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LEADERSHIP

DEVELOPMENT
Outcomes & Evidence
Progress Inventory*
MINOR IN LEADERSHIP STUDIES
Center for Student Leadership Development
Memorial Union
University of Rhode Island
Name:
Date Enrolled:
Date of Graduation:
*The Outcomes & Evidence Progress Inventory is the intellectual property of the Center for Student Leadership Development (CSLD)
at the University of Rhode Island and cannot be reproduced in part, or in its entirety, without the written permission of the acting
Assistant Director of the CSLD.
Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

CONTENTS
ABOUT THE MINOR & CENTER FOR STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT (information included)
Center for Student Leadership Development Information
Minor Information
Developmental Model
ADVISING INFORMATION (students will include own documentation)
Tracking Sheet / Advising Updates
Syllabi of Minor Classes (Core and Electives)
Internship
o Guidelines
o Syllabus
o Mid-term
o Final
OUTCOMES
Outcomes (Self-Leadership, Interpersonal and Organizational, Leadership Theories, Inclusive Leadership,
Critical Thinking)
Targeted Classes
Experiences
Evidence

Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

CENTER FOR STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT


Office: Memorial Union Room 210

Phone: (401) 874-2726

Fax: (401) 874-5317

CSLD Mission Statement


To enhance the mission of the University of Rhode Island, The Center for Student Leadership Development aims to:
Provide developmental opportunities for all students to become informed, inclusive, effective, and ethical leaders in the global marketplace through the implementation of
learner-centered academic, experiential, and co-curricular programming.
Engage in research, assessment, and advancement in order to positively impact the expanding field of leadership studies.
CSLD Vision Statement
The URI Center for Student Leadership Development will promote dynamic strengths-based leadership development through multiple delivery methods to prepare students to be
competitive in the work place and global marketplace. The CSLD seeks to progress as innovators for experiential engagement and enriching assessment.
CSLD Values Statement
Grounded in the Social Change Model of Leadership Development (Higher Education Research Institute), Relational Leadership Model (Komivies, Lucas, & McMahon), and Servant
Leadership (Greenleaf), the URI Center for Student Leadership Development values:
Engaged and experiential learning through a constructivist approach
Inclusion, Social Justice, and Civic Engagement
Ethical and Value-based Leadership & Relationship Building
Innovative Assessment and Presentation Models

MINOR IN LEADERSHIP STUDIES


At URI, we are among only a handful of colleges and universities across the country that offers a Minor in Leadership Studies and one that is customized for each student. We
utilize a cross-disciplinary approach to leadership education designed to complement your academic studies. All courses utilize a variety of teaching methods but ultimately include
some form of experiential learning, practical application, and reflective learning. Employers, now more than ever, are seeking candidates with exceptional skills in the areas of
interpersonal and group management, problem solving, critical thinking and effective communication. We can help with all of the above.

GENERAL INFORMATION

Regardless of your major, you can minor in Leadership Studies.


Requirements may be satisfied by completing 18 or more credits related to leadership and offered by more than one department.
Twelve (12) of the 18 credits must be at the 200 level of instruction or above. A course grade of C or better must be earned in each graded course. At least 12 of the credits
must be earned at URI.
No course may be used to apply to both the major and minor fields of study. Courses in General Education or for other minors may be used for the minor* (*this does not
apply to students in the College of Business). With the exception of internship credit, all courses for the minor must be taken for a grade. The Introductory class must be taken
before the internship and the capstone course.
Application for the minor must be filed in your academic deans office no later than the beginning of the final semester or term.
Approval of the minor does not guarantee that the suggested courses will be available to you on a schedule correlated with your graduation plans nor guarantee space in any
required course.
Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

CORE REQUIREMENTS- 9 Credits


Required Element
Introductory Course
3 credits

Internship
3 credits

Class options
HDF 190: FLITE

Notes
Only offered in spring for first-year students

or

HDF 290: Modern Leadership Issues

Offered Fall and Spring for sophomores & juniors

HDF 417: Leadership Internship

Requires 40 hours/credit with a min. of 80 hours & a max. of 120 hours of documented
internship experience for graded credit

or

Experience through Office of Experiential Learning & Community Engagement


or

Capstone
3 credits

Internship Class in Academic Major

The only time the major and minor can overlap

HDF 412: Historical, Multi-ethnic & Alternative Leadership

Offered only in the fall with preference given to seniors

or

COM 402: Leadership & Motivation

Offered in the spring and summer with Dr. Leatham

or

BUS 441: Leadership Skills Development


or

Portfolio
1 credit

Offered in the fall and spring with Dr. Cooper

HPR 411/412: Honors Senior Seminar

Must be in Honors or have GPA of 3.3

HDF 492: Leadership Minor Portfolio

Taken last spring semester of enrollment (some exceptions)

MINOR ELECTIVES-9 credits


*Additional classes may be appropriate and therefore added to the list; see CSLD for the most updated list or bring a class that you think should be an elective
AAF 300: Civil Rights Movement in the US
BUS 341: Organizational Behavior
BUS 342: Human Resource Management
BUS 441: Leadership & Motivation (capstone option)
BUS 443: Organizational Design & Change
BUS 448: International Dimensions of Business
BUS 449: Entrepreneurship
COM 100: Communication Fundamentals
COM 202: Public Speaking
COM 208: Argumentation and Debate
COM 210: Persuasion: The Rhetoric of Influence
COM 221: Interpersonal Communication
COM 250: Small Group Communication
COM 302: Advanced Public Speaking
COM 308: Advanced Argumentation
COM 322: Gender & Communication
COM 351: Oral Comm. in Business & the Professions
COM 361: Intercultural Communication
COM 383: Rhetorical Theory
COM 385: Communication and Social Influence

COM 402: Leadership and Motivation (capstone option)


COM 407: Political Communication
COM 415: The Ethics of Persuasion
COM 421: Advanced Interpersonal Communication
COM 422: Communication and Conflict
COM 441: Race, Politics and the Media
COM 450: Organizational Communication
COM 461/462: Managing Cultural Differences in Organizations
CSV 302: URI Community Service
GWS 150: Introduction to Womens Studies
GWS 310: Race, Class, Sexuality in Womens Lives
GWS 350: International Womens Issues
HDF 190: FirstYear Leaders Inspired to Excellence (FLITE)
(introductory course option)
HDF 290: Modern Leadership Issues (introductory course option)
HDF 291: Rose Butler Browne Program Peer Mentoring Program
HDF 412: Historical, MultiEthnic, & Alternative Leadership
(capstone option)
HDF 413: Student Organization Leadership Consulting
HDF 414: Leadership for Activism and Social Change
HDF 415: FLITE Peer Leadership

HDF 416: Leadership in Organizations


HDF 417: Leadership Minor Internship
HDF 437: Law & Families in the U.S.
HDF 450: Introduction to Counseling
HPR 118: Honors Course in Speech Communications
HPR 203: The Prepared Mind
HPR 412: Honors Seminar (capstone option)
MSL 101: Introduction to Military Leadership
MSL 201: Leadership & Military History
MSL 201: Military Skills and History of Warfare
MSL 202: Leadership & Team Building
MSL 301: Leadership & Management
PEX 375: Women in Sport Contemporary Perspectives
PHL 212: Ethics
PSC 304: Introduction to Public Administration
PSC 369: Legislative Process and Public Policy
PSC 504: Ethics in Public Administration
SOC300/WMS350: Women and Work
THE 221: Stage Management
THE 341: Theater Management
Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

BECOMING A POSITIVE LEADER THROUGH DEVELOPMENT & INVOLVEMENT


Wilson, 1998 (URI Memorial Union / Center for Student Leadership Development)
Revised after the publication of Exploring Leadership: for College Students Who Want to Make a Difference by Komives, McMahon and Lucas, 1998.

You need to have your own act together before you can lead others:
2. Lead Yourself

1. Know Yourself
Lead Others

P
R
O
G
R
E
S
S

Strengths
Weaknesses
Values
Needs
Styles
o Learning
o Teaching
o Personality
o Membership
o Leadership

4. Develop and Refine


Skills

Leadership theory and


practice
Communication
Group Development
Inclusion
Citizen Activist Skills
Critical Thinking
Teaching and Programming

PROGRESS

Time management
Organization
Self care
Self discipline
Perseverance
Develop and maintain family,
interpersonal, and intimate relationships
Academic, social, personal goals and
objectives

P
R
O
G
R
E
S
S

RE-EVALUATE
former stages
as you progress

3. Broaden Your Perspectives


Understand others

PROGRESS

Hierarchy of needs
Racial, cultural, gender, sexual orientation,
religious, class, ability, etc. diversity and
commonalities
Power, privilege, oppression, liberation;
individual and institutional discrimination

Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

OUTCOMES
In this section, you will track your progress toward the outcomes. Each class in the minor targets different outcomes; all of the classes list these
outcomes on the syllabi (the words goals or curriculum areas may be used instead). In many of our classes, the assignments can serve as your
evidence. Periodically, and not less than at the end of each semester, you should update your outcomes progress. In the additional experiences
column, name additional classes or experiences that contributed to you becoming proficient in that outcome. As the semesters pass, you will think of
things from recent semesters and semesters further in the past, or people or jobs, etc. in your past that also influenced your progress on that outcome.
Do not let that ambiguity upset you. Reflecting on development is not a linear process, but it does help to reflect often. In the descriptive notes
column, share insights about your growth, lack of progress, successes, stumbling blocks, etc. At the end of each section, you need to include evidence
that supports your development toward the outcomes. Copies of papers, grading sheets, evaluation lettersanything that shows that someone has
determined that you have demonstrated proficiency (or not, or are making progress). Make sure to keep electronic copies of all of your evidence to
include in your Portfolio.

Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

Outcome Category: Self-Leadership


1.

Outcome
Student will demonstrate
autonomy and a minimized need
for approval

Target class
URI 101

Additional Experiences
Boarding School

Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice


Autonomy according to Dictionary.com is independence or freedom, as of the will or
ones actions. The first time I truly experienced this was during my second year of
boarding school. I had to live on my own with a roommate in a dorm as a sixteen
year old. Even though I was away from my parents at this time, our teachers and
coaches lived with us in the dorms and monitored our behavior. When it came to
decisions and life-styles, I was responsible for that on my own. I was also
responsible for homework and going to class after late night hockey games that
were hours away on a school night. If it was not for my ability to adapt to this new
living style, I would not have graduated.
Evidence #1

2.

Student will demonstrate


personal, organizational, and
academic examples of selfdiscipline

HDF 290

Spanish 102
Spanish 103

3.

Student will demonstrate the


ability to manage emotions

SOC 497

Summer Internship

4.

Student will demonstrate


knowledge of stress management

URI 101

Personal Research

Self-discipline is a very important component to learn early on in life. It is the way


someone carries themselves on an everyday basis. Every day, at least this
semester, I like to go to class, go to the gym, then go home and eat then do
homework. On Tuesdays and Thursdays I have work from 3-10 and on
Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays I have Brazilian Jujitsu. By me accomplishing
those things makes me make sure I follow my schedule and in order to do that, I
must be organized. A personal academic example would be since the beginning of
the semester in HDF 290 was busy; I would rely on my syllabus to help me keep on
track with what assignment was due when. Also when I took Spanish, I had
assignments due every Sunday I had to do. If I had time during the week I would do
them, but if not I always knew they were there to complete.
Evidence # 2
This past summer when I worked as a Community Service Officer (CSO) for the
town of Narragansett, RI, I was left in many situations where I had to manage my
emotions. I dealt with many drunk, angry, confused, and rude people throughout the
summer. There was one instance where I saw a male hit a female so when I
approached him, he was screaming, foaming from the mouth, and stumbling
everywhere. Even though he was swearing at me and trying to stir up more things, I
remained calm and did exactly what I was supposed to do. If I let my emotions get
the best of me, things could have gotten ugly. Since I was in a professional setting,
I acted as if nothing phased me and I did not show anger back.
As most freshman come to college, they are nervous and confused when it comes
to the workload that college offers and the social aspect. My URI 101 instructor
Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

methods

gave us many handouts right before our exams and it offered many ways to study in
a healthy manner. According to the article cited below, sleep and prioritizing are two
of the best things to do. It also states to eliminate distractions which is good while
studying.
Shaffer, T. (2013, September 17). Quick Tips to Manage That High School and
College Stress. Retrieved December 1, 2014, from
http://www.destinationimagination.org/blog/how-to-manage-high-school-and-collegestress-part-1

5.

Student will demonstrate the


ability to manage stress

Working out

6.

Student will express a personal


code of leadership / membership
ethics

Hockey
Other Sports

7.

Student will demonstrate practice


of the personal code of ethics

Hockey

8.

Student will express a personal


values statement

Childhood

9.

Student will demonstrate practice


of the personal values statement

Family and Friends

Evidence #4
When I get stressed, whether it is in school or something else, I just take a break
and get my mind off what I am doing. Sometimes that is going to the gym, getting
some food, or even just watching TV. What helps the most is just playing with a
stress ball. That can be as simple as squeezing it or even just throwing it off the
wall to myself. Ultimately getting my mind off whatever is stressing me is the best
way of showing stress management.
Evidence #5
My personal code of leadership and ethics that I go by is always being honest,
showing love, and giving it your all no matter what. Being honest can lead into
many things like being well respected and never feeling that painful feeling of guilt.
Showing love is one of the most important things we can do as humans. Especially
in todays age, people need love and compassion that once they experience it, they
will hopefully pass it onto others. Giving it your all not matter what just reassures
that youre doing the best you can at all times, and if you fail, at least you tried to the
best of your ability.
An example of following my personal code of ethics would be during hockey of my
senior year in high school. We were winning 2-1 with a minute left in the game and
a teammate got a penalty, then the opposing team tied up the score and continued
to win in overtime. Everyone was upset with him because of his decision of the
selfish penalty, but I showed love and compassion and reassured him that it is just a
game in the long run it does not matter.
My personal values include God, my family, girlfriend, friends, loyalty, and honesty.
Evidence #8
Loyalty is a word that wraps up my whole personal values statement. To me, loyalty
defines everything. I went to a boarding school nearly two hours away from my
hometown in West Warwick, RI. I was in a new relationship at the time with my
current girlfriend. I have been with her almost five years and even though I had no
means of transportation and a busy academic and athletic schedule, we still
Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

managed to stay together at a young age. I would also go months without seeing
her. Without loyalty in this situation, things probably would not have ended up well.
10.

Student will demonstrate the


ability to lead a project from start
to finish (follow-through)

BCH 190

11.

Student will describe goals and


objective statements regarding
personal issues, career issues,
and community issues
Student will show evidence of
goals and objectives that were
planned and achieved
Student will show knowledge of
the Hierarchy of Needs theory by
Maslow
Student will show application of
Maslows theory to own life
Student will describe personal
HDF 290
leadership style and/or personality
style including strengths and
weaknesses and examples of
application (Sources = Leadership
style inventories, the L.P.I.,
StrengthsQuest, Type Focus
(MBTI), LAMP, and other career
inventories, etc.)

WRT 104

Evidence #9
In BCH 190, we are required to do a stock market project. In this stock market
project, we had to pick five biotechnology companies and write down what their
stock market value. Throughout the semester we were to check up on them and
see the change. Now since the semester is almost over, I waited the three months
and analyzed the final results of my companies. I followed the guidelines for this
and completed the project accordingly.
Evidence #10

12.
13.
14.
15.

StrengthsQuest

For the HDF 290 retreat at the beginning of the semester, we were assigned to sign
up for StrengthsQuest. This website gave us the qualities and personalities about
ourselves that we probably never knew. My top five qualities are responsibility,
belief, consistency, futuristic, and harmony. I think that these five qualities actually
sum me up pretty well. I have always been a responsible person throughout my life.
I am usually one to volunteer as the designated driver when going out and am
always on the lookout. Belief also describes me well because I have always had a
strong faith background, and I always think the best for other people when others do
not. Consistency is a huge part of my life. I like to have a routine to be in and I
sometimes get anxious or nervous if there is no consistency. Futuristic also
describes me in many ways. When I do something or lay in bed at night I often find
myself wondering about the future like where I will be 10 years from now. Harmony
does kind of describe me. I never really thought of this myself, but I do like
environments that are more peaceful rather than those conflicts. For example, I do
not like when there is a conversation going on between family and friends that gets
one party mad or annoyed.
Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

Evidence #15
16.
17.

Student will show knowledge of


the theory of Superleadership by
Manz & Sims
Student will show application of
Manz & Sims theory to own life

Outcome Category: Leadership Theories

18.
19.
20.
21.
22.

Outcome
Student will show knowledge of
the Authority and Bureaucracy
theory of leadership Weber
Student will describe personal
application of the above theory
(Weber)
Student will show knowledge of
the Scientific Management
theory of leadership by Taylor
Student will describe personal
application of the above theory
(Taylor)
Student will show knowledge of
the Management by Objectives
theory of leadership by Drucker

Target class

Additional Experiences

Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice

HDF 290

Target Class

Management by Objective is a theory I learned in HDF 290 by Pete Drucker, where


the superior management of a company or group works together to reach a common
goal or objective. This means the higher up works with the group of people who may
be lower than them. Also, the boss sets clear objectives for one person vs. one
person or a group. This works with good communication and a clear focused path.
There is a five step method to this. The first part of this is to set the organizational
objectives that are at task. After this you must cascade objectives to the employees.
Shortly after that monitor the employees to make sure they are doing the right thing.
The final two steps are to evaluate their performance then to reward them for what
they have done. If the people are rewarded after doing a project, they will more than
likely feel better about themselves and be more inclined to work at a higher level.
Evidence #22

23.
24.

Student will describe personal


application of the above theory
(Drucker)
Student will show knowledge of
Theory X and Theory Y theory

HDF 290

Target Class

In HDF 290 this semester, I was assigned to actually do this leadership theory. This
theory proposed by MacGregor described two different types of people in the work
Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

10

of leadership by MacGregor

25.

Student will describe personal


application of the above theory
(MacGregor)

place. Theory X explains that people are naturally lazy, they have no ambition, and
they need people to threaten them about the possibility of losing their job in order for
them to do their work. Theory Y is completely different than Theory X. Theory Y
describes that work is natural to the people working and they are self-motivated.
Also, they look for responsibly and the bigger picture for the whole organization or
company.
HDF 290

Work

26.

Student will show knowledge of


the Servant Leadership theory
of leadership by Greenleaf

HDF 290

Target Class

27.

Student will describe personal


application of the above theory
(Greenleaf)

HDF 290

Camp Councilor

Evidence #24
I work at a small privately owned liquor store where I am one of three males that
work on week day nights that stock the store for the next day. My normal shift is 39, and I usually work with another male around my age. He does absolutely nothing
when I work with him because he knows I will do all the necessary tough work, while
he can just lay back. Every month or so, our manager/boss will watch the cameras
and realize that he does not do the required work. So, our boss will talk to him and
cut his hours but then my co-worker will begin to work up to standard. After a few
shifts, he will go back to his old ways. He reminds me of Theory X because he is a
naturally lazy worker while he needs the threat of losing work hours in order to
actually perform his duties. I consider myself Theory Y because I always want to
get everything done to the best of the ability possible.
Evidence #25
In HDF 290 one of the class members were to present on the theory called Servant
Leadership by Robert Greenleaf. This theory has ten principles. The first is active
listening which understands the needs of others. The second is Empathy which is
being able to understand the feelings of other people. After this one is healing
which is really getting to the emotions of other people and offering help that way.
The fourth is awareness which is understanding values, feelings, and weaknesses
from others. The fifth is persuasion which ultimately means to use respectful
communication. After this comes conceptualization which is gives the possibilities
and realities for the future. The seventh is foresight which is predicting actions that
can influence the future. The eighth is stewardship which taking safeguarding
responsibly. The second to last is commitment which is commitment and this
means to give yourself to others professionally, spiritually, and personally. Finally
the last and tenth principle is building community which is gathering and seeking
conclusions to better a community.
Evidence #26
When I was a councilor last summer at a Christian Youth Hockey camp, we were
not only someone to talk to, but a leader to set good examples. What the counselors
would do would be to let all the campers eat before ourselves would. Our goal for
this (which happened) was to eventually get the campers to realize that there are
Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

11

other people with the same needs. Even if they were hungry, it is still a nice gesture
to let others eat before you which could eventually develop into many other good
deeds. Some important aspects of this theory are growth, development, and
advancement. To me, these three aspects really define what it means. Once the
students or kids actually grasp what this means, the growth and development really
start to be established. Out of the ten steps, I would consider this foresight because
the hope that these actions would make them and the people they effect a better
person.
Evidence #27
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.

33.
34.
35.
36.

Student will show knowledge of


the Principle Centered
Leadership theory by Covey
Student will describe personal
application of the above theory
(Covey)
Student will show knowledge of
the 14 Points / TQM theory of
leadership by Deming
Student will describe personal
application of the above theory
(Deming)
Student will show knowledge of
the Visionary Leadership (now
often cited as Transformational
Leadership) theory by Sashkin
Student will describe personal
application of the above theory
(Sashkin)
Student will show knowledge of
the Individuals in Organizations
leadership theory by Argyris
Student will describe personal
application of the above theory
(Argyris)
Students will demonstrate
knowledge of the 4 Vs theory
of leadership by Grace (Center for
Ethical Leadership)

HDF 290

Target Class

In HDF 290, we learned about The 4 V's Model by Dr. William Grace which is the
center for ethical leadership. This model is all about knowing personal core values
and tries to incorporate these values to attribute to certain aspects for the better.
These 4 V's are known as values, vision, voice, and virtue. Values are individually
based on the person it effects because everyone has their own different set of
values that help them establish who they are. Vision is the second part which is our
Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

12

ability to see what we want to do and then use our values to reach it. By reaching it
we would have to use the third part which is voice. Using voice would include talking
and communicating to others to help make this vision possible. Finally, virtue is
doing what is right and good by doing what we practice. There are three elements
that relate to this. The first is service which is how we indicate and educate by what
we think is right to others. After this comes polis which is in public how all this
looks to others. The last is renewal which is continuously hitting our values which
affect our whole vision.
Evidence #36
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.

Student will describe personal


application of the above theory
(Grace)
Student will show knowledge of
the Situational Leadership
theory by Hersey & Blanchard
Student will describe personal
application of the above theory
(Hersey & Blanchard)
Student will show knowledge of
the Relational Leadership model
by Komives, McMahon & Lucas
Student will describe personal
application of the above theory
(Komives et al)
Student will show knowledge of
the concept of constructivism

Personal Research

Constructivism is a theory founded by a man by the name of Jean Piaget. This


theory involved humans gaining knowledge from experiences and through ideas like
that. This theory eventually was transformed into the learning and school
environment. It became a major teaching and learning theory in the educational
setting. It is more of a newer theory that overall just has to do with learning through
the interaction with people and experiencing real life situations. In a classroom
setting, this would be a teacher that gives challenging independent thinking activities
rather than a normal lecture setting.
Ozer, O. (n.d.). The Fountain Magazine - Issue - CONSTRUCTIVISM in Piaget and
Vygotsky. Retrieved December 1, 2014, from
http://www.fountainmagazine.com/Issue/detail/CONSTRUCTIVISM-in-Piaget-andVygotsky
Evidence #42

43.

Students will describe personal


Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

13

44.
45.
46.

47.
48.

49.
50.

51.
52.

53.
54.
55.

examples of implementing
constructivism
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of experiential learning
in leadership development (Kolb)
Student will describe personal
application of experiential learning
in leadership development (Kolb)
Student will show knowledge of
the Social Change Model of
Leadership Development by
Astin et al
Student will describe personal
application of the above theory
(Astin et al)
Students will demonstrate
knowledge of the Leadership
Identity Development Model by
Komives et al
Students will describe personal
application of the above theory.
(Komives et al)
Students will demonstrate
knowledge of the StrengthsDevelopment Model by Hulme et
al
Student will describe personal
application of the above theory
(Hulme et al)
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of behavior theories of
leadership from Michigan and
Ohio State
Student will describe personal
application of the above theories
(Michigan & Ohio State)
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of Charismatic
leadership
Student will describe personal
application of the above theory
Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

14

56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.

Student will demonstrate


knowledge of contingency
approach to leadership by Fiedler
Student will describe personal
application of the above theory
(Fiedler)
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of Path-Goal theory by
House
Student will describe personal
application of the above theory
(House)
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of Leader Member
Exchange (LMX) theory
Student will describe personal
application of the above theory
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of Leadership
Substitutes Theory
Student will describe personal
application of the above theory
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of Models of leader
emergence
Student will describe the impact
of traits on leadership emergence
and performance
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of Chaos approach to
leadership by Wheatley
Student will describe personal
application of the above theory
(Wheatley)

Leadership Inventory Revised 8/30/2013

15

Outcome Category: Inclusive Leadership / Diversity and its Application to Leadership


68.
69.

70.

71.
72.

73.
74.

75.

76.

77.

Outcome
Student will demonstrate how
cultural anthropology / paradigms
relate to leadership
Student will describe personal
example of using cultural
anthropology / paradigms as a
leader
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of the Cycles of
Socialization (Harro) theory and
its uses in leadership
Students will demonstrate
personal application of the
Cycles of Socialization (Harro)
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of the Cycles of
Liberation (Harro) theory and its
uses in leadership
Student will demonstrate
personal application of the
Cycles of Liberation (Harro)
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of the Configuration
of Power (Franklin) and its
relationship to leadership
Student will demonstrate
personal application of the
Configuration of Power
(Franklin)
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of racial identity
development via the Cross,
Helms or other models (Ferdman
& Gallegos; Kim; Horse;
Wijeyesinghe etc.)
Student will demonstrate
personal application of model(s)
of racial identity development

Target class

Additional Experiences

Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice

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78.

79.
80.

81.
82.
83.
84.

85.

86.
87.

above
Students will demonstrate
knowledge of McIntoshs theory
of privilege and its relationship to
leadership
Student will demonstrate
personal application of
McIntoshs theory
Student will describe the
differences and similarities of
individual and institutional
oppression and relationships to
leadership
Student will show knowledge of
effective leadership as it relates
to change agency
Student will describe personal
examples of being a change
agent
Student will create a personal
code of inclusive leadership
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of the Model of
Intercultural Sensitivity by
Bennett and its uses in leadership
Students will demonstrate
personal application of the Model
of Intercultural Sensitivity by
Bennett
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of the ally Action
Continuum by Griffin & Harro
Student will demonstrate
personal application of the Action
Continuum by Griffin & Harro

Outcome Category: Critical Thinking


Outcome

Target class

Additional Experiences

Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice


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88.
89.
90.

91.

92.
93.
94.

95.

96.
97.
98.

Student will show knowledge of


principles of critical thinking (logic is
used in this minor)
Student will demonstrate
proficiency of critical thinking
Student will show knowledge of
metaphorical analysis to critically
analyze self and leadership
situations
Student will demonstrate
proficiency of metaphorical analysis
to critically analyze self and
leadership situations
Student will show knowledge of at
least five decision making methods
Student will describe personal
examples of having used five
decision making methods
Student will show knowledge of at
least five problem solving / conflict
management methods, as well as
understanding the roots of conflicts
Student will describe personal
examples of having used five
problem solving / conflict
management methods (if student
has been trained in mediation, that
information goes here)
Student will describe what it means
to analyze, criticize, synthesize and
utilize information as a leader
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of leadership that is
used in crisis
Student will describe examples of
leadership in crisis situations

SOC 497

Internship

When I worked as a Community Service Officer this past year in Narragansett, I had
to respond to a domestic on the street. My co worker and I saw a male strike his
girlfriend in the face, so we had to respond accordingly. The male was on some type
of drug, foaming from the mouth, so as resistant as he was; I remained calm and
separated the two parties. I showed complete control and confidence over the
situation until the uniformed officer came and arrested the offender. This situation
could have gotten worse if I responded with the same hostility and anger as the
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offender had. This was a situation that needed to be dealt with immediately before
things worsened.
Evidence #98

Outcome Category: Interpersonal and Organizational Concepts & Skills

99.

100.

Outcome
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of active listening
techniques

Target class
SOC 240

Additional Experiences
Personal Knowledge
Brazilian Jujitsu
SOC 336
HDF 290

Student will describe examples of


using active listening skills

SOC 240

Brazilian Jujitsu
SOC 336
HDF 290

Descriptive notes regarding learning and practice


Before I interviewed for my boarding schools and even job interviews, my father
taught me some basic ideas on how to show that I am actively listening. He told me
to always look the person in the eye and nod as if I understand. If I have a question,
politely ask it when the interviewer is done or ask if I have any questions. It is also
important to have a smile. Also, for the information they give me, I had to make sure
I write down what they. As I write down the information they tell me, it is also
important to look up and acknowledge that I have understood what they said.
I take the martial art of Brazilian Jujitsu. This class is all about focus and
movements. The instructor demonstrates the move, then we have to duplicate it on
our training partner. As we are performing the move, our instructor will continuously
talk to us as we do the move. We have to worry about listening the whole time as
well as doing the move right. Without these listening skills, it would be pointless to
perform the move. Also, in SOC 240 and 336, our teacher only dictates the notes
out loud with no power point or visual. While I write down all the notes and
everything he says, I have to make sure I listen carefully since I am expected to
write down word for word on what he says.
Evidence #100

101.
102.
103.

Student will demonstrate


knowledge of functions of group
communication by Hirokawa
Student will describe personal
application of functions of group
communication (Hirokawa)
Student will show knowledge of
techniques regarding giving and
accepting of feedback
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104.
105.
106.
107.
108.
109.
110.
111.
112.
113.

Student will describe examples of


giving and accepting feedback.
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of facilitation and debriefing techniques
Student will demonstrate
proficiency of facilitation and debriefing techniques
Student will demonstrate
knowledge of framing and breaking
the frame
Student will demonstrate
proficiency of framing and breaking
the frame
Student will show knowledge of
organizing meetings / setting
agendas / and leading meetings
Student will describe personal
examples of organizing meetings /
setting agendas / leading meetings
Student will show knowledge of
Parliamentary Procedure
Student will show knowledge of
techniques for working with difficult
people
Student will describe personal
examples of using techniques to
work effectively with difficult people

SOC 336

WRT 104

In Soc 336, we are required to do a group presentation where each student has to
read half of a chapter. We have one month to complete this assignment, but like
most students, our group waited until the last week. I got my portion done along with
two of the other kids. One member did not do his portion on the PowerPoint, so in
order to get the grade we would expect, all three of us chipped in and did his
portion. The student who was being difficult was hard to reach by phone and email,
and was very unwilling to do his selected part. Since 75% of us wanted the good
grade, we sucked it up and did his part and even though he was lazy, we gave him a
sheet to read off of to make it look like he actually did his half of the chapter. We
talked to him after words and he was very thankful we did this and apologized for
not doing his part.
Evidence #113

114.

Student will show knowledge of the


stages of group development
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115.
116.
117.

(Tuckman, Bennis or others)


Student will describe personal
examples of group development in
use (Tuckman, Bennis or others).
Student will show knowledge of
group dynamics and group roles
Student will describe personal
examples of group dynamics and
group roles

ENG 240

HDF 290
BCH 190

Being a junior in college, I have done a lot of group projects. Some people I work
with are great and some are not as good. When a deadline is due for a project,
someone has to step up and take control of the situation. I feel like nowadays,
people always wait for others to step up. With that being the case, I was
responsible for getting together a group message to meet with my group members.
In this case, I was the group leader while the other two were just members of the
group. It is also hard to always meet up with people due to different schedules, but
we found a way. When we worked on our project, we all did our work and received
a good grade. Sometimes all it takes is just one person to do the thing that no one
wants; and for this instance start a group message to get the project done.
Evidence #117

118.
119.
120.

121.
122.

123.
124.

Student will show knowledge of


effective memberships skills in
groups
Student will describe personal
examples of membership skills in
use
Student will show knowledge of the
Challenge and Support theory by
Sanford, and its relationship to
organizations
Student will describe personal
examples of using the theory of
Challenge and Support (Sanford)
Student will show knowledge of the
construction / elements of
informative and persuasive
speeches
Student will demonstrate
proficiency in informative and
persuasive public speaking
Student will show knowledge of
planning and conducting interviews
(as the interviewer)

HDF 290

In HDF 290 under the small business portion, we were required to interview
someone who owns a small business or who is a local politician. We had a rubric to
follow which had the topics we needed to cover during this interview. Before I went
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to interview Officer Allsup of the Narragansett Police, I wrote down many of the
points from the rubric. This helped me out significantly, because once I arrived to the
interview to start conducting it, I had everything organized to make the interview go
as smooth and quickly as possible.
Evidence #124
125.

Student will describe personal


examples of planning and
conducting interviews (as the
interviewer)

HDF 290

In HDF 290 this semester, we were required to do a segment on small business


owners or local politicians. I decided to interview my old boss, Officer Allsup, from
my job this past summer while I worked for the Narragansett police as a Community
Service Officer. Prior to the interview, I wrote down all the topics from the rubric on a
piece of notebook paper and wrote down what he said. In this interview, some
questions were asked on how he dealt with situations and some own personal
advice of his own. I also asked him about his own leadership skills and philosophies.
Evidence #125

126.

Student will show knowledge of


preparing for and effective answers
in interviews (as the interviewee)

Williston Northampton School

During my first junior year of college, I interviewed with many boarding schools to
further my academics and sports. The interview that affected me most was the one
with The Williston Northampton School; because that was the school I chose to go
to for two additional years. Prior to the interview, I did research on the school and
my interviewer before arriving to the actual interview. I found it helpful to have
gained this knowledge before being interviewed because it gave me more topics to
talk about rather than myself.
Evidence #126

127.
128.
129.
130.
131.

Student will describe personal


examples of preparing for and
being interviewed
Student will show knowledge of
effective collaboration / coalition
building
Student will describe personal
examples of working in
collaboratives/coalitions
Student will show knowledge of
Intercultural communication
considerations
Student will demonstrate
proficiency in intercultural
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132.
133.

134.

communication
Student will describe ways to
maintain accountability in
leadership / member relationships
Student will describe personal
examples related to maintaining
accountability as a leader

Student will describe ways to build


relationships between leaders and
members

Camp Councilor
Hockey

HDF 290

Personal Research

When I was a camp councilor at the FCA camp, I did not follow directions from my
boss. I was responsible for twelve campers. I was supposed to get them off the ice
and ready for dinner, but instead I let them skate for an extra thirty minutes on the
ice. When our whole group was late, since I was the leader, I told my boss that it
was my fault that we were late because I let them stay on the ice for extra time.
Also, when I was a captain for my select league team during my junior year, I
initiated a fight on the ice. This was not like me to do this, but one of my best friends
on the team got hit from behind and seriously injured. With my emotions running
high, I jumped a kid then later dropped the helmet and gloves and center ice. When
it got cleared up, our coach yelled at us in the locker room. I apologized to the team
and coach afterwards, since I was the captain and it was my responsibility.
Evidence #133
I have played sports all my life and I have realized that teams work better with
people who like each other. Sometimes, people like to think they are the best and do
everything themselves, but ultimately that can hinder progress. It is important for
teams to establish leaders and always improve relationships with each other by
everyone having a voice and come to common ground on decisions. Also, it is very
important to set goals for the team at hand. If everyone meets those goals, then as
a team everyone can feel better about themselves. Before the goals are met, it is
also important to make sure everyone knows their roles so everything can run
smoothly.
McNamera, C. (n.d.). All About Team Building. Retrieved December 2, 2014, from
http://managementhelp.org/groups/team-building.htm

135.

Student will describe personal


examples of building relationships
with members as a leader

Hockey

Evidence #134
When I played hockey for the Rhode Island Saints my first junior year of high school,
I was the captain. I knew and have played with most of the kids on my team for
many years, so it was relatively easy to be the leader. I found it best to always
motivate everyone but also hear feedback and take into account what everyone has
to say. I had the most responsibility out of each player, and people came to me first,
rather than the coach. If there was a problem in the locker room, I would always talk
to each individual then both together afterwards, and come up with a solution on
how to be better and learn from the mistake. An example of this would be when our
goalie did not have the best game, players got mad at him, but we simply just got
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beat and as the skaters, we did not score enough goals either.
Evidence #135
136.

137.

138.
139.
140.

141.

Student will describe how credibility


applies to leadership, as well as
the characteristics and skills of a
credible leader
Student will describe personal
examples of building, maintaining,
and repairing his/her own credibility
as a leader
Student will describe ethical
standards in influence
Student will describe influence
applies to leadership
Student will describe principles of
effective mentoring, as well as
problems particular to the
mentoring relationship
Student will describe personal
examples of mentoring and being
mentored

Camp Councilor
Personal Conversations

Effective mentoring has to do a lot with great communication and the ability to go out
of one's way to reach a person. When I went to Bishop Hendricken my freshman
and sophomore year, I developed a relationship with one of my teacher's who is a
Religious Brother. He was always there for me when I need to talk, especially about
the decision to leave Hendricken and go to LaSalle Academy for schooling. Even
though I would be leaving, he was always there to talk and help me out. Some
problems that risen from this would be me just accepting the truth whether I wanted
to listen to it or not. I learned that sometimes I did not want to accept the reality of
the situation, but once I was older, I realized the advice was only there to help me.
After all these years we still talk and he sends words of encouragement. This is a
perfect example of a mentor, someone who is still willing to communicate after many
years and show care. Since I have been in a relationship with my girlfriend for
almost 5 years, we have been through a lot together. Her freshman year of college
she and her roommates did not get along, so I was always there for her when she
needed me. When I was at boarding school, I did not like my roommate at first
either, so I gave her the best advice I possibly could.
Evidence#141

142.

Student will describe principles of


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143.
144.
145.

effective peer leadership, as well


as problems particular to peer
leadership
Student will describe personal
examples related to being a peer
leader and being led by peers
Student will describe the four
frames of organizations by Bolman
and Deal
Student will describe personal
application of organizational
analysis using the four frames of
organizations (Bolman and Deal)

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