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Your assignment is to develop a text set for a topic and grade level you choose.

As
Kristin described it, a text set is "multimodal resources covering a topic from multiple
perspectives." Think about using a variety of genres and media: fiction, biographies,
informational, poetry, graphic novels, videos, interviews, maps, articles, images,
artwork. These will be posted as resources for the class to access.

Your project should include:


1. Topic and why you chose it. Include connections to standards for the grade
level you teach or anticipate teaching. Include three potential focusing
question. These should be questions that "have more than one response,
encourage multiple perspectives, open up new areas of exploration, or explore
critical issues" (Leland, Lewison & Harste, p. 110) 300-350 words
2. Cross-curricular connections and collaboration. Think about all subject areas:
How can this text set reinforce learning in areas such as math, art, music,
science, and social studies? If you would be doing cross-curricular planning
with another teacher, what will that look like? Think about how your media
specialist can assist you with this activity and document that as well. Do you
expect to have a parapro or collaborative teacher? 200 words
3. Text list with APA citations, original annotations and your rationale for
selection of each resource. Elementary 16 or more resources; middle and high
school 12 or more. Half should be books, the other half websites, videos,
artwork, podcasts maps, articles or other texts. This will be around 8 pages,
double-spaced
4. Description of how you anticipate students interacting with the texts and what
types of responses they will be creating. Include technology integration in this
section. Leland, Lewison, & Harste p. 110-113 will be very helpful here. 300350 words

5. Differentiation for students with disabilities and English language learners.


200-300 words
Articles about text sets
Creating Cross-Curricular Text Sets for the Middle Grades by Amanda Wall
http://www.middleweb.com/15279/text-sets-middle-grades-2/
1. Topic: Our Diverse Families
Rationale: The reason why I choose this topic is because it is hard to define a family
in this modern society. In the past, many people would say that one man and one
woman could make a family, and their descendants have blood relationships with
them. In addition, people tended to choose their partners who are in the same ethnical
categories with them. In my observation, my concept for a family changes as I grow
older, especially after I started to study abroad. American families are more diverse
than I have expected. Some of my friends adopted before they have their own, while
in Asia, others will adopt children when they cannot have their own. The opinions of
whether homosexuals can get married vary. In the U.S., even though some states can
accept homosexual marriages, all residents cannot discriminate homosexuals; in Asia,
opponents will say homosexual marriages are against family values. I was
wondering, what is a family? Therefore, I will introduce adopted family, foster family,
homosexual family, interracial family, and Latin American family in this project. I
hope that I can use this assignment to view how a family is represented in childrens
world.
Grade level: 3rd to 6th graders. I think it is time for us to find out that there are different
components in a family, and then become aware of their own families and others
families. They can start to analyze some critical issues on families in our society. In
my viewpoint, a family is a simple yet profound topic for 3rd to 6th graders.
The three potential focusing questions:
A. How do you define a family? Why?
B. Do you agree with authors viewpoints on homosexual marriages? Why?
C. How adopted children are narrated in those stories?
2. Cross-curricular connections and collaboration.

This topic can cross the field of art, music, humanities, and social science.
Basically, family is a concept and changes over time; after children read family
being interpreted in many fields, they can see how to cultivate their perceptions on
their families. I would like to invite some collaborate teachers such as school
counselors, social workers, children from homosexual families, and homosexual
adults to be guests in my class, and to help students to join talks on family. They
can present some news and documents to let students realize how those issues
work in the area of social science; they might demonstrate some examples in art
and music that extol family lives. In my curriculum planning, I decide to ask
students to read a book on family in my text sets each week, and find some
websites related to this topic. In class, my guests will have an individual lecture in
the first period, and then my guests and I would lead students to ponder on diverse
families. If students feel those issues controversial, maybe we can initiate book
talks to discover similarities among those books and how perspectives change as
time progresses. I think my collaborate teachers will help students to open their
eyes to see real people connected to those issues in books. Through their lectures
and their assigned reading, students can experience real people inside and outside
of books.
3.
1. Willhoite, M. (1990). Daddy's roommate. Boston, Mass: Alyson Wonderland.
Original Annotation:
The boy has a divorced father now lives with his life partner, deals with the issue of
homosexual parents. The two men in the book do the same things heterosexual
couples do: Take care of the house, argue, and spend time with their boy.
This book is a challenged books in the American Library Association in recent years.
Daddy's Roommate was one of the first children's books to portray homosexuality in a
positive light;
Rationale:
The reason why I select Daddy's Roommate is because it is from a childs perspective
to view homosexual marriage. This book is very persuasive and touching. Even
though there are many childrens books on homosexuality in the past two decades,
this book is my favorite.

2. Londner, R., & Avils Junco, M. (2013). Stones for Grandpa. Minneapolis:
Kar-Ben Pub.
Original Annotation:
This is a story about a boy and his dead grandfather. A little boy and his family
gather at the cemetery for his grandpa's gravestone, in the Jewish custom. His
family members tell stories to help the boy remind him of the beautiful memories
he has with his grandpa.
Rationale:
The reason why I select Stones for Grandpa is because it combined components
of Jewish family, grandparents, and death altogether. I love the way the little boy
restore his grandpa. I think it interesting to teach children death, and this book is a
wonderful example.
3. Schmitz, T. (2008). Standing on My Own Two Feet: A Child's Affirmation of
Love in the Midst of Divorce. New York: Price Stern Sloan.
Original Annotation:
Addisons parents are going through a divorce, but he knows that his parents will
always love him. The text in this picturebook teaches kids that having two homes
to live in can be just as great as having two strong feet to stand on.
Rationale:
The reason why I selected Standing on My Own Two Feet: A Child's Affirmation
of Love in the Midst of Divorce is because it use a wonderful metaphor to
positively view divorce. I am not sure how to teach students divorce, for it is a
taboo is my country. I am amazed that there are some picturebooks on divorce, a
topic that we cannot escape nowadays.
4. Hoffman, M., & Asquith, R. (2011). The great big book of families. New
York : Dial Books for Young Readers.
Original Annotation:
The great big book of families introduces various families in this modern society.
This book narrates all kinds of families and their lives together, from houses and

holidays, to schools and pets, to feelings and family trees.


Rationale:
The reason why I selected The great big book of families is because it introduces
various families in this modern society. It also mentions homosexual families. And
it is very practical in teaching children the ideas of family.
5. Garza, C. L., Rohmer, H., & Zubizarreta, R. (1990). Family pictures. San
Francisco, Calif. : Children's Book Press.
Original Annotation:
Carmen Lomas Garza illustrates her memories of growing up in the town of
Kingsville, Texas, and of her great dream of becoming an artist. Young readers
experience daily life in a traditional Mexican-American community.
Rationale:
The reason why I selected Family pictures is because it vividly displays Latino
American life in the U.S. It is the picturebook in Dr. Davilas dissertation. I hope
that people from other cultures can see Latino American through Family pictures.
6. Adoff, A., & McCully, E. A. (1992). Black is brown is tan. New York :
HarperTrophy.
Original Annotation:
Black is brown is tan is like a beautiful poetry on interracial marriage. The story is
warm and loving. Readers from multicultural families will see the diversity of the
American family.
Rationale:
The reason why I selected Black is brown is tan is because its illustrations are so
cute, especially the mixed children. Black is brown is tan is like a beautiful poetry
for me to digest.
7. Lewis, R. A., & Dyer, J. (2000). I love you like crazy cakes. Boston : Little,
Brown.
Original Annotation:
This story of a woman who travels to China to adopt a baby girl, based on the
author's own experiences. The baby brings love and joy into the home.

Rationale:
The reason why I selected I love you like crazy cakes is because its ending is
common: Asian children are saved in the West. I hope students can see this
common plot in adoption picturebooks.
8. Schuette, S. L. (2010). Foster families. Mankato, Minn. : Capstone Press.
Original Annotation:
Simple text photographs present foster families, including how family
members interact with one another.
Rationale:
The reason why I selected Foster families is because foster families are not
common in my country, yet they are widely recognized in the United States. This
little book briefly introduce foster families in an easy way.

Articles, websites, and other resources


1. 'In Our Mothers' House,' Book About Lesbian Family, Restricted By Utah
School District
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/06/01/utah-school-districtrest_n_1564118.html
Original Annotation:
Students in a Utah school district will need permission from their parents to read a
book about a lesbian couple raising a family following the decision by a special
committee to keep it behind library counters instead of on bookshelves. Williams
said a school-level committee made up of teachers, administrators and parents
decided that access to "In Our Mothers' House" should be restricted to students in
grades 3 through 6. When that didn't satisfy the parent, a district committee was
petitioned to address the issue.
Rationale:
The reason why I selected 'In Our Mothers' House,' Book About Lesbian Family,
Restricted By Utah School District this article is because adults have different
attitude toward controversial childrens books. After In Our Mothers' House was

banned, there was a mother suing this school district for it violated the law that
readers have the right to read. I think this news is powerful for me, for we are the ones
who decide the values of books.
2. Ryan, C. (2010). Talking, reading, and writing about lesbian and gay families
in classrooms: The consequences of different pedagogical approaches. In C.
Compton-Lilly & Greene (Eds). Bedtime stories and book reports:
Connecting parental involvement and family literacy. New York: Teachers
College Press.
Original Annotation:
The author explores the involvement of lesbian and gay families in classrooms.
Compton-Lilly demonstrates that there are other dimensions to view their parents
engagement in childrens literacy development (Compton-Lilly, 2011, p. 1-3). There
are two parts in this academic book: Research, Issues, and Policies in Parent
Involvement and Literacy Practices and Experiences: Many Family, Many Literacies,
Many Classrooms
Rationale:
I am also interested in children who are raised by gay and lesbian parents. I
would like to cite, You know what you are going to learn today? That I am a lot like
other kids (Compton-Lilly & Greene, 2011p. 100). We should equally treat children
who are raised by gay and lesbian parents while notice their differences.
It is hard to handle discriminations on children who are raised by gay and
lesbian parents in class. I am not sure if those discrimination laws can be applied to
these situations, since those classmates laughing at others are too young. In addition, I
can see that those parents have difficulties participating in activities in school
(Compton-Lilly & Greene, 2011p. 100), or other literacy program such as family
storytime. However, I still believe that reading childrens books on homosexuality can
help children become more sympathetic adults for gay and lesbian parents, and those
picturebooks on LGBT family really broadens my horizon, too. When teaching those
LGBT picturebooks, I would not stop them immediately if they have negative
impressions on different families. Rather, I would like them to share their
presumptions for those families, and ask them What if? and I want those to
children write down their statements and authors statement, compare and contrast

those similarities and differences. There is no right or wrong answer in those


discussions. What I expect is that students can use this chance to learn to respect other
voices.

3. Becoming Aware of Print


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Yti78OGxg0
Original Annotation:
This clip shows how 32-month-old Mira's parents help her become aware of print.
This video provides a great example of how parents from many backgrounds and
cultures join their childrens literacy development.
Rationale:
We can link this clip to parents involvement in home literacy. In America, many
parents from all backgrounds and cultures are encouraged participate in read-aloud
activities, while read-aloud activities are not common in Asia. We can discuss what
children do with their parents at home.

4. Harry Potter Family Tree by MooyongRocks mooyongrocks.deviantart.com


JK Rowling responds to fan tweeting she 'can't see' Dumbledore being gay
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/jk-rowling-responds-to-fan-whotweeted-she-cant-see-dumbledore-being-gay-10131369.html
Original Annotation:
The photo and the article should be read together. First, it is interesting to see family
tree of the Harry Potter series. Second, JK Rowling has been hailed an inspiration
after she was asked by a young Harry Potter fan why Hogwarts headmaster Albus
Dumbledore was gay.
Rowling had revealed Dumbledore's sexuality in 2007, after the final book, Harry
Potter and the Deathly Hallows, was published.
In a tweet that has since been deleted, fan Ana Kocovic asked: Thank you so much
for writing Harry Potter. I wonder why you said that Dumbledore is a gay because I
cant see him in that way.
Rationale:
J.K. Rowling support minority, such as gays and lesbians, in her Harry Potter

series. She had already told us that Dumbledore is a gay. Actually, Harry Potter
series are books that helps children to appreciate diversity. We can discuss about
those families in the Harry Potter series, and ask them do they think whether
Dumbledore has a family.
5. Adoption Picture Books | Children's House International Adoptions
http://childrenshouseinternational.com/adoption-picture-books/
Original Annotation:
This is a website that introduces many adoption picturebooks. It also introduces
adoption programs categorized by countries.
Rationale:
There are so many adoption picturebooks published in the U.S. And there are
many academic articles on adoption picturebooks. Many stories end when
children are embraced in the Western culture; however, some stories have other
endings. I would like to share this link with various narratives of adoption
picturebooks.

6. Kids React to Gay Marriage


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TJxnYgP6D8
Original Annotation:
Roughly ten children from different races and genders, discussing on two videos on
gays and lesbians, and then to be asked about their opinions on homosexuality.This
video gives us a chance to reflect on homosexuality from childrens viewpoints.
Rationale:
It is interesting to interview children on homosexuality. Most of them agree with
homosexuality, while one of them disagrees. Through childrens eyes, we see many
situations on homosexuality nowadays. After watching this video, I found that it is
necessary to teach lessons of homosexuality since children were young.

7. And Tango Makes Three

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WyPjUa908hM
Original Annotation:
The setting is in the Central Park in New York City and it is a real story. This
story also mentions about adopted family as the two penguins feel happier as they
have a baby penguin.
Rationale:
The reason why I select And Tango Makes Three is because it view
homosexuality in animals world. It is very persuasive that homosexuality exists in
our surroundings and we have to keep a positive attitude toward it.
8. Kids React to Controversial Cheerios Commercial
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VifdBFp5pnw
Original Annotation:
Roughly ten children from different races and genders, discussing on Cheerios
Commercial, and then to be asked about their opinions on intermarriage and racial
equality. Those children perform actively and maturely, eagerly rejecting to racists. It
is impressive to know that it possible to interview children on controversial issues in
digital storytelling. The performance is adorable yet required extra efforts with
children in making video.
Rationale:
I was surprised about this commercial at first, because I did not expect a White mom
and a Black boy. I admit that I have already got used to all-White families and allBlack families. This video gives me a chance to reflect on racial equality from
childrens viewpoints. Through childrens eyes, we see how selfish and ignorant we
adults are.
4. Description of how you anticipate students interacting with the texts and what
types of responses they will be creating. Include technology integration in this
section.
I anticipate that students would like to interpret those texts based on their life
experiences. Major children in my class were into a family with one father and

one mother, and both of their parents belong to the same races. They are their
parents are blood-bound. Therefore, I would like to put them into few groups to
initiate discussions on the definition of family, as small group work within
focused studies. If they have any questions, my collaborate teachers would use
some mass media to help them to imagine other families different from them, for
There is potential for students to ask new questions that lead to further inquiries
(Leland, Lewison & Harste, 2013, p. 111). If they have negative impressions on
different families, I would not stop them immediately. Rather, I would like them to
share their presumptions for those families, and ask them What if? and I want
those to children write down their statements and authors statement, compare and
contrast those similarities and differences. There is no right or wrong answer in
those discussions. What I expect is that students can use this chance to learn to
respect other voices. Whose voices were heard and whose were absent in the
sources you found? (Leland, Lewison & Harste, 2013, p. 110)
There are many videos and websites on family issues. I plan to design
some open question sheets beforehand. Then, my collaborate teachers play those
videos and show those websites for students. My collaborate teachers can cite they
themselves as examples to demonstrate those difficulties that minor families face
in their daily lives. I encourage students to find some videos and websites, and
then to display what they have searched at home. Finally, I would like them to
answer my open questions. They can cultivate their insights from mass media on
family this topic.
5. Differentiation for students with disabilities and English language learners.
This topic, More Diverse Families!, might be easier and approachable for
students with disabilities and English language learners. I would like to ask all of
them to take pictures of their families, and then make it a family wall together. Then, I
would ask students with disabilities can share their experiences of how their parents
interact with each other at home and how their parents interact with them. After
students with disabilities shared their own thoughts about their families, English
language learners can also share their family histories and how their families celebrate
their holidays in their communities. I think both students with disabilities and English
language learners can tell new and interesting ideas on the definition families in this
topic. On the other hand, students from other mainstream cultures can also learn how

different kinds of families exist. In this curriculum, we can discuss about whether
parents from all backgrounds and cultures should participate in, such as, read-aloud
activities at home, since read-aloud is deeply rooted in Western culture. We can see
that even though families have many values and activities at home, they indeed share
similarities and differences. Furthermore, students can recognize the fact that diverse
families are components in this society.