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TM TM FOR THE TRANSMISSION REBUILDING INDUSTRY FOR THE TRANSMISSION REBUILDING INDUSTRY
TM
TM
FOR THE TRANSMISSION REBUILDING INDUSTRY
FOR THE TRANSMISSION REBUILDING INDUSTRY
INDUSTRY FOR THE TRANSMISSION REBUILDING INDUSTRY The Secret Recipe for Growing Your Business BUYER'S
INDUSTRY FOR THE TRANSMISSION REBUILDING INDUSTRY The Secret Recipe for Growing Your Business BUYER'S
INDUSTRY FOR THE TRANSMISSION REBUILDING INDUSTRY The Secret Recipe for Growing Your Business BUYER'S

The Secret Recipe

for Growing Your

Business

BUYER'S GUIDE

REBUILDING INDUSTRY The Secret Recipe for Growing Your Business BUYER'S GUIDE in 2014! INSIDE! JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014

in 2014!

INSIDE!

REBUILDING INDUSTRY The Secret Recipe for Growing Your Business BUYER'S GUIDE in 2014! INSIDE! JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014
JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014
JANUARY/FEBRUARY
2014
Didn’t Use Genuine Sonnax Parts?
Didn’t Use
Genuine Sonnax Parts?
It ought to be a crime to rebuild with anything else!
It ought to be a crime
to rebuild with anything else!

Nobody knows transmissions like Sonnax.

anything else! Nobody knows transmissions like Sonnax. ™ Visit www.sonnax.com for details. • 800-843-2600 •
anything else! Nobody knows transmissions like Sonnax. ™ Visit www.sonnax.com for details. • 800-843-2600 •

Visit www.sonnax.com for details. • 800-843-2600 • 802-463-9722 Sonnax is an Employee-Owned Company

G

EARS

FOR THE TRANSMISSION REBUILDING INDUSTRY

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014

PHONE (805) 604-2000

Publisher

Dennis Madden

Managing Editor

Rodger Bland

Technical Director

Lance Wiggins

Advertising

Frank Pasley

Senior Designer

Jeanette Troub

Contributing Editors:

Steve Bodofsky

Jim Cathcart

Brian Sacks

Thom Tschetter

ATRA Technical Staff:

Bill Brayton

Mike Brown

Steve Garrett

Pete Huscher

Mark Puccinelli

Mike Souza

Jarad Warren

Seminars & Convention Manager

Vanessa Velasquez

The views expressed in this publication should not necessarily be interpreted as the official policy of the Automatic Transmission Rebuilders Association (ATRA). Publication of product information or any advertising does not imply recommenda- tion by ATRA.

GEARS , a publication of ATRA, 2400 Latigo Avenue, Oxnard, CA 93030, is published for the betterment of the transmission industry and is distributed nine times per year. No part of this issue may be reproduced without prior written permission of the publisher. GEARS is distributed to members of the transmis- sion industry in the United States, Canada, ATRA Members in Mexico & Europe, and related automotive industry firms and individually. Send changes of address to GEARS in care of ATRA. Subscriptions are available by contacting GEARS in care of ATRA.

Advertisers and advertising agencies assume full liability for all content of adver- tisements printed and also assume full responsibility for any claims arising there- from against the publisher. The publisher reserves the unqualified right to reject any advertising copy as it deems appropriate, with or without cause.

GEARS is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. It is distributed with the understanding the publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional service. If legal advice or other expert assistance, is required, the services of a competent profes- sional person should be sought from a Declaration of Principles jointly adopted by a Committee of the American Bar Association and Committee of Publishers.

GEARS also welcomes articles submitted by members of the industry. GEARS considers all articles for publication that contribute positively to the welfare of the transmission industry, and reserves the right to edit all articles it publishes. If you would like to submit an article to GEARS, include background information about the author and a telephone number where he/she may be reached. If you want submissions returned, enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope.

returned, enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Editorial and Business Offices 2400 Latigo Avenue, Oxnard CA
returned, enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Editorial and Business Offices 2400 Latigo Avenue, Oxnard CA

Editorial and Business Offices

2400 Latigo Avenue, Oxnard CA 93030 Phone (805) 604-2000 Fax (805) 604-2006

www.gearsmagazine.com

www.atra.com

Publications Mail Agreement No. 40031403 Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses to:

Station A, PO Box 54, Windsor, ON N9A 6J5 Email: gears@atra.com

Issue #181

Printed in U.S.A.

Copyright ATRA 2014

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Printed in U.S.A. Copyright ATRA 2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS Resetting Shift Adapts: Double Duty Dodge Diesel:
Printed in U.S.A. Copyright ATRA 2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS Resetting Shift Adapts: Double Duty Dodge Diesel:
Printed in U.S.A. Copyright ATRA 2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS Resetting Shift Adapts: Double Duty Dodge Diesel:
Printed in U.S.A. Copyright ATRA 2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS Resetting Shift Adapts: Double Duty Dodge Diesel:

Resetting Shift Adapts:

Double Duty Dodge Diesel:

The Secret Recipe for Growing Your

Myth or Must? Page 4

The 68RFE P0871 Overdrive Clutch Failure Page 16

Business in 2014! PAGE 34

SPECIAL INTEREST & TECHNICAL

4

 

Myth or Must? by Mike Souza

10

16

22

24

30

 

by Thom Tschetter

34

 

by Brian Sacks

40

 

by Lance Wiggins

44

46

50

54

 

DEPARTMENTS

2

FROM THE CEO: Don’t Be a Victim

by Dennis Madden

110

Powertrain Industry News

114

Shoppers and Classified

120

List of Advertisers

THE WORD ON THE STREET: Resetting Shift Adapts:

TALES FROM THE BENCH: Getting Familiar:

Subaru Lineartronic CVT by Jarad Warren

A SHIFTING BUSINESS: Double Duty Dodge Diesel:

The 68RFE P0871 Overdrive Clutch Failure by Mark Puccinelli

What's That Sucking Sound? by Steve Garrett

STREET SMART: Stop that Dipstick! by Mike Brown

UP YOUR BUSINESS: Soap Operas Aren’t Only on TV

The Secret Recipe for Growing Your Business in 2014!

FROM THE TECH DIRECTOR: Training…It’s a State of Mind!

I Have A Dream, Too… for Your Business by Jim Cathcart

SHOP PROFILE: North Texas Transmission; Arlington, Texas; A Family Tradition for over 34 Years by Steve Bodofsky

WHAT'S WORKING: Just Do It… by Rodger Bland

ATRA’S 2014 GEARS BUYER’S GUIDE LISTING
ATRA’S 2014 GEARS BUYER’S GUIDE LISTING
Remembering
Remembering

Ewell Dickerson!

page 110

Don’t Be a Victim O ver the past year, I’ve made a concerted effort to
Don’t Be a Victim
Don’t Be a
Victim

O ver the past year, I’ve made a

concerted effort to avoid neg-

ative influences. I’ve stopped

watching political shows, I don’t get

involved in political discussions, and

I try to avoid people who spend their

time complaining. And with good reason: I was becoming increasingly disturbed by current events and the economy. As a

result, I found it harder and harder to stay positive and focused. There was bad news everywhere you turned: The country was falling apart, the economy stinks, and there’s misery as far as the eye can see.

I wrote about this last January and

of my decision to avoid negative influ-

ences. Rather than spend time listening to the news or my favorite political shows, I now spend that time with my family and my hobbies. It’s a decision

I don’t regret. It was tough at first; I’d made a habit of watching certain shows in the evening and, like any habit, the first few weeks were difficult. Now I don’t even think about it.

I no longer focus on all the bad

things going on around me; instead, I concentrate on effective ways to avoid them, move past them, and even benefit as a result of them. Just look around and listen to the language of people bogged down by “victimhood”; it’s becoming a growing trend and it’s spreading everywhere. Signed onto a bad loan? It’s the fault of “predatory lenders.” Someone didn’t get that promotion they were looking for? It’s discrimination. Business not doing well? Let's blame it on reman companies. We even see it in the NFL locker rooms.

by Dennis Madden members.atra.com
by Dennis Madden
members.atra.com
in the NFL locker rooms. by Dennis Madden members.atra.com face the new paradigm is to refocus

face the new paradigm is to refocus on wholesale work; reaching out to general repair shops that offer trans- mission repair in their area. For them, it’s become a great way to expand their businesses, while maintaining their focus on transmission repair. That’s why this year’s What’s Working study is going to reach out to the general repair industry. We’re going to find out what they’re looking for when it comes to wholesale transmis- sions. And we’re going to analyze that data, and use it to help ATRA Members evaluate whether there’s room for them to expand into the wholesale market. As we move into 2014, make the decision to stay positive and focused. Just like anything else, it gets easier with practice. And, once you get past those negative thoughts, it’s harder to see yourself as a victim. Suddenly, a world of possibilities opens up for you. And that study on general repair shops? We’ll share that with you this October at ATRA’s Powertrain Expo. I look forward to seeing you there; I positively can’t wait!

look forward to seeing you there; I positively can’t wait! Not to say there aren’t bad

Not to say there aren’t bad things going on, or people look- ing to take

a d v a n t a g e

of you; there are, and that’s

s o m e t h i n g you need to watch out for.

And it’s certainly not to suggest that the com- moditization of transmission repair hasn’t made it a challenge to run a

transmission shop; it has. But while everyone is faced with these challeng- es, plenty of shops are doing well; some are doing extremely well, in spite of the challenges. So what is it about those shops that makes them successful while others are struggling? In looking back over the shop profiles for the last few years, one thing stood out that they all had in com- mon: A great attitude. No matter how many obstacles they face, they make

it a point to face them with a can-do attitude. They’ve chosen not to be victims:

Instead, they’ve managed to focus on the customer by providing exceptional service. Many have found they don’t need to expand into general repair to stay in business. They can focus on what they love doing: transmission repair. It’s not that they aren’t facing the same difficulties as the rest of the industry. They’re just more determined to succeed. One of the ways that many of the more successful shops have chosen to

KEEP CALM AND CALL ETE
KEEP
CALM
AND
CALL
ETE
KEEP CALM AND CALL ETE
KEEP CALM AND CALL ETE

Resetting Shift Adapts: Myth or Must?

THE WORD ON THE STREET Resetting Shift Adapts: by Mike Souza members.atra.com Myth or Must?
THE WORD ON THE STREET
Resetting Shift
Adapts:
by Mike Souza
members.atra.com
Myth or Must?
Figure 1
Figure 1

W hether you’re installing a

remanufactured transmis-

sion, rebuilding the origi-

nal unit, or just changing the valve body, you need to reset the shift adapts on most vehicles in today’s market. If the aftermarket scan tool you’re using doesn’t have the capability to reset adapts, you may have to tow the vehicle to the nearest dealer for the reset proce- dure… even if your shop is 300 miles away. In some cases, if the transmission isn’t shifting too aggressively (which

could damage internal parts) or isn’t

slipping (which would damage the new clutches), you may be able to drive the vehicle to the dealership or shop equipped to reset the shift adapts. One of the most important issues, too often overlooked, is the need to clear all codes in most modules. Any codes that affect engine load signals must be cleared before resetting shift adapts. In addition, engine and transmis- sion temperatures must be at operating temperature in most vehicles. Many ve- hicles can be drive-learned, but do so with caution: It may damage the new

clutches. If it’s possible to drive the transmission through all the gears on a lift before taking the vehicle on the road, do it. This is similar to what most shops did on the early Chrysler A604 transaxles. Some vehicles’ antilock brake (ABS) or traction control systems (TCS) may not allow you to drive the vehicle on the lift. Those systems re- quire all four wheels to be turning at the same time. In those instances, drive the vehicle at light throttle through all the shifts at least five to ten times be- fore relearning shift adapts at a medium

Figure 2
Figure 2

or heavy throttle. It’s also important to perform an engagement relearn. Shift adapt resets have been around before 1996, or pre-OBD-II compli- ant vehicles. One example is an OBD- I type vehicle such as a 1994 Chevy pickup with a 4L60E transmission. We had one of these come in with the 2-4 band burnt to a crisp and the reverse input drum completely distorted (hour- glassed). After installing a rebuilt transmis- sion, the 1-2 shift was extremely harsh; somewhat brutal. It would relearn on its own, but the time it would take was uncertain. If given back to the customer before the relearn was complete, you can be sure there’d have been a com- plaint. Most scan tools had a functional test section (figure 1) to reset the shift adapts to factory settings. The vehicle still had to be driven to relearn the shifts, but the shifts wouldn’t be so bru- tal.

There was a term used in trans- mission shops called brain deading the computer. You simply removed the battery cables and clamped or taped them together for several minutes, then turned on a few electrical items, such as the radio, windshield wipers, or head- lights. This process would discharge all the capacitors in the computer that were holding power for memory. After

turning all the items off, you’d recon- nect the battery and basic factory shift adapts were reset. A great example of this type of reset is a 1994 Ford Taurus that came into our shop. The vehicle complaint was it shifted late. I drove the vehicle and found that it was shifting from 1 st to 3 rd and then to 4 th . The scan data re- vealed the computer was commanding this shift pattern. The transmission fluid was extremely burnt and contaminated. After sitting on the lift for a couple days with the battery disconnected dur- ing the rebuild and install, it shifted the same way. We disconnected the bat- tery for a few minutes while I pressed the brake pedal. The transmission then shifted through all the gears properly. The reason for the odd shift pat- tern was Ford’s failsafe function called FMEM — Failure Management Effects Mode. The first time the transmission slipped going into 2 nd gear, the com- puter raised the pressure during the

gear

shift into 2 nd gear by 33%. If 2

continues to slip, the computer strategy raises the pressure 33%, up to 3 times; if it still slips, the computer eliminates the shift altogether.

On some later vehicles, performing the brain-dead procedure can cause the computer to lose key memory, so the engine won’t start. If the local dealer doesn’t have off-board flashing capa-

nd

bilities, the vehicle would have to be towed to them to be flashed through the data link connector (DLC). That’s why using the function test feature from a capable scan tool is smarter than using the brain-dead technique. Let’s go over a few examples of some later model reset procedures. Some vehicles are quite simple while others require a capable scan tool. The first example of a simple reset that doesn’t require a scan tool reset func- tion is the Aisin TL80-SN transmission (figure 2). The Aisin TL80-SN is an 8-speed, rear wheel drive transmission, found in the 2014 Cadillac CTS. You’ll need to perform a self-learn procedure after any of these repairs:

transmission replacement

transmission internal service or repair

valve body repair, cleaning, or replacement

torque converter replacement

TCM replacement

TCM software/calibration update

Any service or repair in response to transmission DTCs.

Self Learn Procedure

You must meet these conditions

before performing the self-learn procedure:

Perform any adjustments,

Resetting Shift Adapts: Myth or Must?

programming, or setup proce- dures required when removing or replacing a component or module.

Clear the TCM of all DTCs.

Make sure the transmission fluid is at the correct level.

Verify with a scan tool that

transmission fluid temperature is

at least 65ºC (about 150ºF).

Once you’ve verified these conditions, you’re ready to perform the self-learn procedure:

1. Move the shift lever from neutral to drive and back to neutral. Perform this procedure five times, pausing for five seconds between each neutral-to-drive-to-neutral position cycle. 2. With the engine running, move the shift lever from neutral to reverse and back to neutral. Perform this procedure five times, pausing for five seconds between each neutral-to-reverse-to-neutral position cycle. NOTE: Steps 3, 4, 5, and 6 require driving the vehicle. Never use manual gear function to perform these steps. 3. With the engine running, move the shift lever into drive. 4. Accelerate the vehicle at light throttle (scan tool throttle position between 15%-25%) to 73 km/h (45 MPH), then decelerate to

a complete stop. Perform this procedure five times.

5. Accelerate the vehicle at medium throttle (TP 45%-55%) to 73 km/h (45 MPH), then decelerate

to a stop. Repeat this procedure 5

times. 6. Accelerate the vehicle at heavy throttle (TP greater than 70%) to 72 km/h (45 MPH), then decelerate to a stop. Repeat this procedure five times. 7. Turn the ignition off for at least two minutes. That’s all there is to it; you’ve per- formed the self-learn procedure, so the transmission should be shifting prop- erly.

This next example is for late model Kias; it requires a capable scan tool. The adaptive values must also be re- learned by following steps 2 and 3 after resetting (figure 3). Use the scan tool to

Figure 3
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 4

reset the automatic transmission adap- tive values found in the automatic trans- mission section menu. Follow the steps shown in RESETTING AUTO T/A VALUES or INIT OF TCU

LEARNING Menu Sections

1. Connect your scan tool to vehicle and input VIN or auto select VIN.

2. Select Automatic Transmission system.

3. Select Vehicle S/W Management tab.

4. Select Init Of TCU Learning.

5. Key on, engine off.

6. Shift lever in park or neutral.

7. Vehicle speed 0 MPH

8. Click OK.

9. Adaptive reset is complete.

10. Turn the key off for ten seconds.

NOTE: The 2005-on Sorento requires pressing the accelerator pedal 50%. Follow the instructions on the screen carefully.

Dynamic Automatic Transmission Adaptive Learning Procedure

Connect your scan tool and set it to monitor ATF temperature and TPS opening.

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Resetting Shift Adapts: Myth or Must?

Bring ATF temp- erature to just over 120ºF (about 50ºC).

Drive from a stop, shifting from 1 st to

gears (5-speeds

th

gears) at 30% TPS (about 3000 RPM shift).

Repeat 3–5 times until any shock or flare is eliminated.

3 rd

from 1 st to 4

NOTE: 2005-on Sorento Sub-ROM same as above except 8-12% TPS. If TPS goes over 12%, relearn won’t occur and you’ll have to restart the learning procedure.

Static Shift

Relearn

Figure 5
Figure 5

Stop the vehicle.

Shift into N for three seconds.

Shift from N to D for two seconds.

Repeat 3–5 times until there’s no N to D shock.

Stop the vehicle.

Shift into N for three seconds.

Shift from N to R for two seconds.

Repeat 3–5 times until there’s no N to R shock.

Figure 6
Figure 6

That’s all there is to it.

No doubt about it: Resetting shift adapts is no myth; it’s a must. It’s one that can have a dramatic effect on your transmission repairs. Failure to reset adapts can reduce the life of your

rebuilds and cause customer complaints. And in many cases, the procedure isn’t all that much more involved than a thorough road test!

all that much more involved than a thorough road test! Some Toyotas may require a scan

Some Toyotas may require a scan tool to perform an adapts reset similar to Kia’s, using one of two procedures. The chart (figure 4) shows which years require procedure 1 using a capable scan tool. This procedure is shown in figure 5. Vehicles that don’t require a scan tool for procedure 2 is shown in figure 6. Here’s how to perform proce- dure 2:

1. Disconnect the negative battery cable for 5 minutes.

2. Reconnect battery cable.

3. Start the engine and warm it up to normal operating temperatures before test-driving.

4. Perform a thorough test drive, with several light-throttle accelerations from a stop, until it’s shifting properly.

A higher level. That’s what you get with Ford gas engines and transmissions. A higher
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A higher level. That’s what you get with Ford gas engines and transmissions. A higher build
A higher level. That’s what you get with Ford gas engines and transmissions. A higher build
A higher level. That’s what you get with Ford gas engines and transmissions. A higher build
A higher level. That’s what you get with Ford gas engines and transmissions. A higher build

That’s what you get with Ford gas engines and transmissions.

what you get with Ford gas engines and transmissions. A higher build level means you’re getting
what you get with Ford gas engines and transmissions. A higher build level means you’re getting
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what you get with Ford gas engines and transmissions. A higher build level means you’re getting

A higher build level means you’re getting engine and transmission assemblies built to the exacting specifications of Ford Motor Company. So you not only get the quality build you expect in an assembly from Ford, but also one that’s built by using parts that keep it specific to year, make and model as well as emissions calibrations.

Introducing the all-new 3-Year Unlimited-Mile Warranty – No Commercial Exceptions

Ford gasoline engines and transmissions are covered by a three-year/unlimited-mile warranty.* All warranties are backed by Ford Motor Company. They’re also supported by more than 3,500 Ford and Lincoln Mercury Dealerships nationwide as well as at their originating place of service.

Plus, unlike some competitors, the warranty is good for fleet vehicles. That means you get the same advantages and coverage for commercial use, no exceptions.

For technical questions, contact the Powertrain Assistance Center at 1-800-392-7946 or visit FordParts.com. *See dealer for limited-warranty details. Remanufactured diesel engines are covered by a two-year/unlimited-mileage warranty.

dealer for limited-warranty details. Remanufactured diesel engines are covered by a two-year/unlimited-mileage warranty.
dealer for limited-warranty details. Remanufactured diesel engines are covered by a two-year/unlimited-mileage warranty.
dealer for limited-warranty details. Remanufactured diesel engines are covered by a two-year/unlimited-mileage warranty.
dealer for limited-warranty details. Remanufactured diesel engines are covered by a two-year/unlimited-mileage warranty.
dealer for limited-warranty details. Remanufactured diesel engines are covered by a two-year/unlimited-mileage warranty.

Getting Familiar: Subaru Lineartronic CVT

TALES FROM THE BENCH Getting Familiar: Subaru Lineartronic CVT by Jarad Warren members.atra.com
TALES FROM THE BENCH
Getting Familiar:
Subaru
Lineartronic CVT
by Jarad Warren
members.atra.com

A s more CVTs are being used today we need to keep up with the technology. The Subaru

Lineartronic CVT will be showing up at your shop soon. Getting familiar with this transmission and its controls is the first step to a successful repair. In this article you’ll learn about the transmission sensors and locations; how to operate and test the sensors; and how to test the inhibitor switch, line pressure, and transfer case clutch pres- sure. Figure 1 provides a reference to the major components. On top of the transmission are two main electrical connections. Subaru calls the black connector the T3/B12 connector; it contains wires for the

inhibitor switch and the primary speed sensor.

Subaru calls the gray connector the T4/B11 con- nector; it contains wires for seven transmission solenoids, the transmission temperature sensor, front wheel speed sensor, secondary speed sen- sor, secondary pressure sen- sor, and the sensor grounds. These connectors are easy to reach while performing your electrical tests. The passenger side of this transmission is where most of the sensors are locat- ed (figure 2). The primary pulley speed sensor is located below the main connectors on top of the transmission. The primary pulley speed

Figure 1
Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 2

sensor is a three-wire Hall Effect sensor that creates a signal based on the speed

of the primary reduction gear.

The

secondary

pressure

sensor

FORQUALIFIEDTRANSMISSIONSHOPSONLY *Excludes Commercial and Off-Road Vehicles WIT offers remanufactured automatic and
FORQUALIFIEDTRANSMISSIONSHOPSONLY *Excludes Commercial and Off-Road Vehicles WIT offers remanufactured automatic and
FORQUALIFIEDTRANSMISSIONSHOPSONLY *Excludes Commercial and Off-Road Vehicles WIT offers remanufactured automatic and

FORQUALIFIEDTRANSMISSIONSHOPSONLY

*Excludes Commercial and Off-Road Vehicles

WIT offers remanufactured automatic and manual transmissions. Each transmission is fully dyno-tested and includes a 12 month/unlimited mile warranty on parts and workmanship*. Extended 2 and 3 year warranties on parts and/or labor available*. WIT also distributes a complete line of quality new, used and remanufactured automatic and standard transmission parts.

WIT also distributes a complete line of quality new, used and remanufactured automatic and standard transmission
WIT also distributes a complete line of quality new, used and remanufactured automatic and standard transmission
of quality new, used and remanufactured automatic and standard transmission parts. In stock for YOU, not
of quality new, used and remanufactured automatic and standard transmission parts. In stock for YOU, not
of quality new, used and remanufactured automatic and standard transmission parts. In stock for YOU, not
of quality new, used and remanufactured automatic and standard transmission parts. In stock for YOU, not
of quality new, used and remanufactured automatic and standard transmission parts. In stock for YOU, not
In stock for YOU, not your customers!
In stock for YOU, not your customers!

Getting Familiar: Subaru Lineartronic CVT

Getting Familiar: Subaru Lineartronic CVT Figure 3 ows the engine to nal nal wire wire (center
Getting Familiar: Subaru Lineartronic CVT Figure 3 ows the engine to nal nal wire wire (center
Figure 3 ows the engine to nal nal wire wire (center (center terminal) terminal) will
Figure 3
ows the engine to
nal nal wire wire (center (center terminal) terminal) will will produce produce
a five-volt digital signal if the sensor is
operating correctly.
In-car testing of the inhibitor
switch is easiest at the T3 black connec-
tor on top of bellhousing. This connec-
tor is in the middle of the main harness.
Use figure 4 as a guide for testing the
inhibitor switch in the car. This is T3
pin out view.
Figure 5 shows the pin location of
the range sensor for bench testing.
Figure 6 identifies the wires and
terminals at each connector.
The last piece of information you
need to test the inhibitor switch is
shown in figure 7.
Now let’s test the inhibitor switch
at the T3 black connector. Set your
meter to check continuity and check
for continuity between the terminals
shown: (see chart below)
Figure 4
Figure 5

With the transmission in:

You should have continuity between these terminals:

Park

4

3

(for the starter circuit)

12

11

Reverse

4

2

(for the backup lights)

10

9

Neutral

4

1

(for the starter circuit)

12

11

Drive

4

8

Test the transmission temperature sensor at the T4 gray connector:

Set your meter to check resis- tance.

Connect the leads to terminals 19 and 16 (figure 8).

delivers a signal based on the pres- sure in the second- ary circuit; think of secondary pressure as line pressure. The inhibi- tor switch is on the manual shaft. To remove this switch you have to knock out a roll pin and remove the shift lever. This is easier said than done. The inhibitor switch is the basic range switch for tell- ing the TCM what gear the transmis-

sion is in. It also allows the engine to

start in park and neutral and controls the backup lights. On the driver’s side of the trans- mission there are just two sensors and a ground wire (figure 3). At the rear of the transmission on the tail housing you have the front wheel speed sensor. Yes, the front wheel speed sensor is on the rear tail housing, which is a long way from front wheels. The front wheel speed sensor cre- ates a signal from the outside of transfer case clutch drum. The transfer case clutch drum is powered by the forward or reverse clutch assembly and also powers the transfer gear to the front differential. The front differential pow- ers the front wheels. This is a confusing way of doing things, but in the trans- mission trade that’s normal. Under the sound shield in the middle of transmission is the second- ary speed sensor. The secondary speed sensor creates a signal based on the secondary reduction driven gear, which is in the case and powered by the sec- ondary pulley assembly. Take particular notice of the ground location. This wire provides ground for the three speed sensors, inhibitor switch, and one of the grounds for the transmission control module. The three speed sensors on this unit are all three-wire, Hall Effect sensors. They receive system positive voltage from the shutdown relay and ground. The third wire is the signal wire to the transmission control module. The sig-

Getting Familiar: Subaru Lineartronic CVT

You should have 2.5k ohms at 68ºF (20ºC) and 330 ohms at 176ºF (80ºC). You can also check the solenoids’ resistances at the T4 connector. Figure 9 provides all the solenoid values and pin numbers to check; all of the solenoids are normally grounded to the case, so just check the resistance between the terminal listed and a good

chassis ground. Pressure testing this unit requires a special fitting (14mm x 1.5mm) and gauge set. This transmission creates high pressures; close to 1000 PSI. You

need a gauge or pressure transducer that can handle those pressures and deliver the pressure readings accurately. Subaru offers its own pressure gauge and fitting tools:

498575400 Gauge adapter fitting

498897700 Adapter set

18681AA000 Gauge

assembly To check line pressure, connect your gauge to the second- ary pressure tap (figure 2, see page 10). You should have 72–218 PSI at idle in drive and reverse. At stall you should have 652–870 PSI.

the

transfer case clutch, connect the gauge to the transfer case pres- sure tap (figure 3,

see page 12). In park,

Range switch terminal's and descriptions.

T3

Range

Pin description

connector

sensor

1

3

Neutral range

2

5

Reverse range

3

 

2 Park range

4

 

1 Common ground

5

 

Primary speed sensor power

6

 

Primary speed sensor signal

7

 

Primary speed sensor ground

8 4

 

Drive range

9 8

 

Reverse lights

10 7

 

Reverse lights

11 9

 

Starter system

12

6

Starter system

 

Figure 6

To

check

Inhibitor switch test

 

Range

 

T3 connector

 

Range switch

Park

 

4

 

3

 

2

1

Reverse

 

4

 

2

 

5

1

Neutral

 

4

 

1

 

3

1

Drive

 

4

 

8

 

4

1

Starter P/N

 

12

 

11

 

9

6

Back-up light

 

10

 

9

 

8

7

 

Figure 7

 
 

Solenoid Resistance

 

Solenoids

T4 connecter

 

Resistance

Secondary

5

GND

5-7 ohms

Forward & Reverse

9

GND

4-6 ohms

Lock-up on/off

3

GND

15-17 ohms

Primary Down

1

GND

10-13.5 ohms

Primary Up

6

GND

10-13.5 ohms

Lock-up Duty

2

GND

10-13.5 ohms

AWD

4

GND

2-4.5 ohms

 

Figure 9

 

14

neutral, and FWD-only mode you should have 0 PSI. In AWD in manual 2 range you should have 58–102 PSI with the transfer case duty cycle set to 60% on your scan tool. At 100% duty on scan tool you should have 145–174 PSI.

the

secondary pressure switch (figure 10). Pin 1 receives a 5-volt signal from

the transmission control module. Pin 3 is the sensor ground; pin 2 is

the signal wire to the transmission control module.

Connect your voltmeter to ter- minal 2:

You

can

also

test

Key on, engine off — zero volts

Engine idling; no load — 0.5 volts

Engine stall — 4.5 volts

At this point, you should have all the information necessary to find and test the electrical components in the Subaru CVT. And you should be ready to handle basic electrical and pressure tests when one shows up in your shop. Special thanks to Jerry at Perfection Plus Transmission Parts in Portland Oregon for the use of the core for this article.

in Portland Oregon for the use of the core for this article. Figure 8 Figure 10
Figure 8 Figure 10 GEARS GEARS January/February 2014 January/February 2014
Figure 8
Figure 10
GEARS
GEARS
January/February 2014
January/February 2014

BorgWarner Transmission Systems

Aftermarket Products

BorgWarner transmission products are manufactured to rigid OEM specifications for the automakers themselves, so the chances for defects or comebacks in your rebuilds are virtually impossible. On your shop’s next order, specify BorgWarner for improved fuel economy, reduced emissions and enhanced performance.

Friction Plates, Transmission Bands, One-Way Clutches

Torque Converter Friction Facings

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Electronic Transmission Solenoids

feel good about driving

Double Duty Dodge Diesel: The 68RFE P0871 Overdrive Clutch Failure

A SHIFTING BUSINESS

A SHIFTING BUSINESS

68RFE P0871 Overdrive Clutch Failure A SHIFTING BUSINESS Double Duty Dodge Diesel: by Mark Puccinelli
Double Duty Dodge Diesel: by Mark Puccinelli members.atra.com The 68RFE P0871 Overdrive Clutch Failure Figure
Double Duty Dodge Diesel:
by Mark Puccinelli
members.atra.com
The 68RFE P0871
Overdrive Clutch
Failure
Figure 1

I n 2007, Dodge introduced the

68RFE in the 3500-series truck

equipped with the 6.7 Cummins

diesel engine. This transmission is the heavy duty, 6-speed version of the 45RFE transmission introduced back in 1999. What’s interesting about this pow- ertrain combination is that these trucks are truly used as work vehicles. On the other hand, the 2500 series trucks are equipped with the 5.9 diesel and the 48RE transmissions are more often

used as hotrods and dragsters. In case you were wondering, RFE stands for Rear Drive Fully Electronic. In the 3500D series, the 68RFE transmission is exposed to a harsher working environment than a 45RFE in a 1500 series truck. The harsher working environment has created some unique problems with the 68RFE that are rarely seen with the 45RFE.

Common Problems

Here are some of the more com-

mon 68RFE complaints:

DTC P0871 when hot

Repeated overdrive clutch failure

Binds in 3 rd gear when hot. This condition is often confused with a bindup on the 3-4 shift What we’ve discovered is that all three of these conditions can relate to the same basic failure. Here’s why:

Code P0871 indicates an over- drive fluid pressure switch rationality fault. What this means in simple terms is, when the overdrive fluid pressure

The

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S E R A A L T O S F N ® Q A U
S
E
R
A
A
L
T
O
S
F
N
®
Q
A
U
R
T
A
L
I
T
Y

Double Duty Dodge Diesel: The 68RFE P0871 Overdrive Clutch Failure

switch should be open, it’s closed; or when it’s supposed to be closed, it’s open (figure 1). This code can be set by either an electric or hydraulic problem.

Electrical P0871

Each clutch in the solenoid pack has its own fluid pressure switch, just like a 604. All of the pressure switches receive

a reference voltage signal from the

TCM. As long as the overdrive fluid pressure switch is open, the reference voltage will remain high; that is, it’ll stay at reference voltage level. When the switch closes, it grounds the circuit. The voltage pulls down to zero volts. If the overdrive pressure switch circuit shorts to ground, the TCM will see the overdrive switch as

closed; if it hasn’t commanded 4 th gear yet, the TCM will set the code. Code P0871 usually sets when the overdrive switch circuit voltage

remains at zero volts in 1 st through 3

rd

gears. This usually indicates a valve body problem.

Hydraulic P0871

If a crossleak develops in the valve body and closes the overdrive pressure switch, the reference voltage will again drop to zero volts. The question becomes how to determine whether the code was set

electrically or hydraulically. Both prob- lems — an electrical short in the over- drive switch circuit or a valve body crossleak that closes the switch — will pull the reference voltage to zero volts. The TCM can’t determine which condition caused the problem. It only sees that the overdrive switch voltage

is zero when it should be at reference

voltage, so it sets the code.

Diagnostics and Road Testing

Check your scan tool for event data. If the data shows that the code sets in 1 st through 3 rd gear, then most likely the code is being generated by a valve body problem. If the event data isn’t available, you’ll need to road test the truck to duplicate the code setting condition. Remember the code definition:

the overdrive pressure switch is closed in any gear other than 4 th ,

Cut the overdrive pressure switch circuit wire:

pin 16 at the transmission connector

Figure 2
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 3

or it’s open in 4 th gear.

Road Test Method 1

Monitor the overdrive pressure switch PID only, using data stream select mode. This means the only PID the scan tool is looking at is the over- drive pressure switch. If the switch closes in 1 st –3 rd , it indicates a valve body problem. See road test method 2 to confirm your findings.

Road Test Method 2

Cut the overdrive pressure switch circuit wire: pin 16 at the transmission connector (figure 2). This eliminates

the possibility of a shorted circuit caus- ing the code to set. Since you’ve taken the circuit out of the equation by cutting the wire,

if the code sets while in 1 st

3 rd gears, the TCM has to be at fault. Always recheck the TCM event data on your scan tool to make sure the code didn’t set while in 4 th gear. If the trans- mission shifts into 4 th with this wire cut

through

the P0871 will set on the 3-4 command; that’s normal, because the circuit can’t pull down the way it should in 4 th gear.

Road Test Method 3

Install the oil pressure test pan,

*See our website for full warranty details
*See our website for full warranty details
*See our website for full warranty details

Double Duty Dodge Diesel: The 68RFE P0871 Overdrive Clutch Failure

A worn #4 checkball will feed line pressure in the overdrive circuit.

Miller 1456-6, and attach a 100-PSI gauge or transducer to the overdrive clutch port. If you don’t have the test pan, make a trip to your local hardware store and pick up some 1/16” pipe thread brass fittings for 1/8” plastic tubing. You can run the gauge tubing or the wiring for a transducer out the filler tube (figure 3). Road test and monitor the pressure in the overdrive circuit. While the trans- mission is in 1 st through 3 rd gears, the overdrive clutch circuit should remain at 0 PSI. If you see pressure on the overdrive clutch circuit while the trans- mission is in 1 st through 3 rd gears, the code is being set hydraulically. The majority of P0871 problems occur when the switch is closed hydrau- lically in 3 rd gear: a valve body prob- lem.

Valve Body Problems

A worn #4 checkball will feed line pressure in the overdrive circuit.

Wear in the solenoid switch valve bore can cause P0871 to set by feeding the overdrive circuit and closing the switch. There are aftermarket repair kits available to fix this (figure 4). While there are other possible valve body problems that can set code P0871, they haven’t been resolved yet. If the code still sets after repairing the switch valve bore, the only other solu- tion available is to replace the valve

Figure 4
Figure 4

body with a new one. Dodge sells a replacement valve body with the sole- noid pack for $479. If the overdrive pressure switch is closing from a valve body problem, the pressure will also apply the overdrive clutch when it’s supposed to be off. This will cause a bindup in 3 rd gear and cause the clutch to drag and burn out.

68RFE vs. 45RFE Work Environment

Vehicles equipped with a 68RFE are generally being used as work trucks. They pull large trailers all the time, while the 1500 series truck with a 45RFE may pull the family ski boat

once a month. A transmission that’s subjected to constant high line pres- sure, high torque demands, and repeat hot-cold temperature cycles is going succumb to metallurgic fatigue. This is why the 68RFE is showing up with problems that 45RFEs rarely exhibit. The RFE series transmission is a well-built unit. As with any transmis- sion repair, paying attention to the details before, during, and after the repair is the key to the customer’s and your success.

before, during, and after the repair is the key to the customer’s and your success. 20
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Identify a vehicle’s automatic transmission quickly and easily.

Determine the Precision overhaul, banner and master kit part numbers associated with that transmission.

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Getting Familiar: Subaru Lineartronic CVT

Getting Familiar: Subaru Lineartronic CVT What's That Sucking Sound? by Steve Garrett members.atra.com N ot too
What's That Sucking Sound? by Steve Garrett members.atra.com N ot too many years ago a
What's That
Sucking Sound?
by Steve Garrett
members.atra.com
N ot too many years ago a
mount was simply a mount.
It was made of rubber and,
if it wasn’t broken or collapsed, it
was thought to be good. In our ever-
changing industry, mount technology
has changed just like other vehicle sys-
tems. Today you can find four different
mount technologies in use:
• Mechanical mounts —
conventional molded rubber
interlaid with metal strips.
• Hydraulic mounts — fluid filled
for dampening.
• Electronic — an electric motor
controls dampening noise or
vibration. This design measures
the vibration frequency and
Figure 1
electronic electronic control control system. system.
design design range; range; causing causing vibrations vibrations that that

amplitude of the vibration. The mount is then signaled to develop a movement 180º out of phase, effectively cancelling the vibration. Some electronic mounts, such as those developed by Delphi, use a technology known as Magneto Rheological fluid. This design uses a fluid with tiny particles of iron suspended in it. By sending current through the fluid, the iron particles line up, effectively changing the mount’s fluid viscosity/dampening. Vacuum — typically fluid filled, controlled by vacuum and an

The advent of the vacuum- controlled mount is really nothing new, but does raise a lot of questions when you find a couple of vacuum lines connected to the mount. Honda, Toyota, and GM are just some of the manufacturers that use this design mount. The advantage of a controlled engine mount, including vacuum- controlled it they can adjust to accom- modate a wide range of vibrations. A standard mount will dampen the effects of specific frequencies, yet transfer frequencies outside its

passengers can feel. The controlled mount varies it’s frequency dampening throughout the entire range of the engine. Issues such as fluid leaks, rough engine idle, misfire, harsh transmission engagement and knock/clunk on the shift are just some of the symptoms that you may run across. Most vacuum mounts on the market today operate in a similar manner, so let’s take a detailed look at one of the systems. To understand the operation of the mount, let’s look at the 2014 Cadillac ATS (figure 1), which uses vacuum-controlled engine mounts

Vacuum controls a pair of diaphragms within the mount, which control fluid channeling. Vacuum to the mount is turned on or off to control fluid flow within the mount.

on the 2.0L (RPO LTG) turbo and the 2.5L (RPO LCV) engines. The system consists of:

Fluid-filled (glycol) mounts with various built-in orifices that regulate mount dampening. By controlling which passages the fluid travels through, the dampening rate of the mount will vary. Fluid is forced through the different channels by the main rubber element located on top of the mount. The idle path and the bounce fluid paths control mount movement and dampening. Vacuum controls a pair of diaphragms within the mount, which control fluid channeling. Vacuum to the mount is turned on or off to control fluid flow within the mount. Each mount has two vacuum ports: The port with the larger opening in the mount body is the bounce port; the port with the smaller opening is the idle port. Solenoids control the vacuum supply to the mounts. Two solenoids are used: one controls the bounce port while the other controls the idle port. Both solenoids are On/Off design, which means the solenoid can apply vacuum to the port or allow atmospheric pressure to vent the port. The solenoid electrical connectors are part of the vacuum system, so a vacuum leak in the electrical connector can cause problems with the mount’s operation.

Vacuum Supply

 

Modes

OFF = No Vacuum

     

ON = Vacuum

Idle

Drive-Away

SRS

Idle Port

Vacuum ON

Vacuum OFF

Vacuum OFF

Bounce Port

Vacuum ON

Vacuum OFF

Vacuum ON

Vacuum supply to each mount port will vary depending on the operating mode

 

Figure 2

A vacuum reservoir supplies engine vacuum to the solenoids, while vacuum lines, a filter, and a check valve are used to connect the system.

The FPCM (Fuel Pump Control Module) is used on this application to control the operation of the vacuum solenoids.

The Cadillac vacuum mount sys-

tem uses three operating modes:

1. Idle — Vehicle speed less than 9 MPH (14 km/h); engine speed above 300 RPM.

2. Drive-Away — Vehicle speed 9–65 MPH (14–105 km/h) or VSS above 85 MPH (137 km/h). If a fault is detected in the mount sys-

tem, the control unit will default to Drive-Away mode.

3. SRS (Smooth Ride Shake State)

— Vehicle speed between 65-85 MPH (105–137 km/h). Vacuum supply to each mount port will vary depending on the operating mode: (see chart above)

Testing and Diagnosis

Diagnosis of the system is fairly straightforward. Inspect the system for any evidence of glycol in the lines or other areas of the system. If glycol is present, the mount is leaking and must be replaced. Inspect the lines and connectors for evidence of damage or deterioration. Your scan tool, vacuum gauge, and a hand vacuum pump are the tools you need to diagnose a vacuum-controlled mount. The scan tool will allow you to turn the solenoids on and off as part

of its output override functions. The vacuum gauge will allow you to mea- sure the vacuum available in different parts of the system, while the hand vacuum pump lets you test the system and mounts for leaks. If you decide to use the engine’s vacuum supply, the engine will need to be running. By monitoring the vac- uum available at the mount ports with your vacuum gauge, vacuum should be available and then vented at the mount or solenoid as you cycle the solenoids on and off with your scan tool. If the vacuum supply doesn’t appear to be working properly, you can use your hand vacuum pump to isolate the problem area. If vacuum is available at the mount, you can use your hand vacuum pump to check the integrity of the mount. On some vacuum mount systems, you may be able to use a smoke machine to locate leaks in the system. GM warns against this practice: They’re concerned with over-pressurizing the system, as it was designed to hold vacuum; not pressure. Well, as you can see, the vacuum mounts that are coming into your shops really aren’t that big a deal. A little time, a little understanding, and some basic equipment, and you can diagnose just about anything that hits your door. The only challenge here is to explain to the customer why the mount costs so much. Until next time remember “By fail- ing to prepare, you’re preparing to fail.”

much. Until next time remember “By fail- ing to prepare, you’re preparing to fail.” GEARS January/February

Stop that Dipstick!

STREET SMART

Stop that Dipstick! STREET SMART Stop that Dipstick! by Mike Brown members.atra.com O nce upon a
Stop that Dipstick! by Mike Brown members.atra.com O nce upon a time, transmis- sion maintenance
Stop that
Dipstick!
by Mike Brown
members.atra.com
O nce upon a time, transmis-
sion maintenance included
periodically checking the
Fill Plug
Figure 1A

transmission fluid level by pulling a metal dipstick from a tube alongside the engine. Well, those days are rapidly com- ing to an end. Most new vehicles are doing away with transmission dipsticks and easily accessible tubes for adding fluid to your car’s transmission. Have you ever wondered why? Was it the price of the stick and tube? Was it to prevent you from taking care of your car and forcing you to bring it back to the dealer? A lot of people think so. Here’s the real reason for the change: vehicle owners can damage transmissions by overfilling or using the wrong fluid. How many times have you heard this? “I checked my trans- mission fluid and it was a quart low, so I added a quart and now I have a leak.” Most backyard mechanics don’t realize that the difference between the “add” mark to the “full” mark is only 1 pint. So, if you check the transmission fluid when it’s cold, it’ll be at the add mark; this is normal. If you recheck it hot, it’ll read full. But if you added a quart when you checked it cold, the transmission will be a quart overfilled. When the transmission gets hot the level rises and

reaches the moving parts in the trans- mission. This aerates the oil, allowing it to expand even more. This is where the problem starts:

the expanded transmission fluid starts blowing out the vent. If you’re lucky, all you end up with is a mess, but if the fluid leaks onto the exhaust it can catch fire! Just by adding too much transmis- sion fluid. Transmission fluid isn’t a generic item any more. Manufacturers are using fluids with specific formulas to provide the precise match for lubricating and operating the internal components of today’s transmissions. Using the wrong fluid can cause a variety of problems:

harsh shifts, slide-bumps, shudder dur- ing converter clutch lockup… it can

even cause the transmission to fail long before the car’s warranty expires. Manufacturers generally don’t like replacing transmissions under warranty. It’s expensive. But proving the owner damaged the transmission and voided the warranty by using the wrong fluid is difficult and often more expensive than replacing the transmission. That’s why manufacturers are mak- ing it difficult to service transmissions:

to protect themselves. They’re extend- ing recommended service intervals and, in some cases, are offering prepaid maintenance when you buy a new car. Let’s take a look at what’s involved in servicing the transmission on a 2008 Tundra with an AB60E. This transmis- sion requires Toyota Genuine ATF WS

Aisin solenoid rebuild tool kit, SAP # 35199, works on large canister solenoids found in
Aisin solenoid rebuild tool kit, SAP # 35199, works on large canister solenoids found in
Aisin solenoid rebuild tool kit, SAP # 35199, works on large canister solenoids found in
Aisin solenoid rebuild tool kit, SAP # 35199, works on large canister solenoids found in

Aisin solenoid rebuild tool kit, SAP # 35199, works on large canister solenoids found in Aisin 5 speed and 6 speed transmissions. Includes: AW55-50, TF60 (09G, 09M, 09K), TR60 (09D), TF80 (AF40-6).

35199 35199 #1 SAP Solenoid Tool Set Bluereach Washers for Aisin Bluereach Bushes
35199
35199
#1 SAP Solenoid Tool Set
Bluereach Washers for Aisin
Bluereach Bushes

Benefits of using the tool kit sold exclusively by Seal Aftermarket Products:

Save Money One time tool charge- works on an endless amount of solenoids Uses original canisters No need to buy aftermarket solenoids No need to buy OE valve body

Save Time Cleaning and re-installing original solenoids Instructional DVD included No downtime waiting on solenoid parts

DVD included No downtime waiting on solenoid parts Seal Aftermarket Products LLC 2315 S.W. 32 Ave.,
DVD included No downtime waiting on solenoid parts Seal Aftermarket Products LLC 2315 S.W. 32 Ave.,
DVD included No downtime waiting on solenoid parts Seal Aftermarket Products LLC 2315 S.W. 32 Ave.,
DVD included No downtime waiting on solenoid parts Seal Aftermarket Products LLC 2315 S.W. 32 Ave.,
DVD included No downtime waiting on solenoid parts Seal Aftermarket Products LLC 2315 S.W. 32 Ave.,
DVD included No downtime waiting on solenoid parts Seal Aftermarket Products LLC 2315 S.W. 32 Ave.,
DVD included No downtime waiting on solenoid parts Seal Aftermarket Products LLC 2315 S.W. 32 Ave.,
Seal Aftermarket Products LLC 2315 S.W. 32 Ave., Pembroke Park, FL 33023 • Phone 954-364-2400
Seal Aftermarket Products LLC
2315 S.W. 32 Ave., Pembroke Park, FL 33023 • Phone 954-364-2400 • Toll Free 800-582-2760 • Fax 954-364-2401
www.sealaftermarketproducts.com

Stop that Dipstick!

Overflow Plug Thermostat control cooler Drain plug Figure 1B
Overflow Plug
Thermostat
control cooler
Drain plug
Figure 1B

transmission fluid. After servicing the transmission, make sure the vehicle remains level while adjusting the fluid level.

Remove the refill plug and over- flow plug (figure 1).

Fill the transmission through the refill hole with the amount of fluid listed in the capacity chart.

Reinstall the overflow plug.

Transmission Fill with Trailer Towing System (with Thermostat):

Use compressed air to blow dust off of the thermostat cap to clean it.

Using a screwdriver, push the shaft of the thermostat until the screwdriver contacts the step inside the cap (figure 2).

With the shaft of the thermostat pressed, push a pin (diameter:

1.0–1.8 mm [0.039”–0.070”]) into the hole on the side of the thermostat cap. Slide the pin in until it passes through the hole on the other side of the thermo- stat cap to fix the shaft in place.

Fill the transmission with the amount of fluid listed in the table.

Reinstall the refill plug to prevent the fluid from splashing.

Standard Capacity

plug to prevent the fluid from splashing. Standard Capacity If you can’t add the listed amount

If you can’t add the listed amount of fluid, try this:

Repair

 

Fill Amount

Transmission Pan and Drainplug Removal

2.1

Liters (2.2 US qts, 1.9 Imp. qts)

Transmission Valve Body Removal

4.7

Liters (5.0 US qts, 4.1 Imp. qts)

Torque Converter Removal

5.4

Liters (5.7 US qts, 4.8 Imp. qts)

Install the refill plug.

Allow the engine to idle with the air conditioning off.

Move the shift lever through the entire gear range, one range at a time, to allow the fluid to circulate.

Wait for 30 seconds with the engine idling.

Stop the engine.

Remove the refill plug and add fluid.

Reinstall the refill plug.

Fluid Temperature Check

When not using the Techstream (using indicator light):

Connect a jumper between terminals 13 (TC) and 4 (CG) of the diagnostic link connector (figure 3).

Start the engine.

Turn all accessories off, such as the air conditioning, audio system, and lighting.

Push in With Screw Driver Insert the Pin Until it Passes Through the Hole on
Push in With
Screw Driver
Insert the Pin Until it
Passes Through the Hole
on the Other Side
Figure 2
st
st
th
th
• •
The indicator lights of the meter
The indicator lights of the meter
1 1
to
to
6 6
. Then return the shift
. Then return the shift
quickly move it back and forth
quickly move it back and forth

blink to output DTCs when ter- minals TC and CG are connected.

Slowly move the shift lever from P to S, and change the gears from

lever to P to circulate the fluid through each part of the transmis- sion. Move the shift lever to D, then

between N and D (once every 1.5 seconds) for at least six seconds. This will activate the fluid tem- perature detection mode.

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Call (800) 421-5580 • Local (310) 768-2099 • FAX ( 310) 768-8298 • Se habla Español!

Stop that Dipstick!

TC Jump Pins #13 & #4 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8
TC
Jump Pins #13 & #4
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
CG
Figure 3

Standard condition: Indicator light (D) remains lit for two seconds and then turns off (figure 4).

Return the shift lever to P and disconnect terminals 13 (TC) and 4 (CG) at the diagnostic link con- nector.

Allow the engine to idle until the fluid temperature reaches 46ºC to 56ºC (115ºF to 133ºF).

The indicator (D) will come on again when the fluid temperature reach- es 46ºC (115ºF) and will blink when it exceeds 56ºC (133ºF).

(115ºF) and will blink when it exceeds 56ºC (133ºF). Indication of ATF Temperature Below Proper Temperature

Indication of ATF

Temperature

Below Proper Temperature

Proper Temperature

Above Proper Temperature

Data List [ATF Temperature 1] 37°C (99°F) or less

Data List [ATF Temperature 1] 37°C – 44°C (99°F – 111°F)

Data List [ATF Temperature 1] 44°C (111°F) or Higher

Indicator Light (D) Off

Indicator Light (D) On

Indicator Light (D) Blinking

NOTE: Perform the fluid level inspection while the indicator light is on.

Fluid Level Check

Start the engine and let it idle.

Remove the overflow plug and the refill plug.

Fluid should dribble out the over- flow tube.

If no fluid comes out, add fluid through the refill hole until it starts to dribble out the overflow tube.

If fluid runs out, let it continue to drain until it’s just a trickle.

Reinstall the overflow plug and the refill plug.

Shut the engine off.

Remove the pin from the ther- mostat.

Make sure the thermostat shaft is protruding from the hole of the cap (figure 2).

Make sure there’s no ATF leaking from the cap hole.

Job complete! As you can see, this is no job for the do-it-yourselfer. Transmission fluids still break down. Transmissions still develop leaks and they still need to be serviced. Failure to maintain a transmission through routine service will shorten the

Will Light When ht When Temp Reaches 99°F Figure 4
Will Light When
ht When
Temp Reaches
99°F
Figure 4

transmission life. But from the manufacturer’s point of view, a transmission that fails out- side warranty isn’t their problem. And since most people who purchase new cars don’t keep them longer than five years, they probably won’t have to do anything other than routine mainte- nance. So what should you do? Experienced mechanics change the transmission fluid on their vehicles every 40,000 to 50,000 miles. They want their vehicles to last and they understand the importance of mainte- nance. If your customer plans on keeping his car for 200,000 miles, recommend

that he allow you to change the trans- mission fluid level occasionally, and to check the level between changes. It’s no longer a simple matter of lifting the hood and pulling out the dip- stick to check the fluid level on newer style transmissions. It’s an involved process that demands the professional’s touch. That’s where you come in. Fluid level is still critical to your customers and their cars. You have the equipment and the know-how to perform those checks reliably. And that’s not just smart… that’s street smart!

perform those checks reliably. And that’s not just smart… that’s street smart! 28 GEARS January/February 2014

Dare to Compare

When it comes to remanufactured valve bodies, are you buying on price alone? If so, you'll probably find that you get what you pay for. At Valve Body Xpress, all we do is remanufacture valve bodies, and we do it better than anyone. No cutting corners, no skimping on quality.

Every one of our products is individually tested and calibrated to ensure peak performance. All solenoids are either new or individually tested for integrity and efficiency. At VBX, we don’t just “clean and polish”. We “build it better” by utilizing the latest industry updates and our own exclusive VB-Xtra updates. In fact, we’re so confident in the quality of our products that we offer a LIFETIME WARRANTY on every valve body we rebuild. You can always count on expert product support and customer service when you need it.

In today’s competitive market, you can't afford to waste your time or money on an inferior product. Your customers—and your reputation—are too important.

When you're looking for a premium rebuilt valve body, look no further than VBX. Call (866) 2GET-VBX or visit us online at www.vbxus.com.

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150 MID-ATLANTIC PARKWAY, PAULSBORO, NJ 08066 | (866) 2GET-VBX | www.vbxus.com

UP YOUR BUSINESS Soap Operas Aren’t Only on TV byby ThomThom TschetterTschetter
UP YOUR BUSINESS
Soap Operas
Aren’t Only on TV
byby ThomThom TschetterTschetter

U p Your Business is an exclu-

sive GEARS Magazine

feature in which I’ll share

details about real customer disputes that I’ve helped settle through media- tion and arbitration. This is a story worthy of being a script for a television soap opera. Below are the details obtained from statements by the parties and from an “expert” witness.

The Details

1. The customer left her 2001 Chevy S-10 with a 4L60E at a shop for a diagnostic evaluation. The truck had about 70,000 miles on the odometer, and she claimed the transmission had been serviced at 50,000.

2. Her problem was no reverse. She said she lost reverse when back- ing out of the garage that morn- ing.

3. The road test revealed no reverse engagement; there were no abnor- mal noises and it worked fine in all forward ranges. The fluid was clean, clear, and had no odor.

4. The service writer advised the customer that the problem was inside the transmission and that the shop’s recommendation was to rebuild the unit.

5. The price quoted was for a soft parts overhaul, a torque converter, and an allowance of up to $200 for hard parts, fluids, supplies, and miscellaneous. It also includ- ed a 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty.

6. The customer authorized the job, the work was completed within the estimated price, and the cus- tomer picked up her truck two days later. So where’s the soap opera? Well, as Paul Harvey used to say, “And now, the rest of the story.”

Behind the Scenes

The service writer and the shop owner were at odds over the recom- mendation, and, apparently, they often exchanged words over other similar situations. The service writer believed that certain types of damage on lower mile- age units should be corrected by what he called a “point-of-failure repair.” In this case, he thought the shop should

Without Customers Where are you? Apply for ATRA Membership Today! (866) GO-4-ATRA • (866) 464-2872
Without Customers
Where are you?
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(866) GO-4-ATRA • (866) 464-2872
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have offered to replace the sun shell and reseal the transmission to correct the problem.

have offered to replace the sun shell and reseal the transmission to correct the problem. He was okay with offering the rebuild as an alternative, but strongly felt the shop should at least offer the repair option. He argued that he’d pre- viously worked at a shop that did these types of repairs and had fewer problems than they did with rebuilds. The shop owner countered that there was too much risk in doing the

repair. His belief was, “If anything goes wrong with a unit after we work on it, we’re going to get the blame and have to take care of it, and we don’t make enough on the repair to cover the risk.” He justified his position with the fact that the shop warranted the rebuild for 3 years or 36,000 miles, and the customer did, in fact, get a rebuild. A few weeks later, a similar dis- pute resulted in the shop owner firing the service writer.

The Plot Thickens…

Unbeknownst to the shop owner, shortly after the job was done, the ser- vice writer began a romantic relation- ship with the 2001 Chevy S10’s owner. You’ve probably already guessed what happened next: The customer filed a complain stating that the shop performed unnecessary work on her transmission. She was seeking a full refund. The shop refused, stating that the work was clearly needed as the

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Soap Operas Aren’t Only on TV

truck had no reverse and the problem was internal. The parties ultimately agreed to have the dispute arbitrated through the BBB. The arbitration process includes written statements from both parties, submission of supporting documenta- tion, written affidavits from industry experts, and notification that either party may bring witnesses to testify at the hearing. At the hearing, when the service writer (now boyfriend) walked in, it was as though all the air was sucked out of the room… at least on the side where the shop owner was seated. The shop owner claimed he felt ambushed, but he wanted the case heard and decided, so the hearing proceeded. The basic points 1–6, itemized ear- lier, were never disputed. However, the behind-the-scenes details were offered up and debated during the service writ- er’s testimony and cross-examination by the shop owner. They both stuck to their beliefs… neither of them budged or softened. The shop owner finally threw up his hands and stated, “I rest my case! This is why we’re here today. I’ll go with whatever the arbitrator decides.” (Actually a moot point, since the parties signed a statement agreeing to abide by the arbitrator’s decision before the hearing began.) He was clearly frus- trated and felt “ambushed.”

Three Questions

Here are three questions for you to

consider before I reveal the results of this case.

1. Do you feel the shop did anything wrong?

2. How do you feel about point-of- failure repairs?

3. What would you have decided if you were the arbitrator in this case?

My Thoughts

This is a sensitive subject. There are valid arguments to support both sides of the issue. At the end of the day, I believe that, while a shop owner has the right to set the shop’s policy regard- ing point-of-failure repairs, I more fully believe that complete disclosure rules the day.

The Decision and Reasons

In this case, I ruled in favor of the

shop for the following reasons, in no particular order of importance:

This was more of a continua- tion of the philosophical dispute between the shop owner and ser- vice writer than a legal dispute.

The fact that the customer and fired service writer were romanti- cally involved gave rise to pos- sible conflict of interest and prej- udicial testimony.

They both stuck to their beliefs… neither of them budged or softened. The shop owner finally threw up his hands and stated, “I rest my case!

There was no evidence presented that the work performed wasn’t needed. (If there had been, the ruling would likely have been different.)

There was no evidence presented that the work wasn’t performed. (If there had been, again, the ruling would likely have been different.)

The shop performed the repairs it agreed to at the agreed price.

What Can We Learn?

I chose this particular case because it highlights a gray area that shops frequently face. At my shops, we used

to call these types of repairs “targeted repairs.” We performed hundreds of tar- geted repairs over the years with very few complications. Here’s how we handled them.

1. We never offered a targeted repair if there were any doubts as to it providing a successful, lasting repair.

2. When applicable, we fully dis- closed that there were alternatives to solving the problem.

3. We explained the pros and cons of each alternative and, as appro- priate, emphasized that the most complete solution was a rebuild. (It was amazing how many cus- tomers would choose the rebuild even with a less-expensive alter- native.)

4. We got top dollar for our targeted repairs. We felt justified in charg- ing for the value of our knowl- edge that the targeted repair could resolve the problem.

5. We provided a warranty that described the targeted repair and clearly stated that it only covered the parts and labor provided.

6. Our warranty stated that if the

repair failed or the transmission developed other problems during the first 90 days or 4000 miles, we’d apply 100% of the price paid toward the subsequent repairs, if performed at our shop. And, after the initial warranty time and mileage, we would apply 50% of the price paid toward subsequent work, if performed at our shop. By following these steps, we con- trolled our financial exposure, and we were able to retain lasting customer relationships. When it comes to gray area deci- sions, I like to apply one of my favor- ite quotes by Norman Vincent Peale:

“There’s no right way to do a wrong thing.” About the Author

Thom Tschetter has served our indus- try for more than three decades as a man- agement and sales educator. He owned a chain of award-winning transmission cen- ters in Washington State for over 25 years. In 1996 his business was honored as the number 1 small business in the state and ranked in the top 10, nationally. He calls on over 15 years of experi- ence as a certified arbitrator for topics for this feature column. Thom is always eager to help members of our industry and continues to be active in his retirement. You can contact him by phone at (480) 773-3131 or e-mail to coachthom@gmail.com.

You can contact him by phone at (480) 773-3131 or e-mail to coachthom@gmail.com. 32 GEARS January/February
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The Secret Recipe for Growing Your Business in 2014!

The Secret Recipe for Growing Your Business in 2014! by Brian Sacks Trackable Response Inc.
The Secret Recipe
for Growing Your
Business in 2014!
by Brian Sacks
Trackable Response Inc.

To be found, you must be where your clients are searching and be easy to connect to.

I ’m about to share a very simple sentence with you. Please don’t dismiss it just because it seems

too simple, okay? Ready? To be found, you must be where your clients are searching and be easy to connect to. Yes, I realize that’s a simple sen- tence, and the point seems obvious. Yet so much has changed just in the past 12

months that it bears repeating. I recently gave a presentation on mobile marketing at the annual TOW MANS’ Convention in Baltimore, with over 10,000 operators present. Then, just a few weeks later, I was honored to give this same presentation at the APEX Convention in Las Vegas. As I started to present some statis- tics, one of the gentlemen in the audi-

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The Secret Recipe for Growing Your Business in 2014!

Figures 1 & 2: These slides are what greatly upset him.
Figures 1 & 2: These slides are what greatly upset him.
Figure 3
Figure 3

ence jumped up and started screaming. No, he wasn’t angry at me, but he sure was angry… because he had just fin- ished spending over $200,000 — yes, you read that correctly! — on Yellow Pages print ads for his shops and tow- ing business (figures 1 & 2).

Here’s What’s Important

Studies show that the one device most people carry around with them and engage with at least 15 hours or more a day is their mobile device. Before we go on let me explain that a mobile device can be a tablet like an iPad or a smart phone like the Droid or iPhone. But you not only need to be able to be found on mobile devices, you also need to be easy to connect with.

All of these facts point to your need for having a mobile web site that allows customers to connect with you. Google predicts that, this year, searches for businesses on mobile devices will overtake those on comput- ers and desktops. That simply means people will be searching on their mobile phones for your business; it’s up to you to make sure you can be found. Whether you personally like that fact or not doesn’t matter. Here’s an example: Look at this service station’s web site before they were mobile-optimized and after (fig- ure 3). Do you see the difference? It’s important to remember that, when con- sumers search for you on their mobile devices, they’re looking to take an

action. In fact, over 80% of searches on mobile devices are for local businesses

and often result in a visit or sale within 24 hours. Customers can now just click a button and the phone will dial the busi- ness.

They can schedule an appoint- ment.

They can hit the address and it will integrate with their mobile navigator.

They can get coupons.

They can even refer a friend or relative to your shop.

Is Anyone Really Searching for Me?

These screen shots (Figures 4 and 5) are from a tool from Google that

Figure 4
Figure 4

The Secret Recipe for Growing Your Business in 2014!

allows you to see what terms people are searching for, what devices they are searching on, and how many people each month are searching. This can provide us with a very clear picture of where we need to be found. This shot was taken over a year ago; at that time there were 3000 monthly searches for AUTO REPAIR TAMPA on desktops and laptops, and 900 on mobile devices (phones and tablets). The mobile number is growing each and every day. In fact, as of today, that number is over 1500. That means half of all searches are now on mobile devices and growing larger daily.

Does This Work? Why Should I Care?

Don’t you hate it when a sales- person calls or visits you and promises you the world? They have the cure for your business problems and promise to show you the best way to get new customers fast. Well it’s time to hold them account- able. The simple way to do this is by knowing the ROI — Return On Investment. The best way to accom- plish that is to track the number of visitors you’re getting to your ads, or in

Take a minute right now:

Go to your cell phone and type in your web site address.

this case your mobile web site. More importantly, people search- ing on their mobile devices are buyers! If you aren’t easy to get in touch with, they’ll simply go to your competitor. Recent statistics tell us that 90% of all web sites aren’t currently mobile optimized. Is yours one of the 90%?

Some Simple Math

We know that searches are happen- ing on mobile devices. We know that people searching on mobile devices tend to be action takers looking to con- nect and not just shoppers. We know that this shop had 87 visitors. Finally, if this shop’s average ticket is $300 per transaction and they were only able to serve 10% of their visitors, optimizing for mobile devices would add $2500 to the shop’s bottom line in just 30 days! Contrast this with most Yellow Pages or newspaper ads, radio, TV or other marketing services, and you can

see the difference. Instead of just hop- ing the ad is working, you can be sure whether the money you’ve invested is producing a return or not. Take a minute right now: Go to your cell phone and type in your web site address. Look for the link that allows you to see what your custom- ers see when they search for you on their mobile devices. Are you easy to connect to? If your answer is no, this may be the one thing you can easily fix and see an immediate return in new business.

Brian Sacks is a mobile marketing expert with over 26 years of direct response marketing experience. He’s the cofounder of Trackable Response Inc., the #1 mobile marketing provider to the auto and after- market industry, located in Catonsville, Maryland. He’s a published author who has appeared on over 42 stations around the U.S., and on ABC, CBS, NBC, MPT, and Comcast as a marketing expert. You can receive his free book — The 5 Mistakes Transmission Shop Owners Make — by going to www. TransmissionShopOwner. com

can reach Brian by e-mail at

brian@trackableresponseauto.com or call him at 410-747-1100.

You

by e-mail at brian@trackableresponseauto.com or call him at 410-747-1100. You Figure 5 38 GEARS January/February 2014
Figure 5
Figure 5
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FROM THE TECH DIRECTOR by Lance Wiggins members.atra.com Training…IT’S A STATE OF MIND! L et’s
FROM THE TECH DIRECTOR by Lance Wiggins members.atra.com Training…IT’S A STATE OF MIND! L et’s
FROM THE TECH DIRECTOR
by Lance Wiggins
members.atra.com
Training…IT’S A
STATE OF MIND!
L et’s face it: not everyone’s excited about training. And
no wonder: You get home from a long day’s work, hands
hurt, back sore, hungry, and in need of a shower. But wait,
lookie there, homework! Just what you were hoping for!
Yeah, right. More likely you think of every excuse imag-
inable to avoid the training or homework, just like you did
when you were in high school. And, once upon a time, you
could get by with that attitude.
you were in high school. And, once upon a time, you could get by with that
you were in high school. And, once upon a time, you could get by with that

No more: This business changes daily. If you have any hope of keep-

ing current, you have to bite the bullet, and take part in that training you were trying to avoid. Fortunately for you, ATRA is here to help, with training programs that fit your schedule. Our programs are designed to allow you to study at your own pace, study with colleagues, and, most importantly, gain consistent knowledge without infring- ing on your free time. ATRA offers five ways to gain the education you need to stay on top of your game:

1. EXPO

2. Seminars

3. Webinars

4. Literature (rebuild books, GEARS, Shifting Times)

5. Testing and Certification

Let’s take a look at each of these programs and see how they can fit com- fortably into your busy schedule.

EXPO

This year’s EXPO is scheduled for October 30–November 2, 2014, at the Rio All-Suites Hotel. The pro-

gram is already set in motion, with the top speakers in our industry on board and ready to go. As a special treat, we’ve got a couple double-ups, because there’s just too much to go around. See what you think about this lineup:

Bob Warnke

Niel Speetjens

Bill Anthony

Dan Marinucci

Jack Rosebro

John Parmenter

Mark Puccinelli

Bill Brayton

Steve Garrett

Mike Souza

Bob Nuttall

Randall Schroeder

Sean Boyle

Alan McAvoy

Stevie LaVallee

You want training? We’ve got a leader in valve body repairs and hydraulics, bringing common failures from the valve body world. There’s a ZF specialist, to introduce the latest on the ZF 8-speed, including diagnostic

and rebuild procedures. We have the head builder and general manager for TDE of Illinois, bringing his knowl- edge of the 6HP-19, 6HP-26, 722.9, Audi CVT, and Nissan RE5 units. Add to that the latest inside the hybrid world, hands on the Ford

CFT30, and a key to victory seminar:

“Tips from the Rebuilder’s Bench.”

These are programs presented by veter-

ans who’ve been with us at EXPO for

over 20 years. Expo is where you’ll learn about

new transmissions, such as the DPS6

transmission, or learn how to keep the

oldies together for the entire race and

make sure you have what you need

to take the checkered flag. There’s

even factory experience on the lat-

est Chrysler products and a wealth of

knowledge from a true blue Ford man. To put this into perspective, there isn’t one other show, or one other place on the planet, where you’re going to get 25.5 hours of nothing but trans- mission training packed into a single weekend… nowhere on earth! This is exactly where you need to be October 30–November 2, 2014.

CapitalCore Business Made Personal! 1/4 ISLAND
CapitalCore
Business Made Personal!
1/4 ISLAND
1/4 ISLAND
1/4 ISLAND

Make no mistake about it: If you’re going to call yourself a transmission professional, this is where you need to be… and no, Halloween isn’t a real holiday, so don’t try to use that as an excuse to miss this once-in-a-lifetime event!

Seminars

This year’s seminar book is packed with the latest in fixes: over 235 pages of technical material. Between that, the presenters, and the other attendees, you can plan for a day of intense training, networking, and fixes to propel you to the top of your industry. Seminars are Saturday starting around 8:00 AM and ending between 3:00–4:00 PM. As usual, during the breaks you can visit with the suppliers, see new products, and discover fixes you’ll put to work first thing Monday morning. It’s like a mini-EXPO in your home town!

Webinars

Through webinars, ATRA brings you the latest information available, in small bites designed to target specific areas of training. This is ongoing train- ing, not just a weekend or week-long training session; there’s a new ATRA webinar scheduled every other week, 20 times a year. ATRA webinars are sponsored by SAP (Seal Aftermarket Products). Learn more about SAP at their web site www.sealaftermarketproducts.com. The webinar schedule for 2014 is huge, starting in January and ending in November. And each webinar repeats several times, so there’s no reason to miss one of these 30-45 minute learn- ing experiences. Go to members.atra. com/?page=Webinar_Schedule to view the schedule; we guarantee you’ll love these programs or your money back!

Books and Periodicals

Seminars and webinars are great. But that’s not all we have to offer: We also offer rebuild books, exclusively available through the ATRA BookStore. These are books written and designed by ATRA’s own technical experts, packed with the most valuable tips and tricks to help you diagnose and repair today’s transmissions successfully.

diagnose and repair today’s transmissions successfully. What’s news? We’ve got the lat- est scoop for you.

What’s news? We’ve got the lat- est scoop for you. GEARS Magazine and Shifting Times to bring you regular management, technical, and networking advice and news to help you improve your business. Learn what other shops are doing to be successful, and become familiar with the movers and shakers that keep our industry going strong.

Make no mistake about it: If you’re going to call yourself a transmission professional, this
Make no mistake about
it: If you’re going to call
yourself a transmission
professional, this is
where you need to be…

Testing and Certification

So far there have only been a handful of technicians who’ve been able to earn the new ATRA Masters Certification. Not much wonder: It’s the industry’s toughest test for trans- mission technicians.

The ATRA certification program was designed by the top transmission technicians in the industry, specifically for transmission technicians. There are no “gimmes” in this program: Every question was designed to push your knowledge and understanding to the limit. As an ATRA Certified Master Technician, you can take pride in know- ing you took on the toughest and you earned your stripes. You’re at the top of your game, and there’s no one out there who can deny it. You have a right to be proud of your accomplishment: You’ve earned that right. So whether it’s getting the educa- tion to propel you to the top of your game, or the certification to prove you made it, no one has more to offer than ATRA. Take advantage of it, and get ready to take your game to the next level!

than ATRA. Take advantage of it, and get ready to take your game to the next
I HaveADream, Too… for Your Business
I
HaveADream,
Too…
for Your
Business
I HaveADream, Too… for Your Business by Jim Cathcart M any years ago, the world was

by Jim Cathcart

M any years ago, the world was inspired by Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream”

speech. As I reflected on how powerful that short message has been, it stimu- lated my own thinking about how the business world, and specifically the automotive aftermarket, could use a new dream. Consider the following for your own shop or enterprise. I have a dream that someday there will be a world where:

People always keep their word and can be trusted.

Things are done right, the first time.

Technicians and clerks follow through to completion.

People don’t leave things undone.

People say what they mean, instead of what they think you want to hear.

People are courteous and respectful to each other.

Work is always completed on time.

People show up on time.

People truly listen and pay attention.

Managers genuinely do the right thing by workers and customers.

Workers take care of their tools and workplace.

People take pride in their work and their behavior.

People apologize sincerely.

People admit their mistakes and then make them right.

“Do it right, the first time!”

People say “thank you” when they should.

Nobody tolerates bad behavior or poor performance.

People keep accurate records.

People use language correctly. I could go on, but I think you get the point. Now imagine with me what your world would be like if the above were ‘normal.’ If that were the case:

We wouldn’t need locks. A service- related phone call would take 1/8 the time it takes now. Files would be easy to locate and they’d be accurate and complete. People would look forward to working with each other. Customers would want to come see you and they wouldn’t withhold information from you nor try to trick you into lower pric- ing. You’d always know exactly where you stand with everyone. Do-overs wouldn’t exist. Insurance rates would drop profoundly. Extended warranties would cost less and be less likely to be needed. Tools and equip- ment would last longer without repair. Sales would be easy and honest. Inventory losses and pilferage would no longer exist. Products would be reliable and so would service. And you wouldn’t have to check to make sure things got done correctly and on time. The cost of a ‘do-over’ isn’t just a small, marginal expense. It costs the time, talent, and resources to do it the

first time… and then costs the same again for the re-do, plus the lost pro- ductivity and opportunity while you were repeating the actions instead of doing something new and valuable. It also costs your reputation and affects your feelings, and bad feelings affect work quality and the attitudes of

others. Yikes! This is getting expensive.

A re-do costs many times more than

doing something once. So when you see a sign that says, “Do it right, the first time!” Take it seriously as a way for you to help make

this world better for yourself… and the rest of us. I have a dream that this could happen. Will you help make it true? What’s the first thing you’ll do? How about a quick all-hands staff meeting to read and discuss this article? Then make a list of the things everyone and each one can do. Next, manage that list until it becomes your new “normal.” And let’s work together to keep the dream alive and build a better normal… for all of us: Send your ideas to GEARS

so we can share them with others.

Jim Cathcart, CSP, CPAE, is a world-renowned professional speaker, author, and business coach. More impor- tantly, he’s a part of the ATRA/GEARS family. Contact him at Cathcart.com

or send a message to Jim Cathcart at GEARS Magazine.

Contact him at Cathcart.com or send a message to Jim Cathcart at GEARS Magazine . 44
ATRA Returns to Las Vegas! 201 Hosts the POWERTRAIN OCTOBER 30 - NOVEMBER 2, 2014
ATRA Returns to Las Vegas! 201 Hosts the POWERTRAIN OCTOBER 30 - NOVEMBER 2, 2014

ATRA Returns to Las Vegas!

ATRA Returns to Las Vegas! 201 Hosts the POWERTRAIN OCTOBER 30 - NOVEMBER 2, 2014 RIO
201 Hosts the POWERTRAIN OCTOBER 30 - NOVEMBER 2, 2014
201
Hosts the
POWERTRAIN
OCTOBER 30 - NOVEMBER 2, 2014

RIO HOTEL & CASINO, LAS VEGAS, NV

ATRA Returns to Las Vegas! 201 Hosts the POWERTRAIN OCTOBER 30 - NOVEMBER 2, 2014 RIO
ATRA Returns to Las Vegas! 201 Hosts the POWERTRAIN OCTOBER 30 - NOVEMBER 2, 2014 RIO
ATRA Returns to Las Vegas! 201 Hosts the POWERTRAIN OCTOBER 30 - NOVEMBER 2, 2014 RIO

North Texas Transmission

SHOP PROFILE

by Steve Bodofsky

members.atra.com

North Texas Transmission; Arlington, Texas; A Family Tradition for over 34 Years
North
Texas
Transmission;
Arlington,
Texas;
A Family Tradition for over 34 Years
North Texas Transmission, and yes, that’s AT&T Stadium in the background, home of the Dallas
North Texas Transmission, and yes, that’s AT&T Stadium in the background, home of the Dallas Cowboys.

A lot of transmission shops are

family oriented: owned and

operated by several members

— and even several generations — of the same family. This is often deliber- ate, to share the responsibility and security of a family business. Nowhere is this consideration for family more evident than a shop in the great state of Texas; north Texas, to be specific. In fact, that’s the name of the shop: North Texas Transmission, in Arlington, Texas. The shop’s owner is Richard

Maddux; his wife, Sheila, handles the office and provides customer service. Their son, Dustin, is the shop manager. And Richard’s father, Fred, helps out,

Shop owner Richard Maddux with his wife, Sheila.
Shop owner Richard Maddux with his wife, Sheila.

driving cars and running errands as

needed. Three generations all working under one roof. Of course, not everyone in the shop

is family. There’s Curtis Furguson, who,

according to Richard, is “my right hand man; he’s been with me for 15 years. He can do it all — he has experience with high end European cars, doing electrical diagnosis and repairs.” Then to round out the shop, there’s J.T. Cox and Jesus Holguin, who han- dle the shop’s R&R work.

The History

Richard opened North Texas Transmission in 1990; 23 years ago. But their story begins even earlier:

Richard’s father owned a transmis- sion shop — Able Transmissions, in Fort Worth, which he opened in 1979. Unlike so many other guys whose dad owned a shop, Richard never really got involved in the business while he was young. “I was going to take a year off before going to college, but my Dad said, ‘Instead of sitting around, come

work for me for a year. I’ll give you a set of tools and teach you how to R&R

a transmission. At least you’ll learn

something you can use to earn a living.’ That was 32 years ago.”

Richard found his niche working in the transmission repair business. He continued working for his father. “Within a few months I was tearing

down units and cleaning parts; within six months I was rebuilding 350s. I was building maybe 10 transmissions

a week.” He was still working there

when his father decided to sell Able Transmissions in 1987. “Six months later I was offered a

job running a new shop in Arlington,” says Richard. “I worked for that shop for year.” But the shop didn’t meet his expectations for integrity. “So I took $500 from my personal savings and put a deposit on a building and opened my own shop. “My new career as a shop owner started with me working as many as seven days a week, doing whatever needed to be done — pulling units while lying on my back, rebuilding, and

so on. The location was great so I really

didn’t need to advertise; work just came

in and we grew through word of mouth.

Curtis Furguson has been with North Texas Transmission for 15 years.
Curtis Furguson has been with North Texas Transmission for 15 years.
Dustin, the shop manager, scanning for trouble codes.
Dustin, the shop manager, scanning for trouble codes.

“After about three months I hired my first employee. That’s when I real- ized that I still had a lot to learn about running a business. I saw an adver- tisement for a management course; between that and the subsequent ATRA management seminars, we grew into a successful business. “And we’re continuing to grow, thanks to support from ESI, ProfitBoost, and of course ATRA and its What’s Working program.” In fact, a couple years ago they moved into a new, larger building — from 2500 sq-ft to 5000 sq-ft — about

a block from the old shop’s location. The new shop is right near several major Dallas stadiums, including the Cowboys and the Rangers. “Sometimes they rent our parking lot for the games; that’s how close we are.” While Richard doesn’t thing hav- ing the stadiums nearby had a direct effect on his business, there’s no doubt that it brings more customers past his shop. “And they really cleaned up the neighborhood when they built the new stadium,” he says. “It’s had a good effect on Arlington, that’s for sure!”

North Texas Transmission

A bird’s eye view of inside North Texas Transmission’s shop.
A bird’s eye view of inside North Texas Transmission’s shop.

Business Model

While many shops today are expanding into general repairs, North Texas Transmissions remains a power- train specialist: They service transmis- sions, transfer cases, differentials, and axles. And they stay pretty busy most of the time. They usually rebuild their own units, but they will use remans when necessary. And these days they’re using more remans than ever before. “We probably buy one or two remans every month,” Richard says. When do they choose a reman? “When we’re backed up and need to get the cars turned. We don’t have the luxury of having three or four rebuild- ers on hand, and it’s getting harder and harder to find qualified help. “I know the arguments against using remans, but when the work starts backing up, you have to take care of the customer. And remans can be a good way to do that.” Where do they get their work? “I do transmission work for the near- by CarMax, including their warranty work. Most of the rest of our work is retail. We get a lot of referrals. “There are other transmission shops within walking distance, but

I don’t consider them competition. I

think we separate ourselves with our commitment to honesty and integrity. That’s what our shop is all about. Our philosophy is that we never sell any- thing that doesn’t need to be sold.” And when it comes to serving their customers, Richard says that “I take the money out of consideration. If we don’t sell the job for the right price or there’s an issue with the repair, it doesn’t matter: We make sure the car’s right, regardless of the profit.” That philosophy seems to have

paid off pretty well: “We’ve been in

business for 23 years now, and in that time I’ve never had a Better Business Bureau complaint and I’ve never been

to court,” he says proudly.

“I’m not saying we don’t have complaints; we do… everyone does. But I’ve learned how to deal with them… how to make problems go away. And it’s easier than fighting about something we can fix. That’s how we built our business. In fact, they never even bothered to advertise their shop until recently. “My son, Dustin, joined the shop about five years ago, and since then we’ve started to try to re-grow the shop. Before that

we never did any real advertising; it was all word of mouth. The web site is new — www.ntxtransmission.com — and we’ve gotten onboard with ESI to help build the business. “We have a FaceBook page, but that’s all we’re doing with social media for right now.” Dustin went to Baylor University where he earned a business degree.

“He’s a ‘scratch’ golfer, and it’s become

a running joke: I ask him what he

learned in college and he says ‘how to play golf!’” But there’s little doubt that Dustin’s business degree is a valuable

asset for running a transmission shop. That’s really the whole premise behind the What’s Working program: teaching shop owners to work on their business;

not in it. “I’m glad he’s here, because he’s really sharp on computers and he knows cars. He’s done some R&R work and repairs, but he’s really focused on find- ing the information we need to fix cars. It’s amazing how good he’s become.” To hear Richard tell it, the web site

is all the advertising they do. It took

a bit of coaxing to discover they also

serve their community when possible.

“We’re involved in the community, through the Elks Lodge, the church, and a nearby shelter for battered women. We try to take care of their cars when they have a problem; we’ll get a call that someone needs something, and we’ll take care of it.” What does he mean by “take care”? He wasn’t very forthcoming with that, but when pressed it turns out that their shop will often fix the cars without charging anything at all. Funny how it never seemed to occur to him that he could consider that advertising. It was just something they do; that’s all.

Why ATRA?

North Texas Transmission became an ATRA Member when Richard opened the shop back in 1990. The rea- son? Great technical support. “There were no schools to go to back then; technical information was handed down from older, more experi- enced rebuilders.” But transmissions were beginning to change, and the need for technical support was growing daily. ATRA could provide that support. And, according to Richard, that support is still ATRA’s most valuable asset… one they depend on regularly. What about the Golden Rule Warranty? According to Richard, he’s only taken advantage of ATRA’s war- ranty once; he’s honored it more for other shops than he’s ever needed it himself. But he still considers ATRA mem- bership a worthwhile investment, par- ticularly for their training programs:

He usually tries to get to Expo and takes a few of his staff. His technicians go to the technical seminars while he and Dustin attend the management program. And he always tries to send at least one or two guys to local seminars.

Free Time

No one wants to fix cars all the time, and Richard’s no exception. He likes to devote some of his free time to his grandchildren: Richard and Sheila’s daughter, Crystal Delahoz, has two daughters, Mia Grace, 7; and Ellie, 2. And now there’s a third grand- child: “Dustin and his wife, Heather, had a boy born last Friday (November 15)!” says proud grandpa Richard. “His

Three generations of the Maddux family — Dustin, Richard, and Fred — in front of
Three generations of the Maddux family — Dustin, Richard, and Fred —
in front of their 1940 Chevy coupe.
Sheila Maddux answers phones, takes care of customers, and generally runs the office.
Sheila Maddux answers phones, takes care of customers, and generally runs the office.

name is Holt.” So what else does Richard do when he’s not fixing cars? For one thing, he and his father built a street rod out of a 1940 Chevy coupe, and he has a ’39 Chevy that’s “sitting here, waiting to be built one day.” He also has a motorcycle — a 1989 Harley — that he and a friend tore down to its frame and completely rebuilt. He loves to take it on the road whenever he has a chance. “We usually try to ride to Austin once year (about 200 miles away). I used to make the rallies, but I haven’t had time for them in a while. We put about a thousand miles or so on the bikes every year.”

And he holds a blue belt in Brazilian ju jutsu. He studies under Carlos Machato; an ex world master’s champion and a pioneer in Brazilian ju jitsu in the U.S. So Richard may not be the best person to mess with. (Could that be why he’s never had a complaint?) North Texas Transmissions… a family shop with a tradition of serv- ing the public. Maybe it’s not surpris- ing that they’re doing so well. Maybe they’re just another example of what’s working in today’s transmission repair market.

Maybe they’re just another example of what’s working in today’s transmission repair market. GEARS December 2013
WHAT'SWHAT'SWHAT'S WORKINGWORKING Jeffrey Gitomer and Rodger Bland I really don’t like New Year’s reso-
WHAT'SWHAT'SWHAT'S WORKINGWORKING
Jeffrey Gitomer and Rodger Bland
I really don’t like New Year’s reso-
lly don’t like New Year’s reso-
your your field field of of expertise. expertise.
lutions. If you’re going to resolve
to do something then just do it; if
It’s no different in the management
area of your business either. Personal
development, attitude, and sales skills
are all enhanced when you continually
hone each discipline to mastery.
Introducing Gitomer
Virtual Training!

not, don’t. Having said that, I do believe that the beginning of each year provides an excellent opportunity to evaluate where you are and where you’d like to be, both from a personal and professional standpoint. In business, you’re either moving forward or falling behind:

there’s no standing still. So, what’s your plan to keep your business moving forward this year? I hope it includes training. I believe one of the biggest obsta- cles to success we face as an industry is the failure to recognize the importance

of continual training, mainly from the management side of the shop. That’s not generally the case on the technical issues, because technology is forever changing: To be profitable, you have to keep up with the latest fixes and updates on the newer transmissions. But training shouldn’t be relegated to just one aspect of your organization. Technical training is important, but so is management training. Because it’s not whether you know something; it’s how well you know it. If you came up in this business from the technical side, think back to the first transmission you rebuilt suc- cessfully. Say you built a THM 350, installed it, and it worked flawlessly. From then on you considered your- self a rebuilder — but how good of a rebuilder were you back then? To become a master at anything takes time, experience, and focus on what you seek to master. And yes, it takes training… continuous training in

is Repetition
is Repetition

The Pathway to Mastery

continuous training in is Repetition The Pathway to Mastery I believe there’s no better manage- ment

I believe there’s no better manage- ment training in our industry than the program we offer at our annual Expos. World-class speakers, real-world top- ics, and like-minded attendees are just part of what makes management train- ing at Expo a must for shop owners and their management teams. The only problem with Expo is it only happens once a year. It’s been said that you only retain and use about 15% of the information you learn in class- room training. The audio files for each session help, but only if you use them on a regular and consistent basis. For any training to have a real

impact it has to be internalized. That is,

it needs to be repeated, applied consis-

tently, tested, and tracked. Repetition is key. At ATRA we’ve been looking for

a way to do just that, to create a vir-

tual training system where shop owners and managers could access world class management training at the click of a button 24/7, 365 days a year. We found that such a system already exists and it aligns perfectly with what we’ve discovered in our What’s Working study; namely the five recurring traits of all successful shop owners — and how, with this training, everyone can hone each of those traits to a mastery level.

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of the New York Times bestsellers The Sales Bible, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Black Book of Connections, and The Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude. Jeffery’s syndicated column, Sales Moves, appears in scores of business journals and newspapers in the United States and Europe, and is read by more than four million people every week. In 2008, Jeffery was inducted into the National Speakers Association’s (NSA) Speaker’s Hall of Fame. He delivers over 100 seminars and public speeches each year around the world. Visit him on line at www.gitomer.com. And now his training is coming to our industry! Last December, I traveled to Charlotte, North Carolina, to engage in four intense days of training. I was personally trained by Jeffrey to become a Gitomer Certified Advisor, so I could offer his training workshops to our industry. What’s more, ATRA is now authorized to grant access to Gitomer Virtual Training! Finally, world class management training that aligns completely with what works for our industry. Virtual management training for our industry is here. The next step is up to you… just do it! To take a tour of this amazing training, go to www.gitomervt.com. When you subscribe, be sure to use ATRA code 2047 and receive free pro- cessing on your subscription.

be sure to use ATRA code 2047 and receive free pro- cessing on your subscription. 50
be sure to use ATRA code 2047 and receive free pro- cessing on your subscription. 50
be sure to use ATRA code 2047 and receive free pro- cessing on your subscription. 50

TECHNICAL

CH NICA

SEMINAR

GET ‘EM OUT THE DOOR

MIN

E

TECHNICAL CH NICA SEMINAR GET ‘EM OUT THE DOOR MIN E TE S Toll-free: HOW TO
TECHNICAL CH NICA SEMINAR GET ‘EM OUT THE DOOR MIN E TE S Toll-free: HOW TO
TE S
TE
S
TECHNICAL CH NICA SEMINAR GET ‘EM OUT THE DOOR MIN E TE S Toll-free: HOW TO
TECHNICAL CH NICA SEMINAR GET ‘EM OUT THE DOOR MIN E TE S Toll-free: HOW TO
Toll-free:
Toll-free:

HOW TO

REGISTER

(800) 428-8489

Fax Fax your payment & registration information to:

(805) 988-6761

Online

http:// members.atra.com

Mail

Mail your payment to:

ATRA Seminar Registration 2400 Latigo Avenue Oxnard, CA 93030

FEES

Atra Members: $165 Non-Members: $210 4th person FREE On-site registration: $240

$210 4th person FREE On-site registration: $240 SCHEDULE Registration: 7am - 8am Seminar: 8am Lunch: 12pm

SCHEDULE

Registration: 7am - 8am

Seminar: 8am

Lunch: 12pm - 1pm

Registration: 7am - 8am Seminar: 8am Lunch: 12pm - 1pm LOCATIONS February 8 - Houston, TX

LOCATIONS

February 8 - Houston, TX February 15 - Orlando, FL February 15 - Columbus, OH February 22 - Charlotte, NC March 1 - Dallas, TX March 8 - Boston, MA March 15 - Phoenix, AZ March 22 - Biloxi, MS March 29 - Coeur D’Alene, ID April 5 - Minneapolis, MN April 12 - St. Louis, MO April 26 - Concord, CA May 3 - San Antonio, TX May 10 - Denver, CO May 10 - Des Moines, IA May 31 - Vancouver, BC June 7 - Tulsa, OK August 9 - Albuquerque, NM August 23 - Los Angeles, CA September 6 - Atlanta, GA September 13 - Billings, MT September 20 - Chicago, IL September 27 - Clark-Newark, NJ November 8 - Baltimore, MD

What You’ll Learn

GENERAL MOTORS

ALL GM

Reprogram

6T30

Slip/No 3rd Gear, Possible P0752

6T40/41

Bimp or Surge when at a stop Generation III Updates

6T70/75

TCC Shudder, Engine Misfire, Misfire Codes Shudder, No 3rd/5th/Reverse and/or 4-5-6 Apply TCC Slip, Shudder or Engine Stalls After Rebuild Lack of Power, Shift

6L45/50/80/90

Hard Shifts, No Shift

6L80/90

Slips in All Forward Gears, Slow Engagement, Fwd and Rev. Planetary Noise, Planetary Damage Unigear Planetary and Speed Sensor Design Change No Fwd, Slips Moving Fwd, Neutrals on the 1-2 Shift, Check ball Location and Identification Updated Spacer Plate and Added #8 Check Ball 1-2-3-4 Pressure Plate Identification and Installation 4L60E Hybrid

P2797

4L60/65/70E

No 2-3 Shift, Failsafe has 3rd Gear, After Overhaul

Service 4wd Message, DTC C0327 LCT 1000 Pump Bushing Damage, Radiator Failure, Vibrating Sound After Repair Burnt 3-5 Reverse and 2-6 Delayed Reverse Engagement, Double Bump Reverse Engagement, Bang in Reverse Shift Solenoid Command Specifications TL-80SN (8 Speed) Introduction Shift Solenoid and Speed Sensor Identification Clutch and Brake Application and Ratio Chart Self Learn Procedure

CVT-7

Introduction Fluid Level, Line Pressure and Pulleys Clutches and Brakes, Oil Pump, Aux Gear Box, Reduction Gear Set, Valve Body, Solenoids, Sensors and Valves

1ET35

Introduction

FORD

6R60/80/90

Valve Body Separator Plate Changes

6R80

Starts in High Gear

4R70/75E/W

Dragging Sensation Check Ball Identification

5R55S

Intermittent Hard Shifting Harsh Reverse Engagement, Harsh 3-4 Shift 5R110W/Torqshift Chatter in Reverse Pressure
Intermittent Hard Shifting
Harsh Reverse Engagement, Harsh 3-4 Shift
5R110W/Torqshift
Chatter in Reverse
Pressure Specifications
6R140W/Torqshift 6
Clutch Application and Stall Speed Charts
Gear Ratio and Solenoid Application Charts
Clutch Clearances
Fluid Specifications and Pressure Test Charts
Front and Rear Selective Shim Charts
Fwd, Dir, Inter and OD Selective Snap Ring Charts
Shift Speed Charts
Torque Specifications
Perameter Identifications
Solenoid Identification and Type
2-3 Flare, DTC P0733, Delayed Reverse Engagement
Excessive Column Shift Efforts, Feels Frozen
Odyssey B7TA/B7YA
All Solenoid Codes Set
Odyssey BYBA/BGRA
No 3rd or 4th Gear After Overhaul
MDX, MDKA
Bearing Noise While Driving, In Park and Neutral,
Goes Away in Gear at a Stop
722.9
Check Ball Identification and Location
No Movement
Binds on the 3-4 Shift
Stuck in Failsafe
Stuck in Failsafe, Arratic Shifts, No 1-2 Shift
2-3 Flare After Rebuild
RE5F22A
DPS6
Harsh Delayed Forward Engagement
Harsh Downshift
Erratic, Harsh, Soft or Rough 1-2 Shift
Shudder on Light Acceleration
Fluid Level
RE0F09A
CFT30
Pressure Testing
AWD Noise, Damaged Gears, Cracked Case
Codes, Erratic Shifts, Harsh Engagements, Harsh
3-4 shift
CHRYSLER
ZF4HP16
Neutralizing in 1st and 4th, P0705
A6LF1
41TE
DTC P0750, Multiple Solenoid Codes
45RFE
DTC P0888
Erratic TCC Operation
DTC P1791, Delayed Engagements
45/545/68RFE
Stalls the Engine in Forward and Reverse
545RFE
Wrong Gear Starts, P2706
DTC P0750, Multiple Solenoid Codes
High Speed Momentary Bind
68RFE
Updated Separator Plate, Solenoid Body and Check
Ball Location
Clank Noise from Drive to Neutral
DTC P0871, OD Clutch Failure
DTC P0876, 2C Clutch Failure
48RE
Introduction
Fluid Level Check
Fluid Contamination and Cooler Hose Damage
Side Cover Leaks
Component Identification
Solenoid Identification
A and B Shift Solenoid Function
Line Pressure Solenoid Function
Torque Converter and 2-6 Brake Solenoid
3-5-Reverse, Underdrive and Overdrive Solenoid
Function
Transmission Range/Inhibitor Switch
Internal harness and connector Pin Identifica-
tions
Valve Body removal
Transmission Temperature Sensor (TOT)
Valve Body Circuit Identification
#2 Check Ball Eliminated
62TE
Harsh Shifts
8HP45/W5A580
DTC P0730
722.6/NAG1
DTC P0748
DTC P0730, Limp Mode or Neutral Condition
Adaptation and Repair Verification
AS69RC
Introduction
Valve Body
Input Shaft, Gears, Bearings and Speed Sensor Loca-
tion
F1 Roller Clutch and B2 Clutch
948TE
Introduction
Specifications
Clutch Application Chart
Valve Body and Solenoid Identification
Dog Clutch Identification
Input and Output Speed Sensors
Case Air Checks
Low/Reverse Sprag Rotation
Valve Body Exploded View (Outer)
Valve Body Exploded View (Middle)
Valve Body Exploded View (Inner)
Valve Body Exploded View (Outer Small Parts)
Valve Body Exploded View (Middle Small Parts)
Valve Body Exploded View (Inner Small Parts)
2-6 Brake Clutch Endplay Checks
2-6 Brake Clutch Endplay Checks (Alternate
Procedure)
Low Reverse Brake Clutch Endplay Checks
Overdrive Brake Clutch Endplay Checks
Delay or Slips in Drive
Unit Endplay Specifications (Front)
Unit Endplay Specifications (Rear)
Diagnostic Trouble Code Definitions
TCM Relearn Procedure
Specifications
A4CF2
IMPORT SECTION
Acura MDX
Solenoid Identification
Valve Body Identification
Adaptive Learning
No Reverse
GEARS Magazine's
GEARS Magazine's
2014 Buyer's Guide
2014
Buyer's Guide

A

A & Reds Transmission Parts *

3737 W. 29th St. S.

Wichita, KS 67217 Toll Free: (800) 835-1007 Phone: (316) 942-5300 Fax: (316) 942-8947 www.areds.com

A & Reds Transmission Parts *

2000 Indiana Ave.

Kansas City, MO 64127 Toll Free: (866) 780-7337 Phone: (816) 483-7337 www.areds.com

A&A Midwest / Transmission Quest *

2580 N. Commerce St.

North Las Vegas, NV 89030 Toll Free: (800) 426-8771 Phone: (702) 649-9776 Fax: (702) 649-6777 www.aamidwest.com

A1 Transmissions & Parts Co. *

1020 Yuma St.

Denver, CO 80204 Phone: (303) 623-1401 Fax: (303) 623-4923

Denver, CO 80204 Phone: (303) 623-1401 Fax: (303) 623-4923 A & Reds Transmission Parts * 2300

A & Reds Transmission Parts *

2300 N. Westport Ave.

Sioux Falls, SD 57107 Toll Free: (888) 215-3639 Phone: (605) 338-3800 www.areds.com

A&A Midwest / Transmission Quest *

4050 S. Wentworth Ave.

Chicago, IL 60609 Contact: Steve Feinstein Toll Free: (800) 826-7403 Phone: (773) 624-6111 Fax: (773) 624-6660 spf@transmissionquest.com www.transmissionquest.com www.aamidwestcores.com

Adapt-A-Case *

3400 Jefferson Ave. S.E.

Grand Rapids, MI 49548 Contact: Michael Black/ Duane Reister Phone: (616) 331-0000 Fax: (616) 452-5624 www.Adapt-A-Case.com

Advanstar Communications *

2501 Colorado Ave., Ste. 280

Santa Monica, CA 90404 Phone: (310) 857-7500 Fax: (310) 857-7510 www.advanstar.com

All-Trans, Inc. 134 Transit Dr. Greenville, SC 29607 Toll Free: (800) 922-9562

54

Company names with * are proud ATRA Supplier Members

Phone: (864) 297-9913 Fax: On Request info@alltransparts.com www.alltransparts.com

All Trans Remanufactured Transmissions * 1333 N. 21St. Phoenix, AZ 85009 Toll Free: (800) 858-7269 Phone: (602) 233-3835 Fax: (602) 253-1760 www.alltransremanufacturing.com

Alliance Manufacturing Services

257 Hopeland St.

Dayton, OH 45417 Contact: Don Gray / Clyde Webb Phone: (937) 222-3394 Fax: (937) 222-2578 don@alliancemfg.net

www.alliancemfg.net

Fax: (937) 222-2578 don@alliancemfg.net www.alliancemfg.net Allomatic Products 609 East Chaney St./P.O. Box 267

Allomatic Products

609 East Chaney St./P.O. Box 267

Sullivan, IN 47882 Contact: Israel Tabaksblat

Toll Free: (800) 568-0330 Phone: (516) 775-0330 Fax: (516) 775-5543 apcsales@allomatic.com www.allomatic.com

GEARS

January/February 2014

TRANSMISSION PARTS 800-835-1007
TRANSMISSION PARTS
800-835-1007
Free CD Parts Catalog! CALL TODAY and get your free copy of A & Reds
Free CD
Parts Catalog!
CALL TODAY
and get your free copy of
A & Reds CD catalog.
It’s free and contains
a Transmission vehicle
index, detailed parts
listing by year, make
and model – Plus a handy
list and net price guide,
cooler line return chart,
band adjustment chart,
speedometer gear listings and
much, much more.

AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION PARTS MANUAL TRANSMISSION PARTS TRANSFER CASE PARTS AMERICAN & IMPORTED CARS AND TRUCKS GASKET SETS OVERHAUL KITS MASTER REBUILDING KITS REBUILT AND USED HARD PARTS REBUILT TORQUE CONVERTERS HEAVY DUTY TOWING CONVERTERS HIGH STALL PERFORMANCE RACING CONVERTERS PERFORMANCE CLUTCH AND CLUTCH KITS

WHY CHOOSE A & REDS?

For nearly 40 years we have done one thing and we do it well. We help transmission rebuilders get the job done. We are full line distributor carrying all soft parts, rebuilding kits, new and used hard parts for, Automatic transmissions, Manual transmissions & Transfer cases. Domestic and Imported.

PRODUCTS

We stock top name brand products we are proud to sell from leading companies and you will be proud to use. Alto Trans-Tool Borg-Warner DT Components Dacco Life Automotive Lube Gard Loc-Tite Raybestos Seal Aftermarket Products Rostra SPX Sealed Power Sonnax Superior Smart Blend Teckpak Fitzall Trans-tec Transgo Valeo Muscle Products Miller Tool Wade Parker Seymore Toledo Driveline

LOCATIONS

Wichita KS 67217

3737 West 29th Street South

800-835-1007

316-942-5300

Kansas City MO 64127 2000 Indiana Ave.

866-780-7337

816-483-7337

NEW LOCATION:

Sioux Falls SD 57107

2300 North Westport Ave

888-215-3639

605-338-3800

Your Complete Source for Transmission Cores and Parts Our People Bill Stolberg President & COO
Your Complete Source for Transmission Cores and Parts Our People Bill Stolberg President & COO

Your Complete Source for Transmission Cores and Parts

Your Complete Source for Transmission Cores and Parts Our People Bill Stolberg President & COO (800)
Your Complete Source for Transmission Cores and Parts Our People Bill Stolberg President & COO (800)
Your Complete Source for Transmission Cores and Parts Our People Bill Stolberg President & COO (800)
Your Complete Source for Transmission Cores and Parts Our People Bill Stolberg President & COO (800)

Our People

Complete Source for Transmission Cores and Parts Our People Bill Stolberg President & COO (800) 826-7403,

Bill Stolberg President & COO (800) 826-7403, Ext. 302 wds@aamidwest.com

& COO (800) 826-7403, Ext. 302 wds@aamidwest.com Steve Feinstein Transmission Operations Manager (800)

Steve Feinstein Transmission Operations Manager (800) 826-7403, Ext. 309 spf@transmissionquest.com

Manager (800) 826-7403, Ext. 309 spf@transmissionquest.com Brad Heilman Hard Parts Specialist (800) 826-7403, Ext. 304

Brad Heilman Hard Parts Specialist (800) 826-7403, Ext. 304 bdh@transmissionquest.com

A&A Midwest: Your Comprehensive Resource

A&A Midwest is a comprehensive source for cores, recycling and auto wrecking services, along with transmission hard parts and engine parts under our TransmissionQuest and EngineQuest divisions. A&A Midwest has been family owned and operated since 1949 and continues to be known for its outstanding customer service and high degree of integrity.

TransmissionQuest: “Our Mission is Your Transmission”

A&A Midwest launched TransmissionQuest (TQ) in 2011 with a full-line of thoroughly inspected transmission hard parts. Coverage includes domestic, import, CVT/hybrid, 6-speed, ZF, Mercedes, Aisin Warner, Honda, Acura and many other hard-to-find, late-model applications. TQ offers a complete teardown and inspection of internal hard parts to ensure that every component is rebuildable. This is backed by TQ’s sister company, A&A Midwest Cores, with over 25,000 automatic and standard transmission and transfer case cores in stock.

A&A Midwest Cores

A&A Midwest Cores is a leading core supplier to transmission and engine remanufacturers, providing expertise to customers on whether new, remanufactured or reclaimed will work best for the transmission or engine project they are working on.

Salvage, Scrap Metal and More!

In addition to its TQ division and cores business, A&A Midwest (formerly AAEQ), operates A&A Midwest Auto Wrecking, a major automotive salvage business in Blue Island, Ill. that dismantles vehicles and exports complete engine, drive train systems and body components to developing countries. A&A Midwest’s engine parts division, EngineQuest (EQ), stocks hard-to-find new, remanufactured and reclaimed engine parts, specializing in stock and performance cylinder heads. From our Las Vegas headquarters, A&A Midwest Recycling pays top dollar for scrap metal.

The Proper Handling of Cores

A&A Midwest has learned through experience that the proper handling of automotive cores, particularly transmissions and engines, must be done carefully to ensure their future usefulness. The goal of A&A Midwest is to provide customers with the cleanest, usable parts. A&A Midwest takes special care in accepting, handling, processing, storing and shipping engine and transmission cores and their components.

CHiCAgO FACiLiTY

4050 S. Wentworth Ave. Chicago, IL 60609 (800) 826-7403 (773) 624-6111 Fax (773) 624-6660 www.aamidwestcores.com www.transmissionquest.com

LAS VegAS FACiLiTY

2580 N. Commerce St. North Las Vegas, NV 89030 (800) 426-8771 (702) 649-7776 Fax (702) 649-6777 www.aamidwest.com

426-8771 (702) 649-7776 Fax (702) 649-6777 www.aamidwest.com Please call our Chicago facility for all inquiries related
426-8771 (702) 649-7776 Fax (702) 649-6777 www.aamidwest.com Please call our Chicago facility for all inquiries related

Please call our Chicago facility for all inquiries related to transmissions and transmission parts.

T-1260AC T-1260AC T-CASE T-T-TTT -C-CCACC AAA SSS EEE The ThT hehee T-1000-4AC T-1000-4AC 2010-up 001100---
T-1260AC T-1260AC T-CASE T-T-TTT -C-CCACC AAA SSS EEE The ThT hehee T-1000-4AC T-1000-4AC 2010-up 001100---
T-1260AC
T-1260AC
T-CASE