than the expected data from UK averages.
33% better progress than UK at A/A* and 28% better at A*/C.
Students at KS4 achieved significantly higher than CAT predictions In Additional
Science GCSE over 27% more A/A* grades were achieved in comparison to their
expected progress [CAT predictions] and 25% more A*/B grades were achieved.
Students in Triple Science GCSE made beyond expected progress for each subject
Biology with 57% exceeding CAT predictions for A/A* grades. Chemistry 53%
exceed CAT predictions for A/A*. Physics 60% exceed CAT predictions for A/A*
grades.
Biology:
CATS

Actual Additional
Science Results

Cum %
12
50
85

A*/A
A*/B
A*/C
Chemistry:
CATS

A*/A
A*/B
A*/C
Physics:

Predictions Additional
Science

Predictions Additional Actual


Science
Cum %
12
50
85

Actual
69
84
98

Additional Science
Results
Actual
65
90
98

CATS

Predictions Additional Actual


Science
Cum %
12
50
85

A*/A
A*/B
A*/C

Additional Science
Results
Actual
72
85
98

Additional Science:
CATS Predictions Additional
Science
Cum %
A*/A
8
A*/B
36
A*/C
76
Progress of Emirati students in Science

Actual Additional Science


Results
Actual

35
61
89

The Emirati student made better than expected progress. He attained a B


grade against a CAT prediction of a C grade.

Progress of SEN students in Science

SEN students in Science continue to make Outstanding progress.


In 2014 all SEN students at KS4 made outstanding progress. In summary
100% of SEN students achieved results in line or higher than their CAT
predictions.

Progress at KS5
Biology

Working
level 7
Working
level 6
Working
level 5
Working

at

De
c 13
11%

Actual Results
June 14
3%

at

11%

38%

at

7%

34%

at

48%

23%

level 4
Working at
level 3

26%

3%

Chemistry

Working
level 7
Working
level 6
Working
level 5
Working
level 4
Working
level 3

at

Dec
13
0%

Actual Results
June 14
12%

at

12%

12%

at

24%

18%

at

12%

18%

at

53%

24%

Physics
De
c
13
Working
level 7
Working
level 6
Working
level 5
Working
level 4
Working
level 3

at
at
at
at
at

Actual Results June 14


9%

15
%
8%
23
%
46
%

9%
9%
22%
55%

Sports, Health and Exercise SL


De
Actual Results
c
June 14
13
Working at
13
25%
level 5
%
Working at
37
63%
level 4
%
Working at
50
12%
level 3
%
Environmental Systems and Societies SL
Dec
Actual Results
13 June 14
Working at level
0
7
Working at
0%
8%
level 6
Working at
8%
8%
level 5
Working at
38%

level 4

54
%

Progress of SEN students in Science


SEN students in Science continue to make Outstanding progress.
In 2014 all SEN students at KS4 made outstanding progress relative to their
starting point.

Learning Skills
Enter your judgement for the phase(s) in your school

1.3 Learning Skills

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

Outstanding

Outstanding

Outstanding

Outstanding

1.3 Learning Skills


Evidence sources: Internal and External Lesson Observation Data and Feedback,
Monitoring Evaluating and Review cycle
Our Reflection:

Student engagement in and responsibility for their own learning

The school has a whole school learning and teaching group who drive the
school improvement plan Priority 4 to improve the quality of learning.
This is led by one of the Vice Principals and the strategy cross phase team
meets every three weeks.
Throughout the school there are regular PD sessions and team discussions
about the process of learning with an emphasis on self and peer
assessment.
A Middle leader has responsibility for the development and expansion of
student responsibility and leadership across the school.
The Principal and Senior teams meet with students to discuss their levels of
engagement and responsibilities in and outside of school.
The school provides numerous extra-curricular opportunities for students
both within and outside of the classroom e.g. World Scholars Cup,
Committees, House Charities and events.
Every term the students receive an ATL Attitude to Learning - on a scale
of 1 4 and tutors / class teachers follow these up with conversations of
support /challenge.
The home learning and marking policy have been designed to maximise
student engagement and responsibility. The D - dialogue - of the SID
marking requires students to reflect upon their learning and what they can
do to improve their learning even further.
The School Parliament, CAS groups and year group committees enhance
further learning opportunities in and outside of the classroom.
The House and Committee structure provide opportunities for students to
develop their learning and leadership skills and experiences.
The Extra Curricular programme which includes intervention programmes is
well established and students take full advantage of these opportunities.
Through these programmes the less and more able students are supported
and challenged.
Students are actively involved in the target setting process used throughout
the school.
Students are actively encouraged to attend Parents Evenings and use their
reports to identify next steps during mentoring meetings at KS3 5.
Twice a term reports are sent home to parents with reference to ATL
Attitude to Learning - and student engagement. Tutors and subject

teachers make reference to student engagement and levels of


responsibility.
Tutors in Secondary meet with their tutees twice a day. Learning
conversations take place with students during these sessions.
Tutor and CEP time in Secondary and Basic Skills time in Primary is
structured to support the development of thinking and critical thinking skills
e.g. Year 9 critical thinking puzzles
Themed weeks and days support student engagement e.g. Enterprise
week, Arts Week, World Book Day.

Student Interactions and Collaboration

The teacher coaching triad programmes across the school maximise


opportunities to share and develop outstanding practice which impacts on
learning and progress.
Collaboration is one of the learner profile attributes and is a key feature of
all schemes of learning.
Interactions with parents and the wider community are encouraged through
everything that we do including the creative curriculum, home learning
policy, parental workshops, reporting and assessment processes.
The international nature of the school is an integral part of the schools
vision and ethos which continually promotes student interaction and
collaboration right across all phases.
Each year the extracurricular programme expands to support with further
opportunities for interactions and collaborations within Dubai and around
the world e.g. Trips, Visits, World Scholars Cup.
The school hosts a number of high profile events throughout the year which
enhance student and parent interaction and collaboration eg. International
day, Enterprise and Arts week.

Application of learning to the real world and making connections


between areas of learning

The GEMS Core Values are incorporated into every aspect of learning and
teaching.
The schools learning agenda is holistic and designed to enable all students
to develop transferable skills for the future.
The learning agenda at WIS is constantly reviewed to keep pace with the
rapid technological developments and ever changing demands of the 21st
century e.g. D Thinking, Thinking Schools, Digital learning / BYOD.
Planning across the school highlights the importance of the learner profile
within all areas of learning.
The school uses its PD and coaching programme to ensure that the best
current educational practice from around the world is shared and
developed.
The wide variety of enriching extra-curricular activities exists that allow
students to demonstrate real world thinking that shows a very clear
understanding of learning beyond the classroom.
The development of the integrated pathway at KS4 and 5 provides our

students with ongoing opportunities to apply their learning to the world of


work.
Key events throughout the year focus upon maximizing connections
between areas of learning and the real world e.g. Trips, Educational visits,
Cultural local visits, Guest speakers.
The school focuses on the skills need for the work place and supports this
through the PSHE curriculum as well as career, talks, events and support
and advice from the counsellor.
Work Experience takes place for all Year 10 students and provides
invaluable opportunities for our students to broaden their understanding
and awareness of the world of work.
Cross Curricular projects take place across Curriculum and Year Groups.
These support the embedding of learning skills for our students e.g. Year 4
and 7 Writing in Science.
The school has a Director and Deputy Director of Enterprise and
Innovation. Together they lead on whole school Enterprise events and
opportunities for our students. Entrepreneurialism and the development of
these skills is a key part of this work.

Enquiry research and critical thinking skills, including use of ICT

The school is rapidly developing a whole school approach to embedding


critical thinking skills through both Design Thinking and through its work
with the WIS Learner Profile. Teachers are working in their Curriculum and
Year teams to develop the cognitive processes of learning and building a
number of tools for learning and thinking.
A 5 year Digital Strategy is in place and each Curriculum area/primary year
group has a Digital Driver to lead developments in their areas. These
drivers in particular lead on PD for Blended and Flip Learning.
The GLG is an ever increasing active resource for students and their
parents.

Personal and Social Development


Enter your judgement for the phase(s) in your school

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

2.1 Personal responsibility

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

2.2 Cultural Awareness

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

2.3 Community and environmental


responsibility

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

2.1 Personal responsibility


Evidence sources: Whole School Home school contract, Rewards and consequence system,
Behaviour policy, Triple P for parents and advice sessions e.g. guest speakers, No hat - No play
policy for KS1 and KS2, Attendance tracking and policies, Numerous Charitable events including
VGF events, Student leadership structure, Committee meeting agendas and minutes, Student
parliament agendas and minutes, GEMS Core values, SIMS analysis, Displays around the school,
Staff 100% attendance letters and emails regarding punctuality

Our Reflection:
In the 2014 Inspection GWIS was found to be Outstanding across all phases. We
believe that these judgements remain secure.
Attitudes
Whole School

WIS students across the school show respect for one another and for staff.
They demonstrate excellent standards of behaviour and outstanding
attitudes towards their learning.
Our students [85+ different nationalities] are socially and culturally aware
and demonstrate high levels of consideration, mutual respect and
tolerance.
Our students are exceptionally self-confident in the way they present
themselves both in and outside of school.
Students are highly reflective and receptive to critical feedback from their
teachers and tutors. Where additional support is required students are
confident to request / seek it for themselves.
Student leadership opportunities have expanded this year. Head students
are in place in Key stages 2, 3, 4 and 5 and numerous other leadership roles
across the majority of year groups e.g. House Captains, Vice Captains,
Committee leadership roles, Senior Prefects, tutor and class reps.
House captains are responsible for creating and presenting the house
assemblies which include students from Year 4 to Year 13.
Our students have a strong sense of personal responsibility and freely show
independence of mind. The Principal and Heads of School meet with
students regularly to listen to their views and opinions and suggestions for
further school improvement.
A strong committee structure is in place throughout the school. Students

lead these committees in their year groups and across the phases.
The Student Parliament is in place - Yr 3 13 and comprises of all Head and
Deputy Head Students. The Parliament reports to the Senior Team once a
half term.

Phase 3 and 4

In the Secondary Phase, students can be trusted to run projects or


initiatives without direct staff supervision e.g. Year 9 Mini Enterprise
Project, Committees, World Scholars Cup.
A Prefect system allows students to take further responsibility in upholding
the high expectations we have of all students in the school.
Behaviour Whole School

All students are fully aware of their rights and their responsibilities and the
importance of being self-disciplined and accountable for their actions.
There is a clear, concise and positive behaviour management policy which
is understood by all. This policy is based upon the UN Rights and
Responsibilities of the Child.
Rewards are consistently used to positively encourage exceptionally high
standards of behaviour.
Sanctions are fair and clear, age related and consistently used across the
whole school.
Our students are extremely responsible, respond well to their peers and are
able to resolve any difficulties in a mature manner in a variety of different
contexts.
All staff manage behaviour in a highly skilled, respectful and appropriate
manner. There is a spirit of mutual respect within the school community.
All staff across the school are adept at promoting excellent relationships
between students and all the adults in the school. A highly effective and
positive approach to relationships and behaviour ensures that behaviour
management issues are handled in a consistent and effective manner.
Termly data capture is analysed for students attitudes to learning and this is
celebrated or intervention strategies implemented, where necessary.
All staff are responsible for ensuring students are appropriately dressed and
their behaviour reflects the high expectations of our school.

Phase 1 and 2

Individual behaviour logs/charts (primary) are used by teachers and year


leaders to monitor situations/progress.

Phase 3 and 4

SIMs is used to monitor behaviour and rewards.


The mentor and tutor is at the heart of the sharing of information and
providing individual support.

Relationships Whole School

There is a Wellington Way outlining our expectations about how staff


communicate and interact with their students and with one another. These
expectations reflect the mutual respect that is at the core of our schools
ethos.
Relationships between staff and students are exceptionally positive.
The Principal meets with groups of staff at regular intervals to receive
feedback.
Staff provide a wide range of extra-curricular activities ranging from the
academic through performing arts and sport all of which are well attended
and valued by students.
Staff plan and organise exciting, valuable and rewarding additional
activities to enhance the curriculum e.g residentials, World Challenge trips,
theatre visits, author visits.
Students speak positively about their teachers as evidenced in Year 11
Leavers Afternoon, Year 13 Graduation Speeches, FS and Year 2 and 6
Transitions.
The WIS Council members meet have begun to meet with groups of
students to listen to their opinions. These are fed back to the Senior Teams
and main WIS Council.
Student voice is encouraged, respected and acted upon.
There are many opportunities for students and staff to engage in ongoing
and honest reflections about their learning and social development.
Students have and take full advantage of the opportunity to attend Parents
Evening discussions.
Our students enjoy excellent relationships with one another. They feel
safe, valued and supported. There is a very high degree of tolerance and
genuine kindness shown to all groups and types of learners.

Adoption of a Healthy Lifestyle Whole School

Students at WIS have an excellent understanding of healthy life styles


through both the curriculum and pastoral support that they receive.
They understand the importance of and ways in which they can keep
themselves safe from harm and where to seek advice when needed.
There is an onsite medical team who support all students. Regular up-dates
and advice sheets are circulated to tutors across the school.
Internet safety is high on the schools agenda. It is taught as part of the
PSHE curriculum and IT lessons and students know and understand the
dangers and how best to avoid them.
The school places a real emphasis on providing a wide and outstanding
range of physical and sporting activities which have very high student
participation rates.
There is excellent on site provision to support our students health and wellbeing which includes several external partners working closely with school.

Attendance and Punctuality Whole School

Through SIMS an electronic attendance system is established in school.


There is a strong school wide focus on improving attendance and
punctuality across all year groups which is reviewed frequently.
There is a clear attendance and punctuality policy with a stepped process

2.2

for celebrating attendance as well as dealing with any absences /


punctuality issues.
Parents are contacted on day 1 for any unknown absence. They are
required to submit holiday request forms which are signed off by the Vice
Principals.
There is a policy on punctuality with a clear process for dealing with issues
regarding punctuality.
The importance of excellent attendance and punctuality is emphasised in
our rights and responsibilities policy, and through assemblies / pastoral
messages.
Staff are positioned in key locations around the school and in corridors to
support with the whole school approach to punctuality to lessons.
Students are regularly made aware of their responsibilities regarding
attendance and punctuality.
Staffing expectations regarding attendance and punctuality to school are
explicit to all and regularly reviewed.

Cultural Awareness

Evidence sources: Newsletters, Curriculum Plans, Displays and presentations, Student


knowledge and attitudes, Certification

Our Reflection:
2.2 Understanding of Islamic values and awareness of Emirati and world
cultures

In Phase I & 2 Students follow a UAE Cultural Studies programme integrated


into other curriculum areas along with special themed assemblies designed
to foster cultural understanding.
In Phase 3 Students follow a 9 week (27 lesson) program UAE Cultural
Studies curriculum wich focuses on , economic growth, traditions and
values of the UAE.
Islamic Holy days are celebrated and their significance explained to
students during curriculum enrichment time across all phases.
Our Emirati community is actively involved in the planning of local and
national celebrations.
All Emirati parents are personally are invited to a coffee mornings with the
Principal and Executive teams to discuss promoting Emirati culture in
Wellington 3 times per year promoting better understanding within an
International Schools context.
Our school calendar incorporates the Islamic calendar to ensure that all
students are taught and have a clear understanding of the Islamic faith.
They are able to reflect on the impact of Islamic culture and traditions in
Dubai and the effect it has on their own lives and the lives of others.
There are numerous displays of the local traditions in highly visible areas of
the school which highlight aspects of the local culture.
The Sheikha Fatima Award is given to a female student in each of the GEMS
schools in honour of one of the UAEs foremost woman leaders.
The school is a registered participant in the annual SEWA day.
The PSHE programmes of study makes a major contribution to raising

student awareness of rights and responsibilities. This work is supported by


a linked assembly programme which encourages the student voice and is
enhanced by visiting speakers and staff.
Respect for the heritage and culture within the UAE and understanding
of the wider world cultures

Students follow an integrated Cultural Studies programme designed to


foster cultural understanding, economic growth, traditions and values of the
UAE.
National Day is celebrated across all phases embracing the Emirati
community in planning and delivery.
International Day celebrates the diversity of all our students and promotes
Global & Cultural Awareness to all phases.
Students understand and appreciate the multi-cultural nature of society in
Dubai as well as in their own school and are able to demonstrate their
understanding and respect of cultural diversity.
All year 5 students are engaged in a day tour of key religious/ cultural sites
in Dubai.
In FS Students role play Arabian traditions and activities.
Year 1 explored examples of Islamic Gardens.
All year 7 Students visit a local Mosque to gain further understanding the
Islamic faith.
The Parents association WISPA organise a cultural breakfast at SMCCA takes
place each September to widen the Cultural awareness of our wider
community.
As part of our new staffs induction programme we run a number of cultural
awareness sessions highlighting the importance of respecting the local
customs and beliefs.
Students in years 10-13 are actively engaged in Arabic Culture awareness
days
Our students are responsible and contribute actively to the life of the school
and wider community. They demonstrate high levels of independence and
show respect and consideration for the needs of others
Via the House system students work with and visit 4 local Childrens
Charities; raising awareness of disability of within the UAE.
Primary class assemblies celebrate around the world cultures. Chinese New
Year, Australia day and UK Remembrance Day.
Students are actively involved in the development of their school
community and the GEMS network. Students are part of councils,
parliaments and committees and have significant impact upon the
development of the school.
Tutor notice boards have a strong Where am I from? theme.
An increasing number of students are actively engaged in local
volunteering programmes for example Duke of Edinburgh and CAS
initiatives.

2.3 Community and environmental responsibility

Evidence sources: Newsletters, Curriculum Plans, Displays and presentations, Student


knowledge and attitudes, Certification

Our Reflection:
Community involvement:

At WIS our students in all phases are responsible and contribute actively to
the life of the school and wider community. They demonstrate high levels of
independence and show respect and consideration for the needs of others.
In all phases via the House system students have nominated 4 local
Childrens Charity to work in partnership with. Raising awareness of
disability within the UAE.
All Wellington students are actively involved in the development of their
school community and the GEMS network. Students are part of councils,
committees and other programmes such as student observers and
researchers and as such, have significant impact on the development of the
school.
In Phase 3 & 4 Students are actively engaged in local volunteering
programs for Duke of Edinburgh and CAS initiatives.

Work ethic and enterprise

All our students have exceptionally positive work ethic. The play an active
in role in their committee structures across the school. Their ideas are
highly creative and resourceful.
Students in all phases have a clear understanding of the factors which
characterise Dubais success and take part in many different enterprise
projects to develop their key skills even further.
Students in all phases engage in Global Entrepreneur Week.
Students feel positive about the contributions they make to the success of
Dubai.

Environmental awareness and action

WIS students have a clear understanding of environmental sustainability.


Students and staff across all year groups are actively involved in
sustainability and environmental issues both within school, locally,
nationally and globally.
In phases 2, 3 & 4 Eco and Environmental Committees are active across the
school and have led on whole school responses to recycling, water and
electricity conservation.
Students show care for their school, local environment and wider
environments around the world. Charity and Community Committees are
active across all year groups.
The school holds a Green day to promote local and world eco issues.
Via the Eco committee students raise funds for 4 global rainforests,
planning, delivering assemblies to promote the dirham a month initiative
and have purchased 5 acres of rainforest.

Teaching for Effective Learning and


Assessment
Enter your judgement for the phase(s) in your school

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

3.1 Teaching for Effective


Learning

Outstandin
g

Outstandin
g

Outstandin
g

Outstandin
g

3.2 Assessment

Outstandin
g

Outstandin
g

Outstandin
g

Outstandin
g

3.1 Teaching for Effective Learning


Evidence sources: School Monitoring Evaluating and Review Cycle, Policy, Outcomes of internal
and External Lesson Observations,
Our Reflection:

In the 2014 Inspection GWIS was found to be Outstanding.


We believe that the quality of Learning and Teaching across all Phases is
Outstanding.
Teachers knowledge of their subjects
Whole School

All staff demonstrate strong subject knowledge and an understanding of


how best to teach the content to allow students to learn most effectively as
evidenced through the MER process with middle and senior leaders.
A highly effective recruitment strategy is in place which leads to the
appointment and induction of fully qualified teachers in their chosen
subject/age area.
An extremely detailed and extensive induction programme takes place for
September recruits which includes access to online resources and mentors.
Additionally a handbook of resources, policies and practices is sent to new
teachers in the June of each year.
All new teachers are observed by Senior and Middle leaders within the first
half term to ensure their strengths and areas for development are
identified.
A review of the training needs of new teachers takes place in advance of
them taking up post. Where possible training is organised and completed
e.g. IB training.
A clear cycle of performance management is in place across the school.
Professional Development needs are identified and planned for at this point.
The school and GEMS run a comprehensive PD programme, both in house
and involving external agencies. Several WIS staff are Trainers / Facilitators
for GEMS led PD.
The staff coaching and mentoring programme provides highly quality
Professional Development for all colleagues throughout the year;

o Best practice is shared across all phases on an on-going basis. This


takes place through peer observations, team teaching, coaching
programmes and staff meetings.
o All colleagues attending PD complete an action plan [monitored by
their curriculum leader] to embed and develop their learning and
knowledge.
o An increasing number of networks have been set up across Dubai to
share best practice and resources. Outreach work is co-ordinated
across the GEMs network.
o Toolkits and shared resources from best practice across the school are
stored on centrally accessible drives reference Learner Profile Toolkit.
Key dates have been identified for training the Learner Profile group.
This group will further develop the school focus on the learner profile
attributes. Over the next two years the Drive Team will train teachers
and LSAs in the cognitive processes and learning tools which will be
transferrable across the curriculum and Key Stages.
o Curriculum and Year Group Leaders have standing items around the
sharing of best practice.
o Every member of staff who attends external PD shares the new
knowledge gained with their team and wider teams.
Phase 3 & 4

All teachers at Key Stage 5 have or will shortly be receiving the necessary
IB accredited training.
All IB teachers have access to the online PD forums of the IBCC.

Effectiveness of lesson planning, the management of time and use of


resources in lessons
Whole School

Schemes of Learning are created in the form of unit plans which are
reviewed and developed on an annual basis. These schemes are designed
to allow for individual teachers style and skill set.
The school provides all teachers with a lesson planning proforma that is
used across the school and identifies timings, resources as well as progress
and differentiation.
There are consistent guidelines and expectations around lesson planning
and examples of best practice are shared across teams. Exemplar
materials are shared within and across teams.
Our lesson observation cycle includes the submission of a detailed lesson
plan in advance of the observation.
Cross phase meetings have been incorporated into the middle leadership
meeting cycle. These have led to an even greater understanding of
planning, curriculum, transition and assessment practices across KS 1 5.
Subject overviews are in place outlining Curriculum, Assessment, Parental
Engagement opportunities and MER hypothesis for Key stage 1 5
inclusive.
All classrooms are equipped with wireless technology, speakers,
whiteboards and projectors. Additionally Digital Drivers have been
identified in each Year & Curriculum Team.

Each team has a VLE representative to support with every teacher using
the learning platform as an effective learning resource.
The Ace senior leaders carry out lesson observations of LSAs to ensure
these resources are maximised and maintained.
Teachers make full use of the schools outstanding facilities both within and
outside of their classrooms such as our Library, TV studio and Theatre.
Laptop trolleys are widely used by all curriculum areas to enhance student
learning.
Sets of iPads are used across both phases. Visualisers and other media
equipment are able to be booked from the library or Media Department.
Bring Your Own Device scheme has been rolled out across the school since
September 2014 and will be integrated in all areas of learning in
September.

Phase 1 & 2

All Primary classes have additional learning support from an LSA younger
students one per class and older students have three per year group. LSAs
across the school work with the teacher to support student learning.
Medium and short term planning is shared with LSAs.

Teacher student interactions including the use of dialogue and


questions
Whole School

A whole school marking policy is in place across the school which clearly
defines the schools expectation for all teachers. Through regular book
scrutinies these policies are regularly reviewed by Curriculum and Year
Leaders.
The marking policy [ SID Strength, Improvement & Dialogue] places high
importance upon students being involved in their own learning and active
in discussions about their progress.
Our lesson planning proforma and observation feedback proforma allow for
detailed feedback on questioning. In the former teachers identify key
questions for the lesson.
Observations have shown excellent use of higher order questioning to
encourage students to think at a much more profound level about their
learning.
Students are encouraged to attend Parents Evenings with their parents and
are part of the dialogue to review their progress and next steps.
After each Data Capture [x6 a year ] individual student progress is reviewed
and where needed, interventions put in place to support.

Teaching strategies to meet the needs of all groups of students


Whole School

Child friendly Individual Education Plans are agreed in a meeting between


the parent and child are in place for all Wave 3 SEN students. These are
easily accessible to all staff, parents and the learners.
The ACe team [Achievement Centre] regularly distribute teaching guidance

sheets to support teacher planning of identified learning needs.


PIPs, INCAS, CATs and ALIS testing takes place throughout the year and
supports in the identification of groups of learners.
Gifted and Talented students are identified through detailed analysis of
baseline data and current progress data to allow for appropriate task
planning. This is subject and year group specific and it is recorded on our
Schools Information Management System.
Where appropriate there is setting for students in early phonics, Maths and
Arabic, ELL, Literacy.
Schemes of Learning and lesson planning proformas both highlight
opportunities for differentiation and key / challenge questions. Within
primary levels are identified on planning to ensure challenge and
expectations are at its highest at all times.
Importance is placed upon the understanding of individual learning styles.
Staff action researchers have investigated and fed back to groups of staff
on a variety of aspects of learning ie. Numicon.
Teachers work closely with LSAs to review learning outcomes and adjust
planning where appropriate.

The extent to which teaching promotes critical thinking and


independent learning
Whole School

Priority 4 in our School Action Plan relates to developing the quality of


Learning and Teaching especially through developing our students
creativity and independent learning skills.
The Schools Learning Agenda is aimed at promoting critical thought
through our learning skills contained within our Learner Profile.
Our Learner Profile is a feature in schemes of learning, lesson plans and
across our learning environment.
As part of the schools commitment to Design Thinking and the cognitive
thinking approaches, ongoing PD is in place to support and develop higher
order thinking skills, creativity and independent learning.
The revised Home Learning policy at KS2 & KS3 is project based. This
promotes and enhances critical thinking and independent learning.
Parental Engagement events throughout the school celebrate critical
thinking and independent learning.
Learning spaces across the school are maximized to promote independence
and responsibility for learning.
Displays across the school are designed to engage students and promote
critical thinking.

Phase 3 & 4

As part of the IB Diploma Programme every student studies the Theory of


Knowledge. Class teachers in Phase 3 & 4 are now incorporating TOK
styled questions into their Schemes of Learning and lessons.

3.2 Assessment
Evidence sources:School Monitoring Evaluating and Review Cycle, Policy, Outcomes of internal
and External Lesson Observations,
Our Reflection:

3.2 Assessment
Assessment systems and processes
Whole School

In May 2013 the School introduced SIMS international an information


management. This is now embedded across the school and functioning at a
very high level, having a significant impact upon the way in which data and
information is being managed, accessed and actioned.
Students are set targets at the beginning of the year. These are generated
through online Baseline assessments internal assessments and reports from
previous schools. They are reviewed regularly.
Three academic reviews take place for each student each year which are all
shared with parents.
A comprehensive transfer of data takes place during transition meetings in
Term 3.
At each data capture every class teacher analyses the progress of their
students and the progress made by particular groups of learners.
Curriculum / Year Leaders then analyse their teams data and attend an
accountability meeting at Senior Leadership level to review progress made.
Intervention planning is a key outcome from this process.
Curriculum / Year Leaders attend accountability meetings to discuss the
learning journeys / progress of students in their areas. Here underperformance is discussed and reviewed

Quality and accuracy of assessment data throughout the school


Whole School

At each data capture every class teacher analyses the progress of their
students and the progress made by particular groups of learners.
Curriculum / Year Leaders then analyse their teams data and attend an
accountability meetings to review progress made. Intervention planning is
a key outcome from this process.
Student data is regularly reviewed and discussed at Curriculum / Year
meetings. Here best practice / raising achievement strategies are shared.
Cross phase moderation is taking place for all core and Creative Curriculum
subject areas.

Phase 3&4

The GWIS calculator is used by all Key Stage 4 and 5 teachers and provides
bespoke grade analysis which guide further teacher / student / parent
dialogue and interventions.
Moderation and standardisation takes place within the school. At IB teams
work with other schools to moderate work to ensure accuracy of

assessment data.
Level of teachers knowledge of their students strengths and
weaknesses
Whole School

On average all students receive three reports per year. These detail the
current grades, attitudes to learning and progress check for all. Parent
evening interviews are used to share this data and review progress and the
next steps.
The WIS Marking Policy incorporates next steps statements and gives the
opportunity for ongoing dialogue.
All SEN Support 3 students have Individual Education Plans. These are
accessed by all teachers. These are shared with the student, parent,
teachers and LSAs. They are regularly reviewed especially after each data
capture.
Seating plans are regularly reviewed to enhance learning outcomes for
students and their performance across the curriculum
All Emirati students have individual profiles which include targets and
current data. Their performance is reviewed on a regular basis by teachers
and tutors.

Phase 3&4

An ongoing and personalised mentoring programme is in place for Key


Stage 3 5 students. Here the tutors and support tutors review the
progress / attitudes to learning of their tutees.

Quality and effectiveness of oral and written feedback to students


Whole School

The schools Marking Policy sets out clear and high expectations on the
feedback to students. Strengths and areas for improvement are commented
upon and effective dialogue takes place between the teacher and student
SID marking.
There is a common language of assessment which is understood by all
teachers, students and parents and across all phases.
Students have detailed written feedback in their exercise books which they
regularly refer to.
An ongoing cycle of MER (Monitoring, Evaluation and Review) is embedded
across the school and is led by Middle Leaders. Through our MER processes
for regular student reviews of oral and written feedback and their progress
take place. All Middle Leaders are leaders in this process.

The use of assessment to influence teaching, the curriculum and


support for students
Whole School

A clear assessment policy is in place.

A variety of formative and summative assessment strategies are used as


part of the teaching and learning processes in all subjects.
Assessment for learning is an ongoing focus for the school. Ongoing
training and coaching supports teachers in their planning, teaching and
their assessment of student progress.
Staff use AFL and feedback from their students to enhance teaching and
learning activities and inform future planning / student progress.
The Achievement Centre makes effective use of data to identify areas of
strength and challenge for students with additional needs and to provide
provision mapping for each year group.
Students being identified as making limited progress are directed to
bespoke interventions to support their individual learning needs.

Key impact on student learning


Whole School

All staff have challenging and robust PM objectives which are driven by the
priorities of the school one of which is specifically focused on student
progress.
Regular Learning and Progress Conversations take place which ensures that
the quality of learning is constantly improving across the school.
Robust assessment strategies ensure that students are aware of their
current levels of attainment and take responsibility for the next steps in
their learning.
As a result of our high quality induction processes low staff turnover has a
positive impact on learning.
The MER schedule has been embedded across the school and is impacting
upon raising standards in teaching and assessment.

Phase 1 & 2

All EYFS and Year 1 have undergone intensive training to support student
progress and outcomes.
An online assessment program Fingertips Online has been introduced in
Foundation Stage to support assessment and learning.

Curriculum
Enter your judgement for the phase(s) in your school

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

4.1 Curriculum Quality

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

4.2 Curriculum design to meet the


individual needs of students

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

4.1 Curriculum Quality


Evidence sources: School Monitoring Evaluating and Review Cycle, Policy, Outcomes of internal
and External Lesson Observations.

Our Reflection:
In the 2014 Inspection GWIS was found to be Outstanding across all
phases.
We believe that these judgments remain secure.
Rationale, balance and planning

FS KS3 is founded upon the UK National Curriculum adapted for our


international context with cross curricular links made where appropriate.
In the Primary phase, the Literacy and Numeracy frameworks form the
basis of planning, teaching and assessment including rigorous phonic
teaching in KS1 through Letters and Sounds.
Foundation subjects are taught through the Creative Curriculum a skills
based curriculum combining knowledge and understanding from the
different subjects around a central theme/topic. This has a high emphasis
on the development of critical and higher order thinking skills.
In Primary, Music, PE, Islamic and Arabic are taught by specialists from Year
1 and French from Year 4 onwards.
KS4 students have the opportunity to study GCSE, IGCSE or BTEC courses
or a combination of all three.
The majority of our Post 16 students study the IB Diploma but we also offer
the Courses programme and a Level 2 BTEC in Business. Further BTEC
courses at KS4 & 5 are now offered.
The school has developed the Learner Profile across all Key Stages which
highlights learning skills which are mapped across Schemes of Learning.
All teaching teams have long, medium and short term plans which are
regularly monitored, reviewed and cross referenced to ensure breadth and
balance. Regular meetings take place between Curriculum Leaders in
Secondary and Subject Co-ordinators in Primary to support with curriculum
planning and development.

Continuity and progression

Whole school curriculum maps have been developed to ensure clear

progression and challenge throughout the school. Middle leaders across


the phases meet regularly to review and plan through school projects.
Continuity and progression is monitored within Year Groups led by Year and
Curriculum Leaders in Primary and by Curriculum / Subject Leaders in
Secondary.
Primary and Secondary Middle Leaders meet at regular intervals to share
curriculum plans, assessment processes and student progress across the
key groups and phases. The Senior Teams have a full overview of this
through Middle Leader presentations.
Transition between Key Stages is planned and implemented throughout the
academic year.
Curriculum coverage is mapped across the years and monitored. It also
forms part of our handover arrangements.
There are opportunities throughout the year for students to teach their
peers and across phases.
Data is used to review and track student progress after every Data Capture
minimum 6 times a year and accessible to parents through the SLG.
In Secondary outstanding careers advice, support and guidance is available
to parents and students. This high quality support aids and enhances
smooth transitions.

Review and Development

A full and in depth review of the 2014 Curriculum has taken place and plans
adjusted. We now have a bespoke Curriculum based upon the National
Curriculum for England.
Curriculum Leaders / Subject Co-ordinators in the school keep up-to-date
with curriculum developments / revisions to the National Curriculum
framework as well as IB developments.
Throughout the year teams are constantly reflecting and evaluating their
curriculum offer to ensure high quality provision for all.
The ACE team play a key role in overseeing the curriculum offer for all SEN
and Emirati students and provide advice and support where needed.
All Year Leaders complete cohort analysis of their year groups which inform
the potential curriculum offer needed e.g. Introduction of Level 1 courses
for our current Year 8 cohort from September 2014.
Ongoing professional development [PD] opportunities are provided through
curriculum based staff meetings, internal PD and external courses.
Detailed analysis at FS, KS1 - 5 takes place every June / September and
after each Data Capture which include a Curriculum Review.
Network meetings have been set up across schools in Dubai and focus on
curriculum development and sharing best practice to which WIS attends.
Each year WIS has been part of the KHDAs What Works Conference at
teacher and student level.
WIS is a key player in outreach work and networks across Dubai.
Excellent curriculum information evenings are held throughout the year and
are exceptionally well attended. In addition curriculum information
booklets are available to parents on our website.
Parent / student feedback is invaluable to us. This is incorporated into our
final curriculum offers e.g. Year 10 Curriculum 2014 increasing the
Language Offer.

The staff analysis of the curriculum takes place in November of each year
and informs the staffing need and teaching expertise / recruitment for the
January of the following year.

Cross Curricular Links

Cross Curricular projects take place across Curriculum and Year Groups.
These support the embedding of learning skills for our students e.g. Arabic
Language Day, Science Day & World Book Day.
Educational trips and visits support cross curricular links .

Enrichment

Every teacher delivers weekly extracurricular / enrichment activities.


These include weekly Academic Intervention Programmes.
Our whole school programme shows that we provide an outstanding range
of physical, creative and curriculum based activities.
A Director of Innovation leads a team of staff and students on providing
engaging and cutting edge leadership opportunities in Dubai, Europe and
the USA. Parents actively support the nomination of their students on these
exciting programmes.
The Director of Innovation and Entrepreneurialism and the Innovation Team
continue to establish and develop excellent working partnerships with local
and international businesses in the UAE and further afield.
Under-achieving students are clearly identified from their data and attend a
range of intervention programmes personalised to meet their learning
needs.
A wide range of educational trips and visits take place for all Year groups to
support and enhance the learners curriculum experience. Many of these
take place within Dubai and have cultural and Islamic theme.
Experience of residential trips begin in Year 5 and extend through the
Secondary encompassing experiences from most continents around the
world. These experiences all reinforce our students global awareness that
comes through the Curriculum.
High profile political, humanitarian, educationalists, poets, authors and
other guest speakers are regularly invited into school.
We provide an extensive range of opportunities for parental engagement in
and outside of the classroom.
Many major and high profile events takes place throughout the year
involving links with other schools across Dubai and further afield e.g. WSC,
MUN, Entrepreneurial and other Innovation projects.
The G & T working party have further develop the breadth and range of the
extra-curricular programme.

4.2 Curriculum design to meet the individual needs of students


Evidence sources: School Monitoring Evaluating and Review Cycle, Policy, Outcomes of internal
and External Lesson Observations.

Our Reflection:

4.2 Curriculum design to meet the individual needs of students


Provision for all the different groups of students

The curriculum is regularly reviewed in conjunction with cohort needs.


Whole school curriculum maps have been developed to ensure clear
progression and challenge throughout the school. Each map outlines the
FACS Focus, Assessments, Concepts and Skills to be studied.
The curriculum has an extensive range of subjects and offers many
opportunities for artistic, creative and sporting achievement alongside a
challenging coverage of the academic curriculum.
There are opportunities for higher ability students to participate in clubs, as
well as early entry in examinations and to study dual languages.
At KS4 and 5 most subjects are offered at Foundation and Higher Level.
Entry decisions are carefully made using data and involve conversations
with students and their parents.
ACe link teachers, LSAs and 1:1s support SEN and ELL students through a
variety of small groups, in class support and other learning experiences. At
KS4 an Additional Studies support programme is offered to identify students
with additional learning needs.
When and where appropriate setting occurs throughout the school to
maximise the challenge and progress for all learners.

Curricular Choices

Each year the curriculum offer is reviewed and further developed in line
with the cohort and cohorts coming through e.g. BTEC Level 2 in Business,
Creative and Media, Astronomy, Dual Language learners.
Careers education from Year 9 provides our learners with excellent advice
to inform their curriculum choices at Year 10 and Year 12 and beyond.
The IB Co-ordinator regularly reviews the learning pathways for Post 16
learners and adjusts where needed to support learners.
Parents are guided, supported and involved in the curricular offer process.

How well does the school protect


and support students?
Enter your judgement for the phase(s) in your school

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

5.1 Health and Safety

Outstanding

Outstanding

Outstanding

Outstanding

5.2 Care and Support

Outstanding

Outstanding

Outstanding

Outstanding

5.1 Health and Safety


Evidence sources: Policy, Inspection Outcomes, Ongoing Review and Self Evaluation.

Our Reflection:
In the 2014 Inspection GWIS was found to be Outstanding across all phases.
We believe that these judgements remain secure.
Health & Safety, Care and welfare of students including Child Protection
Whole School

We have a dedicated medical team comprising of one doctor and three


nurses who are on site every day.
Our school counsellors work 4 mornings a week in secondary and 4 days a
week in primary and provide termly analysis.
All staff are trained every year on CP / H & S aspects as needed.
There is a clear policy and procedure in place to support with the
identification & intervention of CP issues.
Medical registers are distributed across the teams.
The Student Watch team meet once a month to raise awareness of CP
issues across school and to discuss strategies.

Arrangements to ensure health, safety and security in all parts of the


school, on school transport and in other environments used by the
school
Whole School

Health and safety requirement certificates are all up to date.


Risk assessments have been carried out for various areas of the school.
A clear evacuation policy is in place with regular drills carried out to ensure
quick and efficient reactions.
Onsite doctors and nursing staff monitor and record all processes and
procedures with medicines.
Fully updated medical records including action plans for children with
specific conditions e.g. diabetes, asthma etc.
There is a clear bus policy for all stakeholders. The policy adheres to the

ministry RAT/STS regulations.


A team of maintenance staff clean and clear corridors and check toilets
throughout the day.
Staff are on duty every day at break and lunchtime.
Regular student surveys are conducted which indicate that our students
feel safe.

Quality of maintenance and record keeping; for example, fire drills and
medicines, together with records of incidents and subsequent actions
Whole School

The school has regular evacuation drills which are timed and evaluated.
All staff are clear about their roles and responsibilities during such an
event. These have been supported by the Civil Defence and deemed
Outstanding.
The school has procedures for a wide range of critical incidents.
The school counsellors keep records and provide half termly analysis. A
student watch group meets every month comprising of the designated
Child Protection Officers, SENCOs and School Counsellors. Class teachers
maintain behaviour logs. Year Leaders monitor the overview of behaviour
including bullying and racial incidents.
The accident file is kept within the Nurses offices.

Suitability of premises and facilities for all students, including those


with special educational needs
Whole School

The school has an on-site maintenance team which regularly checks the
school to ensure that safety is upheld at all times.
Regular Health and Safety walks are carried out and documented. Students
with disabilities are able to access the lifts and thereby gain access to all
parts of the school.
There are personalised evacuation plans for students with special needs.

Provision for and promotion of healthy living


Whole School

Healthy living is systematically built into and promoted in all aspects of the
school including the Curriculum Enrichment Programme and PSHE.
Across all Year Groups - all students receive the required timetable
allocation of Physical Education.
A catering review team has been set up to quality assure and continue to
improve our provision.

5.2 Care and Support


Evidence sources: Home school contract, Lesson observations, Student personal profiles, Extra
curriculum programme, Committee and parliament minutes, Attendance and punctuality tracking
and policies, PHSE programme, CEP programme, Provision map, IEPs, SIMS analysis, Child
protection policy, Displays around the school, WIS charter, School careers counsellor files, Reports
Our Reflection:

In the 2014 Inspection GWIS was found to be Outstanding across all phases.
We believe that these judgements remain secure.
Staff Student Relationships
Whole school

Relationships between staff and students are exceptionally positive across


the school.
Lesson observations indicate that we have trusting, respectful relationships
between teachers, support staff and students.
Staff provide an extensive range of extra-curricular activities some of
which, such as revision sessions, whole school productions and sports,
require weekend commitment.
Staff organise additional activities to enhance the curriculum e.g camps,
theatre visits, author visits.
Students speak positively about their teachers as evidenced via our School
Council and Parliament.
Student Voice is actively encouraged e.g Committees, School Parliament
and through students reflecting on their lessons (Primary) and the use of
lesson observers (Science Secondary).
The vertical House System fosters an ethos of through school support and
friendship.
We are establishing a buddy programme through the house system where
older students support younger ones across the school, and where
established students support new arrivals.
Thought provoking assemblies, quality CEP and PSHE programmes address
the students pastoral needs and support their moral, social and emotional
development.
Regular and ongoing supportive conversations about students regularly
take place between teachers and tutors and in secondary this always
involves the child.

Management of attendance and punctuality


Whole school
Attendance

There is a clear attendance policy with a stepped process for dealing with

attendance issues. An electronic attendance system has been established


in school.
Excellent attendance is rewarded with certificates across the school and
written acknowledgements e.g tutor e-mails, displays, letters home,
certificates.
Discussions of attendance are built into our assemblies and PSHCE, CEP
(Curriculum Enrichment Programme) and mentoring sessions.
Parents are required to submit holiday request forms and holidays in term
time are actively discouraged.

Punctuality
Whole school

Discussion of punctuality is built into our assemblies and PSHCE, CEP


(Curriculum Enrichment Programme) and in mentoring sessions.
The importance of excellent punctuality is emphasised in the home/school
agreement.

Identification of students with Special Educational Needs


Whole school

Students who require additional support are identified through entrance


testing, CATs, baseline data, progress checks and teacher, LSA and parent
referrals.
Entrance tests are undertaken to allow us to identify the needs of the
students.
Ongoing analysis of student progress takes place within every year group
and further identification facilitates support for students with additional
educational needs.
We follow the UK SEN code of practice and use an assess, plan, do, review
cycle to support our students.
Students are placed on SEN support if anything over and above the normal
differentiated curriculum is needed and a wave system of intervention is in
place to ensure the students are supported effectively.

Support for students with Special Educational Needs


Whole school

Wellington International School is fully inclusive and admits students with a


wide range of special educational needs.
The school supports students with SEN in a comprehensive and highly
focused way. The facilities and resources include necessary modifications
to meet the diverse range of special needs.
Our outstanding Achievement Centre is at the heart of the school and
provides exceptional support across all phases and across a wide range of
individual learning needs such as English Language Learners, Specific
learning difficulties, Moderate learning difficulties and Autistic Spectrum

Disorder.
We offer extensive support; Counsellors, ACe teachers and LSAs offer
support across the phases. This support and guidance extends to parents.
Individual Student Personal Profiles inform staff of the strategies to be used
to ensure learning takes place.
The school has developed student friendly Individual Education Plans.
These reviews always take place with parent and student.
A member of the SLT team leads on the 3 18 Gifted and Talented strategy.

Advice and Support for all students


Whole School

Students well -being is closely monitored by all members of staff, including


medical staff and the school counsellors.
A Student Watch Committee meets on a monthly basis and comprises
Senior Leaders and Counsellors.
Counsellors work closely with the school medical team.
Regular health checks are carried out and outcomes shared and reviewed
with pastoral teams.
There is a full time Careers Guidance Counsellor who provides extensive
and comprehensive support. She is available for consultation with
students, parents and staff at all levels.
A highly effective and well-structured PSHE programme runs throughout the
school from FS to Year 11.
The students personal development is further enhanced by enabling
students to be involved in the maintenance of our school environment and
at the same time contributing to global initiatives.
Our outstanding Achievement Centre is at the heart of the school and
provides exceptional support across all phases and across a wide range of
individual learning needs. This support and guidance extends to parents.
Counsellors, ACe teachers and LSAs offer support across the phases.
Child Protection guidelines are followed according to the Child Protection
Policy and are reviewed through regular training.
Support for students well-being is robust across the school. Assessments
are carried out on a termly basis as a minimum to track and monitor
progress.
After each data capture student data is rigorously analysed, interventions
and their impact reviewed and further targeted interventions are put in
place where required to ensure all learners are making progress relative to
their start point.
Student progress is shared and reviewed at Parents Evenings.
Clear, concise, informative and data driven reports are available to parents
three times per year.

Phase 1 and 2

Circle time sessions take place across the Primary phase.

Phase 3 and 4

The personalised CEP programme in Years 12/13 sees a weekly programme


of students engaging with writing their university statements, applications
and looking at how to choose and apply.

How good are the leadership and


management of the school?
Enter your judgement for the phase(s) in your school

Overall
6.1 Quality of leadership

Outstanding

6.2 Self-evaluation and improvement planning

Outstanding

6.3 Parents and the community

Outstanding

6.4 Governance

Outstanding

6.5 Management, including staffing, facilities and resources

Outstanding

6.1 Quality of leadership


Evidence sources: Principals PM, BSO inspection report, DSIB Inspection reports

Our Reflection:
In the 2014 Inspection GWIS was found to be Outstanding across all .We believe
that these judgments remain secure.
6.1 Quality of Leadership
Leadership teams have a clear vision and sense of direction evidenced by the
priorities within the School Improvement Plan. This is focused on continually
raising students progress and achievement.

A new through school vision was developed in the summer of 2014 and
involved consultation and collaboration with all stakeholders within the school.

The Executive team have a commitment to developing whole school attitudes


and practice.
Senior and Middle leaders at all levels across the school are dedicated to very
high standards and set a clear direction for the school. They set and maintain
high levels of professional competence and communicate high expectations to all
staff about sustaining and developing school improvement.
The quality of Distributed Leadership is outstanding. Curriculum, Year Group
and Senior Leaders all share a clear direction for the school.
A robust process of Performance Management is in place to secure further
school improvement and provide opportunities for relevant CPD.
The school prides itself on a strong commitment to professionally develop
every colleague. Succession planning is effectively in place and colleagues are
given opportunities to contribute and delivery 3-18 strategy.
High quality and effective relationships are established and maintained to

enable effective communication across the school.


Strong leadership and innovative approaches ensure that the school has a
clear capacity for continued improvement.

6.2 Self-evaluation and improvement planning


Evidence sources:

SEF, Evidence Files, Monitoring Evaluating and Review Cycle

Our Reflection:
All leaders across the school demonstrate a strong commitment to school
improvement. Self-evaluation and improvement planning are outstanding.
Our comprehensive MER process of monitoring and evaluation is in place
across the school including teaching and learning, curriculum provision and
student progress.
Detailed data analysis from half termly assessments form part of our
monitoring cycle and identify areas of progress and potential under-achievement.
Intervention planning and its impact are regularly reviewed as part of this
process.
Clear processes are in place across the school which impact upon school
improvement planning which include data analysis, questionnaires, scrutinys,
student interviews and team reviews. The results inform our review processes
which include the accurate identification of high quality CPD.
School leaders effectively track and evaluate progress over time. Early
identification allows the school to review and adapt strategy where necessary

6.3 Parents and the community


Evidence sources:

WISPA and WISC minutes, Parental Feedback

Our Reflection:
The school has a long standing commitment to Parental Engagement activities
and involving parents in the life of the school. Partnerships with parents and the
community are outstanding.
Parents are kept informed through a variety of methods e.g. newsletters,
reports, workshops, parents evenings and curriculum booklets.
The school operates an open door policy where parental views are welcomed
and listened to.
A wide range of community links have been established which offer an
extensive range of opportunities for all.
Our parent association WISPA is very active throughout the school. Activities
include the organization of whole school events, supporting after school activities,

supporting charitable initiatives and fund raising for the school.


WISPA provides constructive monthly feedback to the Leadership of the school to
ensure that any generic parental concerns and observations are discussed and
fully addressed.
The WIS Council is actively engaged in all aspects of the school improvement
agenda. The 3 sub committees (Leadership, Standards and The Whole Child)
contribute to the whole school self-evaluation process and to the identification of
school improvement priorities.
The Community Hub in an Established resource for all parents.

6.4 Governance
Evidence sources: Principals Performance Management, WISC minutes and feedback, GEMS
Corporate Office Support and Monitoring

Our Reflection:
WIS is a GEMS school. The GEMS Company is the largest global provider of
private education and his therefore highly experienced in providing clear,
dynamic and innovative leadership and management for its schools.
WIS is supported by the corporate team of professionals, ranging from HR to
legal advisors, recruitment personnel to ICT strategic support and PD to
educational strategic development expertise.
The Principal and the staff at GWIS are supported fully through this network.
In addition, the Principal is line managed currently by the Director of
International Schools who retains an oversight on for the workings of the schools
in the UAE network.
The Principal is monitored by means of a performance management system
and developing areas of feedback such as surveys parental and staff. This
informs planning and decision making.
Principals are held accountable for all day to day matters by a variety of teams
at corporate level ranging from financial control to admissions: from parental
engagement to marketing.
In addition, Principals are managed by means of educational and business
operations type meetings, chaired by senior corporate staff who are by these
means kept fully aware of key developments at a school and company level.
Decisions taken at such corporate level ensure that the commitment to parents
and customers is kept and Principals are held accountable for the development of
said relationship and delivery.
An established parent group [WIS Council] is in place which comprises three
separate committees. This group is proactively involved in reviewing and
developing the schools self-evaluation processes. This group allows parents to

be part of the decision making processes and hold the school to account.
An ongoing process of GEMS reviews takes place whereby a trained team from
GEMS schools visit other schools and validate [ or not ] the schools own selfevaluation and act as a critical friend and help to identify strategy and redefine
priorities.
The school regularly consults with parents and incorporates their feedback e.g.
Home Learning, behaviour policy and reports into school improvement strategy.

6.5 Management, including staffing, facilities and resources


Evidence sources: Policy, Internal and External reports

Our Reflection:
Recruiting procedures ensure that all teachers employed in the school have
appropriate teaching qualifications, expertise in the curriculum and a shared
ethos of quality education with a strong focus on learning.
Regular learning walks show that corridors and classrooms are vibrant and
celebrate learning successfully. Specialist teaching spaces and high quality
facilities provide a generous and stimulating learning environment both in and
outside of the classroom.
The management, staffing, facilities and resources are outstanding. These are
all effectively utilised to enhance student learning.
A relevant training programme provides opportunities for all teachers and
classroom assistants.
Students have very good access to information technology which is an
integrated part of their learning.

Judgement Overview Table


The table below is designed to help schools monitor the accuracy of their own
judgements against the DSIB quality indicators compared to the previous
inspection judgements. It would be useful to compare your ratings for each
quality indicator in last year's self-evaluation form with the ratings in this year's
self-evaluation form. Please use the data you fill in the table to help you reach the
overall performance judgement for your school. It is expected that all schools
submit this document as part of their self-evaluation, including 'Good' and
'Outstanding' schools.

Aspects /
QIs

1.1 Islamic
Education Attainment

1.1 Islamic
Education Progress

1.1 Arabic As A
First Language Attainment

1.1 Arabic As An
Additional
Language Attainment

1.1 Arabic As An
Additional
Language -

Change
between
SEF 201314 & SEF
2014-15

Phases

Year
Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

Inspectio
n 201314

N/A

Good

Acceptable

Acceptabl
e

SEF
2013-14

N/A

Good

Good

Acceptabl
e

SEF
2014-15

N/A

Good

Acceptable

Acceptabl
e

inspectio
n 201314

N/A

Good

Acceptable

Acceptabl
e

SEF
2013-14

N/A

Good

Good

Acceptabl
e

SEF
2014-15

N/A

Good

Good

Good

Inspectio
n 201314

N/A

Acceptabl
e

Unsatisfact
ory

Acceptabl
e

SEF
2013-14

N/A

Good

Acceptable

Acceptabl
e

SEF
2014-15

N/A

Good

Acceptable

Acceptabl
e

inspectio
n 201314

N/A

Acceptabl
e

Acceptable

Acceptabl
e

SEF
2013-14

N/A

Good

Acceptable

Acceptabl
e

SEF
2014-15

N/A

Good

Good

Good

Inspectio
n 201314

N/A

Acceptabl
e

Acceptable

N/A

SEF
2013-14

N/A

Acceptabl
e

Acceptable

N/A

SEF
2014-15

N/A

Acceptabl
e

Acceptable

Good

N/A

Good

Good

N/A

inspectio
n 201314

N/A

Aspects /
QIs

Progress

1.1 English Attainment

1.1 English Progress

1.1 Mathematics Attainment

1.1 Mathematics Progress

1.1 Science Attainment

1.1 Science
Progress

Change
between
SEF 201314 & SEF
2014-15

Phases

Year
Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

SEF
2013-14

N/A

Good

Good

N/A

SEF
2014-15

N/A

Good

Good

Good

Inspectio
n 201314

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2013-14

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2014-15

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

inspectio
n 201314

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2013-14

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2014-15

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

Inspectio
n 201314

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Good

SEF
2013-14

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2014-15

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

inspectio
n 201314

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2013-14

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2014-15

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

Inspectio
n 201314

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2013-14

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2014-15

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

inspectio
n 201314

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2013-14

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2014-15

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Aspects /
QIs

1.3 Learning Skills

2.1 Personal
responsibility

2.2 Cultural
Awareness

2.3 Community and


environmental
responsibility

3.1 Teaching for


Effective Learning

3.2 Assessment

4.1 Curriculum
Quality

Change
between
SEF 201314 & SEF
2014-15

Phases

Year
Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

Inspectio
n 201314

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2013-14

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2014-15

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

Inspectio
n 201314

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2013-14

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2014-15

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

Inspectio
n 201314

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2013-14

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2014-15

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

Inspectio
n 201314

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2013-14

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2014-15

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

Inspectio
n 201314

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2013-14

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2014-15

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

Inspectio
n 201314

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2013-14

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2014-15

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

Inspectio
n 201314

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2013-14

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Aspects /
QIs

4.2 Curriculum
design to meet the
individual needs of
students

5.1 Health and


Safety

5.2 Care and


Support

6.2 Self-evaluation
and improvement
planning

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

Phase 4

SEF
2014-15

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

Inspectio
n 201314

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2013-14

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2014-15

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

Inspectio
n 201314

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2013-14

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2014-15

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

Inspectio
n 201314

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2013-14

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

SEF
2014-15

Outstandi
ng

Outstandi
ng

Outstandin
g

Outstandi
ng

Outstanding

SEF
2014-15

Outstanding

Inspectio
n 201314

Outstanding

SEF
2013-14

Outstanding

Outstanding

SEF
2013-14

Outstanding

Inspectio
n 201314

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Outstanding

Inspectio
n 201314

SEF
2014-15

Outstanding

SEF
2013-14

SEF
2014-15

6.4 Governance

Phases

Year

Inspectio
n 201314
6.1 Quality of
leadership

Change
between
SEF 201314 & SEF
2014-15

Outstanding
Outstanding

N/A

Aspects /
QIs

Phases

Year
Phase 1

6.5 Management,
including staffing,
facilities and
resources

Overall
Performance

Phase 2

Phase 3

SEF
2013-14

Good

SEF
2014-15

Outstanding

Inspectio
n 201314

Outstanding

SEF
2013-14

Outstanding

SEF
2014-15

Change
between
SEF 201314 & SEF
2014-15
Phase 4

N/A

Outstanding

Inspectio
n 201314

Outstanding

SEF
2013-14

Outstanding

SEF
2014-15

Outstanding

N/A

OVERALL PERFORMANCE
Enter your judgement for the phase(s) in your school

Overall
7.The overall performance of our school is

Outstanding

7.The overall performance of our school is


Evidence sources: SEF, DSIB and BSO Reports
Our Reflection:

Our last inspection from DSIB in January 2014 rated the overall performance of
the school as Outstanding. We believe that this judgement remains secure.
The school is fully compliant with all statuary requirements
Progress and attainment are at least good with the majority being outstanding
across the school
All aspects of students personal and social development are outstanding
throughout the school
Students demonstrate outstanding attitudes towards their learning and enjoy
school
Behaviour is exemplary with a strong appreciation given to local traditions
and cultures in the international context, as well as Islam
Teachers have and excellent knowledge of their subjects and produce
consistently high quality planning for a wide range of student needs. The quality
of learning and teaching is Outstanding
Teachers collaborate with colleagues to maximize opportunities for learning
focused on critical thinking, active learning, problem solving and enquiry
WIS has an extremely strong learning ethos
Celebration of learning is explicit and highly developed
Excellent assessment and reporting systems are in place to ensure students
understand and take responsibility for what they have learned
The curriculum is extremely well designed to allow for individualised learning
at all levels of the ability range and provides depth and breadth
School self evaluation is honest, accurate and insightful which in turn drives
an excellent improvement planning cycle forward
There is a safe and secure environment for all, with respectful partnerships
between staff, students and parents
Facilities within the school are excellent and used effectively to maximize

learning
Partnerships with parents and the community are outstanding but are
constantly under review for further development.