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DIXIE STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

ELEMENTARY 3rd SEMESTER ELED 4300 SCIENCE LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE


(8/23/14)
Teacher Candidate ____Meegan Demke___ Grade Level 1 Title Life Cycle Of A Pumpkin___
CONTEXTUAL FACTORS (classroom factors)
Contextual Factors:
18 students, 10 girls, 8 boys
5 ELL students All WIDA level B (Diana, Alexa, Christopher, Carlos, Alan)
1 SPED referral (Alexa)
1 Behavior students (Talon- restless, moves around a lot)
3 High level learners( Ryne, Sela, Jaxon)
0 IEP

Classroom environment:
There are five tables with 3-4 students are each table. There is a rug in from of the tables and a small group table in the
front right corner of the room. The Teachers desk is in the left front corner. There is a small class library by on the back
left side of the room by the door. There are also some computers in the back of the classroom. The class has a computer,
Elmo, smart board, and white board.

WALK-AWAY (As a result of this lesson, what do I want the students to know, understand, and be able to do?)
State Standard/Objective:
Standard 4:
Life Science. Students will gain an understanding of Life Science through the study of changes in organisms over time and
the nature of living things.
Objective 2:
Living things change and depend upon their environment to satisfy their basic needs.
c. Describe and model life cycles of living things
Content Walk-Away:
I will put the life cycle of a pumpkin in the correct sequence.
Language Walk-Away:
I will put the life cycle of a pumpkin in the correct sequence.
Vocabulary: Vine, Sprout, Cycle, Stage

TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION:


Certainly, I learned much concerning the life cycle of a pumpkin. Pumpkins must be planted by spring, and start as
seeds. Inside each seed is a tiny plant. Each seed needs to be planted in warm, moist soil, and it takes about ten
days for a little leaf to emerge. Then two little smooth leaves began to grow, and use the sunlight and air to take
nutrients to the seed. After a while these smooth leaves will wither away, and jagged rough leaves will take their
place. By the beginning of summer the leaves will began to multiply and vines will start to grow. These vines are
curled and spiraled. These vines send out little tendrils that connect the vines together as they grow longer. Next
the vines will produce some yellow flowers that bloom. There are two types of flowers, there are female flowers
and male flowers. There are some differences between these two flowers. Female flowers grow on fuzzy green
balls that look like a swollen bulb, and this is where the pumpkins will grow. Thus, female flowers are baby
pumpkins in the waiting. Male flowers grow on long stems and these flowers carry pollen within their petals. Male
flowers will usually grow first, and will die off eventually. The pollen in these male flowers cause the bees to come
around and pollenate. When the female flowers began to grow the bees have already established their pollination
route. When bees come around the male flowers, the pollen sticks to their bodies. When these bees travel to the
female flowers the pollen stuck to their bodies rubs off into the flower. When this happens, the pollen from the

male flower connects with the female flower. Then the fuzzy green ball that the female flower has grown upon
begins to grow into a pumpkin. Just like humans, it takes a female and male flower to create a pumpkin. By late
summer, all the vines and leaves grow and tangle into one another. The leaves are very large and fuzzy, and the
vines are thick and strong. Pumpkin leaves are very large because they keep the sun off the pumpkins, so they dont
dry out during the hot summer. They act like big umbrellas for the pumpkins. Underneath these big leaves are
where the pumpkins start to grow. Pumpkins need a selected amount of sun and water. Too much sun is harmful to
a pumpkin, because it can wither away the vines and the pumpkin cannot get nutrients. However, too much rain
can also be harmful because it rots the pumpkin. By fall the pumpkins began to grow bigger and bigger. The
pumpkin starts to grow and turns green. On the outside the pumpkins are starting to turn from green to orange. On
the inside the pumpkins are forming seeds and pulp. When the vines start to turn brown then it is time for the
pumpkin to be cut from the vine.

Fridell, R., & Walsh, P. (2014) How does a pumpkin go from seed to pie? Retrieved from
http://www.teacherweb.com/ALSpanishFortElementarySchool/MrsFranklinsClass/Life-Cycle-of-aPumpkin.doc
Levenson, G. (2007) How to grow pumpkins. Retrieved from
http://www.informeddemocracy.com/pumpkin/growing.html
University of Illinois Board of Trustees (2014) Pumpkins and more. Retrieved from
http://urbanext.illinois.edu/pumpkins/growing.cfm

ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE (What evidence do I need to show the students have


learned the Walk-Away?) 5E-Evaluate
Formative Evidence (checking for understanding throughout the lesson):
The students are engaged, and discussing the six stages with their shoulder partners.
The students can act out the six stages of a pumpkin.
Content Walk-Away Evidence (Summative):
The students will put the life cycle of a pumpkin in the correct sequence.
Language Walk-Away Evidence (Summative):
The students will put the life cycle of a pumpkin in the correct sequence.

Approx.
Time

ACTIVE LEARNING PLAN


Approximate length of entire lesson:_40__ minutes.
______

Modifications/Accomodations (ELL, IEP, GATE, etc.)


ELLs: Have visuals of the six
stages of the pumpkins and
their labels. Have pictures of
the vocabulary words. Help
them with the first stage.
SPED Referral: Have visuals.
Have pictures of the
vocabulary words.
High learners: Ask them higher
order questions throughout
lesson. Have them draw on the
back of the assignment their
favorite stage, and draw it
more in depth.
Behavioral: Have him stand at
his desk. Call on him to help get
his wiggles out.

Teaching time: from _____to

Activate/Building Background Knowledge


Good afternoon students, I am very excited to all of you today. I want you to all think back to when you
learned about apples. Remember making applesauce? What do you all remember about the life cycle of an
apple? SIOP 7, 8 (Listen to students probe if needed.) Good class, well today we are going to learn about the
life cycle of a pumpkin. Lets read our goal for todays lesson. I will put the life cycle of a pumpkin in the
correct sequence. SIOP 1, 2 I have a pumpkin here with me I want you to think about how this pumpkin

grew to be big round and orange. Wait time. SIOP 18 Talk to your shoulder partner about it SIOP 16 Good,
now I am going to open up the pumpkin and see if were are correct. SIOP 7 Today we are going to talk about
the life cycle of a pumpkin. But before we can do this we have to go through some vocabulary that we are
going to need to know. (Talk to the students about the words Vine, Sprout, Stage and Cycle and have them
share these words and meanings with their shoulder partners.) (Have the words, on a PowerPoint, with
definition and visuals.) SIOP 16, 17, 9, 8 Well when we see pumpkins at the store, they havent always
looked that way. Pumpkins were once seeds. They had to grow a lot from the time they were little seeds to
become big pumpkins. SIOP 7, 3, 4, 5, 6 Today we are going to talk about the life cycle of pumpkins and learn
how they started from little seeds and became big pumpkins.
Formative assessment:
Learning Goal
The students will understand that
pumpkins are a part of a life cycle.

Success Criteria
The students can answers
questions regarding life cycles of
apples and pumpkins.

Assessment Strategy
The students will talk with each
other and me about how
pumpkins are part of a life cycle.

Modification/accommodations: (ELL, IEP, GATE, etc.)


High learners: Ask Ryne,
ELLs: Have visuals of the vocabulary.
SPED Referral: Have visuals of the vocabulary.
Behavior Student: Allow him wiggle room on the rug.
Focus Lesson (I do it) 5E-Engage
I am going to read a story and I am going to be asking you questions throughout the story, so pay attention.
(Read the book, ask questions for high learners.) Jaxon Why do leaves have to grow before vines? Sela,
How are roots like straws? Ryne How long does it take for a seed to become a pumpkin? SIOP 15 Now we
are going to watch a video on the life cycle of a pumpkin. See if you can make connections to the book we just
read. (Watch video) SIOP 25
Formative Assessment:
Learning Goal
The students will understand the
six stages of the life cycle of a
pumpkin.

Success Criteria
The students will help me draw
the life cycle of a pumpkin on the
Smartboard.

Assessment Strategy
The students will tell me the
stages of the pumpkin, and share
them with their shoulder
partners.

Modification/accommodations:
High Learners: Jaxon Why do leaves have to grow before vines? Sela, How are roots like straws? Ryne
How long does it take for a seed to become a pumpkin?
ELL Students: Have visuals.
SPED Referral: Have visuals.
Behavior Student: Keep him on task during the book.
Guided Instruction (We do it) 5E-Explore
I have created a PowerPoint that goes through the life cycle of a pumpkin. Lets look at it together,
there are six stages that pumpkins go through in their life cycle. Stage one, there is a seed, seeds need three
things in order to grow. Hold up three fingers class, these seeds need first sun, second water and third air. If
the little seed has all these three things then it can grow into the next stage. Turn to your shoulder partner and
tell them what stage one is in the life cycle of a pumpkin. SIOP 16, 17, 10, 11 Stage two is a sprout, and sprout
means what class? Yes, the new part that is growing on a plant, the leaves. We can tell it is a sprout if we see a
little plant that is trying to come up from the ground. Turn to your shoulder partner and tell them what stage
two is in the life cycle of a pumpkin. SIOP 16, 17 Stage three in the life cycle of a pumpkin is the vines. Vines
are what class? Yes, a twisting plant that creeps around the ground. Turn to your shoulder partner and tell
them what stage three is in the life cycle of a pumpkin. SIOP 16, 17 Stage four in the life cycle of the pumpkin
is the flower. This flower is always yellow. There are two types of flowers. One is a boy and one is a girl. The
girl flower is where the pumpkin grows. Turn to your shoulder partner and tell them what stage four is in the
life cycle of a pumpkin. SIOP 16 17 Stage five in the life cycle of a pumpkin is the green pumpkin. This
pumpkin is almost ready to be picked, but it is still growing on the inside and outside. Turn to your shoulder
partner and tell them what stage five is in the life cycle of a pumpkin. SIOP 16, 17 Our last stage is the orange
pumpkin, once this pumpkin is orange it is ready to be cut from the vine. Turn to your shoulder partner and
tell them what stage six is in the life cycle of a pumpkin. SIOP 16, 17 Once pumpkins are cut from the vine

what can we do with them. Turn to your shoulder partner and tell them what you could do what an orange
pumpkin. Wait time. SIOP 18, 16, 17, 10, 11, 25
Formative Assessment:
Learning Goal
The students will gain a deeper
understanding of the life cycle of
a pumpkin.

Success Criteria
The students will tell their
partners what stage of the
pumpkin would do.

Assessment Strategy
I hear the students sharing the six
stages of the pumpkin.

Modification/accommodations:
High Learner: Ask Ryne a specific question which promotes in depth Why do you think pumpkin leaves are
so big? Sela Why cant pumpkins grow up tall?
ELL Students: Have visuals
SPED Referral: Have visuals
Behavior Student: Have him come up to get wiggles out.
Collaborative/Cooperative (You do it together) 5E-Explain
Have the students talk with their shoulder partners about the six stages of the pumpkin. Have them share the
vocabulary words with their shoulder partners. Wait time. SIOP 16, 17, 18
Formative Assessment:
Learning Goal
The students can work with their
shoulder partners to say the six
stages of the pumpkin in order.

Success Criteria
The students can correctly say the
six stages of the pumpkin in
order.

Assessment Strategy
I will walk around and hear if the
students have put the life cycle of
a pumpkin in the correct order.

Modification/accommodations:
Behavior Student:
ELL Students: Have visuals to help with their responses.
SPED Referral: Have visuals to help with her response.
Behavior Student:
Independent (You do it alone) 5E-Elaborate
Okay students now you are going to create your own chart which shows the life cycle of the pumpkin. It has
already been labeled one-six. I want you all to cut and paste the correct stage in the correct sequence. Just like
you did last week. I will be walking around if you need help just raise your hand and Mrs. Capel and I will help
you. If you finish early, I want you to turn the paper around and draw your favorite stage on the back with all
the details we learned from the book, video and PowerPoint. Okay lets start working. SIOP 20,21, 23, 24
Summative Assessment:
The students will draw the six stages of the life cycle of a pumpkin.
Modification/accommodations:
Behavior Student: Have them draw on the back of the assignment their favorite stage, and draw it more in
depth.
ELL Students: Help them with the first stage.
SPED Referral: Help her with the first stage.
Behavior Student: Allow him to stand at his desk.
Closure/Review of walk-aways, vocabulary, and essential questions
(Note: Closure includes student interactions, reflection, and/or demonstrations.)

Okay class lets come back to the rug, and review our goal for today. (Use the PowerPoint) Lets read
our goal, I will draw the life cycle of a pumpkin in the correct order. SIOP 28 Were we able to do this
class? Wait time SIOP 18 Yes, we were! Okay lets go through our vocabulary words that we learned.
(Go through vocabulary have students share them with shoulder partners.) SIOP 27 Now lets
review the life cycle of a pumpkin. (Review the six stages.) SIOP 27, 28, 29, 30

SIOP Indicators
Preparation: 1-Content objectives, 2-Language objectives, 3-Content appropriate, 4-Supplementary materials, 5-Adaptation
of content, 6-Meaningful activities
Building Background: 7-Linked to background, 8-Linked to past learning, 9-Key vocabulary
Comprehensive Input: 10-Appropriate speech, 11-Clear explanation, 12-Variety of techniques
Strategies: 13-Students use learning strategies, 14-Scaffolding, 15-Higher-order thinking,
Interaction: 16-Opportunity for interaction, 17-Grouping supports objectives, 18-Wait time, 19-Opportunity for L1 students
Practice/Application: 20-Hands-on materials, 21-Activities to apply content/language knowledge, 22-Language skills
(reading, writing, listening, speaking)
Lesson Delivery: 23-Content objective supported, 24-Language objective supported, 25-Students engaged, 26-Pacing
Review/Assessment: 27-Review vocabulary, 28-Review concepts, 29-Feedback, 30-Assessment

TEACHING NOTES
What do I need to remember to do? What materials do I need to have ready? What is the approximate time needed for
this lesson?
Have PowerPoint ready.

REFLECTION AFTER LESSON


How can I use the assessment data to reflect on & evaluate the outcomes of teaching and learning? How can I transfer
what I learned from teaching this lesson to future teaching? What was effective and not effective? What goals can I set
to improve my practice and student learning?
Certainly, I felt that this lesson went very well. The students were all engaged and interested in the lesson, which doesnt
happen every time I teach. I felt that the students were able to grasp the vocabulary very well. I used a PowerPoint which I
felt was one of the strengths of my lesson. It just enhanced my lesson, and helped the students stay engaged. I brought in a
real pumpkin, sprout and vine and this helped my ELL students better grasp the vocabulary. I felt that the students were
able to grasp the objective, and from their assessments more than half of them received a perfect score on the assessment.
I think my biggest strengths in this lesson was having a lot of different supplementary materials for all different types of
learners. I had a book, video, actions, interaction with the smart board and hands on. I was able to really help my ELLs.
Also, I was able to include my high learners through higher questions and in-depth thinking. Students who are normally
so bored, were very engaged and interested throughout the lesson. I also feel that I was very clear with my expectations
and instructions throughout the lesson. The students knew how to behave and were all able to have fun, and learn about
the life cycle of a pumpkin. My classroom management is very good, and this helps keep the students interested and
listening. I think one of the weak parts of my lesson was time. I did not have enough time to go through everything that I
wanted to cover, which was a disappointment. I want to work on my pacing, so I have enough time for my closure. As I
spoke with my supervisor, we came up with some goals for next time. One of them was planning more time for closure,
and the other was getting students to use metacognition. Having students think about their own learning and reflecting on
how they know, that they know. As I looked at the assessment I found that eleven out of the sixteen students who took the
assessment received a 100%. They were able to correctly sequence the life cycle of a pumpkin. However, there were a
couple of students who received the same score for their pre-test as their post-test. This was kind of sad to see, and I
wished that I would have paid better attention to all my students rather than focusing on my ELLs and high learners. I
want to work on helping my behavior student better concentrate when I am not right next to him. He needs to work on
self-regulation and I wish I would have had time to help him more. However, I felt that my objective clearly aligned with
the assessment and the students were able to learn about the life cycle of a pumpkin.

Note: You must arrange to have at least 40 minutes to teach your lesson.