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Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

A WONDERMENT OF THE WORLD


GRADE 6
PREAMBLE

A Wonderment of the World is designed to encourage students to view the world around them from different perspectives. The themes covered in the unit
promote contemporary art forms and techniques, challenging outdated stereotypes. The program aims to refresh Visual Arts programs in schools and
strives to highlight the valuable cross curriculum skills and learning that is achieved through a well written Visual arts program. The unit develops
interpersonal skills, social and emotional intelligences, and cognitive abilities such as problem solving skills and creative thinking. Throughout this unit
students will engage with a variety of different material, and mediums. They will experience artworks from varying cultures, and use these new
experiences to inform and influence their own creations. Students will be introduced to public art where they will begin to develop an understanding of
context, location, time and environment and the influence these factors have over how an artwork is perceived. The unit also incorporates ICT which has
been found to promote self-directed learning in students. Throughout the unit, students will continue to develop more sophisticated critiquing skills and
subject specific vocabulary giving them the tools they need to further engage with and enjoy art both academically and in their everyday lives.

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.


Complete
over 2
sessions

Kate Johnston

A
Wonderment
of the World:
Identity
Symbol Tile
Mural

Grade/
Lesson
number/
Conceptual
framework

Themes

AusVELS
Curriculum Foci

Australian
Curriculum foci

Cross
Curriculum
links

Underpinning
Theory

Grade 6

-Identity

Dimension:
The Arts

Strand:
The Arts

Inquiry (Social
Studies)

-Indigenous
Perspectives
(Symbols and Images:
The use of images and
metaphors to make
meaning)

-8 Aboriginal
Ways of
Learning

Artwork
and Artist
*Creating
and Making

Learning Focus:
Students learn
about ways to
design, improvise,
represent,
interpret, make
and present art
works that
communicate
feelings and their
interests and
understanding of
themselves, their
relationships and
other people.
Students gain

Viewpoint:
Visual Arts
Band description:
Visual arts supports
students to view the
world through various
lenses and contexts.
Content description:
Explain how visual
arts conventions
communicate
meaning by
comparing artworks
from different social,
cultural and historical
contexts, including
Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander
artworks.

-Visual
Thinking
Strategies

Resources
and
Relevant
subject
specific
vocabulary
-Sketch books
-pencils
-black markers
-Plain white
Matt tiles (1 per
student plus
spares)

Focus
Questions

-How are
symbols used in
Indigenous
artwork to
create meaning?
-What beliefs,
characteristics
and values
make us who
we are?

-Glaze
-Need access to
a kiln
vocabulary
-Symbol
-Metaphor

-How can we
use symbols to
represent this
image of
ourselves?

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.


inspiration from a
broad range of
sources, including
arts works from
different cultures,
styles and
historical contexts.
Standards:
In their art works,
they communicate
ideas and
understandings
about themselves
and others,
incorporating
influences from
their own and
other cultures and
times. They
evaluate the
effectiveness of
their arts works
and make changes
to realise intended
aims.

Kate Johnston
Content
elaboration:
Analysing how
symbolic meaning or
metaphor is
constructed in their
own artworks and
artworks of others.
Achievement
standard:
Students explain how
ideas are represented
in artworks.
They describe the
influences of
artworks and
practices from
different cultures.

-Identity
-Perspectives

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Learning
Outcome
Students will
learn how to
design symbols
to create
meaning.

Tuning In

Development

-As a class,
view an
Indigenous
artwork that
incorporates
Indigenous
symbols.
-Students to
use Visual
Thinking
Strategies to
discuss the
symbols they
see and the
perceived
meaning of
the symbols
and overall
image.
(Refer to
appendix 1 for
suggested
painting).

-As a class, view


several well
recognised symbols.
Discuss symbol
meanings. Discuss
the
features/characteristic
s of the symbol and
how those features
lead us to derive
specific meanings.
(Refer to appendix 1
for suggested
symbols).
-Model
brainstorming the key
beliefs/
values/traditions, etc.
that make you who
you are (eg: Family).
Only choose one to
base your identity
symbol on.
-Model designing a
basic symbol to
represent this key
value.

Kate Johnston

Consolidation and
Practice
Part 1.
-students are to
design a symbol
that represents
their identity.
Part 2.
-Each student is to
paint their symbol
on a tile (using
glaze). Once tiles
have been baked in
the kiln they can be
displayed as a
permanent tile
mural.

Reflections/Connec
tions
-As a class discuss
the considerations
required to design a
symbol that was
recognisable and
clear enough to
convey the desired
meaning.

Adaptations

Assessment

For students
requiring extra
support:

Assessment as
Learning.

-Design a symbol
to represent a
feeling/emotion.
Or

-Identify and discuss


other symbols that
students see every
day in the world
around them (eg:
crucifix). Do these
symbols mean the
same thing to
everyone?
Do other factors
(such as location,
time, culture and
context) influence
the meaning of a
symbol? Discuss.
-Identify advantages
and disadvantages
of using symbols to

-Select an animal
they feel reflects
them in some
way. Design a
symbol for
selected animal.
Extended
response activity:
Design a symbol
to represent the
school. Can be
done
collaboratively.
School motto and
values need to be
considered in the
design.

-Student
analyses and
deciphers
symbols
designed by
peers.
-Student
identifies
features of
design that are
effective.
-Student
suggests
improvement to
ensure correct
meaning is
conveyed.

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.


(Refer to appendix 1
for work sample).

Kate Johnston
convey meaning.
Think about how
students felt when
they first viewed the
indigenous painting
during tuning in
session. Did they
recognise the
symbols in the
painting? Or did
they require
guidance and
explanation. Why?
What implications
does this have on
the use of symbols
in society?

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Full day
excursio
n

A Wonderment
of the World:
Critiquing
Public Art in
Melbourne

Grade/
Lesson
number/
Conceptua
l
framework

Themes

AusVELS
Curriculum Foci

Kate Johnston

Australian
Curriculum foci

Cross
Curriculum
links

Underpinning
Theory

Resources
&
Relevant
subject
specific
vocabulary

Focus Questions

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.


Grade 6
2
Audience
*Exploring
and
responding

-Learning beyond the


visual arts classroom

Kate Johnston

Dimension:
The Arts

Strand:
The Arts.

Learning focus:
They investigate a
range of traditional
and contemporary arts
forms, styles.
Students learn to
evaluate their own and
other peoples arts
works showing some
understanding of
selected arts forms and
their particular
techniques and
processes as well as an
emerging
understanding of the
qualities of arts
elements, principles
and/or conventions.
Standard:
Students discuss
traditional and
contemporary arts
works using
appropriate arts
language to describe
the content, structure
and expressive
qualities of their own
and other peoples
works.

Viewpoint:
Visual Arts.
Band description:
They apply visual arts
knowledge in order to
make critical
judgments about their
own importance as
artists and audiences
Content description:
Explore ideas and
practices used by
artists to represent
different views,
beliefs and opinions
Content
elaboration:
Exploring crossmedia effects and
characteristics of
representation when
making artworks
inspired by
observation or
imagination, for
example, graffiti art.
Achievement
standard:
Students use visual
conventions and
visual arts practices
to express a personal
view.

-English (Using
relevant evidence
to justify
opinions).

-Feldman
model for
evaluating/criti
quing an
artwork

-Feldman model
template (1 per
student for each
piece of public art
visited).

-How can we
describe an artwork
objectively?
-How do we
interpret an artwork?

-Pencils/pens
-clipboards (1 per
student)
-tablet/smart
phone(for taking
photos of artworks
and referring to
maps of CBD)
vocabulary
-Interpretation
-Analysis
-Justify
-Subjective
-Objective
-composition
-focal point
-balance
-harmony
-contrast
-rhythm
-movement
-pattern
-proportion
-space
-line

-How do we make a
justified judgement
of an artwork?

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston
-colour
-tone
-texture
-shape
-form

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Learning
Outcome
-Students will
learn how to
critique a piece
of artwork.

Tuning In

Development

-As a class, view


Andy Warhols
Campbells Soup
Cans, 1962.
Discuss features of
the painting.
Ask students to
form judgements of
the artwork.
-Do they like the
painting?
- Is it good/bad?
Why/why not?
-Is it art? Why/why
not?
(Refer to appendix
2 for image of
painting)

-Introduce the
Feldman model
template.
-Fill out
template as a
class using
Andy Warhols
Campbells
Soup Cans
painting.
-Discuss factors
such as
objectivity vs
subjectivity.
-Use subject
specific
vocabulary
when describing
and analysing
the painting.
(Refer to
appendix 2 for
Elements of Art
vocabulary and
information).
-Model
justifying

Kate Johnston

Consolidation
and Practice
-Students are to
participate in a
public art crawl
of Melbournes
CBD.

Reflections/Connectio
ns
As a class, discuss the
influence the Feldman
model had over the
development of
judgement/opinion.

-During the
public art crawl
students are to
practice critiquing
each artwork
visited using the
Feldman model.
(Refer to
Appendix 2 for a
list of Public
Artworks and
locations around
Melbournes
CBD).

-Did the Feldman


model make it easier
or harder to explain
the reasoning behind
your opinion of each
artwork?
-Did the use of the
Feldman model
change your initial
opinion of an artwork?
Why/why not?
-Did the class have
many varied opinions
of each piece? What
implications does this
have for public art?
Discuss controversial
public artworks such
as Vault. (Refer to
appendix 2 for
information on Vault).

Adaptations

Assessment

For students
requiring extra
support:

Assessment of
Learning.

Use Visual
Thinking
Strategies to
describe, analyse
and interpret the
artwork. Transfer
responses into
relevant sections
of the Feldman
model template.
Extended
response activity:
Use Feldman
model to critique
informal public
art (eg: graffiti).
Is there a place
for public
graffiti? Discuss.

Collect select
Feldman model
worksheets
-Student
describes and
analyses artwork
using correct and
relevant elements
of art.
-student justifies
their judgements
using factors of
the Feldman
Model.

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.


judgements of
the painting
using factors of
the Feldman
model.
(Refer to
Appendix 2 for
information on
Feldman model,
Feldman model
template).

Kate Johnston

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.


Complete
over 2
sessions.

Kate Johnston

A Wonderment
of the World:
Collaborative
Textured Piece

Grade/
Lesson
number/
Conceptual
framework

Themes

AusVELS
Curriculum Foci

Australian
Curriculum foci

Cross
Curriculum
links

Underpinning
Theory

Grade 6

-Collaboration

Dimension:
The Arts

Strand:
The Arts.

Interdisciplinary
learning.

-Reduce, Reuse, Reappropriate

Learning Focus:
They independently
and collaboratively
explore and
experiment with
different ways of
presenting arts works.

Viewpoint:
Visual Arts.

-Collaborative
art making for
the
development of
relation skills
and emotional
intelligence.

Subject
matter
*Creating
and Making

-Texture and Line

Standard:
Students
collaboratively
experiment with and
apply a range of skills,
techniques and
processes using a
range of materials and
equipment to plan,
develop, refine, make
and present arts works.

Band description:
Visual Arts engages
students in a journey
of discovery,
experimentation and
problem-solving.
Content description:
Develop and apply
techniques and
processes when
making their
artworks.
Content
elaboration:
Enhancing and
practising their art
making skills in using
a range of materials
and technologies.

Thinking
processes.
Communication.

-Inclusive
culture
(Creative
Australia).

Resources
&
Relevant
subject
specific
vocabulary
-Image of Alberto
Burri painting
(refer to appendix
3)
-Small recycled
objects provided
by students (eg:
various bottle lids,
small boxes,
doylies, toilet
rolls, small cans,
small figurines
etc).
-large canvas
-plaster
-spray paint (1
colour)
-Small sample tin
of house paint
(suggest colour

Focus Questions

-How can we ensure


everyone has a
voice/is
included/contributes
?
-How can we make
decisions for the
common good?
-How can we
reuse/re-appropriate
objects in order to
give them a new
function, meaning,
and purpose?

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston
Considering
viewpoint-materials
and technologies.

contrasts with
spray paint).
-PVA
-Superglue (to
glue more difficult
objects.

Achievement
standard:
They demonstrate
different techniques
and processes in
planning and making
artworks.

Learning
Outcome

Tuning In

Development

Consolidation and
Practice

Vocabulary
-texture
-line
-shape
-form
-composition
-Contrast
-reuse
-re-appropriate

Reflections/Conn
ections

Adaptations

Assessment

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.


Students will gain
an understanding
of the
collaborative
process (and how
to use it
effectively).

As a class view
Albert Burris
textured painting
(Refer to
appendix 3 for
image).
-Ask students to
describe piece in
terms of the
elements and
principles of art
(Refer to
appendix 3 for
pdf).
-Discuss
materials used
by artist.

Kate Johnston
Watch video on
how to make a
textured painting.
(Refer to appendix
3 for video link).

Part 1.
-Students are to bring small
unwanted objects from
home to be used in the
piece.

Explain task. As a
class, students are
to create 1 large
collaborative
textured painting
using recycled
objects. The
position of objects,
and the way objects
are used to add to
the texture (eg:
attached whole/
used to make an
impression), is to
be decided as a
class.

-Students are to either stick


object to plastered canvas
or make an impression in
the plaster using object
* All decisions are to be
made collaboratively as a
class.

Collaboration:
Discuss the
collaboration
process. What
techniques did
they use? Were
they effective?
Why/why not?
In what other
contexts might
they use these
collaborative
skills?

Part 2.
Students will then be
required to paint textured
piece and create interesting
lines and effects by letting
paint run.

Texture and Line:


Describe their
textured painting
using the elements
and principles of
Extended response
art.
activity:

Students are then to


use 2 contrasting
paint colours to
create interesting
lines and effects.
Allow contrasting
paint to run across
spray painted
canvas- around
objects and through
grooves/
impressions.

Describe how the


paint flowed.

For students
requiring extra
support:

Assessment for Learning

Allocate specific
roles to students
who may be
struggling with the
collaborative
process (eg: spray
painter/ gluer etc)
Explain how small
contributions from
many individuals
can produce large
scale and incredible
results.

-Student uses democratic


processes to make
decisions

Research other
large scale
collaborative Art
Where might they projects from
have seen flow
around
like this in
Australia/The
nature?
world. Share with
(Refer to appendix class in discussion
3 for image of
time.
river)
Why does the
river twist and
curve the way it

Observation

-Student demonstrates
tolerance of varying
opinions
-Student allows for
compromise.
-Student demonstrates
appropriate social skills
while
collaborating/discussing.

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston
Note: Show
students video
demonstrating how
liquid flows around
objects.
(Refer to appendix
3 for video)

does? Why not


flow in a straight
line?
Re-using/reappropriating:
What was
interesting about
the
materials/objects
they used to make
the piece?
Were the objects
used in the piece
(which were
initially
considered to be
rubbish)
perceived
differently once
they formed part
of an artwork?
Can objects be
made to take on
new roles?
Where would we
see this occurring
in everyday life?

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Complete
over 3
sessions

Grade/
Lesson
number/
Conceptual
framework

Kate Johnston

A Wonderment
of the World:
Claymation of
Flowers
Blooming
Themes

AusVELS
Curriculum Foci

Australian
Curriculum foci

Cross
Curriculum
links

Underpinning
Theory

Resources
&
Relevant
subject
specific
vocabulary

Focus Questions

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.


Grade 6
4
Subject
matter
*Exploring
and
responding
*Creating
and Making
*ICT focus

Flora and Fauna

Kate Johnston

Dimension:
The Arts

Strand:
The Arts.

Learning focus:
Students research,
improvise, practise and
rehearse skills,
techniques and
processes, using a
range of media,
materials, equipment
and technologies.

Viewpoint:
Visual Arts.

Standard:
Students
independently and
collaboratively
experiment with and
apply a range of skills,
techniques and
processes using a
range of media,
materials, equipment
and technologies to
plan, develop, refine,
make and present arts
works.

Content description:
Develop and apply
techniques and
processes when
making their
artworks.

Band description:
Students utilise visual
techniques,
technologies,
practices and
processes.

Content
elaboration:
Enhancing and
practising their art
making skills in using
a range of materials
and technologies.
Considering
viewpoints-materials
and technologies.
Achievement
standard:
Students demonstrate
different techniques
and processes in
planning and making
artworks.

Science

Learning to
see, seeing to
learn.

-Time lapse video


of flowers
blooming

(Drawing and
sculpting as a
means of
learning)

-sketch books
-pencils
-Plasticine
(colours suitable
for making
flowers)
-Laptops/tablets (1
laptop per 2
students)
-Spare digital
cameras (if
laptops/tablets are
unable to take
adequate pictures.
Vocabulary
-Shape
-Form
-Colour
-Movement
*Unfold
*Invert
*stretch
-petal
-stem
-sepal

What does a flower


look like?
What shapes,
colours, and textures
do you see?
How does a flower
bloom?
What movements do
the petals make?
Do the shapes,
colours and textures
appear to change?

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston
-anther
-filament

Learning Outcome

Tuning In

Students will learn


to focus on object
structure and
movement through
drawing/sculpting.

Students will watch a


time lapse video of a
flower blooming and
describe what they
see using the
elements and
principles of art.
(Refer to appendix 4
for video).
*Exploring and
responding

Development

Consolidation and
Practice
Part 1.
Part 1.
Teacher models
Students sketch
how to sketch
flower exactly as
flower at various
they see it at each
stages of the
key stage of the
blooming process.
blooming process.
Play video, pause at Note, for
any key visual
Claymation to look
stage of the
effective, a
blooming process.
minimum of 10
Sketch image
stages will need to
exactly how you
be drawn and
see it. Use correct
sculpted.
terminology to
(Refer to appendix 4
name flower parts
for student work
as you draw them.
sample).
Part 2.
Teacher models

Part 2.
Students are to

Reflections/Connections

Adaptations

Assessment

What are the main


features of the flower?

For students
requiring extra
support:

Assessment as
learning.

Did the process of


drawing the flower
improve your knowledge
of the flowers structure?
Why?
Did the process of
sculpting the flowers and
turning them into a
Claymation improve your
knowledge of the
blooming process? Why?
Extended response
students can share what
they have learned about

Students
experiencing
difficulty making
plasticine sculptures
may choose to
photograph their
drawing and develop
a cartoon rather than
Claymation.
Extended response
activity:
Watch video of the
making of Walt

Informal
discussion.
Student can
explain how the
process of drawing
and sculpting their
knowledge of
flower anatomy
and the blooming
process.
Student can
identify key parts
of a flower.

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston
making a plasticine
sculpture of the
flower based on
one of the sketches.
Part 3. Run a short
tutorial on how to
photograph each
flower sculpture
correctly and turn it
into a Claymation
using windows
movie
maker/equivalent.
(Refer to appendix
4 for video
tutorial).

mould and sculpt a


cartoon making
separate plasticine
processes.
flower for each stage
of the bloom based
on their sketches.
(Refer to appendix 4
for example of
plasticine flower
mid bloom).
Part 3.
Students are to work
in pairs on
laptops/tablets to
develop their
sculptures into a
Claymation of a
flower blooming.
(Refer to appendix 4
for example of a
flower blooming
Claymation).

Disneys The Lion


King. Explain the
process cartoonists
used to ensure the
characters looked
and moved
authentically. How
does it relate to the
flower blooming
activity?

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

APPENDIX 1
Underpinning theories and Teaching practice.
Visual Thinking Strategies:
Involves a teacher facilitated discussion in which students explain what they are seeing using evidence based on what they already know. They draw conclusions
about something new based on prior knowledge and experiences. VTS should be conducted in a group as students benefit from the ideas of others further enhancing
their own understandings. VTS also improves communication skills and vocabulary as students attempt to verbalise what they are seeing (Visual Thinking Strategies,
2013).
Key questions for facilitating VTS effectively:
Whats going on in this picture?
What do you see that makes you say that?
What more can we find?
The following link provides further information on Visual Thinking Strategies and how the strategy functions:
http://www.vtshome.org/what-is-vts
The following link describes how to utilize VTS in a classroom:
http://www.vtshome.org/what-is-vts/method-curriculum--2
Indigenous Perspectives:
Indigenous perspectives can be taught using 8 Aboriginal Ways of Learning. The use of symbols and metaphors is one of the 8 ways of learning from an Indigenous
perspective.

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

The following link provides further information about 8 Aboriginal ways of Learning:
http://8ways.wikispaces.com/
Tuning In resources
The following link provides examples of indigenous artwork that incorporates symbols/iconography, along with symbols meanings:
http://www.kateowengallery.com/page/Aboriginal-Art-Symbols.aspx
Suggested example:
Women sitting around waterhole.
Retrieved from http://www.kateowengallery.com/page/Aboriginal-Art-Symbols.aspx

Note: symbol meanings used in above paintings can be retrieved from above web link
The following link provides a table of commonly known symbols and their derived meanings:
www.crossroad.to/books/symbols1.html
Suggested symbols to analyse as a class

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

Yin Yang: Butterfly: Dove


Sample of students work

APPENDIX 2
Underpinning theories and Teaching practice.
The Feldman model explicitly outlines the objective and subjective factors that need to be considered in order to effectively critique an artwork. The Feldman model
requires students to support their interpretations and opinions regarding an artwork using relevant evidence. This is a skill that is essential across the curriculum and
in everyday life.
The following link provides details about each of the 4 key categories of the Feldman model:

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

R4: Feldman, E. Feldmans Model of Art, Retrieved from http://www2.gvsu.edu/hipshean/resources/Feldman%27s%20Model%20Crit.pdf

Relevant arts based vocabulary


Elements and principles of art

Tuning in resources:

Andy Warhol has produced many artworks that tend to polarise audience opinions. Partly due to his experiences in advertising, Warhol ended up producing
pop art (contemporary). This involved the painting of every day consumer objects, hence Campbells Soup Cans. This prompted many art appreciators to
question is this even art? You decide

The following link provides further information regarding focus artist Andy Warhol:
http://www.warholfoundation.org/legacy/biography.html
Suggested Andy Warhol artwork to analyse as a class: Campbells Soup Cans, 1962

Resources.
Feldman model templateFile (Worksheet for activity)

The following link provides images, names, locations and a brief blurb of various public art pieces around Melbourne:
http://www.thatsmelbourne.com.au/Placestogo/PublicArt/Pages/ArtintheCity.aspx
Suggested public art to view: Vault: Ron Robertson-Swann

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

Corner Dodds and Grant streets

Vault is an interesting piece of public artwork to critique as it caused a polarised public opinion when it was originally unveiled. Public opinion was so strong
regarding this piece that it was eventually removed from its initial central city location. It emphasises the importance of context, and audience when appreciating a
piece of artwork.
Map of Melbourne CBD
https://www.google.com.au/search?q=map+of+melbourne+cbd&biw=1024&bih=456&tbm=isch&imgil=UzB-qpldFS2g6M%253A%253Bhttps%253A%252F
%252Fencrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com%252Fimages%253Fq%253Dtbn%253AANd9GcTQ2La53ZTrWV7Frsh-wQ4KNS6ruqekegSCHKjYdVBZDHyY8z3HHw
%253B600%253B412%253BnD1mU47rzba4MM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.bcl.com.au%25252Fmelbourne%25252Fmelbournemap01.htm&source=iu&usg=__LDNSDDvrsLbhz49kdA8nQA2DU94%3D&sa=X&ei=g5qBU7m7AsvKkwWvzYG4Bg&ved=0CCwQ9QEwAQ#facrc=_&imgdii=
_&imgrc=UzB-qpldFS2g6M%253A%3BnD1mU47rzba4MM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.bcl.com.au%252Fmelbourne%252Fimages
%252Ftvic2%252FMelbournecityV.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.bcl.com.au%252Fmelbourne%252Fmelbourne-map01.htm%3B600%3B412

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

LIST OF PUBLIC ARTWORKS AND LOCATIONS IN MELBOURNE'S CBD

Take a photo
Fill out Feldman model worksheet (1 worksheet each per artwork)
1) Melbourne Fire Brigade Mosaic (corner of Albert Street and Gisborne St)
2) 101 Collins Street Exterior Columns and Foyer
3) Scots Church Corner of Collins Street and Russell Street
4) Tribute to Dame Nellie Melba Collins Street 156 Collin Street
5) Manchester Unity Building: corner of Collins and Swanston Street (exterior)
6) Manchester Unity Arcade Frescos (go inside and look up!) corner of Collins and Swanston Street
7) Einstein Corner of Degraves Street and Flinders Lane (look up!)
8) Birrarung Marr
9) Town Hall (Swanston Street)
10) Eco Architecture: CH2 Building 240 Little Collins Street (view from Swanston Street)
11) Federation Square
12) Degraves Street Subway (Campbell Arcade) Platform Gallery
13) Street Art: Hosier Lane
14) Street Art: Union Lane
15) Walking Man Cnr of Bourke and Swanston
16) Parliament House
17) Hotel Windsor Spring Street (near Bourke Street)
18) Little Lon food court mural of 19th century red light district Crn Exhibition St & Little Lonsdale St
Other types of public art to look out for and discuss
Street statues
Graffiti
(McKenry, 2012)

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

APPENDIX 3
Underpinning theories and Teaching practice.
Providing your students with opportunities to work collaboratively (particularly on imaginative pieces) has many benefits in terms of academic and personal growth.
For example, through the collaborative process, students learn to cooperate and compromise. They gain a thorough understanding of the collaborative process. It also
improves their ability to make decisions for the common good- Thus improving their relationship development and maintenance skills, along with their emotional
intelligence. All of these factors are important for developing well rounded individuals who function effectively in society (Cooper & Sjostrom, 2006).
The following link provides further information regarding the academic connections and personal learning that derives from working collaboratively. It
also includes many ideas for collaborative art activities that can be undertaken in the classroom:
R1: Cooper, M. & Sjostrom, L. (2006). Collaborative Art: Making Magic. Making Art Together: How Collaborative Art-Making Can Transform Kids, Classrooms, and
Communities (pp. 1-13). Boston: Beacon Press.

Theoretical underpinning: Inclusive culture


Collaborative creative projects are inclusive projects which fosters an inclusive culture. This increases acceptance, tolerance and understandings between differing
people and cultures. This strengthens Australia as a unified multicultural nation.
For further information regarding creative Arts and Inclusive culture, refer to the following document:
R3: http://creativeaustralia.arts.gov.au/assets/Creative-Australia-PDF.pdfURL

Tuning in materials, information and resources.


Alberto Burris is an artist who creates textured pieces by attaching physical items to canvas prior to painting.
Suggested Alberto Burris painting to view and discuss with class as a tuning in activity.

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

The following link takes you to an Alberto Burris web page containing photographs of his work plus background information on the artist himself.
http://congustobiz.wordpress.com/2010/11/08/alberto-burris-materical-painting-and-california-deserts/
Materials, information and resources.
The following link is a video of an artist demonstrating how to make a textured painting:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29CpFc8dgAI
The use of texture and line in artwork is a good opportunity for students to increase their descriptive vocabulary. The following link provides information and useful
descriptive vocabulary regarding the different elements seen in visual arts. This vocabulary will also be useful for students when critiquing artwork-particularly when
critiquing using the Feldman model:
Elements and principles of art

The following video is a simulated demonstration of how liquid flows around solid obstacles:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nu2ujy0lf1E
How will your paint flow around your obstacles?
Suggestion: This phenomenon also occurs all around us in nature. Rivers follow the grooves and crevices of the land and flows around obstacles such as trees and
large foreign objects. If possible take students for a walk to a nearby creek or river and enable them to observe and describe it. Birds eye view images of rivers and
creeks may also be useful.

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

Note: students to think about why the river has flowed in the pattern that it has. Why dont rivers flow in a straight line?
APPENDIX 4
Underpinning theories and Teaching practice.
Drawing can be beneficial to learning. More specifically, when attempting to draw something we engage more closely with it. While drawing something you are
forced to examine it closely and pay intense attention to detail. We tend to focus on its features, textures and movements etc.
The following link is part of a documentary by artist Henry Moore, describing the connection between drawing and learning:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLTnsWV2tjE (4:48 6:11)
Sculpting an object after drawing it enhances our knowledge of the object further as our sense of sight is closely connected with our sense of touch.
The following link is part of a documentary by Henry Moore describing the connection between sight and touch:
R4c: YouTube. (2010). The Art of Henry Moore part 3/8. Retrieved from http://youtu.be/lDyjcHb-3bU (8:14 mins) URL (5:20-5:32)
The Benefits of incorporating ICT into an arts classroom.
ICT is the way of the world. It is the future for current generations of students and generations to come. ICT has changed the role of the teacher and the student. ICT
is perceived as relevant to modern day students and so engages them on a deeper level. This encourages students to delve deeper into their own learning and take their

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

search for knowledge in directions they wish to go. The role of the student has transformed from passive listener to active self-directed learner, and the role of the
teacher has changed from knowledge dispenser to facilitator of self-directed learning (Karthikeyan, 2013).
Karthikeyan, P. (2013). ICT in Education. Indian Streams Research Journal. 3(6), p. 1-4. Retrieved from http://web.a.ebscohost.com/
Tuning in materials, information and resources.
The following clip is a time lapse video of various flowers blooming:

Time Lapse of Various Flowers Blooming


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jt03qSdleo
Windows Live Movie Maker Tutorial, 2014:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLTnsWV2tjE

Materials, information and resources.


Technical procedure of task.
-Observe: Watch entire video of flower blooming. Attend to movement details. For example, do the petals grow outwards, unfold, invert?
-Re-observe with specific goals in mind: Re-watch video, pausing at key stages of change. Sketch what the flower looks like (draw what you see) at each key
stage of the bloom. Focus on shape and form. (Recommend a minimum of 6 separate stages of bloom captured). The more stages of the bloom captured, the
better the quality of the claymation.
-Using plasticine or playdough, students mould and sculpt a separate clay model of each key stage of bloom based off their detailed sketches.
-Once clay models are completed photographs can be taken, and windows movie maker can be used to develop a Claymation of a flower blooming.
Samples of student work
Flower Blooms (Claymation using windows movie maker)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5WXzpD7DW4E

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

Plasticine flower (half bloom). Image sourced from https://www.google.com.au/search?


hl=en&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1024&bih=499&q=clay+flower&oq=clay+flower&gs_l=img.3..0l10.4814.10318.0.14941.11.10.0.1.1.1.290.2143.2j
0j8.10.0....0...1ac.1.45.img..2.9.1703.3mN3jz106S8#hl=en&q=plasticine+flowers&tbm=isch&facrc=_&imgrc=nUnybwM8PY1QlM%253A%3B2zVfqvTGzqy_9M
%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.playingwithflowers.co.uk%252Fwp-content%252Fuploads%252F2009%252F11%252FplasticineFlowerCollage2.jpg%3Bhttp
%253A%252F%252Fwww.playingwithflowers.co.uk%252Fbits-and-blogs%252Fhow-to-make-plasticine-flowers%252F%3B546%3B263

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

Rationale
Inspired by Henry Moores (2010) comment An artists raw material is what he has seen and done, A Wonderment of the World is a unit designed to
encourage students to look around at the world around them. This includes their immediate surroundings, their personal intrinsic world (including the
intrinsic world of others), and the natural world. The specific themes covered in this unit are; Flora and Fauna; Identity and Indigenous perspectives;
Learning beyond the classroom; and Reduce, re-use and re-appropriate through collaborative processes. Each theme is explored using appropriate
components of the conceptual framework. The sessions are structured around a creating and making and/or exploring and responding focus. The aim of
this structure is to develop students ability to both produce and understand/relate to varying artworks. Each themed session is supported by relevant
underpinning theories. These theories form the basis of each themed session, and directly inform teaching practices involved.
The Flora and Fauna theme requires students to closely observe the blooming process of a flower and use the experience to respond and create. The
underpinning theory driving this session is learning to see, seeing to learn- drawing and sculpting as a means of learning. According to Henry Moore
(2010), drawing can be beneficial to learning. More specifically, when attempting to draw something we engage more closely with it. While drawing
something we are forced to examine it closely and pay intense attention to detail, therefore increasing our knowledge of the thing or object on a
structural and physical level. This includes knowledge of movement. For example, this session facilitates the knowledge of flower structure and the
physical movements involved in the blooming of a flower.
The Identity and Indigenous perspectives theme requires students to view and discuss specific Indigenous artwork that incorporates the use of
Indigenous symbols. Identity is a crucial part of indigenous culture, therefore identity and Indigenous perspectives are connected. The session is both
supported and driven by 8 Aboriginal Ways of Learning. The use of symbols in indigenous culture to make meaning is one of 8 Aboriginal ways of
Learning. Students will discover the considerations, influences and processes involved in designing a symbol that is effective in making meaning. They
will be required to explore their own personal values, beliefs and cultural influences in the process. This session also facilitates advanced cognitive
processes through the use of visual thinking strategies. Visual Thinking Strategies (2013) involves teacher facilitated discussion where students explain
what they are seeing using evidence based on what they already know. Through Visual Thinking Strategies students learn to support their thinking with
evidence which is a crucial skill across the curriculum and throughout life.

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

The Learning beyond the classroom theme requires students to view and critique public artworks. The critiquing process is guided by the use of the
Feldman model. The Feldman model functions as a template to scaffold the specific thought processes and considerations involved in critiquing a piece
of artwork. The Feldman model requires the use of objective and subjective evidence to support opinions and judgements of artwork which is a
necessary skill across the curriculum and throughout life. The theme also introduces the concept of context and audience and its influence over how an
artwork is perceived. The theme intends to promote the idea that art is all around us and takes many forms- challenging common stereotypes.
The Reduce, re-use and re-appropriate through collaborative processes theme requires students to use recycled household materials to produce a
collaborative textured artwork. Collaborative work promotes academic and personal growth. Through the collaborative process, students learn to
cooperate and compromise. It also improves their ability to make decisions for the common good- Thus improving their relationship development and
maintenance skills, along with their emotional intelligence (Cooper & Sjostrom, 2006). The theme encourages students to consider the re-appropriation
of objects as a result of context.
The overall unit is designed to encourage students to view the world around them from different perspectives-hence, A Wonderment of the World.
References

Cooper, M. & Sjostrom, L. (2006). Collaborative Art: Making Magic. Making Art Together: How Collaborative Art-Making Can Transform Kids, Classrooms, and Communities
(pp. 1-13). Boston: Beacon Press.
Elements and principles of art

Feldman, E. Feldmans Model of Art, Retrieved from http://www2.gvsu.edu/hipshean/resources/Feldman%27s%20Model%20Crit.pdf


Karthikeyan, P. (2013). ICT in Education. Indian Streams Research Journal. 3(6), p. 1-4. Retrieved from http://web.a.ebscohost.com/

Vimeo. (2013). A VTS Discussion with First Grade Students. Retrieved from http://vimeo.com/9678152URL
Visual Thinking Strategies. (2013). What is VTS?. Retrieved from http://www.vtshome.org/what-is-vts/method-curriculum--2URL
YouTube. (2010). The Art of Henry Moore part 3/8. Retrieved from http://youtube/lDyjcHb-3bU (8:14 mins) URL

Unit of work: A Wonderment of the World.

Kate Johnston

YouTube. (2010). The Art of Henry Moore part 7/8. Retrieved from http://youtu.be/aCdeze-GxXA (8:09 mins)URL
Youtube. (2014). Windows Live Movie Maker Tutorial. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLTnsWV2tjE

WEBSITES/LINKS
http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au
http://www.ausvels.vcaa.vic.edu.au
http://8ways.wikispaces.com
http://www.kateowengallery.com/page/Aboriginal-Art-Symbols.aspx
http://www.crossroad.to/books/symbols1.html
http://www.thatsmelbourne.com.au/placestogo/publicart/pages/artinthecity.aspx
http://creativeaustralia.arts.gov.au/assets/Creative-Australia-PDF.pdf URL
http://congustobiz.wordpress.com/2010/11/08/alberto-burris-materical-painting-and-california-deserts/

http://www.warholfoundation.org/legacy/biography.html