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CHAPTER 1

THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND

Introduction:

Nowadays, pupils in the elementary schools both in public and private are having a
problem regarding on how they can improve the quality of education. DepED Secretary Jesli
Lapus, said “ we have to continuously assess our students competencies as mean to determine
ways to further improve our educational system.”
(http://sunstar.com.ph/static/dav/2008/02/17/news.set.in.march.html). The system on how the
lesson should be taught which is based on the traditional approach, the teacher is the only source
of information during the lesson, is not effective anymore. Today, cognitive researchers are
spending more time working with the teachers, testing and refining their theories in real
classrooms, where they can see how different settings and classroom interaction influence
applications of their theories. What is perhaps currently most striking is the variety of research
approaches and techniques that have been developed and ways in which evidence from any
different branches of science are beginning to converge. The story to evolve dramatically in the
next generation. ( http://www.jpsim.bulan.com/2007/11/03/importance-of-instructional
%20materials–in-education.html ).
The way a student learns today is quite different compared to the past years. Today,
students learn in the most and to the great extent if they will learn it through experience, in an
interactive and they learn through doing it by themselves. It is commonly known as learning by
doing (Acero, et.al. 2000).
In response to this, the Department of Education together with other non-government
organizations and other government agencies introduce different types of Teaching Strategies.
Expert Jigsaw, Four Corners, Numbered Heads, and Round Table are few of the many Teaching
Strategies (BEAM or Basic Education Assistance for Mindanao, 2007).While it’s true that these

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Teaching Strategies is made to enhance the quality of education and instruction inside the
classroom, it is also true that not all teaching strategies are effective.
In relation to this, the researchers are interested to know what are the most effective
teaching strategies in teaching different subjects specifically in Science VI and how it can affect
the students performance inside the classroom.

Statement of the Problem:

This research aims to identify the effective Teaching Strategies in Grade VI Science and
its effects to the Students performance of the Selected Schools in the City of Koronadal for the
S.Y. 2009-2010.

Specifically this study will attempt to answer the following questions:

1. What are the common teaching strategies in teaching Grade VI Science?


2. What are the top five most effective teaching strategies in teaching Grade VI
Science?
3. Why did it become the most effective teaching strategies in teaching Grade VI
Science?
4. How do students react to the teaching strategies that were used?

Significance of the Study:

Teachers in elementary, they handles almost of the subjects that we can found in the
elementary curriculum. In that way some of the teachers cannot identify the best and appropriate
teaching strategies to be employed. Poor or wrong choice of the teaching strategies can cause

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poor performance of the students of the public and even in private schools not only on the local
but also in National or even internationally. In that way, we the researchers want to help the
Science teachers to identify the most effective teaching strategies in handling the subject. The
researchers conduct this study to provide the students a more active learning process. The main
aim of this research is to support the Grade VI Science teachers in delivering the subject. The
researchers conduct this study to provide the strategies in handling the subject and also the
researchers conduct this study to provide the students a more active learning process. The main
aim of this research is to support the Grade VI teachers in delivering the subject to maximize the
learning of the pupils.

Scope and Delimitation:

This study parameters only to identify/survey the effective teaching strategies for Grade
VI Science and its effects to the student’s performance of the Five Selected Schools in the City
of Koronadal. With a specific time frame the researchers will conduct their study with the use of
survey forms created personally. This study focuses on effective Teaching Strategies used by the
Grade VI teachers and its effects to the students’ performance. With the use of check list and
questionnaires, the researchers could gather the data needed in the duration of the study. Random
sampling will be used in choosing the respondents of the study. This research will cover half of
the School Year 2009-2010. This survey is designed to be answered by the Grade VI pupils and
teachers of the Five selected schools in the City of Koronadal. The researchers will use
Percentage and Ranking as the statistical tool for this research.

CHAPTER II

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REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

This chapter presents the previous studies and literatures related to the problem. This also
includes the definition of terms at the end of this chapter.
Since 1925, there are surveys conducted internationally which aims to identify Filipino
pupil’s performances. Based on the surveys, they found out that the pupils have poor
performance in the main subjects namely English, Math and especially Science.
In 1995, according to the inter press report, the Philippines ranked third to the last in
elementary and high school students in 45 countries. on 1997 UNESCO or the United Nations
Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization study assessed the performance of the
Philippine Education for All (EFA) program and the Philippine Plan of Action (PPA) for the
1990’s. (http://www.kpfi.org/what/report.asp)
The trends in International Math and Science Survey (TIMSS) conducted in 1998 ranked
the Philippines fourth from the last among the 39 countries that participated in the said survey.
Five years later in 2003, the Philippines were number 41 among the 45 countries that took part in
the TIMSS.
But way up there among the major reasons should be the poor preparation and training of
teachers. (http://opinion.inquirer.net/inquireropinion/editorial/view/20080105-110485/Teacher-
cant-teach)
The 2007 NAT results in Grade VI indicated marked improvements in the Mean
Percentage Score (MPS) in English and Mathematics (12 percent), while Science also registered
a strong 10 percent increase.
(http://sunstar.com.ph/static/dav/2008/02/17/news.set.in.march.html)
From all the findings gathered since 1925 the Department of Education created different
plans to improve the quality of education here in the Philippines.

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Figure 1. Conceptual Framework

5
Types
Good
Poor
Advantages
Clarity
Classroom
Deductive
Student’s
Inductive
Instructional
Classroom
Multiple
Classroom
Teacher’s
Voice
of
Teachers
Student’s
Student’sMaterials
Learning
Attractiveness
Audio
Multiple
Words
Time/Schedule
of the
Modulation
and
Teaching
Effective Intelligences
Visual
Approach
Management
Performance
Instructional
SubjectApproach
Used
Instruction
Management
Approach
Management
Style
Behavior
used
Disadvantages
Intelligences
Materials
performance
Teaching Strategies
Matter
Strategies in Grade VI Science and its Effects
materials to the Students
Performance of the Five Selected Schools in the City of Koronadal
S.Y 2009-2010.

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At the same year (2007) Basic Education Assistance for Mindanao was introduced and
implemented. It gives and suggests teaching strategies on how to handle students learning styles,
aiming to improve the student’s performance using appropriate and précised learning strategies
in each classroom activities.

Teaching Strategies

Teaching strategies or teaching methods refers to an organized, orderly, systematic, well-


planned procedure. It consists of steps which are logically arranged aimed at achieving the
specific aims of the instruction, at enhancing greater and maximizing learning output. Method
directs and guides the teacher in all class activities and involves as well, the organization of
materials to get things done. A generic term that refers to any learning activity learners might
engage in. Interactive instructional technique in which a computer is used to present instructional
material, monitor learning, and select additional instructional material in accordance with
individual learner needs.

Institutions of higher learning across the nation are responding to political, economic,
social and technological pressures to be more responsive to students' needs and more concerned
about how well students are prepared to assume future societal roles. Faculty are already feeling
the pressure to lecture less, to make learning environments more interactive, to integrate
technology into the learning experience, and to use collaborative learning strategies when
appropriate.( http://www.gmu.edu/facstaff/part-time/strategy.html)
It's now time to make choices about what you will have students do in your course in
order to learn the course content and to practice the goals. What kinds of teaching strategies can
be used in the classroom that accomplishes both course content goals and active engagement on
the part of students?
The old adage "if all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail" is equally true of
teaching strategies. If the only classroom teaching strategy you know is traditional lecturing,

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that's the teaching tool that you're likely to use for all classroom situations. If, on the other hand,
you have more tools in your toolbox, you will have the opportunity to choose the most
appropriate tool for the task at hand. In this section of the tutorial, you will explore various
teaching strategies in which most students are active rather than passive in the classroom and in
which the focus is less on the teacher presenting and more on the student learning
(http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/coursedesign/tutorial/strategies.html ).

Teachers Instruction

As a teacher, you will have many challenges to face in teaching a group of students. All
children do not learn in the same way, so a teaching method that is very effective for one student
may not be very helpful to another. You need to differentiate instruction in order to reach all
students, even while working toward the same academic goals. Differentiating instruction creates
more effective learning for your students.
(http://articles.directorym.com/Ho_To_Differentiate_Instruction-a973507.html) The teacher’s
activities of educating or instructing or teaching the pupils; activities that impart knowledge or
skill; “he received no formal education”; “our instruction was carefully programmed”; “good
teaching is seldom rewarded” (http://ardictionary.com/Instruction/5235).

Instructional Materials

An instructional material refers to the various resources available to the teachers and
learners which help to facilitate instruction and learning. These elements found in the
environment and which are meant to help students understand and explain reality.

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The effective use also of non-book materials in teaching-learning process will capture the
student’s interest and develop good attitude towards the topic being discussed. Examples of non-
book materials are audio-visual, instructional aides, educational media, etc. (Acero. et. al., 2000)

Instructional Materials (IM) are considered to be forms of communication and must


therefore be delivered in a manner that is equally effective for persons with disabilities.
(http://www.calstate.edu/accesibility/instructionalmaterials/index.html)

Classroom Management

Elements of classroom management vary. For this purpose, management refers to issues
of supervision, refereeing, facilitating, and even academic discipline. Not all student behaviors
require intervention or confrontation while some are serious enough in nature to warrant formal
disciplinary action. Rest assured that while there are current studies in higher education literature
that suggest a growing trend of rudeness and even overt animosity toward faculty by students,
the vast majority of classroom experiences are not dramatic.(
http://4faculty.org/includes/108r2.jsp)

Teacher’s Approach

Is an enlightened viewpoint of teaching which provide some philosophy and orientation


of the whole process of teaching in which the selection of an instructional method is part and
parcel of, it also embraces the whole spectrum of the process such that: it specifies the major
goal of teaching; the given priorities among the three domains, cognitive, psychomotor, and
affective; the role of the teacher; the expectations from the students; the nature of teaching-

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learning process ; and the kind of evaluative techniques and suitable teaching method/strategies
to be employed. (Acero, et. al. 2000)

Deductive approach begins with a generalization and subsequently all examples and
specific situations to be given are supportive this generalization. It is also a process of starting
with the generalization and arriving at a specific statements or conclusion namely: one which is
not applicable to a class of objects, situations, or phenomena. (Acero, et. al. 2000)

Time/ Schedule

It refers to the amount of time allotted for a specific subject or subject matter for every
class, the time which the subject area is scheduled. The pupil has a short attention span and they
get easily bored easily and they tend to do other things such as talking with their seatmates and
doing some assignments which are not related to the subject. The use of different strategies can
help the teacher to catch their attention and prolonged their attention span.
(http://4faculty.org/includes/108r2.jsp)

Subject Matter

It refers to the specific topic which is taught by the teacher to the students. The teacher
indicates the subject matter that he believes will help attain his objectives. This may be indicated
as generalization in outline form. Sometimes, it can be a part of the procedure or it can be written
on a separate sheet of paper if the teacher wants more details in the outline. The teacher should
also consider the materials and the equipment that he may need. Illustrations and posters may be
prepared to help students concretize what are to emphasize. (Acero. et al. 2000)

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Students Performance

Is a performance that refers to the academic and non-academic capacity of a student. It


may be observed inside or even outside of the classroom but most of the time, students’
performance, is associated with the academic performance of a student. The general level of
ability and interests of students various grade levels differ. Or, within an age-grade itself, there
may be variations due to different environment among pupil. (Acero, et. al., 2000)

Multiple intelligences

The theory of multiple intelligences was developed by Dr. Howard Gardner, professor of
education at Harvard University. It suggests that the traditional notion of intelligence, based on
I.Q. testing, is far too limited. Instead Dr. Gardner proposes eight different intelligence to
account for a broader range of human potential in children and adults. These intelligences are:
Linguistic intelligence (‘word smart”), Logical-mathematical intelligence(“number/reasoning
smart”), Spatial intelligence(“picture smart”), Bodily kinesthetic intelligence (“body smart”),
Musical intelligence (“music smart”), Interpersonal intelligence (“self smart”), Naturalist
intelligence (“nature smart”), Dr. Gardner says that our school focus most of their attention on
linguistic and logical-mathematical intelligence. We esteem the highly articulate or logical
people of our culture. However, Dr. Gardner says that we should place equal attention on
individuals show gifts in the other intelligences: the artists, architects, musicians, naturalists,
designers, dancers, therapists, entrepreneurs, and others who enrich the world in which we live.
Unfortunately, many children with these gifts don’t receive much of reinforcement for them in
school. Many of these kids, in fact, end up being labeled “learning disabled,” “ADD (attention
deficit disorder,” or simply underachievers, when their unique ways of thinking and learning
aren’t addressed by a heavily linguistic or logical- mathematical classroom. The theory of
multiple intelligences proposes a major transformation in the way our school are run. It suggests
that teachers be trained to present their lessons in a wide variety of ways using music,

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cooperative learning , art activities, role play, multimedia, field trips, inner reflection, and much
more (see Multiple intelligences in the Classroom). The good news is that the theory of multiple
intelligences has grabbed the attention of many educators around the country, and hundreds of
schools are currently using its philosophy to design the way it educates children. The bad news is
that there are thousands of schools still out there that teach in the same old dull way, through dry
lecture, and boring worksheets and textbooks. The challenge is to get this information out too
many teachers, school administrators and others who work with children, so that each child has
the opportunity to learn in ways harmonious with their unique minds.

The theory of multiple intelligences also has strong implications for adult learning and
development. Many adults find themselves in jobs that do not make optimal use of their most
highly developed intelligences (for example, the highly bodily-kinesthetic individual who is
stuck in a linguistic or logical desk-job when he or she would be must happier in a job where
they could move around, such as recreational leader, a forest ranger, or physical therapist). The
theory of multiple intelligences gives adult a whole new way to look at their lives, examining
potentials that they left behind in their childhood (such as love for art or drama) but now have the
opportunity to develop through courses, hobbies, or other programs of self development.
(http://sustar.com.ph/static/dav/2008/02/17/news.set.in.march.html)

Definition of Term:

Behavior is the way the students react against something or someone.

Classroom Management is the way the teacher control and handles the classroom situations,
extra activities, and discussions.

Education involves the teaching and learning process. It is an act of educating with
correct instruction and discipline used.

Effective means it is the most precise and accurate use of strategies that increases and
maximizes the learning of the students.

Performance is the way the students behave after the deployment of the teaching strategy.

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Survey is a study conducted in several forms. It is also an act of deploying the survey
tools and to gather it afterwards for the data analysis.

Teaching Strategies are the strategies of the teacher in giving the lesson to the pupils. It is
also an organized, orderly, systematic, well-planned procedure.

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CHAPTER III

METHODOLOGY

This chapter also presents the conceptual framework, as shown in figure 1 and the
theoretical framework as shown in figure 2. This section includes the locale of the study, subject
of the study, research instruments, research methodology, and statistical tools.

A. Respondents of the Study (Subject of the Study)


The subjects of the study were the Grade VI Science Students and
Teachers of the five selected schools in the city of Koronadal. All respondents are
enrolled in grade VI and taking the science subject for the school year 2009-2010.
All teachers’ respondents are teaching grade VI Science for the same school year.

B. Locale of the Study


The locales of the study were the five selected schools within the city of
Koronadal as identified by the researchers.

C. Research Instruments
Data were gathered through the prepared questionnaire. Before the survey,
the prepared questions were tested using actual survey. It elicited responses from
the common and effective teaching strategies, the effect to the students and the
reasons why it was used.

D. Research Methodology
The survey questionnaire was made up of two types, the first is the teacher
survey form and the second is the students’ survey forms, questionnaires were

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Figure 2: Research Design
Science
Five
Grade
TheFrequency
Percentage/Ratio
selected
VI
Subject
Locale
teachers
Science
Descriptive
Effective
Survey
Research
HowResearch
What
Why
What schools
Distribution
of
Statistical
do
did are
are the
students ofof
students
the
the
the
Teaching
itQuestionnaires in
and
Methodology
become
the
researchers Instruments
topcommon
react Study
Study
five
the
Tools
five
the most
to of
most Strategies
teaching
the
will effective
effective
teaching
be in Gradethe
able to identify VI
City
the
selected
five
of Koronadal
selected
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Ranking in
school
the city
in the
of
Science
strategies
Effective
teaching
teachingstrategiesinand
strategies
strategies teaching
Teaching
that
in
inwereits used?
Effects
Grade
teaching
teaching VI VI
Strategies
Grade
Grade to the
VI in Students
Grade VI
City of KoronadalScience?
Koronadal
Performance
Science and ofits
theEffects
Science?
Science? Five Selected
to the Schools
Students in
Performance
the of the Fivefor
City of Koronadal Selected Schools
the S.Y. in
2009-2010
the City of Koronadal for the S.Y. 2009-2010.

15
also made up of questions to gather relevant information regarding with the
effects and common teaching strategies.

E. Statistical Tools
Statistical tools used in the presentation and analysis of the data includes:
Ranking and Percentage to describe the general findings and to determine the
common effects and Teaching Strategies. The data were gathered through survey
questionnaires.
The second part includes the effects of the common Teaching Strategies
and the reason why it was employed.

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CHAPTER IV

DATA PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

This chapter includes the presentation, analysis and interpretation of data.

Table 1. Top Five Effective Teaching Strategies used in Grade VI Science

Number of Percenta
Teaching Strategies
Respondents ge
Socialized Classroom
314 64.64%
Discussion
Lecture 295 60.65%

Laboratory 283 58.23%

Small Goup Discussion 266 54.80%

Reporting 218 44.89%

Formula for percentage

% = No. of respondents responded ×100%

Total no. of respondents

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Figure 3: Top Five Effective Teaching Strategies used in Grade VI Science

The graph shows that 64.64% of the respondents agreed that Socialized Classroom
Discussion is the most effective teaching strategy in teaching Grade VI Science while 60.65% of
the respondents agreed that lecture is the most effective teaching strategy in teaching Grade VI
Science, 58.23% believed that it is Laboratory Method, 54.80% agreed for Small Group
Discussion and 44.89% on Reporting.

This result simply means that most of the respondents agree that Socialized
Classroom Discussion is effective in teaching Science to the Grade VI pupils. Not far from the
Socialized Classroom Discussion is the Lecture which has also earned a great percentage. These
two teaching strategies has been found out similar to each other but they differ in some aspects,
like the Lecture is a teacher focused strategy while the Socialized Classroom Discussion would
involved the teacher and the students in discussing regarding with the concepts or ideas
regarding with a certain topic. The percentage of difference between these two strategies is very
small. The other teaching strategies had also gathered a high percentage, like Small Group
Discussion, Laboratory and Reporting, which means that they are also highly effective among
the other teaching strategies.

Table 2. The Common Teaching Strategies used in Teaching Grade VI Science

Number of Percenta
Teaching Strategies
Respondents ge
Socialized Classroom
Discussion 314 64.64%

Lecture 295 60.65%

Laboratory 283 58.23%

Small Goup Discussion 266 54.80%

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Reporting 218 44.89%

Others 158 32.51%

Storytelling 128 26.34%

Think Pair and Share 25 5.14%

Formula for percentage

% = No. of respondents responded ×100%

Total no. of respondents

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Figure 4. The Common Teaching Strategies used in Teaching Grade VI Science

The graph shows the percentage of the common Teaching Strategies used in teaching
Grade VI Science. The following are the common teaching strategies used in teaching Grade VI
Science:

1. Socialized Classroom Discussion


2. Lecture
3. Laboratory
4. Small Group Discussion
5. Reporting
6. Storytelling
7. Think Pair and Share
8. Others: Film Viewing, Giving trivia and other motivational Strategies
As the graph reflects that 64.64% of the total respondents said that socialized classroom
discussion are one of the commonly used teaching strategies by the teacher, while 60.65% vote
for lecture, 58.23% for Laboratory, 54.80% for Small Group Discussion, 44.89% for the
Reporting, 26.54% for the Storytelling, 5.14% for the Think Pair and Share and 32.51% for other
teaching strategies.

The enumerated teaching strategies are the commonly used Teaching Strategies in
teaching the subject. These are the strategies that are used by the teachers from time to time as an
aid in teaching the lesson. The enumerated teaching strategies are also effective in teaching the
subjects because they were recommended by the teacher who teaches the said subject.

Table 3. The Positive Effects of the Teaching Strategies to the Learners

Effects Number of Respondents Percentage

20
Active 326 67.29%

Excited 296 61.12%

Interested 283 58.38%

Learns Faster 263 54.30%

Enjoy 206 42.40%

Formula for percentage

% = No. of respondents responded ×100%

Total no. of respondents

21
Figure 5. The Positive Effects of the Teaching Strategies to the Learners

The graph shows the percentage of the positive effects of the teaching strategies to the
learners. It indicates that with the use of the teaching strategies the students became:

1. Active in learning

2. Enjoy the subject and the lesson

3. Interested in learning more about the Subject

4. Like the subject

5. Excited for the new lessons

6. Understand the lesson in an easier way

7. Eager to learn

The enumerated effects were based on the survey conducted. The enumerated effects are
also major effects of the strategies employed by the teacher in teaching the subject. The
respondents said that they became active in participating on the activities held inside the
classroom with a percentage of 96.15%, mean while 66.12% of the respondents said that they
enjoy the lesson when a certain teaching strategies were employed, 65.30% of the respondents
answered that they became interested in learning new lessons and concepts, 61.39% said that
they started to like the subject , 61.18% said that they became excited for the new activities and
lesson to be taught by the teacher, 60.77% of the respondents choose the answer that they
understand the lesson in an easier way and 59.33% of the total respondents said that they became
eager in learning Science.

Based on the survey conducted, the positive effects had earned a high percentage. The
difference in the percentage between the effects is quite small that each effect is related to each
other and one effect can result to another effect on.

22
It shows that using teaching strategies can help the learners in learning and studying the
subject and the teachers in teaching the subject. The effects of the use of teaching strategy had
been shown as a positive one. As the percentage supports this conclusion that the teaching
strategies is a positive and a good way of making the students understand the lessons and
complex ideas.

23
Table 4. Negative Effects of the Teaching Strategies to the Learners

Number of Percenta
Effects Respondents ge

Uncomfortable 123 25.31%

Tired 137 28.19%

Sleepy 124 25.51%

Bored 120 24.69%

Formula for percentage

% = No. of respondents responded ×100%

Total no. of respondents

24
Figure 6. Negative Effects of the Teaching Strategies to the Learners

The graph shows the percentage of the negative effects of the teaching strategies to the
students. The following are the negative effects of the teaching strategies to the students:

1. Uncomfortability in performing the activity


2. Tired, they became tired after the activity
3. Sleepy, they became sleepy during the activity
4. Bored, they became bored when doing the activity
The 28.19% of the respondents agreed that they fell bored when conducting the activity,
25.51% of the respondents answered that they feel sleepy when the activity is employed, 25.31%
of the respondents said that they became tired because of the different activities that they
performed and 24.69% of the respondents said that they are uncomfortable when performing the
activities.

The named negative effects had no great effects to the learners as the percentage shows.
The negative effects are so minimal than the positive effects has greater, which means that using
the teaching strategies is a good way of teaching the subject.

The teachers also cited the reasons why they choose a particular teaching strategy in
teaching the subject. These are the following reasons:

1. Science is a subject that needs interaction and a hands-on way of teaching.


2. Science is a subject that focuses on discovery.
3. Science needs a collaborative learning process.
4. Science is a subject that help the students understand their environment.
5. Science is a subject that needs a real life experience for understanding.
They choose the teaching strategy for the reasons enumerated above. They said that
science is not an ordinary subject that can be taught in just sitting inside the classroom.

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CHAPTER V

SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

This chapter presents the summary, conclusions and recommendations after conducting
the study.

Summary
This study tells us that the use of Teaching Strategies are effective and its effects to the
learners, this study also identifies the top five effective teaching strategies, it also identifies the
reasons why the different teachers use the teaching strategies in teaching the subject.

The use of teaching strategies in teaching science is effective with its great positive
impacts to the students like: they became active in participating on the activities held inside the
classroom with a percentage of 96.15%, mean while 66.12% of the respondents said that they
enjoy the lesson when a certain teaching strategies were employed, 65.30% of the respondents
answered that they became interested in learning new lessons and concepts, 61.39% said that
they started to like the subject , 61.18% said that they became excited for the new activities and
lesson to be taught by the teacher, 60.77% of the respondents choose the answer that they
understand the lesson in an easier way and 59.33% of the total respondents said that they became
eager in learning Science.

The use of the teaching has also a minimal negative effects like: 28.19% of the
respondents agreed that they fell bored when conducting the activity, 25.51% of the respondents
answered that they feel sleepy when the activity is employed, 25.31% of the respondents said
that they became tired because of the different activities that they performed and 24.69% of the
respondents said that they are uncomfortable when performing the activities.

The study also identified the top five effective teaching strategies namely: 64.64% of the
total respondents said that socialized classroom discussion are one of the commonly used
26
teaching strategies by the teacher, while 60.65% vote for lecture, 58.23% for Laboratory, 54.80%
for Small Group Discussion, 44.89% for the Reporting, 26.54% for the Storytelling, 5.14% for
the Think Pair and Share and 32.51% for other teaching strategies.

The research also found out that the teachers use the following teaching strategies
because of some reasons like: Science is a subject that needs interaction and a hands-on way of
teaching, Science is a subject that focuses on discovery, Science needs a collaborative learning
process, Science is a subject that help the students understand their environment, Science is a
subject that needs a real life experience for understanding.

This study also found out that not all teaching strategies are effective and has an impact
to the learners specifically to the learners in the identified locale.

Conclusions
After conducting this study, the researchers therefore conclude the following:
1. Not all teaching strategies are effective to the learners of the identified locale.
2. The use of teaching strategies is good and can contribute to the meaningful learning.
3. Selected teaching strategies can be employed effectively to the said locale.
4. The teachers consider a certain qualification in selecting a teaching strategy.

Recommendations
After reflecting on the study, the researchers have drawn the following recommendations:
1. The teachers should use the top five most effective teaching strategies identified in this
research.
2. The teacher should consider some qualities of the teaching strategy before using it.
3. The teacher should avoid strategies that can deteriorate his/her students.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

Book:

Acero, V, et. Al., (2000). Principles of Teaching. Quezon City, Philippines. REX
Bookstore and Publishing Company. ©2000.

Internet:

http://sustar.com.ph/static/dav/2008/02/17/news.set.in.march.html

http://4faculty.org/includes/108r2.jsp

http://www.calstate.edu/accesibility/instructionalmaterials/index.html

http://ardictionary.com/Instruction/5235

http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/coursedesign/tutorial/strategies.html

http://www.gmu.edu/facstaff/part-time/strategy.html

http://www.kpfi.org/what/report.asp

http://opinion.inquirer.net/inquireropinion/editorial/view/20080105-110485/Teacher-
cant-teach

http://www.scribd.com

http://yahoo.com

http://google.com

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Appendix A: Questionnaire for Students

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Appendix B: Questionnaire for Teacher

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Appendix C: Computations

Computation 1: Percentage

Total Respondents
= 486

Number of Votes
Total Number of
Respondents
x 100

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