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Instructors Confidential Manual Supplemental Handbook

by Sifu Guro Bud Thompson

PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 15222

The contents of this work including, but not limited to, the accuracy of events, people, and places depicted; opinions expressed; permission to use previously published materials included; and any advice given or actions advocated are solely the responsibility of the author, who assumes all liability for said work and indemnifies the publisher against any claims stemming from publication of the work.

All Rights Reserved Copyright 2010 by Bud Thompson No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the author. ISBN: 978-1-4349-9041-9 eISBN: 978-1-4349-4062-9 Printed in the United States of America First Printing

For more information or to order additional books, please contact: RoseDog Books 701 Smithfield Street Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222 U.S.A. 1-800-834-1803 www.rosedogbookstore.com

Dedicated To:
This manual is to the devoted students who have spent countless hours, weeks, months and years training. They have earned the privilege and right to be called Sifu/Guro. It is my wish that the instructor will continue to grow in the knowledge of the art and become creative in his or her own right. The full instructor has been granted the right to change anything he or she has been taught in order to benefit his or her own needs and the needs of the students, as he or she sees fit to change. Change is necessary so that the practitioner can adapt to the ever-changing times and situations as he or she deems necessary. Sifu/Guro Bud Thompson
Bud Thompsons Academy of Mixed Martial Arts

Registered in the Library of Congress Register of Copyrights, United States of America Registration Number TXu 1 313 040 June 29, 2006 Kali Academy of Martial Arts Jun Fan Gung Fu Institute Whittier, CA USA For non-commercial and private use only Any public use or copying is strictly prohibited All rights reserved under copyright Revised 2 nd Printing February 1 st 2007

FORWARD
By Dan Inosanto:
I am honored to have been asked to write this forward for my long time student and friend Bud Thompson. I first met Bud, a former body builder, at his Hollywood Natural Foods store, in 1965. I along with my instructor Bruce Lee would frequent the Hollywood book stores for our research on martial arts, and we would stop in to see Buddy for the latest on nutritional supplements. When I opened the Kali/Chinese Gung Fu Academy in Torrance California in 1974 Bud was there to train and has been with me ever since, Actively training at the Kali Academy and following me to the IMB Academy(Inosanto-MartinezBustillo),now International Martial Art and Boxing Academy in Torrance. Bud opened up his school the Kali Academy of Mixed Martial Arts in 1989 and he is still going strong. As my oldest student (Bud is even older than me!), he has never ceased to grow in his love and dedication to the arts. As a student his loyalty and dedication is exemplary. Perhaps his greatest attribute, as a martial artist is open mind, continuing to honor the art and training of the past coupled with his enthusiasm for embracing what is new and innovative. Bud is a true example of one who continues to absorb what is useful, reject what is useless and add what is specifically his own for himself and his students. Bud knows that change is necessary so that his students can adapt to the ever changing times and situations. It has always been my wish that my instructors continue to grow in knowledge and wisdom and become creative in their own right. Bud Thompson is a great example of this. Buds students will benefit from his years of training and teaching not only by studying with him at his academy, but by reading his new manual, which will enhance their skill and knowledge and aid them on their own path.

Dan Inosanto Founder & Head Instructor The Inosanto Academy of Martial Arts Marina Del Rey, California USA

Table of Contents
Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Table of Contents Table of Contents (continued) Table of Contents (continued) Table of Contents (continued) Table of Contents (continued) Table of Contents (continued) Introduction Filipino Martial Arts Phase I Curriculum Advanced Phase I Curriculum Phase II Curriculum Advanced Phase II Curriculum Phase III Curriculum/JKD Status Eskrima #1 Numbering System Portrait Johnny LaCoste/Dan Inosanto LaCostes 1st Cinco Teros Pattern LaCostes 2nd Cinco Teros Pattern LaCostes 3rd Cinco Teros Pattern LaCostes 4th Cinco Teros Pattern LaCostes 5th Cinco Teros Pattern LaCostes Numbering System #1 Ending LaCostes Numbering System #2 Ending LaCostes Numbering System LaCoste Salutation Villabrille Salutation Villabrille Numbering System Floro Villabrille Kali Structure Raymond Tabosas Martial Arts Structure Largo Mano Numbering System Cabelas Numbering System Lameco Numbering System Inosantos Seventeen Count Numbering System Inosantos Twenty Five Count Numbering System Five Point Knife Stroking Drill A Five Point Knife Stroking Drill B Eight Point Knife Stroking Drill Seven Balance Control Points Pekiti Tirsia Numbering System Pekiti Tirsia Sak Sak Drill Five Count Drill Pekiti Tirsia Pekal Three Count Drill Doce Pares Numbering System Cacoy Canette 1978 Old Balintawok Numbering System Contra Sumbrada Hubad Terms / Abcedario Weapons Progression Hubad Seven Ways to Train Twelve Areas Kali - Dumog - Kunsis / Positions in Kali

Table of Contents (cont)


Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Kali Eskrima Silat Knife Basics Kali Eskrima Silat Sensitivity Drills LaCoste Kali Systems of Progression Long and Short Abcedario Long and Short Ugats Long and Short Stick Espada Y Daga Drills Sinawalli Drills (Doble Baston) Sinawalli Drills (continued) (Doble Baston) Sinawalli Six Count Variables (Doble Baston) Kali Eskrima Vertical Gunting Map of Southeast Asia Meaning of the Triangle LaCoste-Inosanto Twelve Sub-Systems of Kali Eskrima Terminology LaCoste Kali Terminology Villabrille-Largusa System English Visayan Tagalog Basic Training Methods Abcedario Training Abcedario Contradas Format Sibat Bangkaw Progression Solo Baston - Solo Espada - Solo Sundang Versus Doble Baston Doble or Doble Espada Versus Baston Y Daga Espada Y Daga Versus Daga Basics Solo Daga Versus Pangamut Versus Doble Daga Areas of Kalibadman Contra Sumbrada Progression Agaw on Second Feed Pangamut Drills Higot - Hubad - Lubad Long Range Basics LaCoste Inosanto System Series #1 LaCoste Inosanto System Series #2 LaCoste System Sub-System Area #7 Breakdown for Sinawalli Six Count Patterns-LaCoste Inosanto System Basic Training Methods Elements in Higot-Hubad- Lubad Counters for the Neck Grab Series #1 LaCoste-Inosanto System Stick & Dagger Basics-Espada Y Daga Olisi Baraw The Moslems of the Southern Philippines (Moros) Bathala Philippines System of Writing Patnubay Sa Pagsulat At Pagbasa Ng Abakada Ancient Majapahit Empire Sri-Visaya Empire

Table of Contents (cont)

Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96 Page 97 Page 98 Page 99 Page 100 Page 101 Page 102 Page 103 Page 104 Page 105 Page 106 Page 107 Page 108 Page 109 Page 110 Page 111 Page 112 Page 113 Page 114 Page 115 Page 116 Page 117 Page 118 Page 119 Page 120 Page 121 Page 122 Page 123 Page 124 Page 125 Page 126 Page 127 Page 128 Page 129 Page 130 Page 131 Page 132 Page 133 Page 134 Page 135 Page 136

Understanding Martial Arts Jun Fan Gung Fu as Developed By Bruce Lee Has a Definite & Set Style Jun Fan Gung Fu Is A Set Curriculum As Developed By Bruce Lee Jun Fan Gung Fu Bruce Lees Base System /Set Curriculum of Material The Facts of Jeet Kune Do Basic Terminology Cantonese to English Cantonese to English (continued) Cantonese to English (continued) Cantonese to English (continued) The Five Ways of Attack The Five Ways of Attack (continued) The Match Jun Fan Gung Fu 1966-1967 Jun Fan Method of Jeet Kune Do Sensitivity Drills Basics Bruce Lee Philosophy Regulations of Jun Fan Gung Fu Jeet Kune Do Chinese Kickboxing Jun Fan Gung Fu Jeet Kune Do Titles of Respect JKD Classification for Types of Speed Jun Fan Method Cross Counters To Hand and Kick Combinations Jun Fan Method Lead Hook Counters Jun Fan Method Middle Juk Tek Counters Jun Fan Method Lead Leg Middle Oou Tek Counters Jun Fan Method Counters For Low Lead Oou Tek Jun Fan Method Counters For Low Rear Oou Tek Jun Fan Kickboxing Drills Basic Trapping Progression Jun Fan Method 1966 Progression Basic Trapping Progression Jun Fan Method 1966 Progression (continued) Basic Trapping Progression Jun Fan Method 1966 Progression (continued) Basic Trapping Progression Jun Fan Method 1966 Progression (continued ) Basic Trapping Progression Jun Fan Method 1966 Progression (continued ) Basic Trapping Progression Jun Fan Method 1966 Progression (continued ) Jun Fan Trapping Progressive Noy Da Series Jun Fan / JKD Focus Mitt Drill /PIA #1 Noy Da Series Jun Fan/JKD Focus Mitt Drill /PIA #2 Noy Da Series Jun Fan/JKD Focus Mitt Drills /PIA #3 Quotations Quotations (continued) Attack by Combination Jun Fan Method of Jeet Kune Do Sensitivity Drills Basics Left Hand Stance Right Hand Stance Jun Fan Kickboxing Drills What Is? The Truth In Combat Is Different For Each Individual 3

Table of Contents (cont)


Page 137 Page 138 Page 139 Page 140 Page 141 Page 142 Page 143 Page 144 Page 145 Page 146 Page 147 Page 148 Page 149 Page 150 Page 151 Page 152 Page 153 Page 154 Page 155 Page 156 Page 157 Page 158 Page 159 Page 160 Page 161 Page 162 Page 163 Page 164 Page 165 Page 166 Page 167 Page 168 Page 169 Page 170 Page 171 Page 172 Page 173 Page 174 Page 175 Page 176 Page 177 Page 178 Page 179 Page 180 Page 181 Page 182 It Has Been Stated Pukulan Pentjak Silat Sera Family Tree ITBA Inosanto Four Count ITBA Inosanto Twelve Count ITBA Inosanto Fifteen Count ITBA Inosanto Eighteen Count ITBA Inosanto Teep Counters Six Count Single End Staff Eight Count Single End Staff Twelve Count Single End Staff Top of the Box Single End Staff Kali Goddess of War Tribes of the Philippines Important Dates in the Philippines Rajah Lapu Lapu Filipino Warrior The Benefits of Meditation Bibliography Areas of the Kaliradman Areas of the Kaliradman (cont Kali Origins Kali Emblems Kali Emblems (cont) Triangles of Kali Kataastaasan the Highest of the Highest Kataastaasan the Highest of the Highest (cont) Spiritual Training One with the Creator Your Place in the Universe Speed-Power-Deception Ancient Kali Script History of the Philippines #1 History of the Philippines #2 History of the Philippines #3 Shrivijaya Empire History of the Philippines #4 Kali Ancient Philippine Law History of the Philippines #5 Judicial Procedure Maragtas Code History of the Philippines #6 The Code of Kalanthlaw History of the Philippines #7 History of the Philippines #8 Majapahit Empire History of the Philippines #9 Kali Goddess of War History of the Philippines #10 History of the Philippines #11 Magellans Voyage History of the Philippines #12 History of the Philippines #13 History of the Philippines #14 History of the Philippines #15 History of the Philippines #16 Spanish Control History of the Philippines #17 History of the Philippines #18 Liga Filipina 4

Table of Contents (cont)


Page 183 Page 184 Page 185 Page 186 Page 187 Page 188 Page 189 Page 190 Page 191 Page 192 Page 193 Page 194 Page 195 Page 196 Page 197 Page 198 Page 199 Page 200 Page 201 Page 202 Page 203 Page 204 Page 205 Page 206 Page 207 Page 208 Page 209 Page 210 Page 211 Page 212 Page 213 Page 214 Page 215 Page 216 Page 217 Page 218 Page 219 Page 220 Page 221 Page 222 Page 223 Page 224 Page 225 Page 226 Page 227 Page 228 History of the Philippines #19 The Katipunan History of the Philippines #20 The Crest of Katipunan History of the Philippines #21 The Philippine Revolution of 1896 History of the Philippines #22 Emilio Aguinaldo History of the Philippines #23 History of the Philippines #24 History of the Philippines #25 Seal of Aguinaldo History of the Philippines #26 History of the Philippines #27 Emilio Aguinaldo, Pres. Filipino Republic History of the Philippines #28 Origins of Wing Chun Wing Chun The History Popular Version 1950s and Yip Man to the Present Day What is Wing Chun Gung Fu? The Three Hands Forms Chi Sao - The Sticky Hands of Wing Chun Wing Chun Dummy Exercise Set #1 Wing Chun Dummy Exercise Set #2 Wing Chun Dummy Exercise Set #3 Wing Chun Dummy Exercise Set #4 Wing Chun Dummy Exercise Set #5 Wing Chun Dummy Exercise Set #6 Wing Chun Dummy Exercise Set #7 Wing Chun Dummy Exercise Set #8 Wing Chun Dummy Exercise Set #9 Wing Chun Dummy Exercise Set #10 Mook Jong (Wooden Dummy) Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #1 Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #2 Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #2 (cont) Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #3 Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #3 (cont) Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #4 Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #4 (cont) Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #4 (cont) Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #4 (cont) Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #5 Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #5 (cont) Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #5 (cont) Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #5 (cont) Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #6 Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #6 (cont) Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #7 Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #7 (cont) Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #8 Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #8 (cont) 5

Table of Contents (cont)


Page 229 Page 230 Page 231 Page 232 Page 233 Page 234 Page 235 Page 236 Page 237 Page 238 Page 239 Page 240 Page 241 Page 242 Page 243 Page 244 Page 245 Page 246 Page 247 Page 248 Page 249 Page 250 Page 251 Page 252 Page 253 Page 254 Page 255 Page 256 Page 257 Page 258 Page 259 Page 260 Page 261 Page 262 Page 263 Page 264 Page 265 Page 266 Page 267 Page 268 Page 269 Page 270 Page 271 Page 272 Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #8 (cont) Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #9 Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #9 (cont) Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #9 (cont) Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #10 Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #10 (cont) Jeet Kune Do Dummy Exercise Set #10 (cont) Bruce Lees Ranking Systems Regino Ilustrismo Numbering System Single Stick (Solo Baston) Single Stick (cont) Solo Baston) Single Dagger (Solo Daga) Joint Locks Wrist Locks Arm Locks Elbow Locks Finger Locks Leg Locks Modified Wing Chun Modified Wing Chun (cont) Kali Hands Boxing Kicking Kicking (cont) Foot Work Sinawalli Six Count Drills (Doble Baston) Sinawalli Six Count Drills (Doble Baston)(Continued) Sinawalli Eight And Twelve Count Drills Cabelas Serrada System Tumbling And Falling The Symbolism Behind The Filipino Martial Arts Logo My Version on JKD by Bruce Lee The Art of Bridging The Distance Distance As Attack Bruce Lees Scientific Street Defense AKA Jeet Kune Do Bruce Lees Scientific Street Defense AKA Jeet Kune Do Terminology JKD Training and Discipline JKD Takedowns and Sweeps JKD Four Ranges of Combat JKD General Training Format Breakholds JKD Grappling Basic Application Drills Technical Aspects of Jeet Kune Do In Memory of Punong Guro Edgar Sulite In Memory of Guro Teddy Lucay Lucay In Memory of Sifu James Yimm Lee In Memory of Bruce Lee / Brandon Lee

INTRODUCTION
This manual is a guide and supplement hand book for instructors of the Kali Academy of Mixed Martial Arts Jun Fan Gung Fu Institute. It is for the support of the instructor in the various martial arts taught at this academy, and in his or her endeavor to pass on the knowledge to future generations. The information in this manual is to be taken serious with honor and respect and not to become common knowledge. To achieve positive results one must become a positive person Its not just the speed and power in combat but the skill, sensitivity, and control that is most effective, speed and power may lessen with advancing age; sensitivity, control and knowledge will last you for a life time. One should never be down on, what one is not up on. and the most difficult of obstacles you will ever face in your life lies within yourself. It is my wish that the instructor will continue to grow in knowledge and become creative in his or her own right. The instructor has been granted the right to change anything he or she has been taught in order to benefit his or her own needs and the needs of the students, as he or she sees fit to change. Change is necessary so that the practitioner can adapt to the ever changing times and situations. Special thanks to Sifu/Guro Dan Inosanto for contributing to the publication of this manual..

Sifu/Guro Bud Thompson Head Instructor

FILIPINO MARTIAL ARTS


Kali is the native art of the Philippines, It consists of both weapons and bare hand skills. The Art Mainly Uses Synchronized Stick Training Drills Along With Body Angling And Fluid Movement, Gearing A Person Toward Better Hand And Eye Coordination And Being Stable In Almost Any Position During Confrontation, Along With Phasing Out The Factor Of Fear Associated With Being Confronted With A Weapon. While it may seem that this art is more of a mans art that is deceiving a thought. Due To the Timing, Balance, And Rhythm Involved a woman has just as much of a chance of becoming proficient at this as she has of becoming a proficient dancer. Along with all the great stories of the Philippines, the blind Princess Josephine stands out. Because no one could beat her in a fight, she would always lead her warriors into battle. It is said among Eskrimadors that By Understanding the Weapon First, You Come To Know the Bare Hand. There are an uncountable number of styles in the Philippines among them, there are known by other names such as Arnis De Mano, Arnis Lanada, Eskrima, Sikaran, Silat, Kuntao, Kalibadman, Kalirongan, Pagkkalikali, and Tjakalele also described as Indonesian fencing. Each style having methods and synchronized techniques to set it apart from another, Yet All BeingTogether By A Common Thread, Concentrating On The Basic Angles Of Attack. We encourage a person to experiment with all the concepts and principles of as many systems as possible. This type of liberal attitude is what makes a free-thinking individual. One Who Make a Style Their Own, and who use their wits and instincts to the best of their ability. To quote the late Bruce Lee who advanced this concept beyond anybody else A Style Should Never Be Like A Bible In Which The Principles And Laws Can Never Be Violated.

PHASE 1 CURRICULUM 26 WEEKS (78 hrs.)


Foot Work R/L Step slide Step/slide step through step slide/push shuffle/angle shuffle Slide step Slide step/step through slide step Cover left/cover right w/ above combinations Kicking Shield: R/L Left hook kick Inward crescent kick Rear hook kick Outward crescent kick Side kick Inverted kick Heel hook Combination kicking Focus Gloves: R/L Jab: single/double/triple ABC series: J/C/H J/C/UCJ/C/OH 2/3 series: J/H/CJ/H/RUCJ/H/ROH 2/3 series: C/H/CC/UC/CC/OH/C ABC=attack by combination, 1/3 series=jab hook, 2/3 series=cross hook J=jab, C=cross, H=hook, UC=uppercut, OH=overhand Eskrima: 12 angles of attack 1-5 countermove of attack point up 1-5 counters of attack point down #1-#2 angle of attack w/quick disarm w/vine & snake (stick/arm) 1-5 Sumbrada box pattern Bukti Negara salutation Wing Chun: R/L Pak sao da (hold center line) Pak sao lop sao da (pass center line) Pak sao da hold center line noy pak sao da Kunsi: Figure 4 lock extended wrist lock wrist throw chicken wing lock (vertical/horizontal) bent elbow wrist lock vertical wrist lock goose neck lock straight arm bars lock bent arm bar lock ANY OF THE ABOVE DRILLS MAY BE CHANGED AT ANY TIME AS THE INSTRUCTOR SEES FIT AS TO FURTHER ENHANCE THE STUDENTS SKILLS.

ADV. PHASE I CURRICULUM 26 WEEK (78 hrs.)


Foot Work R/L Step slide Step/slide step through step slide/push shuffle/angle shuffle Slide step Slide step/step through slide step Cover left/cover right w/ above combinations w/kicking & punching Kicking Shield: R/L Double RHK calf/thigh/ribcage q/s repeat Spin kick side angle kick chicken kick knee drops Focus Gloves R/L Fake jab C/H/C slip C UC/C/H/C Low C HH/C/H/ROH scoop LC/w/rear hand H/C/H Shoulder roll C C/H/ROH, Counter J w/C/UC/RH/OH J=jab, C=cross, H=hook, UC= uppercut, OH= overhand, RUC=rear uppercut, ROH=rear overhand, RH=rear hook, LH=low hook, HH=high hook, W=with Wing Chun: R/L Pak sao da bil gee pak sao da w/foot work Pak sao da bil gee lop sao Chung chuie da Pak sao da bong sao lop sao Chung chuie da (five hits) Mook Jong 1-6 Kali/Eskrima: R/L Sumbrada, empty hand sumbrada Sinawalli drills (all six counts) Four levels standing, kneeling, ground, circling Sinawalli sumbrada Punyo sumbrada Hubad Lubad /variables /empty /weapon Guntings: horizontal/vertical/diagonal Bukti Negara salutation Kali salutation Kunsi: R/L Figure 4 lock extended wrist lock wrist throw chicken wing lock (vertical /horizontal) bent elbow wrist lock vertical wrist lock goose neck lock straight arm bars lock bent arm bar lock ANY OF THE ABOVE DRILLS MAY BE CHANGED AT ANY TIME AS THE INSTRUCTOR SEES FIT AS TO FURTHER ENHANCE THE STUDENTS SKILLS.
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PHASE II CURRICULUM 36 WEEKS (108 hrs.)


Foot Work: R/L Step/slide step/slide step through step/slide slide step slide step/step through slide step step/slide step through slide step/push shuffle/angle shuffle Cover left/right w/above combinations kicking/punching Thai Pads: (Quick Switch Drills) R/L Right lead q/s double kick q/s double kick Step through right teep plant forward q/s double kick q/s double kick Right lead teep q/s single kick q/s double kick plant forward two right knees two left knees push out double kick Q/S= quick switch, Teep= foot jab Focus Gloves: (Jun Fan) R/L Catch J/slip C/UC/OH/UC Catch J/parry C/C/H/C Parry LC with lead forearm C/H/C Shoulder roll cross C/H/C Shoulder roll cross C/LH/HC Jik Chung/Chung Chuie (vertical fist) *J=jab, C=cross, H=hook, UG=uppercut, OH=overhand, RUC=rear uppercut, ROH= rear overhand, RH=rear hook, LH=low hook, HH=-high hook, LC=low cross, HC=high cross W=with Kali/Eskrima: R/L All sinawalli six counts (all levels) standing/kneeling, ground/circling Eight count (Villabrille) Twelve count Eight count (LaCoste) heaven, standard, earth Guntings, take downs Kali salutation Bukti Negara salutation LaCoste salutation Wing Chun: R/L Pak sao da counter w/ pak sao da Pak sao da counter w/tan sao da Pak sao da counter w/lop sao da Pak sao da counter bong sao da lop sao da Pak sao da/bil gee /lop sao da Pak sao (1/2 motion) lop sao left tan right shoulder huen sao/sat sao da Mook Jong 1-10 Kunsi: R/L Figure 4 lock variables/counters extended wrist lock wrist throw chicken wing lock (horizontal/vertical) bent elbow wrist lock vertical wrist lock goose neck lock straight arm bar lock bent arm bar lock ANY OF THE ABOVE DRILLS MAY BE CHANGED AT ANY TIME AS THE INSTRUCTOR SEES FIT AS TO FURTHER ENHANCE THE STUDENTS SKILLS.
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ADV. PHASE II CURRICULUM 52 WEEKS (156 hrs.)


Foot Work: R/L Step/slide step/slide step through step/slide slide step slide step/step through slide step step/slide step through slide step/push shuffle/angle shuffle Cover left/right w/above combinations kicking/punching Thai Pads: R/L DK q/s DK P/F two R knees q/s two L knees P/O DK SK q/s SK PF R Elbow L elbow R elbow P/O SK SK q/s SK P/F grab behind neck interlock fingers R knee to L temple L knee to R temple R knee to L temple P/O DK, SK=single kick *DK=double kick, QS=quick switch, PO= push out, PF=plant forward, R=right, L=left Focus gloves: (Jun Fan) R/L LHK PF C/H/C LHK LHK PF H/C/H/C LHK LHK PF pak sao da lop sao da C/H/C LHK RHK RHK PF C double B&W LH /HH/C/H/C sapo LHK RHK PF S B&W H/C/H/C *J=Jab, C=cross, H=hook, UG=uppercut, OH=overhand, RUC=rear uppercut, ROH= rear overhand, DK=double kick, RH=rear hook, LH=low hook, HH=high hook, LC=low cross, LHK=lead hook kick, RHK=rear hook kick, PF=plant forward, B&W=bob & weave W=with, sapo=foot sweep, DK=double kick, SK=single kick, S=single Kali/Eskrima R/L Wing Chun R/L Sectors Disarms snake/vine Bong sao drills unmatched stanches Knife drills, take downs, dumog A. Lop sao switch Largo Mano, Serada, Numerado B. Tan sao switch Staff drills, box pattern/6 count Don Chi Chi Sao, Chi Sao 8 count Sparring Bukti Negara, Kali, Mook Jong 1-10 LaCoste salutations Kunsi: R/L Figure 4 lock variables/counters extended wrist lock wrist throw chicken wing (horizontal/vertical) bent elbow wrist lock vertical wrist lock goose neck lock straight arm bar lock bent arm lock advanced locks ANY OF THE ABOVE DRILLS MAY BE CHANGED AT ANY TIME AS THE INSTRUCTOR SEES FIT AS TO FURTHER ENHANCE THE STUDENTS SKILLS.
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Phase III Curriculum 104 Weeks (312 hrs.)


Congratulations You Have Reached Jeet Kune Do Status

Foot Work: R/L Step/slide step/slide step through step/slide slide step slide step/step through slide step step/slide step through slide step/push shuffle/angle shuffle Cover left/right w/above combinations kicking/punching Thai Pads: (ITBA) R/L Four count drills Twelve count drills Fifteen count drills Eighteen count drills abc Focus Gloves: (Jun Fan) R/L Coordination drills Progressive focus gloves drills Contact sparring 3 min. Rd. H/F

Kali/Eskrima: R/L Wing Chun: R/L Aamara four corners Progressive trapping Pekiti Tirsia drills Progressive countering Advance knife drills Progressive chi sao sparring Flowing hu hud/punyo sumbrada/ Sticky hand flow sumbrada empty hand Mook Jong 1-10 sets Contact stick, sparring 3 min. Rd. JKD Mook Jong Advance take downs, controls & submissions Dumog Empty hand/pocket stick Numbering systems: Kali Academy Inosanto 17 count/ Inosanto 25 count LaCoste Largo Mano Lameco Villabrille Kunsi: R/L Figure 4 lock variables/counters extended wrist lock wrist throw chicken wing lock (horizontal/vertical) bent elbow wrist lock vertical wrist lock goose neck lock straight arm bar lock bent arm bar lock advanced locks bud bud

ANY OF THE ABOVE DRILLS MAY BE CHANGED AT ANY TIME AS THE INSTRUCTOR SEES FIT AS TO FURTHER ENHANCE THE STUDENTS SKILLS.
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LACOSTE SALUTATION
I present myself to the creator and to mankind on earth I am striving for the knowledge of the third eye of the five senses and beyond the five senses I am striving for the love of all mankind and there will be no shedding of the blood I bow down to you not in submission but in respect to you I extend the hand of friendship because I prefer it over the hand of war, but if my friendship be rejected, I am trained to be a warrior with wisdom I stand in symbolism because I serve only The Creator, my family and my country I cherish the knowledge given to me by my instructors, for it is my very life in combat I am prepared to go against you even through your skill may be greater than mine Because even if my physical body should fall before you to the earth I am not worried because I know my spirit will rise again as it is unconquerable
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VILLABRILLE SALUTATION

O heavenly spirit, forgive me for my faults and weaknesses, And in your mercy and kindness bless me with the spirit That will give me the guidance, strength and power For a strong mind and body so I may develop to be a good Disciple of Kali.....

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FLORO VILLABRILLE KALI STRUCTURE


(uncle) Leoncio Villeganio

Pio

(blind lady) Josephine

Floro Villabrille

California Ben Largusa

Hawaii Kenneth Villabrille Raymond Tobosa Frank Mamallas Rudy Orlando Matt Ihara Fred Lawas Rose Souza Connie Amasiu

Hawaii Teofisto Tobosa Patrick Layusa Richard Terioka Ismile Espanola Beau Van Dan Ecker

REALTIVITY UPMAAH Floro Villabrille Braulio Pedoy

California Ben Largusa

Hawaii Kenneth Villabrille Raymond Tobosa Frank Mamallas Rudy Orlando Matt Ihara Fred Lawas Rose Souza Connie Amasiu 27

Hawaii Hawaii Edwardo Pedoy Teofisto Tobosa Patrick Layusa Richard Terioka Ismile Espanola Beau Van Dan Ecker

RAYMOND TOBOSAS MARTIAL ART STRUCTURE


Instructed by these individuals

(father) Esabelo Richard Fred Tin Chan Atanascio Masutatsu Floro Felciano Bonifacio Maximo Cuba Takamoto Lare Lee Acosta Oyama Villabrille Magsanide Lonzaga Tobosa

Tolesfero Subing-Subing

Kali Boxing Eskrima

Judo

Kempo Tai Chi

Arnis

Karate

Kali

Arnis

Eskrima

Eskrima

Batikan/OSensel Raymond Tobosa

Segunda Batikan/Sensel Teofisto Tobosa

Individuals taught:

Nick Mica

Joey Del Mar

Juanito Ambrosio

Ben Arcamo

Ben Ricky . Arcamo Jr. Tobosa Mike Young Ronald Camanse Lenny Ea James Abril Everesto Tabion David S. Yagen

Glenn Hamaning (Idaho)

Rick Mills (Idaho)

Mike Mulconnery (Idaho)

Mat Ihara

Al Dacoscos (Germany)

Emie Libarios

Romero D. Rodolfo S. Rebujio Trias Jr.

Dolly

Pat

Laverne

Darlene

Lord

Tammy

Ralph

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CONTRA SUMBRADA

1. Hit block hit to the limb 2. Hit block hit to the body with check 3. Hit block two to three hits (defender can defend on both hits) 4. Hit block -2-3 hits with alongain or enganio (PIA) on bangkaw (ABD) 5. Punyo y punyo Sumbrada (PIA), (ABC) 6. Hikot Hubad Lumbad Hampak Twelve areas (in hubad) 7. Entrada Retorada (break in break out) 8. Add elements Kunsi, (locks) Buno, (throws) etc. 9. Block and hit limbs 10. Use different weapons staff, daga, etc. 11. Counter with dumog 12. Total free sparring

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HUBAD TERMS

Lubas twist Tuok chokes Humbot wave Dungad knife thrust Yuta earth Bunbon sand Calibut ground Tuhod knee Siko elbow Songab finger

Hubad applies to: 1. Elbow catch 2. Shoulder stop 3. Neck grab 4. Wrist grab 5. Hip check 6. Knee check 7. Foot check

ABCEDARIO WEAPONS PROGRESSION

1. Olisi y Daga vs. Olisi y Daga 2. Olisi vs. Olisi y Daga 3. Double Olisi vs. Olisi Y Daga 4. Olisi vs. Olisi A. Strike with middle of stick B. Strike with end of stick C. Strike with but of stick 5. Double Olisi vs. Double Olisi 6. Solo Daga vs. Solo Daga 7. Solo Daga vs. Double Daga 8. Double Daga vs. Double Daga

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HUBAD
Three speeds for hubud Three heights for hubud High (standing) Middle (on knees) Low (sitting or lying) Twelve foot work patterns Twelve methods to work within hubad 1. Strikes (all) 2. Punches implies (left & right hand) 3. Elbows (outside against tricep, inside against funny bone) 4. Knees 5. Kicks 6. Chokes 7. Strangles 8. Leg locks (hip, knee, ankles & toes) 9. Arm locks (shoulder, elbow, wrist, & fingers) 10. Throw 11. Sweeps 12. Take downs Variations 1-4-1 Double 2 strike add jao sao to routine Hubad Terms Higot-Hard Tie Higot-Soft Tie Hubad-Untie, loosen Hubad Bud Bud Lubad-Twist Lubad-Blend Harmoniously Bud Bud-Untie loose

45

SEVEN WAYS TO TRAIN TWELVE AREAS


1. Abcedario One side continually feeds the other side defends and counter acts. Analogous to throwing batons practice Abecedario has twelve stages. 2. Contra Sumbrada counter for counter training method, you hit me, I defend and hit you back, you defend and hit me back too. Analogous to playing catch Sumbrada has twelve sages. 3. Mining Sumbrada and Abecedario. 4. Solo Training 5. Hitting Objects 6. Sparring 7. Visualization TWELVE STAGES OF ABCEDARIO 1. Receive one hit One block and hit 2. Receive one hit One block and two hits 3. Receive one hit One block and three or more hits 4. (A) Receive two hits Two blocks and one hit (B) Receive two hits Two blocks and two hits (C) Receive two hits Two blocks and three or more hits 5. (A) Receive three hits Three blocks and one hit (B) Receive three hits Three blocks and two hits (C) Receive three hits Three blocks and three or more hits 6. Receive fakes to positive hits 7. Use/Receive different weapons (A) Use different weapons (B) Receive different weapons (C) Using throws, locks, sweeps, trips, chokes, takedowns, disarms 8. Receive while retreating 9. Receive while moving right or left 10. Receive while circling (left or right) 11. Receive low to high, high to low 12. Receive on different terrain, environments or situations
46

KALI DUMOG KUNSI

1. Face down Upper Section 2. Face up Upper Section 3. Right Side Up 4. Left Side Up 5. Theory of Clock Approach 6. Entries: A. Gunting (Horizontal) B. Gunting (Vertical)

POSITIONS IN KALI
1. Tindog (standing position) 2. Katin Katin (squatting position) 3. Lahod (kneeling position) 4. Lingcod or Pung Ko (sitting position) 5. Higda or Hega (lying position)

47

KALI ESKRIMA SILAT KNIFE BASICS


1. Slash/Slash/Slash Five Ways of Knife 2. Slash/Slash/Thrust 1. Disarm 3. Slash/Thrust/Thrust 2. Keep 4. Slash/Thrust/Slash 3. Return to Sender 5. Thrust/Thrust/Thrust 4. Lock 6. Thrust/Thrust/Slash 5. Throw 7. Thrust/Slash/Thrust 8. Thrust/Slash/Thrust ================================== Kali Eskrima Knife Training 1. Slash 2. Thrust 3. Butt 4. Tear (Rip) ================================== Escala Exercises 1. Slash/Thrust 2. Thrust/Slash 3. Slash/Slash 4. Thrust/Thrust 5. Slash/Butt 6. Butt/Slash 7. Butt/Butt 8. Thrust/Butt 9. Butt/Thrust 10. Slash/Tear 11. Tear/Slash 12. Tear/Tear 13. Tear/Butt 14. Butt/Tear 15. Tear/Thrust 16. Thrust/Tear
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KALI ESKRIMA SILAT SENSITIVITY DRILLS


Higot/Hubad/Lubad 1. Tabon/Siko/Cycle 2. Tabon/Siko/Ordabis Cycle 3. Tabon/Siko/Siko 4. Tabon/Gunting/Siko/Ordabis 5. Siko/Siko/Ordabis 6. Siko/Siko Series Dakop/Dalsa/Diko /Deft 7. Dako/Alsa/Tabon/Siko Right 8. Vertical Gunting/Vertical Straight/Back Hand 9. Horizontal Gunting/Horizontal inside Return/Out Side Return 10. Gunting Sa Ordabis (Back) 11. Pae Was At Dongab (Paa Was) 12. Tuhod/Tuhod 13. Songab/Ordabis/Siko 14. Songab/Siko/Ordabis 15. Songab/Siko/Siko 16. Songab/Songab/rear Siko 17. Songab/Songab/lead Siko 18. Songab/Alas/Rear Siko 19. Alsa/Rear Siko Vertical 20. Alsa/hueng/Lead Siko 21. Pae/Songab (Paa Was)

49

LACOSTE KALI SYSTEMS OF PROGRESSION

Daan and Lihok System A System of Paths and Routes of Motion A. Weapon Routes and Motion B. Footwork Routes and Motion C. Body Routes and Motion D. Hand Routes and Motion E. Elbow Routes and Motion F. Knife Routes and Motion G. Kicking Routes and Motion Numbering System/Stick or Weapon 1. Stick 2. Sword 3. Ax 4. Staff 5. Spear 6. Flexible Weapon 7. Dagger 8. Palm Stick A. Inside Defense System/Parry/Cover-Block B. Outside Defense System C. Wing Defense System D. Roof Defense System E. Umbrella Defense System F. Shield Defense System G. Largo Mano (La Contra/Follow)

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LONG AND SHORT ABCEDARIO

I) Tuo Series (Open) 1. Tuo Six 2. Tuo Five 3. Tuo Four 4. Tuo Three Downward 5. Tuo Three Upward II) Wala Series (Close) 1. Wala Five 2. Wala Six 3. Wala Seven III) Abcedario Blend Numbers 1 Thru 25 IV) Daan Series (To Be Used With Series I thru II) 1. Female Triangle 2. Male Replace Triangle 3. Lateral Triangle Left 4. Lateral Triangle Right Tayada (Circle)

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LONG AND SHORT UGATS


1. Inside Cover Left Parry Down W/Dagger Right High Back Hand W/Stick Right Low Back Hand W/Stick Left Low Thrust W/Dagger Inside Cover W/Dagger Thrust ====================== 2. Inside Cover Left Parry W/Dagger Right Back Hand W/Stick Inside Left Thrust W/Dagger Counter Clockwise W/Dagger ===================== 3. Inside Cover Left Parry W/Dagger Right Back Hand W/Stick Inside Left Thrust W/Dagger Clockwise W/Dagger =============================== 4. Inside Cover Back Hand W/Stick Counter Clockwise W/Dagger Inside Cover W/Stick W/Dagger Thrust ============================= 5. Inside Cover Clockwise W/ Dagger Inside Cover W/Stick W/Dagger Thrust ============================== 6. Inside Switch Clockwise W/Dagger High Dagger Thrust =============== 7. Combinations Of Inside Switches ========================== 8. Inside Switch Clockwise W/Dagger =========================== 9. Close Quarter Inside Switch W/Hit High Wing Slash Dow
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10. Inside Switch W/Hit Outside Deflection/Slash Down ======================== 11. Inside Switch W/Hit Umbrella W/Upward Slash or Roof W/Upward Slash ================= 12. Inside Switch W/Hit Parry W/Dagger Horizontal Hit W/Stick =========================== 13. Inside Switch W/Hit Outside Deflection Thrust W/Dagger =========================== 14. Inside Switch W/Hit Parry W/Dagger Horizontal Backhand W/Stick ================= 15. Inside Switch W/Hit Gunting W/Dagger/Stick =================== 16. Inside Cover Clockwise W/Dagger Double Hit W/Stick ================== 17. Inside Cover Backhand W/Stick Clockwise W/ Dagger Double Hit W/Stick ======================= 18. Inside Cover Clockwise W/Dagger Clockwise W/Dagger Double Hit =========================== 19. Largo Mano Meet Backhand W/Stick Overhand Thrust W/Dagger Backhand W/Stick Palm Up Thrust

LONG & SHORT STICKESPADA Y DAGGA DRILLS

FOUR COUNT: Inward Step In #6 Thrust back hand palm up thrust/repeat left FIVE COUNT: Inward back hand step in #6 thrust back hand palm up thrust/repeat left SEVEN COUNT: (Back hand drill) Back Hand Step In #6 thrust back hand high palm up thrust low palm down thrust high palm up thrust inward/repeat left BLOCKING SYSTEM: A. Check #1 strike w/ long & short #6 thrust comes check w/long & short thrust to chest area W/dagger dagger goes underneath #6 thrust hit head/basic four count B. Check #1 strike w/long & short #6 thrust comes check w/long & short thrust to chest area w/dagger dagger goes over #6 thrust to rib cage/basic four count C. Check #1 strike w/long & short opponents dagger thrusts low line at rib cage dagger hand goes other opponents dagger hand thrust mid-section back hand opponents dagger hand/basic four count D. Check #1 strike w/long & short parry #6 thrust w/dagger hit opponent dagger hand rake opponents throat while going over opponents dagger hand to mid-section thrust/basic four count E. Check #1 strike w/long & short scoop outside low line thrust to mid-section return low mid-section thrust back hand opponents dagger hand/if disarm fails snake #1 strike w/dagger hand for disarm-hit head disarm dagger hand/basic four count-at times hit opponents dagger hand w/stick/basic four count-other times hit opponents dagger hand w/forearm/basic four count F. Inside sweep & snake #1 strike w/knife hand check opponents thrust to mid-section w/stick hand return thrust to mid-section/disarm opponents knife hand G. Inside sweep #1 strike & thrust chest counter clockwise snake #1 strike clockwise snake opponents thrust low line thrust stick & dagger inside collar bone LEARN REFLEX BEFORE TECHNIQUE; WITHOUT REFLEX TECHNIQUE IS WORTHLESS

53

SINAWALLI DRILLS (DOBLE BASTON)


Four Count: (heaven/standard/earth) Inward back hand back hand inward All Six Counts: (heaven/standard/earth/right & left) Abcedario: High inward low back hand high back hand Kobb Kobb: Shoulder/waist/knee (all inward strikes) Back Hand Kobb Kobb: Shoulder/waist/knee (all back hand strikes) Heaven: Inward back band back hand/Inward back hand back hand Standard: High inward point up low back hand point down high back hand point up (repeat left side) Earth: Inward back hand back hand tuck right under left repeat left side) tuck left under right Roof: High inward horizontal wipe high inward (tuck right under left/left side repeat left tuck Left under right/right side) Umbrella: Inward circle head point downward back hand inward (tuck right under left/left side repeat left side tuck left under right/right side) Back Hands Six Count Heaven: Right back hand left back hand right back hand (umbrella switch repeat) Back Hand Six Count Standard: Right back hand heaven left back hand earth right back hand heaven (umbrella switch repeat) Back Hand Six Earth: Right back hand left back hand right back hand (umbrella switch repeat) Abeniko: Left temple right temple left temple left high left back hand high right high back hand (tuck right under left/left side repeat left side tuck left under right/right side) Alto De Bajo: Inward high low high left back hand right back hand (tuck right under left/left side repeat tuck left under right/right side Double Odd Heaven: High inward retract high left back hand high right inward (tuck right under left/left side repeat left side : tuck left under right/right side) Double Odd Standard: High inward retract low left back hand high inward-(tuck right under left/left side repeat: tuck left under right/right side) Double Odd Earth: Low inward retract low left back hand low inward (tuck right under left/left side repeat: tuck left under right/right side) Odd Heaven: High right inward high left back hand from right to left from left side: high right back hand tuck right under left/left side high left inward retract: high right back hand retract: high left inward retract repeat: left/ right (follow up with standard/ earth position

54

Bacala: High right inward 2 circles around head right ends on left side left back hand right back hand tuck right under left/left side repeat: back to right (follow up with standard/earth positions) Split Bacala: High right inward circle around head high left back hand 2nd high circle around head tuck right under left/left side: repeat/right (follow up with standard/earth positions) Upward Figure Eight: Figure eight motion from standard position (waist) right palm up palm down palm up left high back hand right high back hand tuck right under left/left side: repeat: left/right Downward Figure Eight: In figure eight motion from heaven position right palm down palm up palm down high left back hand high right back hand tuck right under left/left side: repeat: left/right Horizontal Figure Eight: In figure eight motion from standard position (waist) right palm up palm up palm up left back hand right back hand tuck right under left/left side: repeat left/right Sungkite: Right high thrust to left side(palm outward) left high back hand right high back hand tuck right under left/left side: repeat left/right heaven/standard/earth Rice Pounding Grips: Earth position both points down right point up left point down left point up (heaven position) right point down (earth position) (heaven/standard/earth) Movements/Positions: A. Tiada: Circling clockwise/Counter clockwise/Diagonally/Forward/Backwards/Latterly B. Standing C. Kneeling D. Ground (On Back) E. Alternating Between A/B/C/D Sumbrada: Right/Left Use of Obstruction: A. Chair B. Wall C. Bench D. Bushes E. Low Ceiling Disarms: Snake/Vine Eight Counts: Abecedario: High right inward low right back hand high left inward low left back hand high right inward high right back hand high left inward high left back hand Kobb Kobb: Shoulder/Waist/Knee/Ankle (inward strikes) Back Hand Kobb Kobb: Shoulder/Waist/Knee/Ankle (back hand strikes) Villabrille Eight Count: Right/Left (See instructor for sequence) LaCoste Eight Count: Heaven: Right high inward low right back hand high left back hand high right back hand: left to right Standard: Right High inward low right back hand high left back hand low right back hand: repeat left to right Earth: Right High inward low right back hand low left back hand low right back hand: repeat left to right Twelve Counts: Villabrille Twelve Count: Right/Left (See instructor for sequence) Villabrille Numbering System: 1/12 Villabrille Numerado Circle: A. Classical Sigung-Long/Short C. Free Lance/Long/Short B. Classical Espada Y Daga D. Free Lance/Espada Y Daga
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SINAWALLI DRILLS (DOBLE BASTON) (cont.)

SINAWALLI SIX COUNT VARIABLES (DOBLE BASTON)

Variables:
1.) I/I/I Family (Inside/Inside/Inside) 2.) I/B/B Family (Inside/Back Hand/Back Hand) 3.) I/B/I Family (Inside/Back Hand/Inside) 4.) I/I/B Family (Inside/Inside/Back Hand) 5.) B/B/B Family (Back Hand/Back Hand/Back Hand) 6.) B/I/I Family (Back Hand/Inside/Inside) 7.) B/B/I Family (Back Hand/Back Hand/Inside) 8.) B/I/B Family (Back Hand/Inside/Back Hand) Total Variables 64 64 64 64 64 64 64 64 512

Key To Variables:
1.) H/H/H (High/High/High) 2.) L/L/L (Low/Low/Low) 3.) H/L/H (High/Low/High) 4.) L/H/L (Low /High /Low) 5.) L/L/H (Low/Low /High) 6.) H/H/L (High/High/ Low) 7.) L/H/H (Low/High/High) 8.) H/L/L (High/Low/Low)

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KALI ESKRIMA VERTICAL GUNTING

1. Siko (Elbow) 2. Tuhod (Knee) 3. Batiis (Shin) 4. Ya Tuck (Stomach) 5. Sangot (Inverted Round Kick) 6. Sipa (Incline Kick) 7. Songab (Finger Jab) 8. Ordabis (Back Hand) 9. Sikod (Push Kick)

57

58

MEANING OF THE TRIANGLE

59

LACOSTE- INOSANTO (Twelve Sub-Systems Of Kali)


1st Area Single Stick Single Sword Single Ax Single Cane 2nd Area Double Stick Double Sword Double Ax 3rd Area Stick & Dagger Cane & Dagger Sword & Dagger Sword & Shield Long & Short Stick 4th Area Double Dagger Double Short Sticks 5th Area Single Dagger Shingle Short Stick 6th Area Palm Stick Double End Dagger 8th Area Staff (Sibat), Oar (dula) Paddle (bugsay), Spear (bangkaw) Spear & Circle Shield Spear Rectangular Shield Spear Rectangular Shield Spear & Sword/Stick Spear & Dagger Two Hand Method (heavy stick) Two Hand Method Using Stick 9th Area Sarong/Malong Sarong/Malong Belt/Whip, Rope/Chain Scarf/Head Band, Handkerchief Olisi Toyok, Tabak Toyok Yo-Yo Tabak Lubid Sting Ray Tail 10th Area Hand Throwing Weapons Spear Dagger Wooden Splinte, Spikes Coins, Washers, Coins, Rocks Sand, Mud, Dirt, Pepper, Powder, Any Object 11th Area Projectile Weapons Blow Gun (sumpit), Sling Shot (pana) Lantanka (portable cannon)

7th Area Panantukan (boxing) Panadiakan or Sikaran (kicking) Dumog, Layug, Buno, Detschon (grappling) Anak-Pagkus (bite & punch) 12th Area Higot-Hampak (tie & hit) Mental, Emotional, Spiritual Training Huhad- Hampak (untie & hit) Healing Arts, Health Skills Lubad- Hampak (blend & hit) Rhythm/Dance History, Philosophy, Ethics
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ESKRIMA TERMINOLOGY / LACOSTE


TO SHAKE TO RECEIVE HOLD THE HAND TO CLAW MOVEMENT OF THE BODY MOVE TO THE RIGHT MOVE TO THE LEFT MOVE TO BELOW MOVE TO TOP STEP TO THE RIGHT STEP TO THE LEFT STEP THE FRONT STEP THE REAR SHIN OF LEG PALM PUSH PULL GRAB DOUBLE GRAB DOUBLE PUSH TRIPLE PUSH TO BLOCK TO COVER TO SLIDE CHOKE PUNCH SLAP HIT FINGER THRUST UYOG DAWAT KAPTAN SA KAMOT GUNITAR ANG KAMOT KAWRAS MOVEMENT LIHOK LIHOK SA TUO LIHOK SA WALA LIHOK SA UBOS LIHOK SA TAAS MO LAKANG SA TUO MO LAKANG SA WALA MO LAKANG SA ATUBANG MO LAKANG SA LOKID MO LAKANG SA LIKURON BUKOGSA BATIS PALAD TULAK OR TULOD BERA SUBNIT OR KAWHAT OR HAWID DOBLE PAG HAWID OR KAWHAT OR SUBNIT DOBLE PAG TULAK OR TULOD TULO PAG TULAN OR TULOD SAGANG TABON LIKAY TUOK SUNTOK SAGPA IGO OR BUTANGAN SONGAB

61

VILLABRILLE LARGUSA SYSTEM

KALI TERMINOLOGY

Parada Payong Pinuti Pitik Praele Punal Saggang Sargento de Armes Semud Senang Siko Sinawali Sulod Sumbrada Sundang Tabas Tambak Taming Tayada Tiel Tiel Lihok Tigbas Tindolo Tindug Tuhan Tuhud Tulo Pesagi Utbong Witik

Stance Defensive parry Garote or sundang Flick with finger(s) Defensive method Short-bladed weapon;daga Defensive x-block Sergeant at arms Mouth (same as Baba) Light; sun Elbow Interwoven motion; Doblicara To move in Counter for counter, style Large - bladed weapon Strike from the right Path; forward / backward movement Shield To circle opponent Foot (same as Siki) Foot movement Strike with bladed / non bladed weapon Finger (same as Tudio) To stand; to get up Master Knee Triangle Tip Whip like strike pull back motion

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ENGLISH
1. Sagang 2. Parry 3. Catch 4. Thrust (illocano) 5. Slash 6. Punch/Hit 7. To Strike W/Blunt Instrument 8. Word Used to Describe Blade Strike 9. Throw 10. Choke 11. Sweep 12. Run 13. Trip 14. Break 15. Lock 16. Pull 17. Push 18. Hit 19. Slap on Arm 20. Slap on Face 21. Over Run or Charge 22. Pull & Push 23. Let It thru 24. Let It Thru & Look For Openings 25. A Strike That Goes Up Like a Block & Go Up W/Wing like Motion 26. Receive

VISAYAN
Sangga Paawas Dakup Dunggag Panastas Sumbag Hampak Panastas Yastas Labay Tapon Tu-ok Walis Dagan, DFumagan Dumalagan (verb) Binte Bintehon (verb) Bali Kunsi (old) Bira Berahon (verb) Tulak, Tuklod Hampak Tapi Sagpat Sagasa Bera Ug Tuklod Palusut Palusutan Boklis Dawat
63

TAGALOG
Pa-uyon Huli-Hulihin Saksak-Doyu Hiwa Suntok Suntok Hampas Hiwa Buno Tapon Sakal Takbo

Bali Trangkada Hela Heling (verb) Tama Sagasa Hela at Tulak

BASIC TRAINING METHODS

1. Abcedario Contradas 2. Contra Y Contra Sumbrada 3. Mixture of Abecedario Contradas & Contra Y Contra (Contra Sumbrada) 4. Away Ang Hanngin (Karensa) (Sayaw) 5. Hampak Training 6. Visualization / Meditation 7. Sparring

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ABCEDARIO TRAINING
Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Stage 5 Stage 6 Stage 7 A. B. C. Block & Return 1hit Block & Return 2 hits Block & return 2 or more hits Receive 2 hits Receive 3 hits Receive fakes to positive attacks Using different weapons Receiving different weapons Using different throws, locks, trips, sweeps, disarms, takedowns Receive while retreating Receive while moving to right or left Receiving while circling (cc & cw) Receive Low High - & High Low Receive on different terrains, training environment & situations

Stage 8 Stage 9 Stage 10 Stage 11 Stage 12

65

ABCEDARIO CONTRADAS FORMAT

1. By the Numbers 2. Mix the Numbers 3. Mix the Combination 4. Isolate the Numbers 5. Isolate the Combinations 6. Fake & Feed the Numbers 7. Feed & Fake at Random

66

SIBAT BANGKAW PROGRESSION


1.

Numbering System #1 17 Single End Reverse Grip Numbering System #1 - 17 Double End Hour Glass (8 count) Rt. & Lt. Hour Glass (12 Count) Rt. & Lt. 5 Count X 3 (15 Count) ABECEDARIO Contradas #1 5 Single End ABECEDARIO Contradas #1 5 Double End High Box High Middle Line Box High Low Line Box Mixtures of the boxes 9 Count Hour Glass to 5 Count Box Pasok Tusok 3 Count (4 ways) Kombansion entries to Box Pattern Laban Ug Laban Hand Strikes and Thrusts Laban Ug Laban Free Lance
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2. 3.
4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

SOLO BASTONSOLO ESPADASOLO SUNDANG VERSUS

1. Solo Baston Solo Espada 2. Doble Baston Doble Sundang Doble Espada 3. Baston Y Daga Espada Y Daga 4. Baston Largo Dos Manos 5. Sibat 6. Bangkaw Spear/Lance 7. Baston Ug Sibat Espada Ug Bangkaw Sundang Ug Taming Sundang Ug Karasak

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DOBLE BASTON OR DOBLE ESPADA VERSUS


1. Solo Baston Solo Espada 2. Doble Baston Doble Espada 3. Baston Y Daga Espada Y Daga 4. Baston Largo Dos Manos 5. Sibat 6. Bangkaw Spear or Lance 7. Baston Ug Sibat Espada Ug Bangkaw Espada Ug Taming

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BASTON Y DAGA - ESPADA Y DAGA VERSUS

1. Solo Baston / Espada 2. Doble Baston / Espada 3. Baston / Espada Daga 4. Baston Largo (Dos Manos) 5. Sibat / Staff 6. Bangkaw, Spear or Lance 7. Baston Ug Sibat Espada Ug Bangkaw

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DAGA BASICS
1. Rt. vs. Rt. 2. Rt. vs. Lt. 3. Lt. vs. Rt. 4. Lt. vs. Lt. 5. S vs. Rt. 6. S vs. Lt. 7. Rt. vs. S 8. Lt. vs. S 9. H vs. H 10. H vs. E 11. E vs. H 12. E vs. E 13. DE vs. H 14. DE vs. E 15. E vs. DE H = Heaven E = Earth DE = Double End S = Single End
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SOLO DAGA VERSUS

1. Solo Daga 2. Doble Daga

PANGAMUT VERSUS
1. Solo Daga 2. Doble Daga

DOBLE DAGA VERSUS

1. Solo Daga 2. Doble Daga

NINE METHODS OF DOBLE DAGA

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AREAS OF KALIBADMAN
1. Single Olisi Concept & Principle: (a) Single Stick (b) Single Sword/Ax Etc. ===================================================== 2. Double Olisi Concept & Principle: (a) Double Sticks (b) Double Sword (c) Double Ax (f) Shield & Dagger (d) Sword & Shield (e) Ax & Shield ======================================================= 3. Olisi/Baraw Concept & Principle: (a) Long Stick (b) Short Stick (c) Stick & Dagger (d) Sword & Dagger (e) Stick & Shield (f) Sword & Shield ===================================================== 4. Baraw-Baraw Concept & Principle: (a) Dagger & Dagger (b) Dagger & Shield ===================================================== 5. Baraw-Kamot Concept & Principle: Dagger & Empty Hand ===================================================== 6. Kamot-Kamot Empty Hands Pangamut Concept & Principle: (a) Panadiakan (sikaran) Kicking System (b) Panatukan (boxing) System (c) Dumog (grappling & wrestling) (d) Hampak-Higot- Hu Bud (bud-bud) Hit/Tie/Untie (e) Kinomutay/Kagat/Angkab-Epit/Pinch/Bite/Choke (f) Songab (finger thrusting) (g) Siko/Tuhod System / Elbow Knee ===================================================== 7.Olisi Palad Concept & Principle: Palm Stick ===================================================== 8. Banckaw/Sibat Spear/Staff & Oar System ===================================================== 9. Flexible Weapons Concepts & Principle: (c) Chain (kabit) (d) Scarf(a) Whip (latigo) (b) Rope (lubid) Handkerchief (panu) (e) Jacket (kanggan) (f) Sting Ray Fish/Tail (g) Olisi Tyuk Clike Nunchak (h) Head Band Cpugont Tagus (i) Belt Csabitan (j) Cloth Around Waist (sarong) ===================================================== 10. Tapon-Tapon Throwing Weapons Or Objects: (a) Sand (b) Coins (c) Mud (d) Yo-Yo (e) Top (f) Dagger (g) Spikes (h) Rattan Darts/bamboo darts (i) Spear (j) Simbalan (light spear) ===================================================== 11. Flying Projectile Weapons: Clipad-Lipad (a) Bow & Arrow (pana) (b) Blow Gun (sumpit) (c) Sling Shot ===================================================== 12. Dos Manos of Sword/Stick 73

CONTRA SUMBRADA PROGRESSION

Stage 1. Stage 2. Stage 3. Stage 4.

One block and one hit Hitting block and hit One block and two-three hits One block and two-three hits Negative to positive hits Hagad / Lansi to Tinoud The use of Enganio and Alanganin Stage 5. Punyo Y Punyo Sumbrada A. With Punyo only B. With Dungab only C. Punyo Y Punyo mix Stage 6. Higot -Hubad-Lubad with Punyo and Punta Sumbrada Stage 7. Entrada Y Retierada: moving in and out of long range, middle range and close quarter range: Break-In-Out, mix angles Stage 8. Add elements to Contra Sumbrada: disarms chokes, strikes, kicks, trips, sweeps, takedowns, locks, etc. Stage 9. One block and hit limbs Stage 10. Use different weapons and receive different weapons Stage 11. Add different environments and counter with Dumog with or without weapons Stage 12. Sparring: A. Non-contact distance sparring B. Light contact 1. Middle and close quarter 2. Long range to limbs and hands C. Medium contact to all parts D. Medium to heavy contact with armor and head gear E. Heavy to medium contact (armor is mandatory) includes all elements

74

AGAW ON SECOND FEED


#1 #1 #1 #1 #1 #1 #1 #5 #5 #5 #5 #5 #5 #5 #4 #12, #10 #2 #6 Backhand Thrust #7 Forehand Thrust #1 #5 Mid-Section Thrust #4 #12 #2 #6 Backhand Thrust #1 #7 Forehand Thrust #5 Mid-Section Thrust

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PANGAMUT DRILLS HIGOT HUBAD LUBAD BASICS

1. Seek the Path 2. One for One cycle 3. 1-4 to 1-4 cycles 4. 1-4-1 to 1-4-1 cycle 5. Siko to Siko cycle 6. Doble Siko cycle 7. Angle #2 to Angle #2 cycles 8. 2-4-2 to 2-4-2 cycle 9. 4-2 to 4-2 cycle 10. Kamot to Kamot cycle Parry, Place, Trap & Punch 11. Vertical Gunting, Trap & Punch 12. Catch, Place Trap & Punch 13. Inward Gunting, Place, Trap & Punch 14. Inside Vertical Gunting, Trap & Lt. Punch 15. Inside Vertical Gunting, Trap & Rt. Punch 16. Switch & Reverse #1 17. Inside Ubon with Songab 18. Outside Ubon with Songab

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LONG RANGE BASICS DISTANCIA LARGO CONCEPTS

1. Principle of Meet 2. Principle of Follow 3. Serada Position 4. Abierta Position 5. Mixed Serada and Abierta Position 6. Range Concept A. Largo Largo B. Largo Media C. Largo Corto

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KALI ESKRIMA SILAT- KUNTAO BERSILAT PANGAMUT - PANANTUKAN


LACOSTE INOSANTO SYSTEM SERIES #1 COUNTER THE LEAD PUNCH BY
1. Paawas 2. Dakup 3. Palasut / Waslik

COUNTER THE REAR PUNCH BY


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Siko 4 Ways Backhand Gunting (Ordabis) To Rear Backhand Backhand Gunting (Ordabis) To Lead Hand Strike Backhand Gunting (Ordabis) To Rear Straight Punch Backhand (Ordabis) To Face Lead Songab /Dongab Rear Songab/Dongab Inside Gunting To Arm Inside Gunting From Inside Thrust 10. Inside Gunting To Inside Thrust 11. Inside Vertical Gunting And Paths 12. Outside Vertical Gunting And Paths 13. Low Rear Dongab 14. Shield And Hit (Taming Ug Hampak) 15. Parry To Shield And Hit (Paawas-aming Ug Hampak) 16. Lead Tuhod (Pinasaka) 17. Rear Tuhod (Pinasaka) 18. Upward Bukton (Pinasaka)

78

KALI ESKRIMA SILAT- KUNTAO BERSILAT


PANGAMUT - PANANTUKAN

LACOSTE INOSANTO SYSTEM


SERIES #2 COUNTER LEAD PUNCH BY OUTSIDE VERTICAL GUNTING COUNTER REAR PUNCH BY: 1. Taming Ug Hampak 2. Taming Ug Siko 3. Taming Ug Ordabis 4. Backhand Gunting (Ordabis) 5. Inside Vertical Gunting Counter Lead Punch By Outside Vertical Gunting COUNTER REAR PUNCH BY: 6. Inside Vertical Gunting Usually To Rear Sikod To Lead 7. Inside Songab/Dongab 8. Backhand Gunting (Ordabis) 9. Inside Vertical Gunting With Lead Siko And Rear Elbow 10. Inside Vertical Gunting With Rear Vertical Upward Elbow

79

LACOSTE SYSTEM SUB SYSTEM AREA #7 PANGAMUT SEMINAR PROGRESSION


SERIES #1 LEAD PUNCH
1. DAKOP/PAA WAS 2. DAKOP/PA A WAS 3. DAKOP/PA A WAS 4. DAKAOP/PA A WAS

REAR PUNCH
1. HIGOT UG SIKO (FOUR WAYS) 2. BACKHAND GUNTING 3. INSIDE GUNTING TO INSIDE THRUST 4. INSIDE GUNTING TO ORDABIS OR OUTSIDE THRUST

SERIES #2 LEAD PUNCH


1. DAKA /PAA WAS 2. DAKAOP/PA A WAS 3. DAKAOP/PAA WAS 4. DAKAOP/PAA WAS

REAR PUNCH
1. V ERTICAL GUNTING OUTSIDE 2. VERTICAL GUNTING INSIDE 3. VERTICAL GUNTING OUTSIDE 4. VERTICAL GUNTING INSIDE

SERIES #3 LEAD PUNCH


1. INWARD GUNTING 2. INWARD GUNTING 3. BACKHAND GUNTING 4. BACKHAND GUNTING

REAR PUNCH
1. BACKHAND GUNTING 2. INSIDE VERTICAL GUNTING 3. BACKHAND GUNTING 4. INWARD GUNTING

SERIES #4 LEAD PUNCH 1. OUTSIDE VERTICAL GUNTING


2. OUTSIDE VERTICAL GUNTING 3. OUTSIDE VERTICAL GUNTING 4. OUTSIDE VERTICAL GUNTING 5. OUTSIDE VERTICAL GUNTING

REAR PUNCH
1. OUTSIDE VERTICALGUNTING 2. INSIDE VERTICAL GUNTING 3. INSIDE BACKHAND GUNTING 4. TABON UG SIKO/SONGAB 5. TABON UG ORDABIS

80

BREAKDOWN FOR SIX COUNT SINAWALLI PATTERNS LACOSTE INOSANTO SYSTEM

1. High High High 2. High High Low 3. High Low - Low 4. High Low High 5. Low High Low 6. Low Low - Low 7. Low Low High 8. Low High High

High High - High High High - Low High Low - Low High Low - High Low High - Low Low Low - Low Low Low - High Low High - High

81

THE EIGHT BASIC FAMILY COMBINATIONS HAVE SIXTY FOUR VARIABLES BASIC TRAINING METHODS
1. Abecedario Contradas 2. Contra Y Contra Sumbrada 3. Mixture of Abecedario Contradas & Contra Y Contra (Contra Sumbrada) 4. Away ang Hangin (Karensa) (Sayaw) 5. Hampak Training 6. Visualization / Meditation 7. Sparring

82

ELEMENTS IN HIGOT HUBAD LUBAD COUNTERS FOR THE NECK GRAB

1. Parry & Grab Neck Paawas ug Subnit ang Ulo 2. Parry, Backfist & Grab Neck Paawas Ordabis ug Subnit ang Ulo 3. Parry Elbow (Horizontal & Grab Neck) Paawas Pinatag Siko ug Subnit ang Ulo 4. Parry, Vertical Elbow & Grab Neck Paawas, Pinatindog ang Siko ug Subnit ang Ulo 5. Parry, Songab & Grab Neck Paawas, Songab ug Subnit ang Ulo 6. Double Parry & Grab Neck Doble Paawas ug Subnit ang Ulo 7. Parry To Cover & Hit To Grab Neck 8. Parry, Songab To Cover & Hit To Grab Neck 9. Humbak ang Abaga To Grab Neck 10. Berahon ang Siko (Over Elbow) To Grab Neck 11. Berahon ang Siko (Inside Under Elbow) & Grab Neck 12. Berahon ang Siko Tulak ang Siko & Grab Neck A. Palm (Palad) B. Forearm (Bukton) 13. Alsa ang Bukton Using One Hand 14. Alsa ang Bukton Using Two Hands

83

SERIES #1 LACOSTE INOSANTO SYSTEM


1. Supine Arm Bar (one leg over body) (three directions of thumb) (no leg over body) 2. Supine Arm Bar (two legs over body) 3. Supine Arm Bar (scissor over neck region) 4. Triangle Strangle With Arm Bar (left leg over base) 5. Triangle Strangle With Arm Bar (right leg over base) 6. Branch Up 7. Branch Down

84

STICK AND DAGGER BASICS ESPADA Y DAGA OLISI BARAW


TUO SIDE (RIGHT)
FOUR COUNT FIVE COUNT SIX COUNT A. HEAVEN-EARTH-HEAVEN B. HEAVEN THREE 1. LABTIK 2. WITIK

WALA SIDE (LEFT)

FIVE COUNT SIX COUNT SEVEN COUNT

85

THE MOSLEMS OF THE SOUTHERN PHILIPPINES (MOROS)


As seafarers, this branch of the Oceanic_Malay has no superior. They carried the cargo of that early day. The famous Venetian traveler, Eben Wahab, wrote about them in 898 in the city of Confu in China, which was the gathering place of southeastern traders. Arabian geographers of the 10th century mention them and their trade in spices. The Phoenician sailed the Mediterranean. The Oceanic-Malay voyaged the wide Pacific from Africa to the Easter Island, from China to the coral seas of the south. The wanderings of these early Malays were remarkable achievements of navigation. The reading of the stars was known to them, as was the making of charts. That these voyages took place at an early date is suggested by the fact that as early as BC 2300 the Chinese had charted the heavens to pave the way for the navigator. The Arabic Book of Miracles describes a voyage of three hundred ships made to Madagascar in 945. Strong evidence shows that the African coast was reached at this early date. The Malay had sailed over a region approximating 2/3 of the circumference of the earth as early as the 9th century. From the Malay sailors Marco Polo learned of Zanzibar, Madagascar, and Abyssinia, carrying back to Europe geographical knowledge the absorption of which was far beyond the capacity of European nations of that period. There also appears faint evidence that the praos of the Malay reached the coast of America. His heritage as a sailor retained for himself the reputation of producing the greatest pirates of all history. The southern region of the Philippines is one of the oldest battlegrounds in the world. The unconquerable Moros were beset upon all sides by land grabbing aggressors. Men of all creeds and colors have scrambled for a foothold in the southern Philippinesfrom India, Ceylon, Borneo, Celebes, Java, China, Japan, Portugal, France, Spain, Holland and England. Their bones moulder there and only the spirits of intrepid adventurers remain. They reckoned not on the courage of the defenders of this soil. During the period of the European expansion and colonization of Asia, the southern Philippines remained unconquered. They successfully defended their island empire from a period a century before 1 AD until their power was finally broken by the dismounted cavalrymen of United States at the battle of Bud Bagsak in 1913.

86

BATHALA

87

88

89

ANCIENT MAJAPAHIT EMPIRE


1. Indonesia 2. Malaysia-Singapore 3. Maralikas (Philippines) 4. Siam (Thailand) 5. Parts of Southern Burma 6. Parts of Laos-Cambodia 7. Parts of SE India 8. Madagascar 9. Easter Islands

90

SRI - VISHAYA EMPIRE

1. Malaya 2. Ceylon 3. Borneo 4. Celebes 5. Maralikas Philippines 6. Parts of Formosa 7. Exercise Suzeraintyn over Cambodia and Champa 8. The Two Main Centers of Sri-Visayan Were Sulu And Visayas

91

UNDERSTANDING MARTIAL ARTS

To Better Understand The Martial Arts You Must Understand The History To Understand The History You Must Understand The Cultures To Understand The Culture You Must Understand The Philosophy and Philosophers What They Were Trying To Express To The People of That Time And Period

Sifu/Guro Dan Inosanto

92

JUN FAN GUNG FU AS DEVELOPED BY BRUCE LEE

Jun Fan Gung Fu As Developed By Bruce Lee Has A Definite and Set System Of Progression and Material To Be Taught and Learned.

Jeet Kune Do Was Conceived By Bruce Lee as His Personal Form of Combat Based On His Research and Findings. Not to Be Standardized, Because Each Individual Has Different Needs.

93

Jun Fan Gung Fu is A Set Curriculum As Developed By Bruce Lee

Jeet Kune Do Uses Jun Fan Gung Fu As its Base Curriculum Through 1. Research Internally (within the group) Externally (outside the group) Exploration Experimentation & Development These Three Points Lead to

2. 3.

Discovery Of New Material

Creation Of New Material

94

JUN FAN GUNG FU IS BRUCE LEES BASE SYSTEM AND IS A SET CURRICULUM OF MATERIAL

1. Exploration Internally Internally from within yourself Internally from within your school Externally Externally what others do in your school Externally outside of your school (system) 2. Research Internally Internally from within yourself Internally outside of your school (system) 3. Experimentation Knowledge from Creativity & Discovery

95

THE FACTS OF JEET KUNE DO


1. The economy tight structure in attack and defense (attack: the alive leads / defense: sticking hands) 2. The versatile and artless artful, total kicking and striking weapon 3. The broken rhythm, the half beat and the one or three-and-a-half (JKDs direct in attack and counter) 4. Weight training and scientific supplementary training plus all-around fitness 5. The JKD direct movement in attacks and counters-throwing from where it Is without repositioning 6. The shifty body and light footwork 7. Theun-crispystuff and unassuming attacking tactics 8. Strong in-fighting - A. shifty blasting B. throwing C. grappling D. immobilization 9. All-out sparring and the actual contact training on moving targets 10. The sturdy tools through continuous sharpening 11. Individual expression rather than mass product; aliveness rather than classicalness (true relationship) 12. Total rather than partial structure 13. The Training of continuity of expressive self behind physical movements 14. Loose power and powerful thrust-drive as a whole. A springy looseness but not a physical lax of body. Also, a pliable mental awareness 15. The constant flow (straight movement and curved movement combined-up and down, curved left and right, sidesteps, bobbing and weaving, hand circles 16. Well-balanced posture of exertion during movement, constantly. Continuity between near all-out an near all-loose
96

BASIC TERMINOLOGY

SIFU JOAP HOP YU BAY GIN LAI GUNG (COMMAND) BAI JONG HEY YUT YEE SAM NG LOK CHUT BAK GOW SUP

TEACHER INSTRUCTOR GROUP TOGETHER READY SALUTE (SALUTATION) ATTACK READY POSITION STANCE START BEGIN ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE SIX EIGHT NINE TEN

97

CANTONESE TO ENGLISH

Cantonese
Jik Tek Hou Jik Tek Jit Dum Tek Hou Jik Dum Tek Juk Tek Hou Jut Tek O"Ou Tek Hou O"Ou Tek Noy O"Ou Tek Qua Tek So Tek/So O"Ou Tek Dum Tek Hou Dum Tek Juen Juk Tek Juen Qua Tek Juen So Tek Chung Chuie Hou Chung Chuie Ping Chuie Hou Ping Chuie Ha Ping Chuie Choap Chuie Qua Chuie Lau Sin Chuie So Chuie Jin Chuie O"Ou Chuie Ha Pak O"Ou Sao Kao Sao Jeet Tek Jit Chung Chuie Pak Sao

English
Straight Kick Rear Leg Straight Kick Straight Stomp Kick Rear Straight Stomp Kick Side Kick Rear Leg Side Kick Hook Kick/Round Kick Rear Leg Hook Kick/Round Kick Inside Inverted Hook Kick/Unmatched Reverse Crescent Kick/Inverted Heel Hook Kick Stomp Kick Rear Leg Stomp Spinning Side Kick Spinning Crescent Kick/Inverted Spinning Heel Hook Kick Vertical Fist Rear Vertical Fist Horizontal Fist Rear Vertical Fist Low Horizontal Fist Half Fist/Leopard Fist Punch Backlist Vertical Backfist Down Quarter Swing With Fist Uppercut Hook With Fist Low Slap Parry Hook Hand Parry Wide Horizontal Hook Hand Parry Stop Kick/Intercepting Kick Straight Vertical Fist/Straight Blast Slap Parry 98

CANTONESE TO ENGLISH (cont)


Pak Sao Da Lop Sao Lop Sao Da Jut Sao Jut Sao Da Huen Sao Jao Sao Ha Jao Sao Li Sao Tan Sao Tan Sao Da Bil Gee Bil Sao Bil Sao Da Bong Sao Fook Sao Talk Sao Sat Sao Jong Tao/Kow Tao Sut Da Woang Pak Ha Woang Pak Goang Sao Quan Sao Seong Jut Sao Go Da Joan Da Ha Da Jern (Jeong) Woang Jern Dim Jern Da Jee Yao Bok Gik Kwoon - (Goon) Lin Lop Sao Mah Bo Noy Gnoy Noy Moon Chuie Ling Wood Jik Chung Chuie Goang Gnoy Lop Sao Noy Pak Sao Slap Parry With Hit Pull Hand/Grab Hand Pull Hand/Grab Hand W/Hit Jerk Hand Jerk Hand W/Hit Circling Hand Parry Running Hand/Disengage Low Running Hand/Disengage Pulling Palm Up Deflection Toward Palm Up Deflection Palm Up Deflection W/Hit Finger Jab/3rd Win Chun Form-Palm Down Palm Deflection Vertical Palm (Vertical)Deflection W/Hit Wing Hand Deflection/Elbow Up In Air Block Forearm Down Deflection/Bent Elbow In Block Palm Up Deflection Under Elbow Knife Hand Palm Down/Kill Hand Head Butt Knee Hit/Knee Strike Cross Slap Parry Low Cross Slap Parry Hard Inward And Downward Block/Outside Palm Up Low Wing Deflection/Inside Two Hand Jerk Hand High Hit Middle Hit Low Hit Palm Cross Palm Hit Vertical Palm Hit Free Style Sparring Gym/School/Training Place Cross Grab Hand/Cross Pull Hand Horse Stance Inside Outside Inside Gate Punch Fast And Accurate Straight Blast/ Vertical Punches Hard Outside Pull Hand Inside Slap Parry 99

CANTONESE TO ENGLISH (cont)


Gnoy Lop Sao Noy Lop Sao Jang (Jiang) Chum Jang Jong Sao Yuen Don Chi Seong Chi Sao Fak Sao Sot Kil Jao Mah Ng Moon Mo Hay Do Gim Lin Sil Die Da Chin Na Man Sao Wu Sao Yu Bay Jeet Tek Gin Lai Joap Hop Phon Sao Bai Jong Chum Kiu Toy Yao/Yow Joe Chun Yut,Yee, Sam, Say, Ng, Lok, Chut, Bak Gow, Sup Fu Jow Luk Sao Poon Sao Lung Tao Hay/Hey Jang Da Gung (Command) Sa Fot Sibak Sidal Sifu Outside Pulling Hand Inside Pull Hand Elbow Elbow Down Deflection 108 Techniques On Dummy Soft One Hand Chi Sao/Single Striking Hand Two Hand Chi Sao Backhand Using Knife Hand Hammer Fist Running Horse Five Gates Chinese Weapons/Kung Fu Weapons Sword Or Knife Sword Or Knife Simultaneous Hit And Block Grappling, Locks, Chokes, Throws Lead Hand/Inquisitive Hand Rear Hand Ready Stop Kick/Intercepting Salute Group Together Trapping Hands Ready Stance Seeking The Bridge/Bridging The Gap Retreat Right Left Advance One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight Nine, Ten Eagle Talon Moving Hands Questioning Hands While Rolling Dragon Head Begin/Start Elbow Hit/Elbow Strike Attack Hand Techniques Instructors Senior One Who Learned After You Your Jr Instructor 100

CANTONESE TO ENGLISH (cont)


Si Gung Si Hing Si Joy Sil Lim Tao Si Sook Tan Dar Toe Dai Toe Suen Woang Jeong Yee Kim Yang Mah Yun Jeong Har Dar Jee Yao Bok Gik Joan Dar Jor Mah Jull Da Kok Soot Kwon Mah Mook Jong Noy Moon Chuie Noy Pak Noy Sing Nuie Toe Pak Dar Bi Jong Cheong Cheong Kil Lik Chum Jiang Chum Kil Die Jong Ding Sao Gnoy Lop Go Dar Your Instructors Teacher/Grandfather 1 Who Learned Before You/Senior Or Brother Founder Of The Style 1st Wing Chun Form/"Little Imagination" Instructor's Junior Attacking From The Palm Up Block Students Student's Student/Grandchildren Sideward Palm Strike Pigeon-Toed Stance Vertical Palm Strike Low Blow Free Style Middle Blow Sitting Horse Stance Running Hand And Strike National Art Staff Horse Stance Wooden Dummy Inside Gate Punch Inside Slap Block Patience-Perseverance Female Student Attacking From The Slap Block On-Guard Stance Spear Long Bridge Strength Drop Elbow Block Searching The Bridge/2nd Wing Chun Form Downward Palm Strike Bent Elbow Forward Energy Block Outside Slap Block High Blow

101

THE FIVE WAYS OF ATTACK

A. Simple Angle Attack (S.A.A.)


(Check the eight basic blocking positions) 1. Leading with the right, guarding with left, while moving to the right 2. Leading Right Stop Kick (Groin, Knee, Shin) 3. Broken Timing Angle Attack (B.T.A.A.)

B. Hand Immobilizing Attack (H.I.A.)


(Close own boundaries while closing distance -Watch out for stop hit or kickReady to angle strike when opponent opens or backs up) -Use feint before immobilize-

C. Progressive Indirect Attack (P.I.A.)


(Moving out of line whenever possible -Boundaries close accordingly) 1. High to Low A. R. Str. to Low R. Thrust B. R. Str. to R. Groin Toe Kick C. R. Str. to L. Str. (or Kick) D. L. Str. To R. Groin Toe Kick 2. Low to High A. R. Str. to High R. Str. (or Hook) B. R. Groin Kick to High R. Str. C. R. Groin Kick to High Hook Kick D. L Str. To R. High Str.

102

THE FIVE WAYS OF ATTACK (cont)


3. Left/Right or Right/Left A. R. Str. to R. Hook B. L. Str. To R. Hook C. Snap Back and L. Crosss opponents R. D. Opponent Cross Hand Block (L. Cross)

E. Attack By Combination (A.B.C.)


(Tight Boundaries Broken RhythmSurprise Opponent Speed) 1. The One-Two (O-N-E- Two) 2. The O-N-E-Two Hook 3. R-Body R-Jaw L-Jaw 4. R-Jaw Hook-Jaw L-Jaw 5. The Straight High/Low

F. Attack By Drawing (A.B.D.)


(Awareness Balance to Attack) 1. By Exposing 2. By Forcing 3. By Feinting

103

THE MATCH
TIMMING DISTANCE SPEED AND RHYTHN AGGRESSIVENESS

THE MATCH

ATTACK
S.A.A S.D.A. WITH OR WITHOUT B.T.A.A. P.I.A. I.A. H.I.A. A.B.T. A.B.C. A.B.C. A.B.D. A.B.D.

COUNTER ATTACK #1
STOP THRUST

#2
TIME THRUST KICK NO EVASION

OFFENSIVE ATTACK
4 BASIC OFFENSIVE DEFENCE YEILDING PARRY RIPOSTE ATTACT AFTER A DEFENCE

#1

KICK EVASION

#1 #2

#2

BEFORE DURING AFTER

BEFORE DURING AFTER

#3 #4 #5
RECOVER

#3

COUNTER TIME
# 1 STOP THRUST

SINGLE RIPOSTE

INDIRECT RIPOSTE

COUMPOUND RIPOSTE

DELAYED RIPOSTE

RENEWED ATTACK

DEFENCE

# 2 TIME THRUST

104

JUN FAN GUNG FU


1966-1967 A. Pak Sao, Lop Sao, Qua Chuie, Rear Chung Chuie, Lop Sao Da to Figure 4 Takedown to: 1. 2. 3. 4. B. Arm Pit Arm Bar Wrist Flexion to Supine Arm Bar Wrist Flexion to Prone Arm Bar With Head Trap With Leg Wrist Flexion to Prone Arm Bar While Lying on Side

Pak Sao, Loy Pak Da, Jang (Elbow Strike) to Under Arm Hook to Arm to: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Bent Arm Lock Takedown to Prone Bent Arm Lock with Head Crank Kneeling Straight Arm Lock Under Arm Hook Takedown to Supine Arm Bar Surfboard Standing Face Lock Standing Front Choke Rear Choke A Rear Choke B

C.

Pak Sao and Opponent Grabs Punch to: 1. Side Wrist Flexion Lock 2. Side Wrist Flexion Lock to Arm Pit Arm Bar 3. To 2 Finger Hyper Lateral Extension

D.

Counter Pak Da & Lop Da 1. 2. 3. 4. Two Finger Lock, Rear Hand, (Palm Down) Two Finger Lock, Rear Hand, (Palm Up) Two Finger Lock, Palm Lateral Lateral Wrist Lock (Lead Hand or Rear Hand)

E.

Countering Right or Left Oou Tek 1. Sitting Leg Lock 2. Standing Leg Lock 3. Single Boston Crab
105

JUN FAN METHOD OF JEET KUNE DO


SENSITIVITY DRILLS BASICS

1. Hinge Principle Lop Sao, Qua Chuie 2. Ball & Socket Principle Pak Sao, Qua Chuie 3. Biu Gee to Pak Sao Da 4. Biu Gee to Lop Sao Da to Pak Sao Da 5. Bong Sao & Lop Sao Cycle A. Using Chung Chuie B. Using Qua Chuie C. Using Sat Sao D. Using Sot Kil 6. Pak Sao Cycle 7. Combination of Lop Sao Cycle with Pak Sao Cycle 8. Don Chi Progression 9. Seong Chi Basics with Seong Chi Progression 10. Mix Don Chi Basics with Seong Chi Progression 11. Mix with Push Hand Basics with Chi Sao Basics 12. 2nd Motion Counter 1st Motion Basic Progression

106

BRUCE LEE PHILOSOPHY


Abandon all the martial arts you have learned yet not really abandoning them. In a well not dug, in the water not filling it, a shadow is reflected; a man with no form, no shadow is drawing water from this well. A man with no form, no shadow, turns into a rice pounder when he pounds rice. Bruce Lee It was Bruces habit to forever expound the advantages and disadvantages of the various combat styles none were overlooked. He counseled his disciples not to think in terms of East vs. West, Chinese vs. Japanese, Okinawan vs. Korean, Karate vs. Judo, boxing vs. wrestling, Aikido vs. other Jiu-Jitsu styles, Thai boxing vs. Burmese boxing, Filipino fencing vs. Western fencing, etc. for the purpose of determining which was better; but, rather. To examine each method individually, find its pluses and minuses, then inquire of ourselves, When will this work for me? In other words, if I have two weapons, a hand grenade and a knife, and someone asks which is superior, Id reply, It depends. If the enemy is fifty yards away Id heave the grenade. If we were in a phone booth, Id be better off with the shorter weapon. Methods of combat also have their range of efficiency.

107

REGULATIONS OF THE JUN FAN GUNG FU INSTITUTE JEET KUNE DO CHINESE KICKBOXING
1. Any member, instructors, and students alike, will be immediately expelled for teaching Jeet Kune Do without permission from the head of the school. 2. Do not get involved in situations that will jeopardize the reputation of our Institute. Exercise your better judgment. 3. Treat your instructor with great respect and listen to his advice. Always address your instructor formally and consult him when in doubt regarding the program and/or reputations of the Institute. 4. Each student must carry his current quarterly card for inspection upon request. This up to date card will indicate your authenticity as a Jun Fan official member. Be sure to observe the date of expiration, membership will terminate without renewal. 5. Recommendation is required to join the Jun Fan Gung Fu Institute. 6. Be punctual for classes and do not fail to report your absence to your instructor. The door will be locked during practice, and no one should open it unless the right knock is given. 7. Always bow before and after each practice. If you are late to class, you are required to wait at the door till your instructor acknowledges you for salutation. Observe the difference between student to student salutation and student to instructor salutation. 8. In the event of the absence of the instructor, an appointed senior member will take over the class.

108

JUN FAN GUNG FU JEET KUNE DO


TITLES OF RESPECT
SI JOY SI GUNG SI TAI GUNG SIFU SI HING SI DAI SI JAY SI MUI SI BAK SI SUK SI MO SI BAK GUNG SI JUK TOE DIE TOE SUEN YUT HING TUNG MOON Founder of system Bruce Lee Grandfather or teacher of your Sifu BRUCE LEE Great-Grandfather, your instructors SI GUNG Your instructor, your father in Kung Fu Your senior, your older brother. Your junior, your younger brother. Your female senior, your older sister Your female junior, your younger sister Uncle, your instructors senior TAKY KIMURA & JAMES LEE (deceased) Uncle, your instructors junior Your mother in Kung Fu (or wife of SIFU) Elder Kung Fu brother of SI GUNG Nephew, student of SI DAI Student, disciple Grandson, student of TOE DIE Number one brother Follower of same style
109

JKD CLASSIFICATION OF TYPES OF SPEED


1. Physical Speed Performance speed: Quickness in a chosen motion. Examples: Side Kick, Hook Kick, Jab, etc. Initiation Speed Economical starting to a stimulus. A. Visual stimulus B. Audial stimulus C. Tactical stimulus Perceptual Speed Visual speed. The ability to see opening and incoming attacks and targets. Works in conjuncture with Initiation Speed. Mental Speed Quickness of the mind to select the right move for the appropriate counter attack or attack or opening. Alteration Speed Ability to change direction quickly. Combination Speed Ability to deliver a series of movements in combination. Sensitivity Speed (Contact Reflex) Ability to react instinctively to an outside stimuli. Footwork Speed (Speed in Mobility) Ability to move your base or stance quickly. Hand Trapping Speed Ability to trap quickly in combination.

2.

3.

4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. Ability to calm yourself and react quickly and effectively to any given situation.
110

JUN FAN METHOD CROSS COUNTERS


TO HAND & KICKING COMBINATIONS

1. 2. 3.

Shoulder Roll & Kick Bob & Weave Jeet Sao A. Shoulder Stop B. Bicep Stop C. Inside Leverage Gnoy Woang Pak Da

Hand ABC

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Outside Parry & Cross High Outside Parry & Cross Low Outside Parry & Hit Outside Tan Sao with Da (Tan Da) Pak Sao Tan Da

10. Loy Woang Pak Da

111

JUN FAN METHOD


LEAD HOOK COUNTERS

1. 2. 3.

Cover

Hand ABC KC

Bob & Weave to Hand ABC to KC Cover & Hit Simultaneously to Hand ABC 1. Tan Da 2. Jung Da 3. Biu Da 4. Tight Jung Da (Jeet Sao) Shoulder Stop With Rear Hand Hand ABC to KC (Jeet Sao) Advancing with Switch Lead with Rear Hand To Hand ABC to KC KC

4.

5.

112

MIDDLE JUT TEK COUNTERS

JUN FAN METHOD

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Ha Pak & Riposte Oou Sao & Riposte Kao Sao & Riposte Jit Tek under leg Jeet Juk Tek Jeet Tek & Riposte Tan Tek & Riposte

113

JUN FAN METHOD LEAD LEG


MIDDLE OOU TEK COUNTERS

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Ha Woang Pak Low cross slap Jeet Juk Tek (Rear Leg) Intercept with Juk Tek Gnoy Oou Sao Outside hook hand Lop Gerk Juk Tek / Oou Tek Grab leg with Juk Tek / Oou Tek Lop Gerk Jik Tek Grab leg with Jik Tek Jo Ma Oou Tek Move left and Oou Tek Yow or Yao Ma Oou Tek Move right and Oou Tek Toy Ma - Gung Retreat and attack Attack with PIA to ABC PIA to HIA-ABC Jeet Juen Tek Intercept Spinning Juk Tek
114

9.

JUN FAN METHOD COUNTERS FOR


LOW LEAD OOU TEK

1.

Toy Ma Gung or Toy Bo Gung Evade both feet back and attack Toy Gerk Oou Tek Retreat lead leg and attack with lead or rear Oou Tek Toy Gerk Juk Tek Retreat lead leg and attack with rear Juk Tek Tu Ma Oou Tek Lift and Oou Tek Tu Ma Dum Tek Lift and Dum Tek Pak Tek Slap Kick rear leg Hou Dum Tek Rear Dum Tek Jeet Oou Tek Intercept with Oou Tek Lau Ma Female stance & attack

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. Boang Gerk / Jeet Gerk Wing Leg / Intercepting Leg


115

JUN FAN METHOD COUNTERS FOR


LOW REAR OOU TEK

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Jeet Juk Tek (lead leg) Jeet Juk Tek (attack rear leg) Jeet Jik Tek to body Jeet Jik Dum Tek to body Jeet Jik Dum Tek to hip Jeet Jik Dum Tek to leg Jeet Oou Tek to base leg / body Boang Gerk / Jeet Gerk Jeet Juk Tek to leg Yao Ma or Jo Ma & Riposte Lead Biu Gee / Lead Chung Chuie Toy Ma & Attack

116

JUN FAN KICKBOXING DRILLS

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Catch and JAB Parry and JAB Catch and JAB & HOOK Parry and JAB & HOOK HA PAK and Return 1-2-3 KAO SAO and Return 2-3-2 Parry and JAB and Return JAB and Lead OOU TEK Parry and JAB and Return JAB and Lead JUK TEK Parry JAB and Return JAB and REAR OOU Tek Counter LEAD OOU TEK with Side Step 3-2-3 Counter REAR OOU Tek with Side Step 2-3-2 Counter LEAD JUK TEK A. JIK TEK with 2-3-2 B. JEET JUK TEK with OOU TEK 2-3-2 C. KAO SAO with HA JUK TEK 1-2-3-2 or 2-3-2

13. Counter Lead JUK TEK with SIDE STEP to Inside With HA JUK TEK, Lead OOU TEK 2-3-2 14. BLOCK Rear OOU TEK, CROSS, HOOK, Rear OOU TEK, Lead HA JUK TEK 15. Parry JAB on the Outside Lead OOU TEK 2-3-2 16. Counter 1-2-3 with Catch the JAB, PARRY CROSS, Bob and Weave THE HOOK 2-3

117

BASIC TRAPPING PROGRESSION JUN FAN METHOD


1966 PROGRESSION

1. PAK SAO DA A. BY REFERENCE POINT ATTATCHMENT B. BRIDGING THE GAP TO ATTATCHMENT C. BY FEINTING AND THEN BRIDGING GAP TO PAK SAO DA BY CAPTURING. D. PAK SAO DA BY CAPTURING. 1. IN FLIGHT DURING ATTACK 2. IN CHAMBERING POSITION BEFORE ATTACK 3. IN CHABERING POSITION AFTER ATTACK 2. TYPES OF PAK SAO DA A. GNOY DA OR OUY DA B. LOY DA [TWO TYPES] 1. INSIDE OF WU SAO 2. OUT SIDE OF WU SAO C. JUNG DA D. HA DA 3. PAK SAO DA TO JIK CHUNG CHUIE 4. PAK SAO DA, --- BONG SAO, --- LOP SAO DA WITH QUA CHUIE OR SAT SAO (FAK SAO) GUM SAO DA 5. PAK SAO DA, --- LOY PAK SAO DA 6. PAK SAO DA, --- CHUNG CHUIE --- LOY PAK SAO DA 7. PAK SAO DA, --- BIU SAO AS WEDGE, --- PAK SAO DA, --- LOP SAO DA --- PAK SAO DA 8. PAK SAO DA, --- BIU SAO AS WEDGE, --- LOP SAO WITH CHUNG CHUIE --- PAK SAO DA 9. PAK SAO DA --- BIU SAO AS WEDGE LOP SAO DA Rt. SAT SAO (FAK SAO) GUM SAO DA
118

BASIC TRAPPING PROGRESSION JUN FAN METHOD


1966 PROGRESSION (cont)

10. PAK SAO DA ---BIU SAO AS WEDGE PAK SAO DA Lt. SUT SAO (FAK SAO) 11. PAK SAO DA ---BIU SAO AS WEDGE LOP SAO DA PAK SAO DA Lt. SUT SAO (FAK SAO) 12. PAK SAO DA ---BIU SAO AS WEDGE LOP SAO DA Rt. SUT SAO (FAK SAO) CUP SAO DA (KAO SAO DA) 13. PAK SAO DA ---JAO SAO---DOUBLE JUT SAO GUM SAO DA JANG (ELBOW) 14. PAK SAO DA ---JAO SAO ---DOUBLE JUT SAO DUM TEK GUM SAO DA JANG (ELBOW) 15. PAK SAO DA ---JAO SAO ---DOUBLE JUT SAO REAR HAND BIU GEE OR REAR CHIUNG CHUIE GUM SAO DA TO ANY TYPE OF FOLLOW UP 16. PAK SAO DA ---JAO SAO ---DOUBLE JUT SAO JONG TAO (HEAD BUTT) SUT (KNEE) JANG (Elbow) OR GUM SAO DA (VICE VERSA) 17. PAK SAO DA---JAO SAO---DOUBLE JUT SAO SUT (KNEE) GUM SAO DA
119

BASIC TRAPPING PROGRESSION JUN FAN METHOD


1966 PROGRESSION (cont)

18. PAK SAO DA---JAO SAO---DOUBLE JUT SAO DUM LOY TEK TO KNEE GUM SAO DA JANG (ELBOW) 19. PAK SAO DA---JAO SAO---DOUBLE JUT SAO WITH ANY OF THE COMBINATION OF HEAD BUTT (JONG TAO), PUNCH (CHUNG CHUIE), KNEE (SUT) FOOT STOMP (DUM TEK), ELBOW (JANG), FINGER JAB (BIU GEE), ANY PALM STRIKE (JERN), INSIDE STOMP KICK (LOY DUM TEK) BACKHAND KNIFE HAND (WISK HAND) SAT SAO/FAK SAO ETC. 20. PAK SAO DA GO JAO SAO DA HA JAO SAO DA GO JAO SAO DA DOUBLE JUT SAO GUM SAO DA TO OTHER COMBINATION ROUTES 21. PAK SAO DA GO JAO SAO DA HA JAO SAO DA GO JAO SAO DA DOUBLE JUT SAO GUM SAO DA TO OTHER COMBINATION ROUT

120

BASIC TRAPPING PROGRESSION JUN FAN METHOD


1966 PROGRESSION (cont)

22. PAK SAO DA GO JAO SAO DA PAK SAO WITH QUA CHUIE 23. HALF PAK SAO LOP SAO DA TO OTHER COMBINATION ROUTES OF ENERGY 24. HALF PAK SAO DA LOP SAO DA PAK SAO WHEN PARRY HAND PASSES PAK LOP SAO DA PAK SAO DA 25. HALF PAK SAO DA LOP SAO DA CHUNG CHUIE AFTER PARRY HAND PASSES JUT SAO DA GUM SAO DA 26. HALF PAK SAO DA LOP SAO DA HUEN SAO TO REAR HAND SAT SAO GUM SAO DA 27. FAKE PAK SAO DA WITH DELAY CHUNG CHUIE AFTER PARRY HAND PASSES JUT PAK SAO DA GUM SAO DA 28. PAK SAO DA GNOY LOP SAO DA PAK SAO DA
121

BASIC TRAPPING PROGRESSION JUN FAN METHOD


1966 PROGRESSION (cont)

29. PAK SAO DA GNOY LOP SAO DA LOY KAO SAO DA 30. GNOY WOANG PAK DA GNOY LOP SAO DA GNOY LOP SAO DA ON THE REAR ARM 31. HALF PAK SAO DA LOP SAO DA CHUNG CHUIE BEHIND REAR PARRY 32. HALF PAK SAO DA LOP SAO DA CHUNG CHUIE BEHIND REAR PARRY PAK SAO DA LOP SAO DA PAK SAO DA 33. HALF PAK SAO DA CHUNG CHUIE BEHIND REAR PARRY CHUNG CHUIE BEHIND RETURNING PARRY GUM SAO DA FAK SAO DA GUM SAO DA 34. CHOAP CHUIE ---QUA CHUIE LOP SAO WITH QUA CHUIE 35. CHOAP CHUIE ---QUA CHUIE PAK SAO DA -----BONG SAO WITH LOP SAO WITH QUA CHUIE OR FAK SAO (SUT SAO) (FOR LEAD HAND BLOCK) 36. CHOAP CHUIE ------QUA CHUIE -----JAO SA
122

BASIC TRAPPING PROGRESSION JUN FAN METHOD


1966 PROGRESSION (cont)

TO ALL THE BASICS IN THE JAO SAO SERIES 37. CHOP CHUIE ------- QUA --GNOY LOP SAO DA ---- PAK SAO DA 38. FAKE CHOP CHUIE ----- FAKE QUA CHUIE TO 1. JUK TEK (HA, JUNG, GO) 2. OOUI TEK (HA, JUNG, GO) 3. JIK TEK (HA, JUNG, GO) 4. ILA HOU OOU TEK 5. HOU SUT 6. JUNG DUM TEK 7. JUN JUK TEK 8. JUN QUA TEK 9. JUN SO TEK 10. JUN OOU TEK 11. JUN JUNG DUM TEK 12. JUN JIK TEK NUMBERS #1 - #2 ARE IN THE JUN FAN GUNG FU CHUM KIU SERIES. THE JUN FAN CHUM KIU TECHNIQUES ARE NOT TO BE MISTAKEN FOR THE WING CHUN CHUM KIU TECHNIQUES. JUN FAN CHUM KIU TECHNIQUES ARE SEEKING THE BRIDGE OR ATTACHMENT ENTERING TECHNIQUES OR BRIDGING THE GAP TECHNIQUES.

123

JUN FAN TRAPPING PROGRESSION


1. PAK SAO DA 2. PAK SAO DA/CHUNG CHUIE (5 HITS)/PAK SAO DA 3. PAK SAO DA/LOP SAO QUA CHUIE 4, PAK SAO DA/NOY PAK SAO DA 5. PAK SAO DA/CHUNG CHUIE/NOY PAK SAO DA 6. PAK SAO DA/TAN SAO DA/NOY PAK SAO DA 7. PAK SAO DA/LI SAO DA/NOY PAK SAO DA 8. PAK SAO DA/NOY LOP SAO DA/NOY PAK SAO DA 9. PAK SAO DA/BIU GEE/LOP SAO DA/PAK SAO DA 10. PAK SAO DA/BIU GEE/PAK SAO DA/LOP SAO DA 11. PAK SAO DA/ BIU GEE/PAK SAO DA/PAK SAO DA 12. PAK SAO DA/BIU GEE/PAK SAO DA/CUP SAO DA/PAK SAO DA 13. PAK SAO DA/(W1/2 DA) PAK SAO DA/CHUNG CHUIE 14. PAK SAO DA/(W1/2 DA) PAK SAO DA/HUEN SAO/SAT SAO DA W/PAK CUP SAO/ PAK SAO DA 15. PAK SAO DA/W1/2 DA/PAK SAO/PAK SAO DA/REVERSE (OUTSIDE) PAK SAO/PAK SAO DA 16. PAK SAO DA W1/2 DELAY/PAK SAO DA 17. PAK SAO DA W1/2 DELAY/CHUNG CHUIE/JUT SAO DA/ NOY PAK SAO DA 18. PAK SAO DA/ LOP SAO DA/ PAK SAO DA 19. PAK SAO DA OR BIU GEE/LOP SAO DA/LOP SAO DA 20. PAK SAO DA/JAO SAO DA/JUT SAO/NOY PAK SAO DA 21. PAK SAO DA/JAO SAO DA/JUT SAO/DUM TEK/NOY PAK SAO DA 22. PAK SAO DA/JAO SAO DA/JUT SAO DA/NOY PAK SAO DA 23. PAK SAO DA/JAO SAO DA/HUEN SAO/GO DA 24. PAK SAO DA/HA JAO SAO/GO JAO SAO/JUT SAO DA 25. PAK SAO DA/JAO SAO/HA JAO SAO/GO JAO SAO/JUT SAO (VARIATIONS) 26. BIU GEE/LOP SAO/JUT SAO A. SUT (KNEE) D. HEAD BUTT B. RIGHT CHUNG CHUIE E. JANG (ELBOW) C. LEFT CHUNG CHUIE F. DUM TEK (FOOT STOMP) 27. PAK SAO DA/CHOAP CHUIE/QUA CHUIE DA 28. PAK SAO DA/CHOAP CHUIE/QUA CHUIE DA/JAO SAO-JUT SAO (VARIATIONS)

124

JUN FAN/JKD FOCUS MITT DRILLS PROGRESSIVE INDIRECT ATTACK/PIA Matched Leads: NOY DA or SPLIT ENTRY WILL PRECEDE EACH SERIES OF ATTACK COMBINATIONS NOY DA IS AN EXAMPLE OF DEFENSIVE OFFENSE AND IS IN RESPONSE TO AN ATTACK FROM JAB OR CROSS 1. NOY DA/CROSS (JIK CHUIE) HOOK (OOU CHUIE) CROSS (JIK CHUIE)/LEAD HOOK KICK (OOU TECK) 2. NOY DA/JUT SAO* CROSS (JIK CHUIE) HOOK (OOU CHUIE) CROSS (JIK CHUIE) LEAD HOOK KICK (OOU TECK) * Jut Sao is in response to a stiff-arm jab or cross that doesnt retract 3. NOY DA/QUA CHUIE* CROSS (JIK CHUIE) HOOK (OOU CHUIE) CROSS (JIK CHUIE) LEAD HOOK KICK (OOU TECK) * Qua Chuie proceeds without Pak Sao by rolling off the inside hit of Noy Da 4. NOY DA/LOP DA/CROSS (JIK CHUIE) HOOK (OOU CHUIE) CROSS (JIK CHUIE) LEAD HOOK KICK (OOU TECK) *Note mitt holder defends with rear hand and crosses centerline w/blocking hand 5. NOY DA/ PAK DA* LOP DA/CROSS (JIK CHUIE) HOOK (OOU CHUIE) CROSS (JIK CHUIE) LEAD HOOK KICK (OOU TECK) * Note mitt holder defends by raising the lead barrier to initiate trapping combination 6. NOY DA/PAK DA*GNOY PAK DA**PAK SAO/QUA CHUIE*** LOP DA/CROSS (JIK CHUIE) HOOK (OOU CHUIE) CROSS (JIK CHUIE) LEAD HOOK KICK (OOU TECK) * Note mitt holder defends by raising the lead barrier to initiate trapping combination ** Combination know as Double Pak Sao *** Defender Parries Wong Pak Across centerline in Response to Double Pak, Ball and Socket Principle Is Applied Here
125

NOY DA SERIES #1

NOY DA SERIES #2
JUN FAN/JKD FOCUS MITT DRILLS PROGRESSIVE INDIRECT ATTACK/PIA

7. NOY DA/PAK DA* BIU GEE WEDGE/PAK DA/LOP DA** PAK SAO/QUA CHUIE/LOP DA/CROSS (JIK CHUIE) HOOK (OOU CHUIE) CROSS (JIK CHUIE) LEAD HOOK KICK (OOU TECK) * Note mitt holder defends by raising the lead barrier to initiate trapping combination ** Defender Parries Wong Pak Across centerline in Response to Double Pak, Ball and Socket Principle Is Applied Here

8a. NOY DA/PAK SAO/JAO SAO (TO OUTSIDE)* DOUBLE JUT/THROW ACROSS CENTERLINE/NOY DA** PAK DA/LOP DA/CROSS (JIK CHUIE) HOOK (OOU CHUIE) CROSS (JIK CHUIE) LEAD HOOK KICK (OOU TECK) * Note mitt holder defends by raising the lead barrier to initiate trapping combination ** Hit to interrupt timing and to allow for stance change to adjust to different facing or lead change

8b. NOY DA/PAK SAO/JAO SAO* DOUBLE JUT/DOUBLE THROW ACROSS CENTERLINE AND BACK**NOY DA*** PAK DA/LOP DA/CROSS (JIK CHUIE) HOOK (OOU CHUIE) CROSS (JIK CHUIEW)/LEAD HOOK KICK (OOU TECK) * Note mitt holder defends by raising the lead barrier to initiate trapping combination ** Essentially a fake to confuse and interrupt timing *** Hit to interrupt timing and to allow for stance change to adjust to different facing or lead change

126

NOY DA SERIES #3
JUN FAN/JKD FOCUS MITT DRILLS PROGRESSIVE INDIRECT ATTACK/PIA

8c. NOY DA/PAK SAO/JAO SAO*JAO SAO** NOY DA*** PAK DA/LOP DA/CROSS (JIK CHUIE) HOOK (OOU CHUIE) CROSS (JIK CHUIE)/LEAD HOOK KICK (OOU TECK) * ** *** Note mitt holder defends by raising the lead barrier to initiate trapping combination Lead does not change only running hand moves, fakes to outside and comes back to original position Hit to interrupt timing and to allow for stance change to adjust to different facing or lead change

Miscellaneous Terminology: Pak Sao Pak Sao/Da Biu Gee Oou Chuie Ping Chuie Ha Go Lo Seong Wong Pak Noy Pak Da Noy Pak Jik Chuie Jao Sao Slapping Hand Slapping Hand w/Hit Finger Spear (Palm Down) Hook Punch Horizontal Punch Lower Gate/Low Line Middle Gate/ Mid Line High Gate/High Line Double Slap Block Across Center Line Split Entry Hit/Slap Parry Outside w/ Hit Inside Inside Slap Block/ Parry Straight Punch Running Hand

127

QUOTATIONS

IT MATTERS NOT WHAT SYSTEM YOU HAVE STUDIED. TRUE OBSERVATION BEGINS WHEN DEVOID OF SET PATTERNS AND FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION OCCURS, WHEN ONE IS BEYOND STYLES, METHODS, SYSTEMS, AND ORGANIZATIONS. BRUCE LEE

THE WORD MASTER DENOTES A SLAVE AND STYLE MANIFESTS ITSELF IN NARROW HORIZONS AND BONDAGE. IT IS ONLY WHEN MASTER AND STYLE ARE TRANSCENDED THAT TRUE FREEDOM OF EXPRESSIONS BEGINS. JAMES LEE TO FULLY UNDERSTAND, ONE MUST TRANSCEND THE DUALITY OF FOR AND AGAINST INTO ONE ORGANIC WHOLE. A GOOD MARTIAL ARTIST RESTS IN DIRECT INTUITION. MOST STYLES GIVE PARTIAL TRUTHS, NO MATTER HOW GOOD THEY ARE. THIS PARTIAL TRUTH BECOMES A SECT, A LAW, OR WORSE STILL A PREJUDICIAL FAITH. EVENTUALLY IN ORDER TO PASS ALONG THIS KNOWLEDGE FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION, VARIOUS RESPONSES AND MY OWN NATURAL TENDENCIES HAVE BEEN TO ORGANIZE AND CLASSIFY MATERIAL AND PRESENT IT IN A LOGICAL ORDER TO MY STUDENTS. SO WHAT MIGHT HAVE STARTED OFF AS SOME SORT OF PERSON FLUIDITY OF ITS FOUNDER IS NOW SOLIDIFIED KNOWLEDGE, PACKAGED FOR MASS DISTRIBUTION AS WELL AS MASS INDOCTRINATION. SINCE YOU ARE A CREATING INDIVIDUAL, YOU ARE MORE IMPORTANT THAN ANY EXISTING STYLE OR SYSTEM DEVISED BY ANY MARTIAL ART MASTER OR NATION OR GROUP. KNOWLEDGE COMES FROM DISCOVERING THE CAUSE OF YOUR IGNORANCE. PROBLEM SOLVING JOINED WITH DIRECT INTUITION GIVES US THE WISDOM FOR THE USAGE OF THIS KNOWLEDGE.

128

QUOTATIONS (cont)

ABANDON ALL THE MARTIAL ARTS YOU HAVE LEARNED YET NOT REALLY ABANDONING, THEM. IN A WELL NOT DUG, IN THE WATER NOT FILLING, A SHADOW IS REFLECTED; AND A MAN WITH NO FORM, NO SHADOW IS DRAWING WATER FROM THE WELL. A MAN WITH NO FORM, NO SHADOW, TURNS INTO A RICE POWDER WHEN HE POUNDS RICE.

BRUCE LEE

IT WAS BRUCES HABIT TO FOREVER EXPOUND THE ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF THE VARIOUS COMBAT STYLES NONE WERE OVERLOOKED. HE COUNSELED HIS DISCIPLES NOT TO THINK IN TERMS OF EAST VS. WEST, CHINESE VS. JAPANESE, OKINAWAN VS. KOREAN, KARATE VS. JUDO, BOXING VS. WRESTLING, AIKIDO VS. OTHER JIU-JITSU STYLES, THAI BOXING VS. BURMESE BOXING, FILIPINO FENCING VS. WESTERN FENCING, ETC. FOR THE PURPOSE OF DETERMINING WHICH WAS BETTER; BUT. RATHER. TO EXAMINE EACH METHOD INDIVIDUALLY, FIND ITS PLUSES AND MINUSES, AND THEN INQUIRE OF OURSELVES, WHEN WILL THIS WORK FOR ME? IN OTHER WORDS, IF I HAVE TWO WEAPONS, A HAND GRENADE AND A KNIFE, AND SOMEONE ASKS WHICH IS SUPERIOR, ID REPLY, IT DEPENDS. IF THE ENEMY IS FIFTY YARDS AWAY ID HEAVE THE GRENADE. IF WE WERE IN A PHONE BOOTH, ID BE BETTER OFF WITH THE SHORTER WEAPON. METHODS OF COMBAT ALSO HAVE THEIR RANGE OF EFFICIENCY.

129

USEFUL ABC ATTACKS FROM KICKING RANGE TO HAND RANGE TO KICKING RANGE

ATTACK BY COMBINATION

POSSIBLE BASIC 5 COUNT COMBINATIONS


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. LEAD ROUND KICK CROSS LEFT UPPERCUT RIGHT UPPERCUT LEFT ROUND KICK LEAD ROUND KICK RIGHT UPPERCUT LEFT UPPERCUT RIGHT CROSS LEFT ROUND KICK LEAD ROUND KICK CROSS LEFT ELBOW RIGHT ELBOW RIGHT KNEE OR RIGHT ROUND KICK LEAD ROUND KICK RIGHT ELBOW LEFT ELBOW RIGHT ROUND KICK LEFT ROUND KICK LEFT ROUND KICK RIGHT ROUND KICK LOW LEFT ROUND KICK RIGHT CROSS LEFT ROUND KICK LEFT ROUND KICK RIGHT ELBOW LEFT ELBOW RIGHT KNEE LEFT ROUND KICK
130

JUN FAN METHOD OF JEET KUNE DO


SENSITIVITY DRILLS BASICS

1. HINGE PRINCIPLE (LOP SAO, QUA CHUIE) 2. BALL AND SOCKET PRINCIPLE (PAK SAO, QUA CHUIE) 3. BIU GEE TO PAK SAO DA 4. BIU GEE TO LOP SAO DA 5. BONG SAO AND LOP SAO CYCLE A. USING CHUNG CHUIE B. USING QUA CHUIE C. USING SUT SAO D. USING SOT KIL 6. PAK SAO CYCLE 7. COMBINATION OF LOP SAO CYCLE WITH PAK SAO CYCLE

131

132

133

JUN FAN KICKBOXING DRILLS

1. CATCH AND JAB 2. PARRY AND JAB PARRY AND JAB & HOOK 3. CATCH AND RETURN 1-2-3 PARRY AND RETURN 1-2-3 4. CATCH AND RETURN 1-3-2 PARRY AND RETURN 1-3-2 5. HA PAK AND RETURN 1-2-3 6. KAO SAO AND RETURN 2-3-2 7. PARRY JAB AND RETURN JAB AND LEAD OOU TEK 8. PARRY JAB AND RETURN AND LEAD JUK TEK 9. PARRY JAB AND RETURN JAB AND REAR OOU TEK 10. COUNTER LEAD OOU TEK WITH SIDE STEP 3-2-3 11. COUNTER REAR OOU TEK WITH SIDE STEP 2-3-2 12. COUNTER LEAD JUK TEK A. JIK TEK WITH 2-5-2 B. JEET JUK TEK WITH OOU TEK 2-3-2 C. KAO SAO WITH HA JUK TEK 1-2.-3-2 OR 2-3-2 13. COUNTER LEAD JUK TEK WITH SIDE STEP TO INSIDE WITH HA JUK TEK, LEAD OOU TEK 2-3-2 14. BLOCK REAR OOU TEK, CROSS, HOOK REAR OOU TEK, LEAD HA JUK TEK 15. PARRY JAB ON THE OUTSIDE LEAD OOU TEK 2-3-2 REAR OOU TEK, LEAD OOU TEK LEAD HA JUK 16. COUNTER 1-2-3 WITH CATCH THE JAB, PARRY CROSS, BOB AND WEAVE THE HOOK 2-3

134

WHAT IS?

What is learning?

A journey and process, not a destination and conclusion. A guide, not a guard or dictator.

What is an instructor?

What is a discovery?

A constant process of questioning the answers, not answering the question. Open minds so that you can be not Closed achieve the goal. Being and becoming, not just remembering and reviewing .

What is the goal?

What is the test? What do we teach?

Individuals; not lessons, not styles, not systems and not methods or techniques. Whatever we choose to make it.

What is the school?

Where is the school?

Wherever we are

135

THE TRUTH IN COMBAT IS DIFFERENT FOR EACH INDIVDUAL

1. RESEARCH YOUR OWN EXPERIENCE 2. ABSORB WHAT IS USEFUL

3. REJECT WHAT IS USELESS 4. ADD WHAT IS SPECIFICALLY YOUR OWN

136

IT HAS BEEN STATED

IT HAS BEEN STATED THAT JEET KUNE DO IS A PROCESS OF ELIMINATION AND NOT ACCUMULATION OF KNOWLEDGE BUT IT MUST BE REMEMBERED THAT THIS IS A PROCESS AND NOT A PRODUCT.

THE KEY WORD HERE IS PROCESS. YOU ARE CONSTANTLY, THROUGHOUT YOUR ENTIRE LIFE ACCUMULATING AND THEN ELIMINATING WHAT IS USEFUL AND NOT USEFUL IN YOUR LIFE.

137

Pukulan Pentjak Silat Sera Family Tree


Badui Tribe
Pak Sera Mas Djut Johan de Vries (uncle of John and Ernest to Mas Djut) John de Vries (Lineage holder of the original system) Ernest de Vries Ferdie de Vries Mas Rhum

Theo Schryn

Ernest Tremeullen

Paul de Thouras (linage holder)

Maurice de Thouras

Willem Reeders

Benny Zeventer

Dolf de Vries

Joop Brewer

Victor De Thouras (no longer Affiliated)

Stevan Plinck (no longer affiliated)

Dan Inosanto (no longer affiliated)

Gus Van Ham Ralf Burgemeestre

Nono de Vries

Robert Vanatta Narin Lattitham Louis Campos Clifford Stewart Jonny Ronko Arie Hunto

Pukulan Pentjak Silat Bukti Negara Family Tree


Pendekar Agung Paul de Thouras (Creator of Bukti Negara)

Guru Stevan Plinck 1 st Instructor (no longer affiliated)

Guru Danny Huybrechts (lineage holder of Bukti Negara

Board of Directors

Guru Pangkat Tuo Vahid Aminian (Senior Guru)

Guru Pangkat Tuo Clifford Stewart (Senior Guru) (no longer affiliated)

Guru Pangkat Tuo Louis Campos (Senior Guru) (no longer affiliated) Guru Pankgat Dua Tim Anderson

Guru Pangkat Tuo Larry Watanabe (Senior Guru)

Regional Directors Guru Pankgat Satu Dave Moss (Indiana) Rick Jackson (Pennsylvania) Bart Berner (Ohio) George Darish (Michigan)

Guru Pankgat Satu Pete Poching John Tessier Freda Doyle


INACTIVE IN CURRENT ORGANIZATION Guru Martin Beijer Guru Burton Richardson Guru Mike Gallo Guru Vernon Ford

138

ITBA INOSANTO FOUR COUNT


FIRST SERIES 1. LEAD HOOK KICK/CROSS/HOOK/REAR HOOK KICK 2. LEAD HOOK KICK/CROSS/HOOK/LEAD HOOK KICK 3. REAR HOOK KICK (RETRACT KICK) LEAD HOOK/CROSS/LEAD HOOK KICK 4. REAR HOOK KICK (RETRACT KICK) LEAD HOOK/CROS /REAR HOOK KICK SECOND SERIES 1. 2. 3. 4. JAB/CROSS /RIGHT HOOK KICK LEFT HOOK KICK JAB/CROSS/LEFT HOOK KICK/RIGHT HOOK KICK JAB/CROSS/DOUBLE RIGHT HOOK KICK JAB/CROSS/DOUBLE LEFT HOOK KICK

THIRD SERIES 1. 2. 3. 4. CROSS/HOOK/CROSS LEAD HOOK KICK HOOK/CROSS/HOOK REAR HOOK KICK JAB/REAR HOOK KICK/LEAD HOOK KICK/REAR HOOK KICK CROSS/LEAD HOOK KICK/REAR HOOK KICK/LEAD HOOK KICK

MISCELLANEOUS COMBINATIONS 1. (COUNTER CROSS) DOUBLE PARRY/DOWNWARD RIGHT KNEE/LEFT HORIZONTAL ELBOW RIGHT DOWNWARD ELBOW/RIGHT KNEE/RIGHT HOOK KICK 2. (PARRY THE LEAD TEEP) LEFT HAND PARRY TO OUTSIDE/ HOLD LEG/RIGHT KNEE TO THIGH/RIGHT HOOK KICK TO THIGH/LEFT HOOK KICK TO THIGH/FOLLOW W/ LEFT LEAD HOOK KICK/CROSS/HOOK/RIGHT REAR HOOK KICK

139

ITBA INOSANTO TWELVE COUNT


MUAY THAI CURRICULUM
TWELVE COUNT LEFT LEAD 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. LEFT ROUND KICK CROSS HOOK RIGHT DIAGONAL DOWNWARD ELBOW HOOK NECK/RIGHT KNEE RIGHT ROUND KICK RIGHT ROUND KICK HOOK CROSS LEFT DIAGONAL DOWNWARD ELBOW HOOK NECK/LEFT KNEE LEFT ROUND KICK

140

ITBA INOSANTO FIFTEEN COUNT


LEFT LEAD MUAY THAI CURRICULUM

1. LEAD HOOK KICK/CROSS/HOOK/REAR HOOK KICK 2. LEAD PARRY TO CROSS/LEFT COVER TO HOOK 3. LEAD HORIZONTAL ELBOW/REAR DOWNWARD ELBOW 4. RIGHT KNEE / LEFT HOOK KICK/CROSS/HOOK/RIGHT KNEE/ RIGHT HOOK KICK 5. TEEP COUNTERS CROSS/SLIP TO OUTSIDE OF SECOND CROSS AND BUMP TO WITH RIGHT SHOULDER (THIS PUTS THE RIGHT LEAD FORWARD) FOLLOW WITH CROSS/HOOK/DOUBLE LEAD HOOK KICK

141

ITBA INOSANTO EIGHTEEN COUNT


THREE PART SERIES LEFT LEAD MUAY THAI CURRICULUM

# 18 A/SERIES
1. (COUNTERS LEAD TEEP) LEAD PARRY TO OUTSIDE/REAR

HOOK KICK TO LEAD THIGH/FOLLOW FOUR COUNT TO BODY 2. (COUNTERS REAR LOW HOOK) LEG SHIELD/REAR HOOK KICK TO INNER THIGH LEAD/FOLLOW FOUR COUNT TO BODY 3. (COUNTER CROSS) SHOULDER STOP/CROSS/HOOK/REAR ELBOW/REAR KNEE/REAR HOOK KICK (ALL RIGHT SIDE)

# 18 B/SERIES
1. (COUNTERS LEAD HOOK KICK TO SHOULDER) RIDE KICK USE RIGHT HIGH COVER AND LEFT HAND PARRIES DOWN/RIGHT HOOK TO SIATIC NERVE/FOLLOW FOUR COUNT TO BODY 2. (COUNTER MID LEVEL REAR HOOK KICK TO WAIST) SLIP KICK OR CATCH KICK WITH BODY ZONING/SIMUTANEOUSLY DELIVER HOOK KICK TO SUPPORT LEG/FOLLOW W/ FOUR COUNT TO BODY (MAY KICK SUPPORT LEG SECOND TIME W/ OPPOSITE LEG PRIOR TO FOUR COUNT) 3. (COUNTER CROSS) CIRCULAR PARRY TO OUTSIDE W/ LEAD HAND/ FOLLOW CROSS/HOOK/REAR ELBOW/REAR KNEE/REAR HOOK KICK

# 18 C/SERIES
1. (COUNTERS LOW HOOK KICK TO SHIN) THAI SWITCH TO LEAD HOOK KICK TO INNER THIGH/FOLLOW FOUR COUNT 2. (COUNTERS LOW RR RD) LEAD LEG SHIELD SWITCH TO REAR HOOK KICK TO THIGH/FOLLOW FOUR COUNT TO BODY 3. (COUNTERS CROSS) RISING LEAD ELBOW INSIDE CROSS/LEAD ELBOW/ REAR ELBOW/REAR KNEE/REAR ROUND NOTE: CROSS COUNTER SERIES CAN BE BROKEN UP INTO ANY COMBINATION OF CROSS/HOOK/ELBOW/KNEE/HOOK KICK. EXAMPLE PARRY CROSS/FOLLOW WITH CROSS/HOOK/REAR ROUND
142

MUAY THAI CURRICULUM TEEP COUNTERS INSIDE PARRY FEEDER SERIES/LEFT LEAD
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. LEAD PUSH KICK/RIGHT LOW ROUND KICK LEAD PUSH KICK/RIGHT MID ROUND KICK LEAD PUSH KICK/RIGHT HIGH ROUND KICK LEAD PUSH KICK/RIGHT CROSS LEAD PUSH KICK/RIGHT DIAGONAL DOWNWARD ELBOW LEAD PUSH KICK/RIGHT KNEE KICK

ITBA INOSANTO

DEFENDER SERIES TO COUNTER FEEDER SERIES/LEFT LEAD 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. PARRY PUSH KICK FROM INSIDE TO OUT/LEFT LEG SHIELD/LEFT KICK LEG/FOLLOW W/ 4/COUNT (LEFT ROUND/CROSS/HOOK/RIGHT ROUND) PARRY PUSH KICK FROM INSIDE TO OUT/CUT KICK W/OR WITHOUT CATCH/FINISH W/ 4.COUNT PARRY PUSH KICK FROM INSIDE TO OUT/HIGH DOUBLE COVER/CUT KICK/ FOLLOW W/ 4-COUNT PARRY PUSH KICK FROM INSIDE TO OUT/CIRCULAR PARRY/CROSS/HOOK/RIGHT DIAGONAL DOWNWARD ELBOW/RIGHT KNEE/RIGHT ROUND KICK PARRY PUSH KICK FROM INSIDE TO OUT/INSERT LEFT LEAD BETWEEN ELBOW/HEAD/FOLLOW REAR DOWNWARD DIAGONAL SNAP ELBOW/RIGHT KNEE/RIGHT ROUND KICK PARRY PUSH KICK FROM INSIDE TO OUT/SIDE STEP/HOOK UNDER KNEE W/RIGHT ARM/PUSH BODY W/LEFT (PUSH FOR THREE STEPS) CUT KICK W/RIGHT ROUND UNDER KNEE/FINISH W/ 4-COUNT

143

144

145

146

147

KALI GODDESS OF WAR

The goddess is full breasted, naked and standing on one foot. Her other leg bends at the knee, with the sole of her foot resting on the other knee of the supporting leg. Both ankles have several anklets enriching each. Kalis dark hair is bejeweled and piled on top of her head. The top of Kalis coiffeur culminates with three spires, the center most being the highest. Her tongue fully extends from her mouth, with teeth bared. She wears a garland of skulls around her neck, dangling bracelets on her wrists and a slave bracelet around each bicep. A drooping belt of severed hands encircles her narrow waist. Four arms extend two from each shoulder, with her hands holding a kamagon (battle stick), sword or a knife, shield, a strangling noose or a severed hand of a giant. An empty hand extends forward, palm out. Kali, in Sanskrit means black and sources describe the goddess Kali as a black faced demon with blood smeared all over her face. They also state the paintings and sculptures show Kali stepping prone figure of consort, Shiva. The Hindu meaning for the Kali is a devouring destructive goddess who is blood thirsty.
148

TRIBES OF THE PHILIPPINES

Agta (Negritos) Apayao, Tingguian Descendents of headhunters and live close to rivers. Ata (Negritos) Ati (Negritos) Ayta (Negritos) Badjao-Sea Gypsies Bagobo-Upland tribe of Mindanao Batak-Semi-nomadic tribe of hunters & gathers. Bontol (Igorots)-Head hunters. Tooth for a tooth attitude. Dumaget (Negritos) Ifuago (Igorots)-Built giant rice terraces. Ilokano-Malay Ancestry Ita (Negritos) Jama Mapun- Muslim people of the Cagayan Islands. Kalinga (Igorots)-Head hunters. Mandaya, Marisaka-Animism strongly practiced.

Manobo-Upland tribe of Mindanao Maranaw (Moslems)-Last Islams Mindoro Mangyans Fishermen turned agriculturists do to new settlers pushing them into the jungles and hills. Alagan Hanunoo Tadyawan Buhid Iraya Palawan Samel (Moslems) Subanon-Upland tribe of Mindanao. Tboli-Live in Tinuary highlands Taganua-Palawan island forest dweller ethnic group. Tasada-50, 000 years has passed them by. Taut Batu-People of the Rock Animism, they live in caves. Tausug (Moslems) - The first Islams, love & ceremonial tribe living mainly on Basilan Island.

149

IMPORTANT DATES IN THE PHILLIPINES

3000 1000 AD 1250 1433 1521 1565 1571 1896 1898 1898 1899 1899 1942-1944 1946 1954 1972 1986

Malays from Indonesia and Malaysia arrive Chinese traders Datu Sumakwels Maragtas Code Rajah Kalantiaws Code of Kalantiyaw Ferdinand Magellan landed in the Philippines Spanish explores claimed the Philippines for Spain and established a permanent settlement Spanish control Philippines The Spaniards execute Jose Rizal, a leader of the Philippine Independence movement. Emilio Aguinaldo led the revolt against the Spaniards. Philippines declare independence from Spain Spain gave the Philippines to the United States after the Spanish American War Malolos Constitution, the Philippines was declared a republic Philippine-American confrontation Japan controlled the Philippines The Philippines gained independence The Philippine Army defeated the Communist led Huk rebels after a five year fight President Ferdinand E. Marcos declared a state of martial law, which lasted until 1981 Widespread protests against President Macros forced him to leave office

150

RAJAH LAPU LAPU FILIPINO WARRIOR

Conqueror of Magellan at the Battle of Mactan 1521

151

THE BENEFITS OF MEDITATION

Spiritual

Developmental Triangle

Physical

Mental

1. Patience is increased 2. Will is strengthened 3. Efficiency improved 4. Thought ability improved 5. Fuller personality is achieved 6. A sense of stability is achieved 7. Spiritual insight can be achieved

152

BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. Dan Inosanto The Filipino Martial Arts, Know Now Publishing Co. 1980 P.10-13. 2. Abdul Muhammed Ehmee, A Short History of the Fighting Art of the Philippines. 3. Buji Mateen, Majapahit. 4. Rasaan Lateef Mateen, The Quest for the Fountain Culminates. 5. Alan Villiers, Magellan, a Voyage into the Unknown National Geographic, Vol. 149 No. 6. June 1976, P. 720-753. 6. Tim Joyner, Magellan, International Marine, 1992. 7. Leukosis-Mendelssohn, The Universal Standard encyclopedia, Vol. 15 Unicorn Publishers, Inc., New York, 1954. 8. Fontaine-Couch, Colliers Encyclopedia, Vol. 15, P. F. Collier & Son, Crowell-Collier Publishing Company 1954. 9. Encyclopedia Britannica CD, 1994-1998. 10. Worldbook Encyclopedia CD. 11. American Heritage Dictionary CD. 12. Francis St. Clair, The Katipunan, The Rise and Fall of the Filipino commune, Manila 1902. 13. Henri Turot, Aguinaldo et les Philippines, (Emillo Aguinaldo, First Filipino President, 1898-1901.) Paris 1900. 14. Richard Brinsley Sheridan, Barrister at Law, Inner Temple, The Filipino Martyrs, A Story of the Crime of February 4, 1899, John Lane : The Bodley Head, London & New York, 1900. 15. Dr. Antonio De Morga, History of the Philippine Islands, Vol. I-II. Kraus Reprint, Arthur H. Clark Company, 1907. 16. Blair and Robertson, Customs of the Pampangos in their Lawsuits, op. cit. Vol. XVI. p. 329.) 17. Blair and Robertson, Relation of the Conquest of the Island of Luzon, Manilia, April 20, 1572, op. cit. Vol.III. p.165. 18. Book of Knowledge, Volume 9, 1952. 19. Robert Reish, Kali Training Manual, 1993, P. 1-36.

153

Kaliradmam: From Kali (Visayan) meaning knowledge & wisdom Three Areas of Arnis
1. Single Stick 2. Double Stick 3. Stick Dagger Sword & Dagger Sword & Shield

AREAS OF THE KALIRADMAN

Seven Areas of Eskrima (Pangamut)


1. Single Stick/Sword 2. Double Stick/Sword 3. Espada y Daga 4. Single Dagger 5. Staff/Spear/Oar 6. Palm Stick 7. Empty Hands

According to Guro Dan Inosanto there were originally 12 categories in Kali and possibly some master may have mastered them all: 1. Solo Baston/Olisi a. Single stick, can d. Slipper art b. Single sword e. Newspaper art c. Single ax f. Tjaband - sai 2. Doble Baston/Olisi (Sinawalli) a. Double sticks, canes d. Sword and shield b. Double sword e. Ax and shield c. Double axe f. Shield and dagger 3. Espada y Daga, Olisi y Baraw a. Long stick short stick d. Stick and shield b. Stick and dagger e. Sword and shield c. Sword and dagger 4. Baraw Kamot, Daga (single knife) a. Dagger and empty hands c. Single short stick b. Bali song (butterfly knives) 5. Daga y Daga/Baraw y Baraw (two knives) a. Dagger and dagger c. Double short sticks b. Dagger and shield 6. Tabak Maliit/Olisi Palad a. Palm, pocket, or yawara stick b. Double end dagger 7. Panantukan (Mano Mano) - Kamot Kamot Pangamut (empty hands) a. Panatukan (boxing) system b. Panadikan/Pananjakan (Sikaran) kicking system c. Dumog, Layug, Buno, Destchon (grappling & wrestling) system d. Hampak-Higot-Hubud-Lubud (tie & hit, untie & hit, blend & hit) e. Kinomutay/epit (pinch) Kagat/Angkad (bite) Kugat (choke) f. Songab finger thrusting g. Siko Tuhod System (elbow-knee) 154

TWELVE AREAS OF KALIRADMAN

AREAS OF KALIRADMAN (Cont)


8. Sibat (staff), Bangkaw (spear) a. Bangkaw (spear) b. Bangkaw Taming c. Bangkaw & Kalasag d. Sibat (staff) 9. Maluwag Maluwag (flexible weapons) f. Olisi Toyok (nunchaku long & short) g. TabakToyok (nunchaku) h. Putong Tagkus (stick blend) i. Putong Tagkus (head hand) j. Sabitan (belt) k. Sarong (cloth around waist) 10. Tapon Tapon (Throwing weapons & objects) a. Dirt, pepper, mud b. Stone, rock, sand c. Coins d. Yo-yo e. Top (spinning) 11. Lipad Lipad (Projectile Weapons) a. Pana (bow & arrow) b. Sumpit (blow gun) 12. Hilot Ancient & Modern Healing Arts a. Healing Arts 1. Massage 2. Trigger Points b. Health Arts c. First Aid f. Baraw (Dagger) g. Spikes (metal) h. Rattan darts / bamboo darts i. Bankaw (Spear) j. Simbalan (Light Spear) c. Pana (sling shot) d. Lantanka (portable canon) d. Ethics & Moral Training e. History f. Rhythm Training (music & dance) g. Spiritual Training h. Mental Training a. Latigo (whip) b. Lubid (rattan or rope vine) c. Kabit or De Cadena (chair) d. Kanggan (jacket) e. Buritot Page (sting ray fishtail) e. Duta (oar) f. Heavy stick (Dos Manos) g. Log stick (Dos Manos) h. Spear & stick, sword or dagger

1. Regino Ilustrismo 2. Juanito LaCoste 3. Floro Villabrille 5. Pedro Apilado 6. Pasqua lOvalles 7. Jack Santos 8. Sam Tendencia 9. Leo Giron 10. Angel Cables

DAN INOSANTOS KNOWLEDGE


11. Max Sarmiento 12. Dentoy Revillar 14. Art Miraflor 15. Telesporo Subingsubing 16. Bravlio Pedoy 17. Leo Gaye 18.Cacoy Canete 19.Ted Lucay Lucay 20.Greg Lontanyao 155

21. Edgar Sulite 22. Emil Saturion 23.X Factor 24. X Factor 25.Z Factor 26. Flesimo Maxcrenede 27.Vincent Evangelista 28.Tedero Ramos

KALI ORIGINS
Luzon Region (Northern Philippines)
Arnis Sikaran Kali Largo Mano Kabroan

Visayan Region (Central Philippines) Pangamut - Empty Hand Fighting System (Eskrima)
Kali (Silat)

Mindanao Region (Southern Philippines)


Kuntao (Maranaw, Magmindano, etc.) Silat (Tausog 10 types) Bersilat (Maranaw , Magmindano) Kali (Silat)

Southern Thailand
Silat Muay Thai Kabri Kabrong Silat Pattani

Malaysia
Pulat Bersilat

Indonesia
Pentjak Silat Pukulan (Dutch Indonesian term for Pentjak Silat) Silat Pukulan Pentjak Silat Kuntao

Kali Villabrille Largusa System


Eskrima (Visayan) Arnis (Luzon) Sikaran (Luzon & Visayan) Silat (Mindanao) Kuntao (Mindanao) Kaliradman (Panay Visayan) Kalirongan (Panganasan) Pagkalikali (Ibang Tribe)

Visayan Kamarohan LaCoste System


Much of John LaCostes training came from the Visayan Region, the island of Cebu, Bohol and Panay. The island of Panay, one of the western most islands, was thought To be the birth place of Kali. He also studied in the Oriental Negros, Occidental Negros, Samar, Leyte and the Suriago.

Visayan Region (Central Philippines)


Pagamut (empty hand) Kali (Eskrima) Pandiakan (Sikaran) Panantukan (Filipino Boxing) Dumo, Layug, Buno Detschon (Grappling Art) 156

Kamoro (Southern Philippines)


Tausog Tribe Kuntaw, Silat Maranaw Tribe Silat & Bersilat Langka Silat Magmin Tribe Kali Silat Bersilat, Langka Silat Kuntaw (Silat)

KALI EMBLEMS
When Dan Inosanto studied the Filipino martial arts, he noticed that each Kali system had its own particular emblem or school patch. Although each design was slightly different, they all had common elements. The circle, triangle, and one or more weapons appeared in just about all school emblems. Dan developed his emblem to take into account the history, religion, and cultural diversity of the Filipino people. He intended the symbols to represent the development of Kali from the early 1500s until the present time. Initially the design incorporated the all seeing eye of God. The eye, and now the circle, represents the omnipresent (present in all places at all times), omnipotent (a force of unlimited power & authority, omniscient (having infinite awareness, understanding, & insight possessed of universal or complete knowledge), and omnificent (unlimited & creative power) of the Creator. The emblem also had the Roman numeral XXV representing the 25 Kali systems Dan had studied at that time. External The circle represents Diyos (the Triangle Creator). The two apparent triangles Internal Diyos Depicted are the outside triangle Triangle (Creator) representing the external Kali system. Hidden within these triangles, or symbolized by them, are other triangles representing the numerous concepts, strategies, and moral values of the warrior. The Buwan (moon) symbolizes how the warriors trained, in secrecy and at night by moon light. The half moon recognizes that only half of the Philippines were conquered. The Suntok (fist) represents the Pangamut (empty hand) Filipino Fighting Kali (Kamot Lihok), Kaliradman Kalirongan, or Kaltan. Eskrima, Escrima, Egrima, Estoke, And Estocada. Silat and Sikaran. Oeste Asar Sunset) Gabi (Night)

Lamay (Vigil Wake)

Subo (Sunrise) Este Bulan (Moon)

157

KALI EMBLEMS (cont)


The Bolo and the Olisi divide the emblem into four quadrants representing Norte (north), Este (east), Sur (south), and Oste (west). These four quadrants also represent the four patron (guardian or protector) Saints San Raphael, San Miguel, San Gabriel, and San Uriel. The Olisi (hard stick) is divided by the Bolo (blade) into three sections representing the Norte (northern) Luzon region, Centro (central) Visayan region and Sur (southern) Mindanao region of the Philippines. The Lohot represents the Visayan blade, but also symbolizes blades From Mindanao in the southern in the southern Philippines. At the top of the universal triangle is the Diyos (creator). This followed by Ka (self) and Kaaway (opponent) North San Raphael Diyos (Creator)

West San Uriel

East San Miguel

Ka (Self) South San Gabriela

Kaaway (opponent)

Kamagong Olisi

Luzon (North) Visayan (Central)

Lahot Visayan Blade Bulan (Moon Line)

Adlaw (Sun Line)

Mindanao (Southern)

Future

Triangle Of Knowledge & Wisdom

Visayan Group (Central Islands)

Present

Past

Kali Total Art

Triangle Of Heritage

Triangle of The Art Luzon Group (Northern Islands)

Mindanao Group (Southern Islands)

Eskrima Arnis (Stick)

158

Empty Hand Skill Kuntao - Silat Suntokan Panantukan Panantukan Hampak At Hubud Hampak At Higot Dumog & Bersilat

TRIANGLES OF KALI
Diyos (Creator) Love

Kali Triangle Langit (Heaven)

Attributes of the Creator

Lupa
(Earth)

Compassion

Humility

Spiritual Training One with the Creator Your place in the Universe

Lalaki Ng Tatsulok

Triangle Of Development or Level Physical Training or level Three in Three Stages or Levels Mental Training or level Seven Stages or Levels

Babae Ng Tatysulok

Father

Diyos (Creator) Supreme Being Supernatural Spirit

Spiritual

Spiritual Triangle

Universal Triangle

Developmental Triangle Physical Mental

Son Holy Spirit (Used by most Eskrimadors) God

Iyong (Yourself)

Kalaban (Opponent)

Duty (To self, family, tribe, country, creator

Triangle of service & duty Family or Friends Tribe or Country Loyalty Courage (To face inner and outer conflict)

159

THE HIGHEST OF THE HIGHEST


Triangle of Idealism

KATAASTAASAN

Kagalang - Galang The Most Respected

KaliKalian Ancient Martial Art

of the Philippines
Kaalam (Wisdom)

Father

Respect

Triangle of Progression

Spiritual Triangle

Code Of Ethics Self Discipline

Kalaki (Skill)

Kina Adman (Knowledge)

Son Holy Spirit (Used by most Eskrimadors)

Discipline Speed

Honor

Safety Play Energy Drills Types of Attack

& Flow Training Development Triangle

Deception Technical Skill Fighting Skill Energy of Attack

Power

Triangle of Combat Adjustment

Angle of Attack

Timing & Rhythm of Attack

160

KATAASTAASAN THE HIGHEST OF THE HIGHEST (cont)


Media (middle range) Medium Range Triangle of Fighting Distance
Close Range In-Fighting Style Attack by Trapping Hand Immobilization Serada Style Long Range Distance Fighting Attack by Drawing/Exposing Retreating Style Largo Mano Style

Corto (Close Range) Mind

Largo (Long Range)

Muhahuna (Mind)

Muhahuna (Mind)

Internal Triangle

Internal Triangle

Rhythm Triangle

Hands

Feet

Seat Of Internal Strength

Point of Contact

Teel (Feet)

Kamont (Hands)

Moderate

Observation Of Triangle

Neutral

Triangle Of Touch Soft Hard

Triangle of Experience Practicing Technique Receiving Technique

Triangle of Combat Personality Passive Aggressive

Single Positive Attack

Rhythm In Attracting
Combination Positive-Positive Attack Combination Negative- Positive Attack

161

SPIRITUAL TRAINING ONE WITH THE CREATOR


YOUR PLACE IN THE UNIVERSE

Triangle Of Development or Level

Physical Training Or Level Three in Three Stages or Levels

Martial Training Or Level Seven Stages Or Levels

Guro (Teacher) Spiritual Guide or Healer

Balanced Martial Artist

Warrior Mandirigma Manggugubat-Cebu

Seeker of Wisdom Dumog or Karunungan Philosopher, Teacher, or Learner

Triangle for 3 in 1 Martial Artist


12 10-11

11 10 9 8 1

12

Left Front

Right Front

1-2

Left Side

Right Side 3 Right Rear Side Right Rear 4-5 6

2 3

9 Left Rear Side Left Rear 7-8

Footwork Triangle Footwork Triangle Of John LaCoste

162

SPEED - POWER - DECEPTION

Speed Power

Speed Deception Deception

Speed Power Power

Types of Attacks

Energy of Attack

Energy & Flow Drills (Play)

Triangle of Adjustments Angle of Attack Empty Hands Timing & Rhythm of Attack

Developmental Triangle Technical Skill Fighting Skill

Retaining Energy

Triangle of Progressive Training Sticks Blades & Other Weapons

Triangle Of Combat Energy Following Energy Harmony Function Blend Deflecting Energy

Triangle Of Harmony Female Soft Left Eye Left Nostril Night Male Hard Right Eye Right Nostril Day

163

ANCIENT KALI SCRIPT

164

HISTORY OF PHILIPPINES #1
Filipinos are recognized for their skill in martial conflict, particularly in the use of bladed weaponry. This reputation defines both modern martial artists and warriors of past centuries. Current Filipino systems represent an accumulated wealth of knowledge and experience passed down by those who first struggled to reach the islands and then battled to maintain recognition, land, or independence. The Philippines is a large archipelago or group of islands located in the Pacific Ocean. The islands were known as the Maharlikas prior to the coming of the Portuguese and Spanish in the 15 th th and 16 centuries. The Philippine Islands lie on a Sundra Shelf, approximately 500 miles east of the coast of Southeast Asia. The Sundra platform is a stable continental platform and southward extension of the Southeast Asia mainland. In ancient history, the entire 690,000 square miles of Sundra Shelf was above sea level but now is mostly covered by shallow seas. Borneo and parts of Java, Sumatra, and associated islands are eroded metamorphic sections of the shelf which will still remain above sea level. The Philippine Archipelago is surrounded to the north and west by th4e South China Sea; to the east is the Pacific Ocean, and south, the Celebes Sea. T he archipelago is approximately 1,150 miles long from north to south, and nearly 700 miles wide from east to west, and has a total area of 115,600 square miles. Its coastline totals 14,400 miles, and includes 20 harbors. The Philippine Islands are compromised of 7,000 islands, of which the corners are Celebes and the Molucca Islands to the south, Formosa to the north, and Borneo to the southwest. Seven of the Philippine Islands have an area of more than 1,000 square miles each, and contain the majority of the population. In order of size, from largest, they are Luzon, Mindanao, Leye, Cebu, Boho, and Masbate. Borneo is considered one of the gr eat islands of the world. It is located southwest of the Philippines, boundedc by the South China Sea to the northwest, and, clockwise, by the Sulu and Celebes seas, the Makassar Strait, and the Java Sea. Borneo lies southeast of the Malay Peninsula which juts out from the Malay Archipelago. Borneo, and Palawan, which is a western Philippine island and the Blabak- Bugsuk, a group of small islands off the southern tip of Palawan, are the remains of a land bridge that connected them during the Pleistocene Epoch (1,600,000 to 10,000 years ago). Consequently Borneos flora and fauna are more closely related to Palawan than to those of other islands in the Philippines

165

HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES #2


. Ancient land bridges, evidence by the Sundra Shelf; Borneo and Palawan, make it reasonable to assume that early man may have used them to cross from mainland Southeast Asia to the Philippines. Determining exactly how the first man arrived in the Philippines, either by land bridge or across the ocean in sea worthy vessels, is debatable. Concurrently, pinpointing the exact racial origin of the first man to arrive in the Philippine islands remains open to theory. Nevertheless, pottery shards derivatives of ancestral languages geography and blood genetics all help researchers discover racial origins. Three races are each found in the insular projection of lands south of Asia and are revealed as the probable ancestors of the Pacific Islander: The Australoid, Veddoid, or Negritoid people. Research further narrows the earliest settlers top the Philippine Island as being of the Negritoid or Veddoid races. Blood group genetics support that Philippine Negritos descended from late Pleistocene peoples, called Proto Malays, who inhabited the island of Southeast Asia more then 30,000 years ago. It is theorized that these people with dark skin and sometimes frizzy hair, traveled by land from Central Asia. Perhaps the Negritos walked across the ancient land bridge. The Negritos are credited with bringing the pana (short bow) and later developed the long bow. Although some people have thought that African Negroid people originally related to the Proto Malays, blood group research does not support that theory. In addition to the Negritos, researchers have pointed to the curly hair Veddoid race as being among the early men to arrive in the Philippines. They are also Proto Malay, and were believed to have migrated to the islands of the Indonesia from mainland Asia, during the Neolithic Period (Stone Age, Bronze Age and Iron Age) until about 1000 BC. The Veddoid were related to the Lakai, of the Malay Peninsula, and the Vedda of Ceylon, India. Some researchers state that the Veddoid features and preference to live on the Philippine mountain slopes tie them to the Mongol race. Inhabitants among the inland tribes of northern Mindoro, in the west central Philippines, are believed to have traces of the Veddoid. The first to arrive in the Philippines by boat were probably Indonesian sailors of the Veddoid race who have been described as tall, burly, sea-loving and fearless. Additionally, farm and fishing immigrants described as shorter, darker complexioned then the preceding Indo Aryan group would have been of the Negrito race. Research informs us that the Veddoid, Negrito and Austronesian races were all forerunners of the various Pacific Island tribes. Certainly immigrants continued to arrive in the Philippines in a series of migrations throughout the centuries. Some think that the first groups of the Malays to the Philippines were Austronesian. They would have been fro a Mongoloid race whose descendants were the pagan head hunting tribe of Igorots (also spelled Igorrotes). The Igorots were any of the various ethnic groups who lived in the mountains of northern Luzon. Subsequent Proto Malay (Indonesian) invaders usually settled on the outskirts of islands, while previous coastal Malays fled to other islands or moved inland. Some escaping inhabitants chose to seek isolation and maintain their culture. Others chose the converse and regardless of how relatively pure a race may have been originally, or which race arrived first, those who remained without evading invaders, ultimately intermarried and produced a racial blending. Just as intermarriage produces a blending of races, so does it also result in a greater wealth of knowledge and culture. This held true regarding knowledge of martial arts. It would be absurd to assume that an individual left his country and abandoned his experience or knowledge of anything. Warrior arts and skillful implantation thereof were vital for protection and preservation of an individual or group. Emigrants needed to be prepared for hostile encounters during travel and for their uncharted futures and would heavily rely on their marital arts.

166

HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES #3


Cultures who remained relatively isolated from others also exemplified a passion for the combat skills. They continued to refine and perfect their knowledge martial arts. The Philippines Islanders, whether assimilated or isolated, retained, developed and exemplified a highly developed level of martial skill. Their techniques and weaponry were undoubtedly a reflection of a people who valued, cultivated, and practiced these warrior arts. As waves of migrants arrived, former island residents could learn from, or practice against the newcomers. Its is estimated that around 3000 BC, more groups of Malays, from Indonesia and Malaysia, began settling in the Philippines. The area of the central Philippines where they initially arrived, is now call the Visayan (also, Bisayan) region. Chinese trades arrived adding to what would become a cultural mixture in the Philippines, as well as eventually all of the Pacific Islanders. They were known to have resided in the Philippines from approximately 1000 AD.

SHRIBIJAYA EMPIRE
Shrivijava (also Srivijawa or Scrivishaya) tribes of Asian and Indian Hindus migrated into Indonesia th th and Malaysia during the 5 and 6 centuries. They began as a Hindu group, call the Brahins, who migrated from India and arrived in the Palembang, Sumatra around the fifth century. This Brahin group grew into one of the earliest of the great Asian empire and became the famous Hindu-Malayan Empire of th Shrivijaya. Palembang served as its capital city from the 7 century until the kingdom was overthrown by th the Hindu Majapahit Empire in the 14 century. Meanwhile, the Shrivijayan Empire flourished in the Malay Peninsula, western Java, and Sumatra through the 9th and the 13th centuries. Shrivijaya based its great power on successful commercial and maritime endeavors. It dominated international sea trade by controlling the Strait of Malacca and establishing trade with China and India. The Srivijayan Empire utilized a combined advantage that facilitated their ability to conquer. They possessed superior physical height, martial expertise, organization, and bladed weaponry. Balangay (sailboats arrived with the Malays of this new culture. Each Balangay contained a lager family group, or social unit, established a new settlement that sometimes grew to be 30 to 100 families. This family was labeled the barangay (village), or boat village. Barangay villages were the first to leave written records in the Philippines and remained relatively isolated from other barangays . The Srivijayan colonized Borneo, and then invaded further into the Philippine. Again, those who didnt flee were eventually assimilated into the Srivijayan culture. The Taglogs, Ilocanos, Pampangos, Visayans, and Bicolarios all claim Srivijayan ancestry. The Vijayans are considered to be the second Malay invaders, and descendants from them were later, to become Christians during the Spanish occupation. The Shrivijayans influence was significant through the spreading of its cultural wealth. The religion of the Shrivijayans was Buddhism and Hinduism. They were endowed with knowledge of philosophy, art, seamanship and agriculture. Additionally, the Srivijayans were equppied with a calendar, a Sanskrit alphabet and the Maragtas Code (1250 AS) and the Code of Kalantlaw (also Kalantiyaw: 1433 AD) these codes were among the few written documents remaining from the pre-Spanish Philippine culture, and both were found on the Island of Panay. The Philippine Island fell into there division, geographically, and politically: 1) the northern region was the Luzon. 2) The central region, the Visayas; 3) the southern region, Mindanao. Panay is the farthest west of the Visayas. Its shape is somewhat triangular and covers an area of 4,446 square miles. It has a rugged mountain range paralleling its western coast. Between this range and a hilly eastern protiuon, a fertile plain extends for about 95 miles from the northern to the southern coasts. Deltas of the Jalaud, Jaro, and Sibalom rivers from broad lowland in the southeastern part of the Panay. There are many fishponds in the northern and eastern sections of the island. Current inhabitants of Panay are mostly Hiligaynon (Ilongo or Panayan) ethnolinguistic group, and nomadic Negritos both residing in the mountains.

167

HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES #4


KALI
Many Filipinos believe that Panay was the birthplace of kali (kalian), the name for early combative arts within the Philippine Islands. Kali is a Sanskrit word which literally means black. Inherently, kali was an art for the preservation of life. It was the mode of combat used to protect an individual (kalitao/kaliman) his family, village, and culture. It was also a way of life that embodied philosophy, physical training, combative and restorative arts, literature, and religion. The kaliman confronted death, or the threat of death, as part of his daily life, until ultimately; he became released from its inherent fear. The importance of jail was emphasized in kaligayahau (happiness) and kalayon (freedom), words that denote both the spirit of kali and a kalitaos perspective of the world. In his confrontation with the darker side of life, the kaliman came to view and live life devoid of false illusion, empty dreams, and anxiety regarding combat, old age or long term illness. He could live his life unencumbered from his fear of consequence. Today, Tuhon Leo Gaje expresses that this worldly view engendered mutual respect among and a respect for life itself. Therefore, the god of violence (Kali) was also one of respect and peace. The head of each family unit was a kalitao (kaliman ) or martial artist who earned rank or title in accordance with his fighting skills, etc. The kalitaos rank was signified by his kali (Bladed weapon). An individuals blade would reveal his rank, locale (Barangay , region) and religious heritage (Hindu, Indonesian, or Moslem). Persons of greater status and authority wore respectively shorter blades, called danganan, indicating that their marital ability was superior to others. Although there are up to twenty five or more variations of Filipino bladed weapons, more common are the kris, balasiong , barong , hunong, kampilan , laho t, and utak . Kali was named differently, depending on the people and region of the Philippines to which it belonged. It was 1 ) Pananandata to the Tagalogs, 2) Kalirongan to the Pangasinenses, 3) Didya or Kabaraon to the Ilocanos, 4) Kaliradman or Pagaradman to the Visayans, 5) Sinawalli to the Pampaguenos, and 6) Pagkalikali to the Ibanag. Each region had a master teacher, or tuhon , who commanded the most respect and honor from the people. He held the responsibility of passing on the culture of the Philippine Islanders to younger generations. The tuhon was the leader of a central community bothoan (school). The Filipino culture at that time included history, astronomy, engineering, medicine, and language, both oral and written. Languages differed among regions, and even now a number in excess of 300 major dialects, with Tagalog being the current national language. The highest in the political power system of the Visayan, central region of the Philippines was a sultan (Moslem for ruler of a country). He ruled over all the Barangay (village) datus (chiefs). The predominantly Islamic region of the Philippine islands, Mindanao, had no larger governing political group. However, one researcher offered that some thought there may have been a time when three sultans the Philippines.

ANCIENT PHILIPPINE LAW


Philippine judges were consistently easier on first time delinquents, but more heavily penalized repeat offenders. Gregorio Araneta, a notable Filipino jurist stated, These primitive laws could compare very favorably to those of the Greeks and Romans. Any judicial system calls for laws to be created for its society. Ancient Philippine law sanctioned the datu (chief) of each barangay (village) to make the local laws for his village. The datu could receive assistance from the elders. In instances of creating regional, confederate laws, a superior datu held that power. The chief datu would assemble lower ranking datus in his home, brief them as to the need of a law and readily obtain their agreement. The new law would be put in writing and became effective immediately. A village crier would then travel throughout the barangays carrying and clanging a bell, while he called umalahokan! This noisy attention would assemble the villagers. The, the crier would announce the new law, and all subjects could beware. From that time on the law went into effect, and any person who violated it incurred its penalties

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JUDICIAL PROCEDURE
Before the Spanish arrival, when the datus (rahahs), tuhons , and sultans were still in power, trials affecting either criminal or civil case were held in public. The judiciary process was comprised of a barangay court, consisting of datus , elders and the defendant who represented himself in the trial. The defendant was required to swear an oath, prior to stating his case. These oaths were taken very 1 seriously and perjury was almost nonexistent. Examples of oaths included, May the crocodile eat me. May I die if I should tell a lie! May the lightning strike me! May the sun kill me! May no woman love me! or May the moon frown upon me! When two people were in opposition to each other in a trial, each being a litigant, the court usually moved in favor of the litigant who presented the most proof. If the accused attempted to resist his sentence, the judge made himself a party to the cause, and all of them (winning litigant and judge) at once attacked with full force the resisting party, and execution to the required amount was levied upon him. If datus required mediation to resolve a disagreement among residents of different barangays, or among datus , themselves, then outside datus or elders would arbitrate the dispute. Usually, they were able to settle the dispute before tribal conflict between opposing barangays would occur, and avoid further distress or even war.

TRIAL BY ORDER
According to ancient Philippine law, if proof remained insufficient regarding which accused person was truly at fault, then the court would use a trial by ordeal to determine the guilty party. This was especially true regarding criminal cases. Religious belief supported the Philippine perspective that the gods would favor the innocent and condemn the guilty. The court would utilize three ordeals, or tasks, to which toe defendant(s) would submit, in order to determine the guilty party. They were 1) the river ordeal, 2) the boiling water ordeal, and 3) the candle ordeal. The ordeals were reminiscent of trials used during the witch hunts of 1692 in Salem, Massachusetts Bay Colony, in which 19 convicted witches were hanged 150 suspected witches were imprisoned. In both the Philippines and Massachusetts, the methods used were extremely unfair, but ended in a simple conclusion. The three Philippine ordeals were as follows: 1) The river ordeal involved forcing suspected persons into the river at spear point. The first suspect to surface was found guilty. 2) The boiling water ordeal demanded that each guilty party reach into a pot of boiling water to retrieve a stone from its depths. The person burned the most severe was determined to be the guilty one. 3) In the candle ordeal, each suspected person had a candle of equal dimension placed in front of him. The candles were lit and the persons candle which burned down first, convicted him as guilty.

MARGATAS CODE

Many Filipino Scholars and researchers agree that the Margatas Code2 was written in 1250 AD by Datu Sumakwel, and is, therefore, also known as the Sumakwel Code.3 Datu Sumakwel was considered the oldest and wisest of the Borneo datus who colonized ancient Panay, and the same adjectives are used to describe his code.3 However, Datu Sumakwel chose to name code Margatas, which is Sanskrit for Great People. The full text of the Margatas Code is as follows: 1. Deliberate refusal to work in the fields or to plant anything for daily subsistence is a most serious crime which deserves severe penalty. a. The lazy person shall be arrested and sold to a rich family to serve as a slave and, as such, to learn the lesson of service and the value of work in the house and in the fields. b. Later, when he has been trained for work and has come to love it, he shall be restored to his family. The price paid for him shall be returned and he shall no longer be considered a slave, but a free man who has been regenerated and desires to live by the fruit of his labor

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. c. If much later it is found out that he has not reformed in any way and that he wastes his time in idleness, he shall be arrested again by the authorities and sent to the forest. He shall not be allowed to associate with the rest of the community because he is a bad example. II. Robbery of any sort shall be punished severely. The fingers of the thief shall be cut off. III. Only those who can support a family or several families can get married more than once and have as many children as they can. a. The poor family cannot have more than two children because it cannot support and properly bring up in the community a greater number of children. b. The children who cannot be supported by their parents shall be killed and thrown into the river. IV. If a man has had a child by a woman and he runs away from her because he does not want to marry her, his child by this woman shall be killed because it is difficult for a woman without a husband to support a child. a. The parents of the woman shall disinherit her. b. The village authorities shall look for the man, and when they catch him and he still refuses to marry, he shall be executed before the child of the woman he has abandoned. Father and child shall be buried in the same grave.

THE CODE OF KALANTIAW

The penal Code of Kalantiaw (also Kalantiyaw) was one of the few written documents to survive from the pre-Spanish Philippine culture. It was apparently written in 1433 by Rajah Kalantiaw, third chief of Panay, and then passed on to his overlord, Rajah Besar. It is the second oldest known written code of the Filipino people and was discovered on the island of Panay in 1614.4 The Code of Kalantiaw contained eighteen orders, the first of which was Thou shall not kill. It contained principles and values by which to live (or die) and listed punishments that were then considered appropriate for moral or social disobedience. A Spanish priest, Father Plasencisa, wrote that the early judges of the Philippine Islanders received testimony orally from both sides,, under oath, according to their usage, which was swearing by the crocodile, the sun, the moon, and many other things by which they swore. Another Spanish document supported Father Plasencias findings and added, all islands have this (type of swearing of) oath(s) in common, a fact that I have noticed since our coming to his land. A range of punishments, depending on the violation, included light fines, up to being cut into pieces and thrown to crocodiles. Breaches of ancient Philippine religious beliefs resulted in many violations. These included singing during night walks, killing white monkeys, and cutting sacred trees. The latter explained why the superstitious Philippine Islander of that day would respectfully say, excuse me even when urinating on a tree.

The full text of the Code of Kalantiaw is as follows:


1. Do not kill, nor steal, nor hurt the aged, for your life will be exposed to the danger of death. All those who violate this order will be drowned with a stone in the river or in boiling water. 2. See to it that all your debts to the chiefs are readily paid. He who fails to comply will be lashed with a whip one hundred times for the first offense. If the debt is large, the debtors hand must be immersed in boiling water three times. For the second offense. The debtor will be put to death by blows. 3. No one should marry very young girls nor marry more than he can take care of, nor be excessively lustful. He who disobeys this order for the first time will be compelled to swim for three hours. For the second offense, he will be put to death with the prongs of a spine.

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4. Follow and obey: Do not disturb the graves in passing before them, wherever they may be, whether in caves or trees, show your respect for the dead. He who disobeys this order will be put to death by exposure to ants or be whipped to death with prongs. 5. Agreements for bartering food should be fulfilled to the letter. If one fails to comply with this order, he will be whipped for one hour. For the second offense, he will be placed among the ants for one day. 6. Respect holy places, such as trees of recognized worth and other spots. For the first offense, one will be fined the equivalent of one months labor in gold or in honey. For the second offense, the punishment is five years. 7. The death penalty will be imposed upon the following: Those who kill sacred trees; those who shoot arrows at night at old men and women; those who enter the homes of the chiefs without permission; those who kill sharks or striped crocodiles. 8. Slavery for one year will be the penalty for stealing the wives of chiefs; for keeping bad dogs who bite the chiefs; for setting on fire anothers crops. 9. To be beaten for two days: Those who wing in their night walks; those who kill birds known as Manaul; those who destroy the chiefs records; those who deceive with wicked intention; those who trifle with the dead. 10. It is the duty of the mother to instruct her daughters secretly in sex hygiene and prepare them for motherhood. Husbands should punish their wives if they catch them in adultery in flagranti. Whoever disobeys this order will be cut into pieces and the pieces thrown to the crocodiles. 11. The following will be burned alive: Those who, through force or cleverness, escape and evade punishment; those who kill too young children; those who try to steal the wives of old men. 12. The following will be drowned: The slaves who attack their chiefs or owners and masters; those who are lascivious; those who kill their idols by breaking them or throwing them away. 13. The following will be placed among ants for half a day: Those who kill black cats at the new moon; those who steal objects; however insignificant, from their chiefs and elders. 14. The following will be reduced to slavery for life: Those who refuse to marry off their beautiful daughters to sons of the chiefs or hide them in bad faith. 15. Regarding beliefs and superstitions. The following will be whipped; Those who eat the bad meat of sacred insects or useful herbs; those who injure or kill chickens of Manaul or white monkeys. 16. The fingers of the following will be cut off: Those who destroy idols made of wood or clay on their altars; those who break the pick used by priestesses for sacrificing pigs, or who break wine vessels. 17. The following will be put to death: Those who desecrate the places where idols and sacred objects pertaining to their gods and chiefs are found. Whoever does his necessities in these places will be burned. 18. Those who disobey the above orders, if they are elders, will be thrown into the river to be eaten by sharks and crocodiles. Done in the Year 1433 Kalantiaw, Third Chief Aklan, Panay

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1 2

Vide Penal Legislation of the Philippine Islands in Philippine Law Journal (manila, February, 1914). The first version of the Maragtas in the Ilongo Bisayan language was published by Pedro A. Monteclaro in Iloilo, 1907. For an English translation, see Manual L. Carreon Margatas (Manila, 1943, typescript). 3 Guilliermo Sl Cuino, El Codigo de Margatas. El Debate. Manila, February 20, 1938. 4 The Kalantiaw Code was discovered in 1614 in the possession of a Filipino Chief of Panay, acquired by Marcelino Orfila of Saragoza, Spain, and translated into Spanish by Rafal Murviedo y Samanev. The first Spanish text of the code appeared in Father Jose Ma Mavons manuscript entitled Las Antiguas Leyendas de la Isla de Negros (written in Himalayan, Negros, 1837-1839). The first English translation was printed in James A. Robertsons Social Structure of and Ideas of Law Among Early Philippine Peoples, M. Stephen and H.E. Bolton (editors). The Pacific Ocean in History, New York, 1917, pp. 182191. See also Josue Soncuya, Historia Prehispana de la Isla de Panay (Manila 1917), pp. 27-28; Encarnacion Alzona, A History of Education in the Philippines 1565-1930 (Manila 1932), pp. 4-7 and Gregorio F. Zaide, Early Philippine History and Cuture (Manila, 1937), pp. 30-32. Note: Other historians dispute the ancient laws. They comment, The Code of Kalantiaw, a well known code of laws supposedly given by Datu Kalantiaw of Aklan in 1433 is a clever hoax. The hoax was done by Jose E. Marco, and antique collector from Negros Occidental, who gave the document to James E. Robertson of the National Library in 1914. It could not be authentic because of its suspicious origin, the strange writing and modern words in the text, and the un-Filipino harshness of its laws (e.g. flogging, exposure to ants, swimming for hours).

The same holds for the Margatas Code, which was taken from the Margatas, a book where the legend of the Ten Datus of Borneo was taken, is only the imaginary creation of Pedro A. Monteclaro, a visayan public official and poet. He wrote the Margatas in 1907 based on folklore and oral tradition. Source of information Philippine History and Government by Gregorio F. Zaide and Sonia M. Zaide While the Srivijayans still had control in the Philippines, the Chinese made a significant impact on the culture during the 12th century. Even though Chinese traders had been trading in the Archipelago since th 1000 AD, and some had taken residence in the islands, they immigrated by the thousands during the 12 century. This was due to the Manchurian invasion of China. Since this was not a first appearance to the islands of the Philippines, the Chinese were readily accepted into the culture and, significantly, added to the racial/cultural mix. The Chinese, following suit with previous cultures, introduced their kuntao martial arts of the Tang Dynasty. These, too, were blended into the Philippine system of martial arts.

MAJAPAHIT EMPIRE

By the end of the 12th century, Shrivijaya shrunk in power, became a small kingdom, and the th Javanese Majapahit kingdom rose in the 13 century. This Moslem (also Muslim) empire was founded by Vijaya, a prince of SIngsari, and was the last Indianized kingdom to rule in Indonesia. The Majapahit had its base in eastern Java, but spread throughout Southeast Asia, conquered Srivijaya and dominated Indonesia. The Majapahit people were greatly influenced by Aram Moslem missionaries and became known as a Moslem Empire. Majapahits arrived, as a third major wave of Malay invaders to the Philippine Islands. They and subsequent Mohammadean Malay invaders, chose mostly to reside in the southern region. From those Malays, descended the fierce Moros (Moslem/Islam) of the Philippine Islands. They were a proud culture who chose isolation, and still remain as a distinct culture. They too, as the Srivijayans before them, used the Sanskrit based writing system. The Majapahit zenithed in the 14 th century under the leadership of King Hayam Wuruk and his prime minister, Rajah Mada. Researchers are not in agreement regarding Majapahits territory. Some say that during its peak, the empire included areas that are today Burma, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, Cambodia, the Philippines, and Madagascar. Others state that the Empire covered present day Indonesian and part of Malaysia. Still others claim that its territory was confined to eastern Java and Bali. Regardless, the Majapahit became a significant power and maintained intercourse with China, Cambodia, Annam (central Vietnam) and Siam (Thailand). The Majapahit Empire lasted until the early 16 th century, when it was defeated by the Arab Moslem missionaries, who, earlier, had so heavily influenced their culture. Some theorize that perhaps the Moros would have conquered the Philippine Island, Had not the Spanish taken possession in 1565

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KALI -THE GODDESS OF WAR
The martial system of kali cannot be considered a separate entity from its philosophy, religion, or historical aspect, as an object of worship, and of kali, the fighting art. Thus, it is important to study, both th th the historical and spiritual influence on the art. Philippine Islanders, from the 6 century through the 16 century, are believed to have worshipped the goddess of violence and death, Kali. The Goddess is full breasted, naked and standing on one foot. Her other leg bends at the knee, with the sole of its foot resting on the knee of her supporting leg. Both ankles have several anklets encircling each. Kalis coiffeur culminates with three spires, the center most being the highest. Her tongue fully extends from her mouth, with teeth bared. She wears a garland of skulls around her neck, bangle bracelets on her wrists and a slave bracelet around each bicep. A drooping belt of severed hands encircles her narrow waist. Four arms extend, two from each shoulder, with her hands holding a kamagon (Battle stick), sword or knife, shield, a strangling noose, or a severed hand of a giant. An empty hand extends forward, palm out. Kali, in Sanskrit means black: and sources describe the goddess, Kali, as a black faced demon with blood smeared all over her face. They also state tat paintings and sculpture show Kali stepping on the prone figure of her consort, Shiva . The Hindu meaning for the Kali, is a devouring destructive goddess who is bloodthirsty. This stems from an incident in her life in which she was called to kill Raktavija , a demon. Raktavija seemed immortal since he could instantly reproduce at the rate of 1000 clones per drop of blood that fell to the ground from his body. To circumvent this, Kali speared and held Raktavija aloft so she could drink his blood as it fell, and not one drop reached the earth. Indians honored the goddess, Kali, by daily sacrifice of goats at her temple in Jalighat, Calcutta. Also, assassins in India (also defined as thugs; sthaga, thag, thagi, thags, or thuggee), ritually offered their sacrificial victims to Kali. Ironically, however, the Philippine Islanders viewed Kali as a peaceful god. They and the Asian Indians, were able to rectify lifes apparent contradictions. Further illustration of this was that the Asian Indians believed their supreme goddess, Devi, revealed her multiple, contradictory personalities in other goddess forms. Kali is associated with another goddess, Durga (also a fierce aspect of the Devi), and represented the forms of her dark, terrifying, fierce side. Devi also took other forms in which she represented peace and tranquility.

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More illustrations of the Indian Hindu religion folklore may shed light on the belief system of the Filipinos who shared this religious heritage. The following is from northern India where Shaivism/Shaktism is foremost. The people believe there is a great goddess, Mother Earth, who is married to an earth god, or the sun. The people annually celebrate her anniversary, the period of impurity, with a festivity devoid of routine agricultural duties. Then, during the harvest season, the people appease Mother Earth by engaging in orgiastic activities. Remote areas of central India identify Mother Earth as Devi, the supreme goddess most worshipped in northern India. Kali/Mari, again, is portrayed as the malevolent Mother Death form of Devi, Mother Earth. Then, the mountain dwellers of hilly, forested northern India make piles of stone s or tree branches. These piles are to honor mountains and forests personified as mothers to the believers. These rugged shrines are then left, and other believers leave offerings as they pass. In east and northeast India, Shaivism is broadly popular, and Shaktism is common. There the people believe that a deceased relative will be re-born within one year, through a child born into the relatives family. They believe that Sasthi (the sixth) is to be worshipped on the sixth day of a childs birth, and is represented by placing a compost pile of manure or dirt in the birthing room. Sasthi is supposed to be the teaching god of young children and women in childbirth. The east and northeast Indians additionally believe Candi to be a form of the fierce goddess Durga, who is (along with the goddess, Kali) the dark side of the supreme goddess, Devi. They believe that Candi resides in trees and is appeased by clumps of earth. Believers in Gaya, an Indian Bihar state, ward demons and ghosts away by holding a ceremony that honors their deceased. The east and northeast Asian Indians also worship Manesa, a great mother snake goddess who resides in stone statues of her image seated on a snake and in the Manesa plant. In writings, it is she who is supposed to protect and bless travelers as they journey through life and during the rainy season when reptiles are most dangerous. Sanskrit writing and poetry also identifies Manesa with demonic snake characters. The snake, especially the cobra, is also a sacred to most Asian Indians. Cobra statues and snake stones (nagalkals) are objects of worship and offerings in order to elicit protection from living snakes and blessings of rain and fertility. The snake stones are more popular with women desiring fertility. However most people, including every joint family of the Coorgs in Karnataka state have a guardian snake deity. Brahman priests served in small sanctuary or private garden ceremonies. Vaishnavism is prevalent in western India where many lower caste people choose it as a way of life to fulfill the demands of existence, and aspirations towards salvation or social elevation. They do anticipate an ultimate reunion with their supreme god. Black magic, use of scapegoats and ritual nudity are components within their belief system. Mediums and exorcists use self torture to elicit divination, or the will of mother goddesses, and Brahman priests are present to conduct important functions. Other regions or India, especially in the south, use devil dancing as a means of exorcising evil spirits. An outlawed method of appeasing gods to ward off evil was the hook swinging festival. Cadakpuja, and usually held in cases of famine or other calamities. This practice lasted into the twentieth century and involved swinging a man suspended by hooks that were attached to the end of a long pole. The man would be swung around in sacrificial pain, in the hopes of invoking the gods to end famine or other major catastrophes. In many regions, especially in western India, where Vaishnavism is dominant, many believe that righteousness will improve their life in a subsequent world. In order to discover divine will, exorcists and mediums seek to be possessed by mother goddesses and submit themselves to self-torture. They are then called upon to prophesy about future events. In western India the worship of snakes is more prominent, with some temples even dedicated to the serpent. There is also widespread practices based on the belief in blaming others, ritual nudity, and black magic.

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In peninsular India, Shaivism and devotional forms of Vaishnavism are primary. Each village ascribes a shrine, or sacred place to honor the goddess Devi or her multiple, multipersonalitied forms. Many detailed stories sing praise of goddesses who protect from disease. These goddesses are relied on for daily needs and protection against infection of cholera and small pox for the villager and his cattle. The goddess, Mariyamma, particularly addresses smallpox resistance, and she presides over a large region of peninsular India. These goddesses are viewed as mothers who bestow all good of bad luck. They are personified in clay, sticks, or stone pillars, without regard to permanence, and worshipped with animal sacrifices. Other offerings may include rice, fruit, or flowers. They are offered daily, or whenever, since no calendar of festivals is imposed. Most shrines are rugged and simply made of small bricks, buildings, or stone flat areas beneath a tree. The priests (pujari) of these cults are not of the Brahman sect. Male deities surface among these females. They are Shiva and Aiyanar. Shiva is the supreme male god, of all India, or general Hinduism. Shivas consort is Durga (name varies according to village, or temple) one of the fierce forms of Devi. AIyanar is the other male god, who is worshipped in Shiva temples and ranks higher than his complement goddesses, due to his vegetarianism. Aiyanar is believed to protect villages, act as their patron, and grant blessings, including the fruit of offspring. Fixed annual festivals were arranged for the male deity, or for exorcism of evil power and, generally, occurred during major agricultural seasons.

MAGELLANS VOYAGE
The Philippines is the only nation in Southeast Asia that became subject to western colonialism before it had the opportunity to develop an advanced elite culture or a central government that ruled over a large territory. Due to many invasions, the Philippine Islanders developed over centuries, martial arts prowess in accordance with their culture and heritage. The Moslem Moro Filipino skills made history when they were threatened by a Portuguese navigator, Ferdinand Magellan, in 1521. History credits explorer Magellan with two firsts: 1) he was the first European to discover the Philippine Islands (April 7, 1521) and 2) he successfully circumnavigated the earth for Spain. This cursory glance at Magellans successes gives rise, historically, to a brilliant victory. However, personally, Magellans voyage was plagued with disaster and death, including his own. Portuguese Ferdinand Magellan, was probably born in 1480 and served a military career under Emanuel, King of Portugal. Magellans assignments took hi to the East Indies in 1505. Then, from 15081512 he made exploratory missions to Sofala, Malacca, Java and the Moluccas (Spice Islands). In 1513, he was wounded and Lamed for life while serving a Moroccan assignment. However, Magellans disagreements with Emanuel, King of Portugal, caused Ferdinand to secede from his native country and adopt Spain as his homeland. Where Emanuel, King of Portugal, opposed Magellans vision to circumnavigate the earth and was unwilling to boost his salary, Charles I, King of Spain, shared and funded Magellans goal. Under Spanish sail, Magellans fleet of five ships left Seville, Spain on September 20, 1519. Within two months theyd reached South America. By March of 1520, Magellans fleet arrived in Port Julian, near the southeastern tip of South America and remained almost six months. During that time, one of his ships was wrecked and his crew mutinied. Magellan was successful in quelling the mutiny, but as his fleet sailed into the Pacific Ocean through what is now the Strait of Magellan, another of his ships deserted. Magellans three remaining ships reached the Ladrones (Island of Thieves, later named Marianas) on March 5, 1521. However, many of his crew were weak and sick with scurvy. Magellans fleet then anchored off Guam and was quickly approached by fast sailing, remarkably maneuverable outrigger canoes. These people were Micronesian people called Chamorros, who were tall, fair and good looking according to the Spanish explorers. However, when the Chamorros boarded one of Magellans ships, the Trinidad, they stole according to the Spaniards eyes, but believed themselves to be honest recipients as guests of the strangers. Nevertheless, Magellan was determined to retrieve the more important item taken by the Chamorros, the ships long boat. So with armor and crossbows they regained their boat. Magellan then ordered the vengeful burning of forty or fifty houses in a small local village and killed seven inhabitants. Afterward, Magellans fleet set sail and headed south.

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On March 16, 1521, Magellan sighted the mountains of Samar (Zambia). It was a portion of the Philippine Islands archipelago, located southeast of the central Vasayan Islands. Magellan named it St. Lazarus, since he first saw it on March 16, or St Lazaruss Day. Samars coastal reefs prohibited landing, so Magellans fleet sailed southward and then west into Leyte Gulf. He sighted natives in many canoes off the shores of Suluan, but feared possible conflict with the islanders and decided to ford ahead. Magellan sailed another eleven miles and anchored at Homonhon, apparently an uninhabited small island. Its bay was a pleasing half moon shape, with a white sand beach and appealed to Magellan and his scurvy weakened sailors. Two days later, nine natives, apparently from Suluan, arrived aboard a prau, a swift Malayan single outrigger boat with a triangular sail. Another source said pirogue/piragua, a canoe made from a hollowed tree trunk. A few came aboard Magellans ship and received trinkets, including red cloth, mirrors, hawk bells, and ivory. In return, they gave all the food they carried in their vessel. Antonio Piagafetta, was a gentleman passenger and adventurer aboard Magellans ship. Pigafetta kept a journal and much of the information about this voyage was due to his faithful writings. The food items were a jug of palm wine, fish, two kinds of bananas, which Pigafetta described as figs a foot long, plus cochi (coconuts). Pigafetta also noted that they were naked except for loin cloths of park, and named them Caphri (Kaffirs), Arabic for unbelievers. Through sign language, the natives agreed to return with fresh provisions. True to their commitment, four days later they brought coconuts, rice, palm wine, oranges, and chicken. They were accompanied by their chiefs, whom Pigafetta described as extensively tattooed, adorned with gold armbands, earrings, and wearing silk embroidered cotton skirts. Imagine how delighted Magellan must have been to see the clothes and ornaments indicative of trade with China. March 25th, Magellan sailed west from Homonhon, and then south until he landed in front of Limasawa, a small island south of Leyte. The wary islanders came by canoe, but stayed aloof of Magellans ship. So, Magellan plied the natives with trinkets offered on a plank, which was gently slid towards their canoe. Once the gifts were received, the islanders departed. A few hours later, two balangays arrived bearing their leader, Rajah Kolambu (Colambu) who ruled Limasawa, Suluan, and a district in Mindanao. Rajah Kolambu sent a few of his men to Magellans ship, bearing gifts of a gold bar and basket of ginger. With great restraint, Magellan politely declined, to avoid appearing eager. Meanwhile, to his delight, Magellans Malayan slave of ten years, Enrique, understood these natives language. Scholars believe that Enrique was reared in the central Philippines, captured, taken to Sumatra, and then to Malacca islands (east Indies) and eventually sold to Magellan. As the days passed, Magellan earned Rajah Kolambus trust and, the latter, invited Magellan to be bonded to his as a blood brother casi casi ceremony. This ceremony was popular in Malay at the time and involved each drinking a few drops of the others blood. Magellan introduced the islanders of Lamsawa to Christianity, by holding a solemn Easter mass on the beach. Antonia Piagefettas journal account was, After the mass, some of our men took communion. The captain general then ordered the performance of a sword dance, at which the kings we greatly pleased. This display of swirling blades would have appealed to the blade wielding Filipinos, and Pigafetta confirmed its success. Magellan further bragged about the superiority of Spanish warriors, claiming that they could take on and defeat Filipino warriors three to one. Magellan also queried the natives and ascertained that a greater selection of spice commodities could be had from Seylani (Leyte), Zubu (Cebu) and Clagan (Mindanao). Rajah Kolambu then offered to escort Magellans fleet through the tricky reefs and through his quest, if Magellan would delay two days th and help with the rice harvest. Magellan, short of staples, agreed. A week later, on April 4 , Ferdinand Magellan, his new blood brother, Rajah Kolambu and men, in their respective ships and balangay headed northeast for Cebu. They chose Cebu because it served as the trading center for the Philippine Islands as was ten times larger than Limasawa.

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Magellan entered the Cebu port with a huge show of artillery intended to impress the short, fat local ruler, Rajah Humabon. When ordered to pay a required harbor fee, common to sea faring traders, Magellan refused. He then intimidated the ruler by claiming that his king was more powerful than that of the notorious Portuguese, who ruthlessly conquered Malacca and Calicut. Next, Magellan used gifts and the promise of strong trade to successfully endear himself to Rajah Humabon. Magellan was invited to the palace where Rajah Humabon was comfortable in a loincloth. Humabon, in order to secure friendship with Magellan engaged him in the casi casi blood brother ceremony. Where the two Rajahs used casi casi to bond relations with Magellan, he in turn used Christianity as a tool to manipulate them. Particularly, Magellan wanted to cement future Spanish trade through Rajah Humabon. With Cebu as a base trading center, business could be networked throughout the Archipelago, and extended to the Asian mainland. Magellan even bribed prospective converts with the promise of new suits of armor, gave showy displays of piety, and promised favored treatment to Christians. Magellan additionally informed Humabon that as a Christian, he could more easily subdue enemies. Humabon expressed a desire to become a Christian, but worried that the other chiefs, as equals, wouldnt obey him. Consequently, Maellan boasted that resistant chiefs would be killed and their possessions seized. On April 14, 1521, Magellans fleet chaplain baptized the two rajahs: Kolambu and Humabon, the latters wife, and approximately 800 others. Within the next eight days, 2,200 people on Cebu and some neighboring islands followed the lead of the two rajahs and became Christians. The irony was while their captain and fleet chaplain were baptizing souls into Christianity, many of the sailors were debauching the Cebu island women. According to Pigafetta, however, Cebu males participated in the custom of palang which subjected their women to painful sexual relations. Pigafetta described. The males, large and small, have their penis pierced from one side to the other near the head, with a gold or tin bolt, the thickness of a goose quill. In both ends of the same bolt, some have what resembles a spur with points on the ends, others like the head of a cart nail. I very often asked many, both old and young, to see their penis, because I could not credit (believe) it. In the middle of the bolt is a hole, through which they urinate. The bolt and spurs always hold firm. Pigafettas additional information was the men of Cebu, have as many wives as they wish, but one of them is the main wife. Whenever any of our men went ashore, both by day and by night, everyone invited them to eat and drink the women loved us very much more than their own men. All of the women from the age of six years upward have their vaginas gradually opened because of the mens penises. The horrific custom of palang, in all its facets, outrages our culture. However, in line with our beliefs, the natives of Cebu were outraged by the philandering of their wives and daughters. Magellan shared their anger, and in fact, demoted one of his participating ship captains for his wanton licentiousness. Meanwhile, the newly baptized Rajah Humabon told Magellan that several local chiefs were unwilling to submit to his authority. Magellan then ordered the neighboring chiefs to acknowledged Humabon as their superior or suffer the consequences. Regardless, three chiefs remained unmoved. So, Magellan dispatched a small group of his militia to use one chiefs village as an example to the others. Magellans men punished the chief, burned his village of Bulaya and returned with livestock, as contraband. That was enough to convince the remaining two defiant chiefs to acquiesce and pay the more strict tribute to Humabon, as demanded by Magellan for their resistance: a goat, pig, basket of rice and jug of honey. The remaining chief, Rajah Lapulapu, of Mactan (Magtam) Island remained fiercely defiant and challenged Magellan to battle. Mactan is a small (area 24 sq. mi.). coral, rectangular shaped island, off eastern Cebu and several hundred miles south of Manila. Rajah (Ci)Lapulapu and his tribesmen, consistent with the history of Philippines, were skilled fighters of Sri Vijayan ancestry. They were used to battles, having spent years fending off neighboring Rajah Humabons tribe. Mactan has extensive mangrove swamps, and perhaps the reason for the tribes territorial disputes.

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Magellan was determined to deal with Rajah Lapulapus resistance as effectively as he had the Bulaya village. However, one of his ship captains attempted to dissuade Magellan from invading Mactan. Magellan had boasted that only sixty men would be required for the assault that would prove Spanish superiority in warfare and teach Rajah Lapulapu a lesson as welled. The captain whod warned Magellan not to battle, declined participation, but sent another instead. Additionally, Rajah Humabon warned Magellan that his plan to attack Mactan was not sound, but Magellans mind was set. In any event, Rajah Humabon backed Magellan with thirty of his own canoes, bearing 1,000 Filipino warriors in total. Rajah Humabon offered his men to lead the attack, but Magellan unwisely refused and ordered Humabon and his men to remain in their canoes. Then, Magellan adhered stubbornly to his deadly plan and disregarding the advice of all headed to Mactan with his sixty men. He was flanked by his blood brothers Kolambu, Homubon and warriors. They arrived on Mactan on April 7, 1521, with the deadly intent to destroy Rajah Lapulapu and subjugate his people. An over confident Magellan, usually thorough, neglected considering the tide or a reef that prevented his ships from coming closer than 1,000 yards from shore. This meant that his mounted swivel guns were ineffectively out of range and Magellan and his men had to wade to shore. The Spaniards carried only their muskets which proved ineffective in penetrating the native wooden shields. Furthermore, Magellan and his men wore only half of their armor, which exposed their legs. This proved to be Magellans Achilles hell. Lapulapu and his tribesmen responded with fire hardened bamboo spears (some iron tipped), blades resembling large scimitars (bolos), stakes, arrows (tipped with poison), stones, and dirt. Magellan was struck in the leg with a poisoned arrow and ordered his men to slowly retreat. Magellan continued to battle along with just a few of his men. He was struck in the face with a hardened bamboo spear, and succumbed to death when an arm injury prevented any further fighting on his part. Magellan suffered that resounding defeat and lost his life on April 27, 1521. His body was never recovered by Europeans. Conversely, Rajah Lapulapu became a hero and his city, formerly called Opon, was renamed Lapulapu in his honor. Antonio Pigafetta, was a gentleman passenger and adventurer aboard Magellans ship. Pigafetta survived the voyage and kept a journal. Much of the information about Magellans voyage was due to his faithful writings. In great detail he described their encounters in the Philippines: On Friday the twenty-sixth of April, Zzula, lord of the aforesaid island of Mattan (Mactan) sent one of his sons to present to the captain-general two goats, saying that he would keep all his promises to him, but because of the lord Cilapulapu (who refused to obey the King of Spain) he had not been able to And he begged that on the following night he (Magellan) would send but one boat with some of his men to fight. The captain-general resolved to go there with three boats. And however strongly we besought him not to come, yet at midnight we set forth, sixty men armed with corselets and helmets, together with the Christian king (Humabon, whom Magellan had baptized): and we so managed that we arrived at Mattan three hours before daylight. The captain would not fight at this hour, but sent to tell the lord of the place (Cilapulapu) and his people that, if they agreed to obey the King of Spain, and recognize the Christian king as their lord, and give us tribute, they should all be friends. But if they acted otherwise they should learn by experience how our lances pierced. They replied that they had lances of bamboo hardened in the fire and stakes dried in the fire, and that we were to attack then when we would When day came, we leapt into the water, being forty-nine men, and so we went for a distance of two crossbow flights before we could reach the harbor, and the boats could not come further inshore because of the stones and rocks which were in the water. The other eleven men remained to guard the boats. Having thus reached land we attacked them. Those people had formed three divisions, of more than one thousand and fifty persons. And immediately they perceived us, they came about us with loud voices and cries, two divisions on our flanks, and one around and before us. When the captain saw this he divided us in two, and thus we began to fight. The hackbutmen and crossbowmen fired at long range for nearly half an hour, but in vain, (our shafts) merely passing through their shields, made of strips of wood unbound, and their arms. Seeing this, the captain cried out, Do not fire, do not fire any more. But that was of no avail. When those people saw this, and that we fired the hackbuts in vain, they shouted and determined to stand fast they fired at us so many arrows, and lances of bamboo tipped with iron, and pointed stakes hardened by fire, and stones, that we could hardly defend ourselves.

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Seeing this, the captain sent some of his men to burn the houses of those people in order to frighten them. Who, seeing their houses burning, became bolder and more furious, so that two of our men were killed near these houses, and we burned a good thirty of their houses. Then they came so furiously against us that they sent a poison arrow through the captains right leg. Wherefore he ordered us to withdraw slowly, but the men fled while six or eight of us remained with the captain. And those people shot at no other place but our legs, for the latter were bare. Thus for the great number of lances and stones that they threw and discharged at us we could not resist. Our large pieces of artillery which were in the ships could not help us, because they were firing at too long range, so that we continued to retreat for more than a good crossbow flight from the shore, still fighting, and in water up to our knees. And they followed us, hurling poisoned arrows four or six times, while, recognizing the captain, so many turned upon him that they knocked his helmet off its head twice. But as a good captain and a knight he still stood fast with some others, fighting thus for more than an hour. And as he refused to retire further, and Indian threw a bamboo lance (spear) into his face, and the captain immediately killed him with his lance, which he left in the Indians body. Then, trying to lay hand on his sword, he could draw it out but halfway, because of a wound from a bamboo lance that he had in his arm. Which seeing, all those people hurled themselves on him, and one of them with a large javelin thrust it into his left leg, whereby he fell face downward. On this all at once rushed upon him with lances (Spears) of iron and of bamboo and they slew our mirror, our light, our comfort, and our true guide While those people were striking him, he several times turned back to see whether we were all at the ship. Then, seeing him dead, as best we could we rescued the wounded men and put them into the boats which were already leaving. After dinner the Christian king sent to tell those of Mactan that if they would give us the bodies of the captain and the other dead men, we would give them as much merchandise as they desired. And they answered that they would not give up such a man, as we supposed, and that they would not give him up for the greatest riches in the world, but that they intended to keep him as a perpetual memorial.

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Magellan became too overconfident regarding the fighting ability of his soldiers and intended to prove that to his Christian Filipino cohorts. He believed that the spear, kalis (broadsword) and baraws (daggers) of Lapulapu and his men were no match against their own European steel armor and muskets. He had hoped to conquer Mactan as a present to Rajah Humabon. He therefore, took only 60 men who wore only half their armor (legs exposed), ordered Humabons back up force to remain in their balangays , neglected to judge the tide or reefs and waded to shore. His own arrogance and pride defeated the otherwise cautious Magellan, and so he paid with his life. Magellan had his chance to fight with the native in habitants. He learned too late, however, that aside from the confidence of Lapulapu and his men, and of the magic powers of their anting-anting (amulets), they were skilled in the art of kali using bladed weapons. For the first time in history, the Filipino art of fighting was used against Europeans in defense of the country where it was developed. Villagers in cotton cloth fought the armored Spaniards to the beach. They battled Spains finest steel with pieces of rattan, homemade lances and fire hardened sticks with points. At noon that day, Magellan died at the hands of the fiery chieftain Lapulapu, the first Filipino to successfully resist foreign aggression. Lapulapu and his 1,050 men effectively used fired hardened bamboo spears (some iron tipped), blades resembling large scimitars (bolos), stakes, arrows (tipped with poison), stones, and dirt in defeating Magellans invading force. Perhaps Lapulapu kept Magellan as a trophy or idol, but there is no evidence that this was ever done. A tall column overlooking the bay where the battle took places commemorates the death of Magellan. Bit according to Filipino history, Magellan was a pirate. He burned their homes and trade to enslave their people as part of the great Spanish conquest. In the little township a mile or two away, a new bronze statute of Lapulapu, leader of the warriors who killed Magellan, shines in the sun. Magellan and his men were the first Westerners to witness and gain knowledge of the fighting arts of the Philippines. The battle of Mactan became notorious, and whereas Magellans fate was mourned, Lapulapu became a hero in the Philippines. Rajah Humabon never fulfilled his plans to attack Lapulapu. The latter had gained a reputation as being extraordinarily powerful. However, both rajahs would have been accomplished in pangamut, an early form of kali. It consists of eight strokes, two slashes each to the head, chest, and kidney; then two thrusts, to the head and chest. Lapulpalus weapon was the kampilan (double pointed blade) and his kali would have been a harder, more powerful style. Lapulapu was reputed as having the ability to throw a short stick that would pierce a coconut tree. Humabon would have used a softer, lighter, more evasive kali style.

SPANISH CONTROL
Philip the II of Spain, for whom the archipelago was named, continued to send expeditions to the Philippines, under the following series of leaders: Garcia Jefre de Loyasa, Alvaro Saavedra and Lopez de Villalobos. It was not until 1563, when the fifth expedition (Magellan counting as the first) arrived with its captain adventurer, Miguel Lopez de Lagaspi (also spelled Legazpi, in some sources). Lagaspi made headway into the Philippines. In May 1565 he established a permanent European colony on Cebu. His Spanish conquistadors successfully used fire power, military strategy and the advantage of the barangays isolation from each other to conquer Cebu and annex neighboring islands. Then, in 1570 Legazpis grandson, Juan Salcedo, sailed to Luzon and established friendly relations with the Rajah of Tondo, Lacandola, and the Rajah of Manila, Soliman. By 1571, just forty years after Magellans death, the elder Miguel Lopez de Legaspi proclaimed Spanish sovereignty over the Philippine Archipelago and named Manila as its capital.

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In 1574, an exiled Chinese pirate, Li Ma Hong, attempted to take control of Manila. He came with sixty-two armed junks, containing some 5,000 men. Li Ma Hong demanded control of the city, but was defeated. Most of his men escaped to the north and intermarried with the islanders. The Dutch, traditional enemies of Spain, often tried to invade the islands and wrest control from the Spanish, but were consistently forced into retreat. Spain continued to dominate and chose to retain the barangay as their basic unit of local administration in the islands. Unfortunately, they sadly disregarded the venerated tuhons careful passage of writings, which were passed down through centuries, one generation to the next. The Spanish destroyed most of the Philippine Islanders writing and eclipsed many areas of Filipino culture. Most certainly, Spanish rulers would have viewed the Filipino martial arts, kali, as a potential threat attempted to squelch it by prohibiting the Filipinos from displaying or carrying bladed weapons. However, as fast as the Spaniards tried to eradicate kali, the arts transitioned to alternate seemingly innocuous avenues of Filipino culture. Although practice with the blade was still continued in secret, usually at night under moonlight, kalimen switched their ancestral arts emphasis from kalis (bladed weaponry) to bahi (hardwood) or oway (rattan) sticks. Additionally, mono mono plays were staged as mock battles of Moors against Crusaders. However camouflaged within the plays dances, kali, (now arnis in Spanish) was retained, hidden, and legally practiced directly before the unsuspecting Spanish despots. Arnis survived the Spanish conquest and later, as we shall see, the American occupation. The Spaniards did their best to completely immerse the Philippine Islanders into Spanish ways. They even changed the entire blocks of Filipino surnames from their native names into completely different Spanish ones. Kali names changed accordingly and gleaned additional techniques. Kali became arnis de mano (Spanish for arnis, trapping or defensive armor). Kali also changed to the Spanish names: 1) estocada, to Tagalogs, and 2) egrima, escrima, or eskrima (to fence or skirmish) to Visayans. Other areas knew kali as estoque, fraile, arnis de mano, or arnis . The stick became known as the baston, garrote, or tabak , and the blades were often grouped under the term bolo. Espada y daga was what the Spanish called the blade and dagger. Sinawali or doble baston refer to the use of two sticks. Kali cultivated mutual respect among men while preserving life and freedom. This was mostly clearly observed in the unconquerable spirit of the Moors in the southern Philippines. Dan Inosato related, the Muslim warriors opposed the Spanish conquests with their religion, their courage, and their unparalleled fighting ability. Spain was never able to subjugate or even extort tribute from the Moslems in the south. The Spaniards strategy was to capture Moro chiefs and then break and force them to make their people submit, as they had done to Montezuma in Mexico. It never happened. Spain misjudged these descendants of the Moslem Majapahit Empire. Moro leaders were fiercely committed to retaining freedom, and would mete out death or die attempting to protect this fundamental value. They boldly, competently and successfully keep their people and territory free from invaders since the time when they themselves were conquerors. The Spanish were not the first to fail in an attempt to control Moro territory and they would not be the last. To date no one has succeeded in conquering or dominating the proud strong people of the Mindanao. Another Filipino point of contention regarding three religious orders, Dominicans, Augustinians, and Recollects and their ownership of one tenth of all the Philippine islands unimproved land. This had occurred because the Catholic Church had been united with the Spanish government for over three hundred twenty seven years. Plus, the Filipino clergy resented the power the Spanish clergy held in the church. Despite sporadic opposition from the Filipino clergy throughout the years, the Spanish retained power in the islands. Additionally, the Spanish continued to repulse foreign attempts to take over the Philippine archipelago, including the time in 1762 when the British captured the city of Manila. Spain regained the city, however, according to the Treaty of Paris in 1763.

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LIGA FILIPINA
In 1872, Filipino soldiers at Cavite arsenal rebelled, killed their Spanish officers and demanded independence. This revolt failed to produce freedom and resulted in the martyred deaths of three Filipino priests: Jos Burgos, Mariano Gmez, and Jacinto Zamora. They were blamed for sedition and executed. Their deaths served to further incite bitter resentment toward Spanish rule. Discontent bred the Propaganda Movement against the Spanish by Filipino refugees in Europe. Foremost among them was Dr. Jose Rizal, who was residing in Spain to further his education. Rizal wrote a novel, Noli me Tngere, (The Social Cancer) in 1886. It centered around the Spanish corruption of Manilan society. The nineteenth century brought forth an educated middle class that yearned for independence. When Rizal returned to the Philippines in 1892, from Madrid, he was pardoned by the captain General of the Archipelago. Three days later, Rizal threw a reunion with Filipinos of some wealth and having the same zest for independence from all Spanish control, as himself. In the beginning of 1893 the society of the Liga was formed as an imitation Filipino form of the Spanish Freemasons. Rules were made and officers decided upon an initiation rite for new members. The initiation included swearing oaths, kissing a skull and signing documents in the blood of the person swearing allegiance to the Liga . Further, the nationalistic ideas of the Liga were spread through conferences, books, pamphlets and its underground paper, La Solidaridad. Only wealthy men and members of Masonic orders were invited to join the Liga and unite in plotting the abolition of Spanish rule. Pio Valenzuelas testimony regarding his initiation into the Liga Filipina was: Once in the house, they spoke of many things, en resum, that the aim of the association was to obtain the independence of the Philippines, oppressed and enslaved by the Spaniards. Placing a dagger at his breast, they obliged him to throw himself upon it. But lacking the courage they placed it in his hand, leading him to a man whom recognized to be seated, and ordered him to strike the man with the dagger, a thing which de hared not do either. He was then conducted into a room and addressed by a person he knew to be Bonifacio by the voice, who informed him that he could not retrace his steps because he knew of the existence of the society, he could not assist at the juntas, nor could they teach him the signs of recognition til he had been re-initiated; they moreover made him sign two sheets of blank paper, causing him to swear never to reveal the existence of the society to anyone, under the pain of assassination. They then removed the blindfold and he saw around him eight or nine individuals dressed in cloaks and hoods; he signed the two sheets of paper and was again blindfolded and conducted to a considerable distance from the house where the bandage was again removed. Another member of the Katipunan, in his declaration made on the 22 of September in 1896, stated during the month of February 1893, one Sunday morning, a certain Estanislao Legaspi entered his store, telling him to accompany him in a calesa. He listened to tirades against the Spanish government til their arrival at the house of a certain Tranquilino Tories, in Calle Elcano. Here his eyes were bandaged by Legaspi and he was handed over to the care of another individual who conducted him to the upper story of the house and made him sit down; he then heard a person whom he knew to be Legaspi by his voice speak, saying several things against the Spanish Government, demanding of him an oath of blind obedience, and a defense of the Philippines til the shedding of the last drop of his blood, threatening him with fearful punishments if he should turn traitor. The ceremony being terminated, his eyes were unbound and he saw, on a table, a skull which they made him kiss, and Legaspi handed him a lance commanding him to wound himself in the arm; but he felt a feeling of feint-heartedness come over him, and manifested to those present that he had not the courage enough to wound himself and wished that the oath he had taken had been enough; he was dispensed from the operation. When the bandaged was removed the eight individuals composing the junta were masked with black hoods, but after he kissed the skull and attempted to wound himself they removed the hoods and he then recognized Estanislao Legaspi, who presided, Mariano de Vera, Teodoro Plata and Juan de la Cruz, who was a clerk of the Tabacalera and who had led him upstairs; he did not know the other three. The witness paid two pesos as entrance fee, promising to pay 50 cents monthly. He then asked Legaspi what association it was and he replied it was the Liga Filipina.
nd

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The Liga Filipina was well organized according to provinces: Each province had a provincial council, organized similarly as the main Supreme council, but each headed with only six councilors. Those councilors had under their orders as many popular councils as pueblos in the province. The chain of command began with the powerful Supreme Council and filtered down through the well organized provincial councils. Dues were collected from the membership in order to further its mission toward national independence. However, by 1894 when the society was one year old, its membership voted to disband. Nevertheless, another secret society had already been established prior to the Liga, with similar, but more radical initiation practices. This other society would move to the forefront, and last until 1898, long enough to perpetrate rebellion and death. That society was the Katipunan.

THE KATIPUNAN
Additionally, other persons significantly affected the Filipino move toward independence. Philippine patriot, Andres Bonifacio was born in Manila of poor parents of Chinese and Tagalog descent. He later emerged as a primary advocate for Filipino nationalism. Bonifacio was well-read and a graduate of the University of Santo Tomas in Manila. He wanted complete severance from Spanish rule. Bonifacio worked as a warehouse clerk and messenger prior to 1892. In that year, Andres Bonifacio founded and led a secret nationalist revolutionary society known as the Katipunan. The full name of the society was Kataastaasan Kagalang-Galang Na Katipunan Nang Manga Anak Nang Bayan meaning, Supreme Worshipful Association of the Songs of the People. The Katipunan fulfilled Bonifacios ideal, it was a Filipino nationalist organization founded to oppose Spanish rule. The Katipunan was organized under the umbrella of the order of Freemasons as was the Liga Filipina. Masonic orders are traditionally secret, anyway. So for Filipino Freemasons to initiate members and swear them to silence as to words and actions within the sect, was not questioned by the Spanish. Again, the Spanish had introduced the Filipinos to Masonry. The organization of the free Masons worked out to perfectly suit the Katipunan. Members, respectively, were ruled from the top by the Supreme Council, which was similar to the organization of the Spanish Masonic orders. Power filtered sequentially downward to the provincial council, popular council, sections, and delegates. Freemasons initiated rites, through secrets, are not mystical. By comparison, initiation rites were mysterious with the Ligas , and even more radical with the Katipunan. Its initiates and those involved, all wore masks. The new initiate was faced with a table bearing a skull, crossbones, triangles, and two candles. The Katipunan initiation would include an explanation of its purpose: the liberation of the Tagalog people, and expulsion or destruction of the Spanish. Then, the new initiate would somberly be reminded of the three martyred Filipino priests (1872) and would witness imitations of assassinations or suicide. Then, the Katipunan initiate took oaths of obedience, and would dedicate himself to freedom of the people unto death, protection of the brotherhoods secrets to the grave and commitment to increasing membership. The initiate was required to cut his own arm with a dagger and used the flowing blood as ink in signing written oaths. Initiates were warned that grave repercussions were to be imposed upon any Katipunan member who violated his oaths. Masonic brothers all used special signs and passwords to recognize brother members of their society. They also promise strict compliance to orders from superior members. Monthly dues were collected and used by the Supreme Councils central Masonic treasury to publish propaganda, and procure weapons.

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In the diagram to the left, the triangle represents the Holy Trinity: Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. The top of the triangle represents the Kataastaasan, Supreme or highest of the highest. The lower left corner of the triangle was the Kalagayan, the most loyal of the loyal. One whom is of the highest virtue, morality, honesty, loyalty, nobility, and compassion. The lower right side of the triangle was the Katipunan Sons of the Katipunan , a secret organization. The eye represented the all-seeing eye of God. And the crosses were symbols used during the great crusades.The words forming a circle around the symbol, Acmunera Acsanta Sacrificia Cometio Spiritusam, CG Sacdona Porvn (?) Credo ix Deum Patrem Omni Potentem Sancto Illi Sancto Aila (? ) translate to Both gifts and holy sacrifice in the company of the Holy Spirit. Sacred gifts (?) believe in God, the father Almighty to the holy of the holies (?) Inside the circle, Triunfus unus solos Deus, translates to Triumphant one: only God. The other symbols may be initials or coded initials of the leaders of the Katipunan, or have other meanings. Hocuar gran turret gran torclam gran torcibam sancta mimitam sancta saiamitam may be a mix of corrupt Spanish, native dialect, and a blend of Latin The book entitled Lithim Na Karunungan Ng Diyos (Secret knowledge of God) translates many of the Katipunan text, symbols, and coded messages. It may possible to recover this book from other sources, perhaps in the Philippines or Spain. Ac And or both. Acumunera Both gifts. Acsanta And holy. Ai Alas! Aila - ? Cometio In the company of. Credo Believe. Deum God. Deus God. em To the. Evante Advance. Gran Great. illi That. illic that, he (pron.). ix in. Katipunan - Secret organization. Sons of the Katipunan. Munera Gifts. Munero Honor, to reward. Omni All. Omni Potentern All mighty to the. Patren The father. Porvn / Potent Mighty. Sac - Contracyion for sacred. Sacdona Sacred gifts. Sacrifice Sacrifice. Sam. Abbreviation for Sancto (spirit) Sancta Holy. Sancte - Solemnly. reverently. religiously. conscientiously. purely. Sancto Holy. Santa Holy. Solus Only, single, sole, Alone, lonely, solitary. Solus only, is one. Spiritus - Life, breath, Spirit, courage, pride. Arrogance, moral. Spiritusam. (Spiritu sancto) Holy spirit. Toreuma atis Embossing, relief. Triunfus - (Triumphus) Triumphant. Unus One. Special thanks to Father George Kanard for the translations of the Katipunan crest.

Anti-Spanish sentiment ran so strongly within the Philippines that the Katipunan society was known to have had 100,000 members by 1896, when discovered by the Spaniards, and believed to have had up to 400,000 during the course of its existence. Its members were mostly of Tagalog workers and peasants. The urban middle class members favored reform rather than revolution.

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Commensurate with its large membership was the Katipunans growth, geographically, from Manila to branches in central Luzon. Panay, Mindoro, and Mindanao. They were organized by provinces, much as the Liga had been, and this organizational system proved very effective. In 1895, Andres Bonifacio concretely moved toward armed rebellion. He began futile negotiations with Japan, hoping to solidity that countrys backing in the event the Katipunan rebellion was successful. Wealthy Filipinos contributed funds enough to purchase a good number of arms which were deposited on the coasts of Cavite and Balangas. The assault plan was to massacre all Spanish men, women, children, religious, or lay people. Once that nefarious deed was accomplished, the Katipunas were sanctioned to ravage and pillage at will. To better his position within the organization, Bonifacios became mayor of Vacite Viejo in August, 1896.

From August 19-21, 1896 the Spanish discovered the insurrectional conspiracy of the Katipunan and began making arrests accordingly. This was confirmed two days later by a telegram sent to Colonial Minister Seor Castellano, from Governor General Blanco, in Manila. The telegram read as follows: Manila, August 21, 1896- The Governor General to the Colonial Minister -Vast organizations of secret societies discovered with anti-national tendencies. Twenty-two persons detained among them the Gran Oriente 9of Philippine Freemasonry) of the Philippines, and others of importance. Immediate action taken and special judge will be designated for greater activity. Blanco

THE PHILIPPINE REVOLUTION OF 1896

The Spanish knowledge of Katipunan intent to purge the Philippine Islands of all Spaniards intensified the need for the Katipunan society to act, or abolish their resolve of Filipino independence. th Bonifacio subsequently held a meeting on the 24 of August with five hundred of the Katipunan members in attendance. They voted to either return as legal subordinates of Spanish authority or to proceed with armed and immediate rebellion. Andres Bonifacio supported immediate rebellion and the Katipunan membership overwhelmingly agreed as indicated by the vote. Therefore, orders were sent to Manila, Cavite, Nuevo Ecija and other provinces to rebel on Sunday, August 30 th. 1895, at sunrise. As planned, the entire province of Manila, Luzon erupted into the anti-Spanish revolt of the Katipunan. Atrocities were perpetrated against, as many Europeans and loyal natives as were encountered.

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Nevertheless, the Katipunan was not invincible. Spanish forces subdued Andres Bonifacios groups and they fled northward to Montalban. Additionally, Spanish military forces successfully protected the province of San Juan del Monte with two sections of artillery. Meanwhile, sixty Veteran Guards were able to stay off rebels in the Sampaloc suburb. With Andres Bonifacio in exile, another rebel lieutenant, , assumed leadership of the Katipunan and commanded an assault in the province of Cavite, on August 31, 1896. The Katipunan targeted, disarmed and assassinated the resisting Spanish Civil Guard. They also invaded Roman Catholic convents and estates in the province and ruthlessly murdered all within. Next, on September 3, 1896, Aguinaldo led another ferocious Katipunan revolt at the Luzon capital city of Nueval Ecija. Again, the Katipunan successfully targeted and defeated the Civil Guard. By the time reinforcements arrived from Manila, there were very few Spaniards left to rescue. Finally, Spain was spared from further massive Katipunan atrocities by Teodoro Paino, a mere initiate of the Katipunan. He was a workman for Diario de Manila, a printing business serving the Katipunan by secretly producing its proclamations, lithographic stones, daggers, and harboring receipts. However, the Katipunans recent mobilization as a mass killing machine had convicted Teodoro Painos conscience. So, Paino Emilio Aguinaldo shared his regret for having belonged to the Katipunan and disclosed its secrets to his sister. She was a student at the College of Looban, where she reported her brothers testimony. The college was operated by the Roman Catholic Sisters of Mercy who, in turn, sent Paino to repeat his confession to the parish priest of Tondo. Then Teodoro Painos knowledge was passed to the subdivisions lieutenants and on up to their district chiefs. It ignited a 15 day non-stop manhunt that exposed valuable evidence of paper goods and paraphernalia associated with the Supreme Council of the Katipunan and resulted in more than 500 arrests. The Spanish continued their request to eradicate the Katipunan . They were able to defeat a fiftytwo day campaign by using reinforced Spanish troops. Andres Bonifacio had lost the confidence of the Katipunan as their military leader since his forces had been pushed into retreat of the first day of the rebellion. Meanwhile, the Spanish rounded up a scapegoat to avenge themselves against the insurgents. They targeted Dr. Jose Rizal, founder of the defunct Liga Filipina. Although Dr. Rizal had written years earlier to elicit support for political reform and Filipino independence, he had never advocated rebellion or violence. Nevertheless, the Spanish arrested Jose Rizal and publically executed him on December 30, 1896. Rizals death served to further fuel the Filipinos animosity against Spanish control in the Philippine Islands. K.K.K.N.M.A.N.B. Kataastaasang Kalagayan Katipunan Nang Manga Anac Nang Bayan (Supreme Society of the Sons of the People) The words Supreme Society express the idea of supreme Social Situation, of a society formed of noteworthy people. A well-read writer on the subject of El Katipunan o elfilibusterismo en Filipinas, says, speaking of this union of such notable folk: A reunion of people who meet to concoct assassinations cannot be a reunion of noteworthy people but should rather be a reunion of noteworthy criminals. There is not the shadow of a doubt that this is the best and, in fact, the only title to which such a society as the Katipunan can justly lay claim.

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Opinions are divided as to the origin of the word Katipunan and as to the manner in which it should be written. Some spell it with C whilst the majority use K. As to the derivation: the root word is undoubtedly tipon which, prefixed with the particle ca and terminated with an gives us a word, which signifies very select association. The word is, however, generally written with a K so as to be in keeping with the Tagalog way of spelling, as they (that is to say, the redimidos) have taken to the use of K for C whenever C has a hard sound as in cat. In like manner, to the insurgent and his sympathizers, Cavite should be Kawite. The K and W are Blumentrittisms, i.e., of German descent. The organization of the Katipunan society was analogous to that enjoyed by the Liga Filipina but amplified to the extent of anarchism, swearing hatred and destruction to everything of a character or nature Spanish, and sowing the seed of a race-hatred. The Supreme, Provincial, popular Councils, sections and the delegations ruled this association. As in freemasonry, the initiations were performed with a wealth of the ridiculous and with unending extravagancies; but of such a nature that the ignorant Indian was fascinated and became converted into a slave of his oath. The initiated and the person to be initiated were masked and lead into a room. Before a table was placed a skull and crossbones, a triangle and two candles. The skull and crossbones symbolized the transition to a different reality. The person about to be initiated was told that the object of the Katipunan was the liberating of the Tagalog people, and the expulsion of the Spaniards from the archipelago or their destruction. Following this came a series of questions and replies in the which the martyrdom of the Gomez, Burgos and Zamora, native priests judged and condemned for their part in the rebellion of Cavite in 1872, was exalted, and they passed on to the proofs which consisted in imitating an assassination and suicide. This was followed by the taking of an oath of striving to effect the liberation of the people til death, an oath which demanded a blind obedience to the commands of the superior and the preservation of the secrets of the association under the pain of death. Finally, to terminate the ceremony, they made an incision in the arm of the person initiated and with the blood which flowed from the wound thus made, the new katipunero signed his compromise. The initiated were called brethren and had their sacred words and their special signs of recognition. They were ruled by a code which established severe punishments including whipping til death and received no orders from anyone, or had no intercourse with anyone, except with their immediate superiors. Matters of importance and organization were dealt with in assemblies constituted by the Supreme Councils and all the presidents of the provincial and popular councils. The accords were taken and discussions decided by a majority of votes. Both the Supreme, provincial, popular Councils, and the sections held their periodical sessions in which were discussed a thousand different affairs, and the decisions of the Councils had to be submitted to the approval of the immediate superior. The gatherings were always held in different houses and localities, no day being set aside as fixed, but the days of festivities were chosen for that purpose, under the pretext of banquets or dances in the which the authorities had no suspicion and because on the said days these semi-public rejoicings were permitted without the necessity of seeking the license of the governing authorities. Both the provincial and the popular councils and the sections were known by special names: the initiated were Baptized with symbolic appellations; and the documents were drawn up in the Tagalog dialect, the most important being in secret code. Under the Presidency of Bonifacio, the society commenced an era of febrile activity; the greater umber of the tribunals of the pueblos were converted into centers of propaganda, which were directed by the municipalities. Pamphlets and proclamations against the friars and Spanish element were circulated in profusion. Injuries and outrages were invented, and by these and a thousand and one other infamous means, little by little, hatred and revenge were inculcated into the mind of the Indian

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. In 1895, Bonifacio took the first decisive steps towards the organizing of an armed rebellion; he sent different delegations to Dapitan to confer with Rizal and receive his advice and instruction; he opened negotiations with the Japanese Government but did not succeed therein. But with his immense ascendancy over the popular masses, ascendancy beyond imagination, he declared himself dictator. The secrets aiders of the Katipunan who pertained to the upper classes offered funds of considerable amount with which were acquired a good number of arms which were landed on the coast of Cavite and Batangas with the aid of wealthy persons. In August of this year (1896) exaltation among the masses reached its full height, and Bonifacio, realizing the fact, prepared to take what was necessary in order that in a short time the conspiracy, which was to take effect on the same day and hour in almost all Luzon, should be in readiness. The plan of the attack and taking of Manila was coarsely conceived but it might have been successful, and massacre, sacking and pillage would have crowned the iniquitous work. Astounding is the number of the initiated; in Manila and its province alone they exceed 14,000 and in the provinces of Cavite, Batangas, Laguna and Nueva Ecija there are no less than 20,000. Adding to this number those of the remainder of Luzon, the total will ascend to an enormous mass of illusioned who bowed in obedience to an iniquitous schemer. It must be recognized, however, that Bonifacio is not a common man, of active character, energetic and bold, gifted with a facility of expression in his language which suggested itself to his countrymen, of a criterion clear but badly cultivated by the reading of books of an elevated style and a pernicious character and possessed of an unfathomable ambitionsuch was the warehouse proter who had charge of the storehouse of the foreign commercial house of Fressel and Company in Calle Nueva, Binondo. The orders were circulated with rapidity throughout Manila, Cavite, Nueva Eciia, and other provinces, commanding that armed rebellion should commence at day-break of Sunday the 30 th. The day and hour assigned finally arrived, and the whole province of Manila broke out, the rebels committing a thousand and cone abuses and crimes upon as many Europeans and loyal natives as were encountered. Like wild beasts they attacked the waterworks and the powder station situated at San Juan th del Monte from whence they were valiantly driven back by a section of artillery and another of the 70 regiment. Simultaneously they attempted to invade the suburb of Sampaloc by way of Santa Mesa and there also they were combated and dispersed by 60 Veteran Guards who prevented, by their defense, a day of mourning for the city of Manila. All Cavite, except the capital, arose in insurrection on the afternoon of the 31st, assassinating and disarming the whole of the Civil Guard of the province, after a heroic defense on the part of the latter. They assaulted the convents and estates of the Religious Orders and murdered the defenseless ministers rd of the Lord. On the 3 of September the capital of Nueva Ecija was attacked by large masses of rebels, and the colony and the Civil Guard heroically resisted until the arrival from Manila of a column which combated the enemy and saved that handful Spaniards from a certain death. In the daily report of the secret police department made to General Blanco on the 30th of June 1896 is the following notice: Herewith is given translated most faithfully from Tagalog, the result of an interview held with a well-to-do Indian who belonged to the most popular of the Masonic lodges, who tried to draw into it a friend. Questioned upon certain affairs, he said: In the Masonic lodges of San Juan del Monte and of Pandacan, the whole pueblo, rich and poor, is inscribled. In the reunions the brethren attend blindfolded, and the chiefs with the face covered. The person who desires to enter the lodge is obliged to have his face covered and his eyes bandaged in sign of blind obedience; the proofs are carried out and signature made as follows. The person receiving the initiated takes a dagger and gives it to him, saying to him:

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Do you swear to be steel like that which you hold in your hand and not to bend in the exigencies which oppress and vex us, and to labor in pro of the independence of your enslaved country? I swear, answers the person to be initiated. Do you swear not to have father, mother, wife, child, nor any relative but the revenging arm which shall sleep and live with you? I swear. Then they surround him with arms of all classes and say to him: Here is they family, thy only work, and may it give thee thy life and open thy eyes for the good of the country. Then they make a small incision in the form of a cross in the right arm near the shoulder. At present our meetings are held at night and in the most lonely fields, with the object of not being surprised. It is well known among us masons that Rizal is attributed with the faculty of being able to translate his person instantaneously from one point to another. With a March 1897 convention in Tejeros, came another step toward Filipino independence. The Filipino rebels named Emilio Aguinaldo as president of their new unofficial republic. Andres Bonifacio, however, refused to acknowledge the decision of the 1897 convention and attempted to create his own rebel government. Aguinaldo responded by having Bonifaciou arrested, tried for treason, and found guilty as charged. Andres Bonifacio received the death sentence. Ironically, the very man Andres Bonifacio, who founded the Katipunan and fought for supreme independence of the Filipino people, was executed by the new independent Philippine republics firing squad. Another irony was when Bonifacios forces became militarily weak early in the rebellion, he lost the confidence of the Filipino people. Then, toward the latter part of 1897, Emilio Aguinaldo also became militarily weak. The Spanish army, bulked with Filipino mercenaries, sent the new president Aguinaldos rebel troops into retreat in the mountains, southeast of Manila. On December 15, 1897, the Spanish governor general induced President Aguinaldo to sign the Pact of Biac-na-bato. Ints purpose was to have both sides make concessions towards peace and temporarily halt the Philippine Revolution. The Filipino revolutionaries were to stop the violence and their leader, Aguinaldo, was to voluntarily exile himself to Hong Kong. The Spaniards sweetened Aguinaldos acceptance of exile with offering him a bribe of 400,000 Spanish pesos. Spains end of the bargain was a promise to implement liberal reform within a three year period. Unfortunately, the Pact of Biac-na-Bato didnt bind either side to reform their intent or honor their pledges. The Spanish didnt carry through with their promises of reform in the Philippines. Aguinaldo, meanwhile, realizing the reneged reform spent his bribe money purchasing arms and ammunition in Hong Kong, his new residence of exile. Aguinaldo also met with American consulates and Commander George Dewey in Singapore, to elicit US support for Philippine independence from Spain. US Sympathy for rebels against Spanish control began when several American newspapers published photos in 1895 and exposed Spanish brutality in quelling revolt. Rioting erupted against the Spanish in Havana, Cuba. In response, American sent its battleship (USS Maine) on January 1898, to protect American citizens and property caught in that hot spot. However, on February 15, 1898 while in Havanas harbor, an explosion aboard the USS Maine caused the battleship to sink and take 260 American seamen with it. The cause of the detonation was never determined, but the ensuing deaths outraged the US public, who adopted a newspapers quote, Remember the Maine, to hell with Spain.

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Although Spain called an armistice on April 9 and scurried to grant Cuba some power of self government, the United States intervened. William McKinley was president of the United States and demanded that Spain completely remove its forces from Cuba and grant it independence. America assured Spain it would not annex Cuba for the US but would back Cubas right to freedom and use whatever force was necessary to ensure it. Spain declared war against the United States on April 24, 1898. The US responded in like by th st declaring war against Spain on April 25 , but made it retroactive to the 21 of April. Meanwhile, the US ordered Commodore George Dewey to destroy the unprepared Spanish fleet in Manila Bay, Philippines. Commodore Deweys own ship led the US fleet, single file, into the Manila Bay in the early morning of May 1, 1898. Had the Spanish prepared for war with competency and strategy, the entrance to Manila would have been peppered with mines and virtually impenetrable. To the contrary, however, Commodore Deweys route was clear of mines and they met very little resistance. The Spanish fleet was anchored and consisted of thirteen ships (tubs, according to one source). History describes Deweys victory as relatively bloodless. On the American sides there were no fatalities and only seven seamen wounded. If rumor is correct, it would have explained Commodore George Deweys crushing defeat of the Spanish. The rumor had it that when war was declared, 224 Spanish sailors deserted their ships, commanders stayed Manila cafes the evening before Deweys fleet struck, and some of the Spanish ships scuttled themselves! Apparently, the Spanish army and navy commanders in the Philippines were ill-trained, equipped, or motivated to resist foreign invasion as supported by history recording the American takeover from the Spanish, as a relatively bloodless event. Spanish Governor Fermin Jaudenes had secretly arranged a surrender after a mock show of resistence to salvage his honor. Commodore Geroge Dewey then took possession of Cavite and declared a blockade of Manila until ground troops arrived three months later. Other foreign ships stayed in the bay with Deweys permission, including seven English and four German warships. Common opinion held that the German supported Spain. SO when the German commander violated international law by sending his boats from ship to ship without Commodore Deweys permission, he took stern measures. At one point Commodore George Dewey fired warning shots across the bow of the German ship. He next invited the German commander aboard his ship and informed him that ship to ship visitation without permission was an act of war. Commodore Dewey then offered, As we are in for it now, it matters little to us whether we fight Spain, or Germany, or the world. And if you desire war, you can have it right here. You need not cable to Berlin, nor need I to Washington. You can just have war here and now. The German commander backed down from the challenge, and Commodore Dewey thereby further reinforced US control of the Philippines. It appeared as though the German presence was there to assure that the US would not take over the Philippines, as Prince Henry (of Germany) had stated back in a Hong Kong conference that Germany would not permit America to annex the Philippine Islands. On the other hand, perhaps Germany was waiting, as a vulture, to swoop in itself. It was believed that England stood by as an ally. Again, it was not US intention to annex the Philippines at the time Commodore Dewey destroyed the Spanish fleet, or when US forces took possession of Manila, on August 13, 1898. Commander George Dewey requested Emilio Aguinaldo to return from Hong Kong to the Philippine to help eradicate the Spanish from the land. On May 19, 1898, Aguinaldo returned to resume authority and presidency over what he understood would become the free republic of the Philippines. Aguinaldos troops governed all of the Philippines, other than the city of Manila, which was occupied by American forces. With the intent of working as allies, Aguinaldos men were given American arms and ammunition. The Filipino forces then efficiently rounded remaining Spanish delegates on Luzon and delivered them to US forces in Manila. On June 12, 1898, the Filipinos declared independence of Spain.
th

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On June 30, 1898, three thousand American servicemen arrived to the Philippines aboard the US cruiser, Charleston. Then, on August 13, Manila fell after a bloodless battle. The Treaty of Paris was enacted on December 10, 1898. In accordance with its terms, the US paid Spain $20,000,000 for sovereignty of Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Philippine Islands. This accumulation of property tipped the international scales, making the United States a world power with new weight in international politics. In 1898, then, the Spanish colonial government was replaced by an American military government. Consequently, the Filipinos realized that America, formerly viewed as the savior of the weak and oppressed, was no longer intending to grant independence to the Filipino republic. In fact, it appeared that America was replacing Spain as a formidable oppressor in the Philippines. Clearly, Aguinaldo and his countrymen had not fought all those years to continue in slavery. Nor had they battled with intent to submit to yet another foreign power. The goal of the Filipino people was to govern themselves as an independent republic. Therefore, on January 23, 1899, Emilio Aguinaldo established a provisional Filipino government at Malolos under the Malolos constitution. Malolos, in central Luzon, became the Filipino capital. Again, the Filipinos resumed the fight for independence. This time it was against the United States of America. Fighting on the outskirts of Manila broke out between the Filipinos and US servicemen on February 4, 1899. It was found the next morning that the brave but reckless Filipinos were severely defeated. While the fighting was in progress, Emilio Aguinaldo issued a proclamation to his people dated February 5, 1899. It read as follows: By the proclamation of yesterday, I have published the outbreak of hostilities between the Filipino forces and the American army of occupation in Manila, unjustly and unexpectedly provoked by the latter. My manifesto of January 8 th last, published the grievances suffered by the Filipino army at the hands of the American army. The proclamation of General Otis relates to the insults to the Filipino people. The constant outrages and taunts which have caused the misery of the people of Manila, and finally the useless conferences proved a premeditated transgression of justice and liberty. I know that war always has produced great disasters. I know that the Filipino people have not yet recovered from past losses, and are not in the best position to endure others. But I also know by experience how bitter is slavery, and by experience also I know that we should sacrifice all on the altar of our honor and the national integrity so unjustly attacked. I have tried to avoid, as far as it has been possible for me to do so, armed conflict, in my endeavor to assure our independence, by pacific means, and to avoid more costly sacrifices. But all my efforts have been useless before the measureless pride of the American government and all of its representatives in these islands, who have treated me as a rebel because I defend the sacred interests of my country and do not make myself an instrument of their dastardly intentions. Past campaigns will have convinced you that the people are strong when they wish to be so. Without arms we have driven from our beloved country our ancient masters, and without arms we can repulse the foreign invasion as long as we wish to do so. Providence always has means in reverse and promptly helps the weak in order that they may not be annihilated by the strong, and that justice may be done and humanity progress. Be not discouraged; our independence has been watered with the generous blood of our martyrs; blood which may be shed in the future will strengthen it; nature has never despised generous sacrifices. But in order that our efforts may not be wasted, that our desires may be listened to and our independence gained, it is indispensable that we adjust our actions to the rule of law and of right leading to triumph over our enemies and to conquer our own evil passions.

-Emilio Aguinaldo, President of the Filipino Republic Mololos, February 5th, 1899 191

HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES #28


Two days later the United States ratified the Treaty of Paris against Spain and America dispatched reinforcements to the Philippines. And now the Philippine-American war continued. Throughout the spring of 1899, American troops pushed Aguinaldos forces northward into the central Luzon Plain, and by the end of that year Aguinaldo and what was left of his government forces retreated into the inaccessible northern mountains. By November 1899, Aguinaldos forces, extremely weakened, were operating under tactics of guerilla warfare. However, in 1901, fighting continued with increased bitterness on the island of Samar. General Jacob F. Smith, enraged by a guerilla massacre of US troops, launched a retaliatory campaign of such indiscriminate ferocity that he was court-martialed and forced to retire. The insurrection was finally brought to an end when, in a daring operation led by General Fredrick Funston, General Aguinaldo was captured in his secret headquarters at Palanan in northern Luzon on March 23, 1901. Aguinaldo subsequently appealed to Filipinos to cease fighting and accept US sovereignty. He then took an oath of allegiance to the United States, and retired to private life. Although an end to the insurrection was declared in 1902, sporadic fighting continued for several years thereafter. After 1902 the American civil government regarded the remaining guerillas as mere bandits, though the fighting continued. About 1,000 guerrillas under Simeon Ola were not defeated until late 1903, and in the Batangas province, south of Manila, troops commanded by Macario Sakay resisted capture until as late as 1906. There, the rebels tactic of burning pacified villages contributed to their own defeat. The United States gained an undisputed control of the Philippines and retained possession of the islands until 1946. In 1935 when the commonwealth government of the Philippines was established in preparation for independence, Aguinaldo ran for president but was decisively beaten. He returned to private life until the Japanese invaded the Philippines in 1941. The Japanese used Aguinaldo as an anti-American tool. They caused him to make speeches, to sign articles, and to address a radio appeal to General Douglas MacArthur on Corregidor to surrender in order to spare the flower of Filipino youth. When the Americans returned, Aguinaldo was arrested and, together with others accused of collaboration with the Japanese, was held for some months in Bilibid priso until released by presidential amnesty. As a token vindication of his honor, he was appointed by President Elpidio Guirino as a member of the Council of State in 1950. In the later years of his life, he devoted his major attention to veterans affairs, the promotion of nationalism and democracy in the Philippines, and the improvement of relations between the Philippines and the United States. It was not until July, 1946, that the Philippines truly became an independent republic and was recognized as such by the rest of the world. It continued under the US sovereignty during the intervening years with control gradually shifting toward Filipino self-government. These various transitional stages of government ultimately led to 1946 when the Filipino dream of foreign independence was finally realized. It may be noted that the Moros, true to their fierce commitment of independence, as always, successfully resisted any foreign intervention. In fact American servicemen found their .38 caliber hand guns proved ineffective to halt assaulting Moro warriors who were protected by their religion and antinganting. Therefore, the US government issued .45 automatic weapons as a direct result of the Philippine conflict with the Moros. Additionally, consistent with their heritage and reputation, the Moros of today continue to resist government interference.

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ORIGINS OF WING CHUN

The origins of the Wing Chun Gung Fu system are still uncertain to this day. This is particularly due to the lack of written records about Wing Chun in the past, and much of what we know today has only been passed down by word of mouth. Nevertheless, there is a generally excepted version of events. The myth surrounding who designed the system only serves to heighten the mystery and history of Gung Fu.

193

WING CHUN'S HISTORY THE POPULAR VERSION


In the late 1600's and early 1700's Gung Fu became very popular at the Siu Lam (Shaolin) monastery in Honan Province, China. The Gung Fu exercises were designed to help keep the monks and abbots awake during long periods of mental training and meditation. By exercising their bodies as well as their minds; they developed even further in their spiritual training. The Manchu (non-Chinese) government in the North at the time was deeply suspicious of such activities, believing the monastery to be training an army. They eventually attacked the monastery, burning it to the ground and killing many of the monks and disciples. A few escaped the attack though, and they are thought to have been Buddhist nun Ng Moi, Abbot Chi Shin, Abbot Pak Mei, Fung To Tak and Master Miu Hin. Ng Moi hid on Mt. Tai Leung and it was there that she met Yim Yee and his daughter Wing Chun. Wing Chun was a beautiful teenager who had attracted the unwanted attention of a local man. Ng Moi liked Wing Chun and agreed to teach her Gung Fu to defend herself. After training Wing Chun eventually challenged her persistent admirer and beat him in a fight. Wing Chun carried on training in Gung Fu and taught her husband when she married - Leung Bok Chau. He named the system after his wife and passed it on to Leung Lan Kwai. Leung LAN Kwai in turn passed the Gung Fu techniques to Wong Wah Bo who taught a man named Leung Yee Tai. Leung Yee Tai had already learnt a pole form from escaped Abbot Chi Shin, and thus the pole form was incorporated into the system. Leung Yee Tai passed the system to Leung Jan, a doctor of Fatshan, China. Leung Jan became an absolute Master of Wing Chun and defeated many challengers from other styles of Gung Fu. He taught everything he knew to Chan Wah Shun.
194

1950'S AND YIP MAN TO THE PRESENT DAY

Chan Wah Shun taught the system to a man named Yip Man, who attained the highest level of skill within Wing Chun and taught many people, including Bruce Lee in the 1950's in Hong Kong. Yip Man simplified the system, particularly removing the long and complicated names and is mainly responsible for the Wing Chun system as we know it today. He was a superb teacher and taught according to the individual's own skill and knowledge, adapting his approach where necessary. Wing Chun flourished in Hong Kong and Yip Man also passed his knowledge to his two sons, Yip Chun and Yip Ching. They continue the tradition and have themselves many students and instructors under them. Sifu Shaun Rawcliffe, Chief Instructor of the Midlands Wing Chun Kuen, is a representative of Grandmaster Yip Chun. Today, both Yip Chun and Yip Ching continue to teach and pass on their wealth of knowledge through seminars, and their health and vitality is an example to us all.

195

WHAT IS WING CHUN GUNG FU?

Wing Chun was made famous by Bruce Lee. Wing Chun was Bruce Lee's first discipline and the art of Wing Chun is tightly integrated into his style of Jeet Kune Do. The Wooden Dummy is a major component of Wing Chun Training. Wing Chun specializes in the techniques of the hand, whereas many northern Chinese Gung Fu specializes in kicking. Wing Chun combines many short punching techniques designed to reach the opponent faster and more efficiently. Wing Chun was one of the original Shaolin Temple styles and was designed for smaller people to defeat bigger foes. So it is ideally suited for women. Wing Chun [widely translated as 'beautiful springtime' or 'springtime song] is a Southern Chinese Martial Art, one of the branches of the generic term Gung Fu. Wing Chun is a direct, scientific and clinical style of fighting, in which the attacker is quickly overwhelmed by speed and power. Being a martial art, the fighting aspect is only one part of the whole system, and emphasis is also placed on relaxation and physical health, with Wing Chun practitioners continuing to practice well into old age. This relaxation and health is something which can benefit the practitioner everyday in today's stressful society. The confidence gained from ability is often enough to see the practitioner through conflict, but techniques can be applied in a real self defense situation safe in the knowledge that they work.

196

THE THREE HAND FORMS


Siu Lim Tao is Wing Chun's first form. Translated as 'Way of the little Idea', the practitioner uses the form to study and perfect certain Wing Chun techniques and principles. These include the centerline - the center of the body which must be protected; elbow position; leg strengthening; basic techniques; use of energy (in the last few inches) and body limits. The form is learnt in the class and practiced at home, lasting anything from five to forty-five minutes, with about twenty minutes being the generally accepted time limit. Chum Kiu (seeking the bridge') is Wing Chun's second form and introduces the practitioner to stepping, turning and moving the body in the correct way to face different directions. It also contains some of the Wing Chun kicks, all of which are low for maximum effect and minimum risk. Wing Chun's last hand form is called Biu Tze, literally translated as 'Shooting Fingers'. Traditionally a secret form only taught to close and loyal students, Biu Tze is the emergency form of Wing Chun, allowing the practitioner to view possible mistakes or wrong positions, and offers solutions to those problems. The third form also allows the practitioner to train his or her elbow strikes, a powerful close range weapon. Following on from the three hand forms are the more advanced forms of Wing Chun - the Wooden Dummy, the Pole form and the Knife form. All these continue on from the hand forms and progress the training, through correct positioning and use of the weapons, more energy and strength is built up. The Wooden Dummy provides a useful 24hr training tool to use for positioning, footwork and training energy.

197

CHI SAO
THE STICKING HANDS OF WING CHUN

Chi Sao, or 'Sticking Hands', is the backbone of Wing Chun and the training that bridges the forms and free-fighting. Rather than sparring, Chi Sao gives two practitioners the opportunity to test and explore each other's strengths and weaknesses, allowing a unique and unplanned learning process to take place. Chi Sao practice should be viewed as a game rather than a competition. Chi Sao helps to hone footwork, reflexes, positioning, techniques, energy and the automatic response to a situation for which Wing Chun has become famous. Chi Sao has some similarities to Tai Chi's pushing hands.

198

WING CHUN DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 1


1. IN FRONT OF DUMMY RIGHT HAND IN FRONT OF LEFT HAND BOTH IN BIU SAO POSITION 2. RIGHT HAND PALM SAO LEFT HAND LOP SAO RIGHT HAND GRABS DUMMY BEHIND NECK AND PULLS AT THE SAME TIME WITH LEFT HAND LOPS LEFT ARM 3. (GOING TO LEFT) RIGHT BONG SAO, RIGH TAN SAO, LEFT MIDDLE JERN DA WHILE CHECKING DUMMY LEG WITH RIGHT SHIN 4. GONG SAO MOVING TO RIGHT QUAN SAO TO LEFT TAN SAO, RIGHT MIDDLE JERN DA CHECKING DUMMY LEG WITH SHIN 5. RIGHT GONG SAO TO LEFT JAO SAO, RIGHT HUEN SAO, GO DA LEFT PALM 6. DOUBLE TALK SAO

199

WING CHUN DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 2

1. IN FRONT OF DUMMY LEFT HAND IN FRON OF RIGHT HAND BOTH IN BIU SAO POSITION 2. LEFT HAND PALM SAO RIGH HAND LO SAO, LEFT HAND GRABS DUMMY NECK AND PULLS AT THE SAME TIME THE RIGH HAND LOPS RIGHT ARM 3. (GOING TO RIGHT) LEFT BONG SAO TO LEFT TAN SAO, RIGHT MIDDLE JERN DA WHILE CHECKING DUMMY LEG WITH LEFT SHIN 4. RIGHT GONG SAO MOVING TO LEFT QUAN SAO, RIGHT TAN SAO, LEFT MIDDLE JERN DA CHECKING DUMMY LEG WITH RIGHT SHIN 5. LEFT GONG SAO, TO RIGHT JAO SAO PALM GO DA, LEFT LOP SAO 6. DOUBLE TALK SAO

200

WING CHUN DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 3

1. RIGHT INSIDE WOANG PAK, LEFT INSIDE WOANG PAK, RIGHT INSID WOANG PAK 2. LEFT SOT SAO TO LEFT LOP SAO, RIGHT HA CHUNG CHUIE DA BETWEEN ARMS 3. LEFT INSIDE WOANG PAK, RIGHT SOT SAO 4. RIGHT LOP SAO, LEFT HA CHUNG CHUIE DA BETWEEN ARMS 5. RIGHT GONG SAO, RIGHT HUEN SAO LEFT JAO SAO RIGHT GO JERN DA 6. DOUBLE TALK SAO

201

WING CHUN DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 4

1. RIGHT LOW BONG SAO 2. HIGH RIGHT DOUBLE WOANG PAK, RIGHT JUK TEK TO DUMMY TRUNK 3. LEFT LOW BONG SAO, HIGH DOUBLE WOANG PAK, LEFT JUK TEK TO DUMMY TRUNK 4. RIGHT GONG SAO, LEFT JAO SAO, ROLL BOTH HANDS TO DOUBLE MIDDLE JERN DA, ROLL HANDS BACK UP TO DOUBLE HIGH JERN DA 5. DOUBLE TALK SAO

202

WING CHUN DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 5

1. THREE HUEN SAOS TO RIGHT BONG SAO, RIGHT TAN SAO, LEFT MIDDLE JERN DA, RIGHT JIT TEK TO LEG 2. (LEFT SIDE) GONG SAO THREE HUENG SAOS TO LEFT BONG SAO, LEFT TAN SAO, RIGHT MIDDLE JERN DA, LEFT JIT TEK TO DUMMY LEG 3. RIGHT GONG SAO, LEFT JAO SAO SIMULTANIOS RIGHT HUEN SAO GO DA 4. DOUBLE TALK SAO

203

WING CHUN DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 6

1. THREE EYE RAKES BETWEEN DUMMY ARMS (ONE TO RIGHT - ONE TO LEFT - ONE TO RIGHT, RIGHT CUP SAO, LEFT MIDDLE JERN DA

2. RIGHT QUAN SAO, PO PAI (RIGHT HAND OVER LEFT) LEFT BONG SAO, PO PAI (LEFT HAND OVER RIGHT) RIGHTGONG SAO PO PAI (RIGHT HAND OVER LEFT) RIGHT BONG SAO, PO PAI (LEFT HAND OVER RIGHT)

3. GONG SAO, LEFT HUEN SAO TO MIDDLE JERN DA, RIGHT JAO SAO GO DA (SIMULTANIOUS)

4. DOUBLE TALK SAO

204

WING CHUN DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 7

1. RIGHT - LEFT - RIGHT GONG SAO, RIGHT BONG SAO, RIGHT BIU GEE, PAK SAO, LOP SAO

2. LEFT BONG SAO, LEFT BIU GEE, PAK SAO, LOP SAO, RIGHT BONG SAO 3. RIGHT TAN SAO LEFT MIDDLE JERN DA WITH LEFT JIT TEK TO DUMMY TRUNK

4. LEFT BONG SAO, LEFT TAN SAO, RIGHT MIDDLE JERN DA RIGHT JIT TEK TO DUMMY TRUNK

5. RIGHT GONG SAO, LEFT JAO SAO, RIGHT GO DA (SIMULTANIOUS) 6. DOUBLE TALK SAO

205

WING CHUN DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 8

1. LEFT TALK SAO, RIGHT HAND BUI SAO POSITRIONED IN CENTER LINE, RIGHT JIT TEK TO DUMMY TRUNK, LOW RIGHT JUK TEK TO DUMMY LEG 2. RIGHT TALK SAO, LEFT HAND BUI SAO POSITIONED IN CENTER LINE, LEFT JIT TEK TO DUMMY TRUNK, LOW LEFT JUK TEK TO DUMM LEG 3. RIGHT HAND KAO SAO TO MIDDLE ARM, LEFT MIDDLE JERN DA 4. LEFT HAND KAO SAO TO MIDDLE ARM, RIGHT MIDDLE JERN DA 5. RIGHT GONG SAO LEFT JAO SAO, RIGHT, GO DA (SIMULTANIOUS) 6. DOUBLE TALK SAO

206

WING CHUN DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 9


1. LOW RIGHT BONG SAO, LOW LEFT BONG SAO, LOW RIGHT BONG SAO 2. RIGHT TAN SAO TO GO JERN DA 3. LOW LEFT BONG SAOT LEFT TAN SAO TO GO JERN DA 4. RIGHT BONG SAO, TWO HAND LOP SAO ON LEFT DUMMY ARM, RIGHT JIT TEK ON DUMMY LEG 5. LEFT BONG SAO, TWO HAND LOP SAO ON RIGHT DUMMY ARM, LEFT JIT TEK TO DUMMY LEG 6. GOING LEFT, RIGHT BONG SAO, RIGHT SO TEK TO DUMMY LEG 7. GOING RIGHT, LEFT BONG SAO LEFT SO TEK TO DUMMY LEG 8. RIGHT GONG SAO, LEFT JAO SAO, RIGHT GO JERN DA 9. DOUBLE TALK SAO
207

WING CHUN DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 10


1. RIGHT OUTSIDE WOANG PAK, LEFT OUTSIDE WOANG PAK, RIGHT OUTSIDE WOANG PAK 2. (LEFT SIDE) LEFT HAND IN BIU SAO POSITION ON TOP LEFT TOP ARM, RIGHT HAND IN FIST POSTIONN PALM UP RIGHT TO REAR OF LEFT, RIGHT JITTEK TO DUMMY LEG 3. KAO SAO MIDDLE ARM WITH LEFT HAND TO RIGHT SIDE OF DUMMY 4. RIGHT SIDE, RIGHT HAND IN BIU SAO POSITION ON RIGHT TOP ARM, LEFT HAND IN FIST POSITION PALM UP TO REAR OF RIGHT, LEFT JIT TEK TO DUMMY LEG 5. RIGHT GONG SAO, RIGHT SO TEK TO DUMMY LEG 6. LEFT GONG SAO, LEFT SO TEK TO DUMMY LEG 7. DOUBLE TALK SAO, LEFT JIT TEK TO DUMMY TRUNK

208

MOOK

JONG

WOODEN

DUMMY

209

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET #1


1. PAK SAO DA , WOANG PAK WITH BUI GEE , WOANG PAK WITH BIU GEE 2. PAK SAO DA 3. DOUBLE GOANG SAO HUEN SAO AND GO DA WITH RIGHT, HUEN SAO AND GO DA WITH LEFT 4. HUEN SAO AND HA DA WITH RIGHT, HUEN SAO AND HA DA WITH LEFT 5. PAK SAO WITH DA OUTSIDE OF REAR HAND, DOUBLE JUT SAO, GUM SAO WITH GO DA 6. PAK SAO WITH DA OUTSIDE OF REAR HAND, DOUBLE JUT SAO, GUM SAO WITH GO DA 7. PAK SAO WITH DA OUTSIDE OF REAR HAND, DOUBLE JUT SAO, DOUBLE TALK SAO WITH RIGHT JUK TEK 8. PAK SAO WITH DA OUTSIDE OF REAR HAND, DOUBLE JUT SAO, DOUBLE TALK SAO WITH LEFT JUK TEK

210

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 2


1. PAK SAO DA, BONG SAO, LOP SAO WITH SOT SAO 2. SWITCH (TO OTHER SIDE) 3. PAK SAO DA, BONG SAO, LOP SAO WITH SOT SAO 4. SWITCH 5. PAK SAO DA, BONG SAO, LOP SAO WITH QUA CHUIE GUM SAO WITH CHUNG CHUIE, LOP SAO WITH SOT SAO, GUM SAO WITH CHUNG CHUIE 6. SWITCH 7. PAK SAO DA, BONG SAO, LOP SAO WITH QUA CHUIE, GUM SAO WITH CHUNGCHUIE, LOP SAO WITH SOT SAO, GUM SAO WITH CHUNG CHUIE 8. SWITCH 9. DOUBLE GOANG SAO ON YOUR LEFT SIDE OF DUMMY 10. LEFT HUENG SAO AND LEFT JERN DA LOW 11. RIGHT HUEN SAO AND RIGHT JERN DA LOW 12. LEFT HUEN SAO AND LEFT JERN DA HIGH 13. RIGHT HUEN SAO AND RIGHT JERN DA HIGH

211

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 2 (cont)


14. PAK SAO WITH LEFT DA ON OUTSIDE OF REAR ARM 15. DOUBLE JUT SAO, GUM SAO WITH DA BETWEEN ARMS 16. SWITCH 17. PAK SAO WITH RIGHT DA ON OUTSIDE OF REAR ARM 18. DOUBLE JUT SAO, WITH DA BETWEEN ARMS 19. SWITCH 20. PAK SAO WITH LEFT DA, LEFT JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, DOUBLE TALK SAO WITH LEFT JUK TEK 21. SWITCH 22. PAK SAO WITH RIGHT DA, RIGHT JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, DOUBLE TALK SAO WITH RIGHT JUK TEK

212

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 3

1. LEFT SIDE OF DUMMY 2. PAK SAO DA 3. LOY PAK SAO DA 4. RIGHT SIDE OF DUMMY 5. PAK SAO DA 6. LOY PAK SAO DA 7. LEFT SIDE OF DUMMY 8. PAK SAO DA 9. LEFT CHUNG CHUIE 10. LOY PAK SAO DA 11. RGHT SIDE OF DUMMY 12. PAK SAO DA 13. RIGHT CHUNG CHUIE 14. LOY PAK SAO DA 15. LEFT SIDE OF DUMMY

213

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 3

(cont)
16. DOUBLE GOANG SAO 17. LEFT HUEN SAO TO HA DA 18. RIGHT HUEN SAO TO HA DA 19. LEFT HUEN SAO GO DA 20. RIGHT HUEN SAO GO DA 21. RIGHT SIDE OF DUMMY 22. PAK SAO WITH HA DA 23. JAO SAO - JUT SAO - GUM SAO DA ( DA OUTSIDE OF NEAR ARM 24. LEFT SIDE OF DUMMY 25. PAK SAO WITH HA DA 26. JAO SAO - JUT SAO - GUM SAO DA (DA OUTSIDE OF NEAR ARM) 27. RIGHT SIDE OF DUMMY 28. PAK SAO WITH HA DA TO JAO SAO TO DOUBLE JUT SAO, JONG TRO, SUT, DUM TEK 29. LEFT SIDE OF DUMMY 30. PAK SAO WITH HA DA TO JAO SAO TO DOUBLE JUT SAO, JONG TRO, SUT, DUM TEK
214

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 4


1. CHOAP CHUIE, QUA CHUIE, JUK TEK 2. KAO SAO, JU TEK 3. CHOAP CHUIE, QUA CHUIE, JUK TEK 4. KAO SAO, JUK TEK 5. CHOAP CHUIE, QUA CHUIE, OOU TEK 6. KAO SAO, OOU TEK 7. CHOAP CHUIE, QUA CHUIE, OOU TEK 8. KAO SAO, OOU TEK 9. CHOAP CHUIE, QUA CHUIE 10. COUNTER REAR HAND OBSTRUCTION 11. WITH LOP SAO, SOT SAO, GUM SAO DA 12. LOP SAO DA, GUM SAO DA 13. CHOAP CHUIE, QUA CHUIE 14. COUNTER REAR HAND OBSTRUCTION 15. WITH LOP SAO, SOT SAO, GUM SAO DA, LOP SAO DA, GUM SAO DA
215

JEET KUN DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 4 (cont)


16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. CHOAP CHUIE, QUA CHUIE COUNTER FRONT HAND OBSTRUCTION WITH PAK SAO DA LOP SAO,QUA CHUIE GUM SAO DA, LOP SAO DA, GUM SAO DA CHOAP CHUIE, QUA CHUIE COUNTER FRONT HAND OBSTRUCTION WITH PAK SAO DA, LOP SAO, QUA CHUIE GUM SAO DA, LOP SAO DA,GUM SAO DA DOUBLE GOANG SAO (LEFT SIDE OF DUMMY) LEFT HUEN SAO AND HIT LOW RIGHT HUEN SAO AND HIT LOW LEFT HUEN SAO AND HIT HIGH RIGHT HUEN SAO AND HIT HIGH RIGHT SIDE OF DUMMY PAK SAO WITH DA MIDDLE HIT JAO SAO DOUBLE JUT SAO
216

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 4 (cont)


32. SWING TO LEFF DA, LEFT GUM SAO, LEFT GUM SAO WITH RIGHT DA 33. LEFT SIDE OF DUMMY 34. PAK SAO DA WITH MIDDLE HIT 35. JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO 36. SWING TO RIGHT DA, RIGHT GUM SAO WITH LEFT DA 37. RIGHT SIDE OF DUMMY 38. PAK SAO DA WITH MIDDLE HIT 39. JAO SAO, HUEN SAO 40. DOUBLE TALK SAO 41. 42. 43. WITH LEFT JUK TEK LEFT SIDE OF DUMMY PAK SAO DA WITH MIDDLE HIT

44. JAO SAO, HUEN SAO 45. DOUBLE TALK SAO

46. WITH RIGHTJUK TEK


217

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 4 (cont)

47. ***PING CHUIE MAY BE SUBSTITUTED FOR CHOAP CHUIE IN THIS SET 48. ***SOT SAO MAY BE SUBSTITUTED FOR QUA CHUIE IN THIS SET 49. ***BIU GEE MAY BE SUSTITUTED FOR QUA CHUIE IN THIS SET

218

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 5

1. BIU GEE, PAK SAO DA, LOP SAO DA, PAK SAO DA 2. OOU SAO, LEFT JUK TEK ON LEG 3. BIU GEE, PAK SAO DA, LOP SAO DA, PAK SAO DA 4. OOU SAO, RIGHT JUK TEK ON LEG 5. BIU GEE, LOP SAO DA RIGHT BIU GEE OUTSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 6. LEFT BIU GEE INSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 7. LEFT LOP SAO DA INSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 8. RIGHT LOP SAO DA INSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 9. RIGHT BIU GEE INSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 10. LEFT BIU GEE OUTSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 11. LEFT LOP SAO DA OUTSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 12. LEFT BIU GEE OUTSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 13. RIGHT BIU GEE NSIDE OF DUMMY OF DUMMYARM 14. RIGHT LOP SAO INSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 15. LEFT LOP SAO DA INSIDE OF DUMMY ARM
219

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 5 (cont)

16. LEFT BIU GEE INSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 17. RIGHT BIU GEE OUTSIDE OF DUMMUY ARM 18. RIGHT LOP SAO DA OUTSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 19. RIGHT BIU GEE OUTSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 20. LEFT BIU GEE INSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 21. RIGHT BIU GEE INSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 22. LEFT BIU GEE OUTSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 23. LEFT LOP SAO DA OUTSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 24. LEFT BIU GEE OUTSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 25. RIGHT BIU GEE INSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 26. LEFT BIU GEE INSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 27. RIGHT BIU GEE OUTRSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 28. RIGHT LOP DA OUTSIDE OF DUMMY ARM 29. DOUBLE GOANG SAO (LEFT SIDE OF DUMMY)

220

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 5 (cont)

30. LEFT HUEN SAO WITH LOW HIT 31. RIGHT HUEN SAO WITH LOW HIT 32. LEFT HUEN SAO WITH HIGH HIT 33. RIGHT HUEN SAO WITH HIGH HIT 34. YOUR LEFT SIDE OF DUMMY 35. PAK SAO DA (WITH MIDDLE DA) 36. RIGH JAO SAO 37. DOUBLE JUT SAO 38. SWING TO RIGHT GUM SAO WITH LEFT DA BETWEEN ARMS 39. RIGHT SIDE OF DUMMY 40. PAK SAO DA (WITH MIDDLE DA) 41. LEFT JAO DA 42. DOUBLE JU SAO 43. LEFT GUM SAO WITH RIGHT DA

221

JEET KUNE DO DUMM Y EXERCISE SET # 5 (cont)

44. SWINGTO LEFT GUM SAO WITH RIGHT DA BETWEEN ARMS 45. YOUR LEFT SIDE OF DUMMY 46. PAK SAO DA WITH MIDDLE DA 47. RIGHT JAO SAO 48. DOUBLE JUT SAO 49. DOUBLE TALK SAO 50. RIGHT JUK TEK 51. YOUR RIGHT SIDE OF DUMMY 52. PAK SAO DA WITH MIDDLE DA 53. LEFT JAO SAO 54. DOUBLE JUT SAO 55. DOUBLE TALK SAO 56. LEFT JUK TEK

222

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SE # 6


1. YOUR LEFT SIDE OF DUMMY 2. PAK SAO WITH HA TEK (WITH CHUNG CHUIE, LOP SAO, PAK SAO DA) 3. PAK SAO DA, (OUTSIDE HIT) JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, GUM SAO DA 4. PAK SAO DA, (MIDDLE HIT) JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, GUM SAO DA 5. PAK SAO DA (LOW HIT) JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, GUM SAO DA 6. PAK SAO WITH PING CHUIE, QUA CHUIE, JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, GUM SAO DA 7. YOUR RIGHT SIDE OF DUMMY 8. SAME AS # 1 RT. SIDE 9. SAME AS # 2 RT.SIDE 10. SAME AS # 3 RT. SIDE 11. SAME AS # 4 RT. SIDE 12. SAME AS # 5 RT. SIDE 13. SWINGING JUT SAO TO LEFT WITH RIGHT KAO, SAO AND RIGHT JUK TEK TO OOU TEK

223

14. DOUBLE GOANG TO YOUR RIGHT 15. LEFT HUEN SAO TO LEFT HA DA 16. RIGHT HUEN SAO TO HA DA 17. LEFT HUEN SAO TO LEFTGO DA

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 6 (cont)

18. RIGHT HUEN SAO TO RIGHT GO DA 19. (AT RIGHT SIDE OF DUMMY) LEFT HA DA TO JAO SAO TO SWING JUT SAO TO LEFT WITH LEFT DA TO LEFT GUM SAO DA AND RIGHT DA 20. (LEFT SIDE OF DUMMY) RIGHT HA DA TO JAO SAO TO SWING JUT SAO TO RIGHT WITH RIGHT DA TO RIGHT GUM SAO A ND LEFT DA 21. (RIGH SIDE OF DUMMY) LEFT HA DA TO JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, DOUBLE TALK SAO TO LEFT OOU TEK TO LEFT JUK TEK SIDE STEP TO LEFT 22. (LEFT SIDE OF DUMMY) RIGHT HA DA TO JAO SAO , DOUBLE JUT SAO, DOUBLE TALK SAO TO RIGHT OOU TEK TO RIGHT JUK TEK
224

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 7

RT. SIDE LT. SIDE RT. SIDE LT. SIDE RT. SIDE LT. SIDE RT. SIDE LT. SIDE RT. SIDE LT. SIDE RT. SIDE RT. SIDE LT. SIDE RT. SIDE LT. SIDE

1. PA SAO, TAN SAO DA 2. PA SAO, TAN SAO DA 3. PAK SAO DA, WOANG PAK DA TAN SAO DA (DUMMY RT. SIDE) 4. PAK SAO DA, WOANG PAK DA PAK SAO DA (DUMMY LT. SIDE) 5. RT. BIU TO BIU SAO DA 6. LT. BIU TO BIU SAO DA 7. RT. BIU TO WOANG PAK DA - BIU SAO DA 8. LT. BIU TO WOANG PAK DA - BIU SAO DA 9. RT. BIU TO LEFT LOW GOANG SAO DA 10. LT. BIU TO RIGHT LOW GOANG SAO DA 11. DOUBLE GOANG SAO TO LEFT 12. RT. HUEN SAO TO RT. GO DA 13. LEFT HUEN SAO TO LT. GO DA 14. RT. HUEN SAOTO RT. HA DA 15. LT.HUEN SAO TO LT. HA DA
225

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 7 (cont)

RT. SIDE

16. RT. PAK SAO WITH LT. HA DA, LT. JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, RT, HA DA GUM SAO WITH LT. DA 17. LT. PAK SAO WITH RT. HA DA, RT. JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, LT. HA DA LT. GUM SAO WITH RT. DA 18. RT. HA DA, JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO SWING, JUK TEK TO JUT TEK 19. LT. HA DA, JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO SWING, JUK TEK TO JUK TEK

LT. SIDE

RT. SIDE LT. SIDE

226

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 8

BETWEEN BOTH ARMS 1. LEFT TAN SAO 2. RIGHT TAN SAO 3. LEFT TAN SAO YOURE LEFT SIDE OF DUMMY 1. RIGHT JAO SAO TO RIGHT JUK TEK 2. LEFT PAK SAO DA 3. RIGHT LOP SAO DA 4. LEFT PAK SAO DA BETWEEN BOTH ARMS 1. RIGHT TAN SAO DA 2. LEFT TAN SAO DA 3. RIGHT TAN SAO DA

227

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 8 (cont)


RIGHT SIDE OF DUMMY 1. LEFT KAO SAO TO LEFT JUK TK 2. RIGHT PAK SA DA 3. LEFT LOP SAO DA 4. RIGHT PAK SAO DA CLOSING SECTION (RIGHTSIDE OF DUMMY) 1. DOUBLE GOANG SAO TO LEFT 2. RIGHT HUEN SAO & RIGHT GO DA 3. LEFT HUEN SAO & LEFT GO DA 4. RIGHT HUEN SA AND RIGHT HA DA

5. LEFT HUEN SAO AND LEFT HA DA

228

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 8 (cont)


6. RIGHT HIT BETWEEN ARMS & RIGHT JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, DOUBLE TALK SAO TO RIGHT JUK TEK 7. LEFT HIT BETWEEN ARMS AND LEFTJAO SAO, DOUBLE DOUBLE JUT SAO, DOUBLE TALK SAO, TO LEFT JUK TEK

8. RIGHT HIT BETWEEN ARMS AND RIGHT JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, DOUBLE TALK SAO TO RIGHT OOU TEK 9. LEFT HIT BETWEEN ARM AND LEFT JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, DOUBLE TALK SAO TO LEFT OOU TEK

229

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 9


BETWEEN BOTH ARMS 1. RIGHT WOANG PAK WITH LEFT BIU GEE 2. LEFT WOANG PAK WITH RIGHT BIU GEE 3. RIGHT WOANG PAK WITH LEFT BIU GEE LEFT SIDE OF DUMMY ARM 1. RIGHT KAO SAO ON LOW ARM WITH RIGHT JUK TEK 2. LEFT PAK SAO DA 3. RIGHT LOP SAO DA 4. LEFT PAK SAO DA BETWEEN BOTH ARMS 1. LEFT WOANG PAK WITH RIGHT BIU GEE 2. RIGHT WOANG PAK WITH LEFT BIU GEE 3. LEFT WOANG WITH RIGHT BIU GEE

230

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 9 (cont)


RIGHT SIDE OF DUMMY ARM 1. LEFT KAO SAO ON LOW ARM WITH LEFT JUK TEK 2. RIGHT PAK SAO DA 3. LEFT LOP SAO DA 4. RIGHT PAK SAO DA CLOSING SECTION RIGHT SIDE

1. DOUBLE GOANG SAO TO LEFT 2. RIGHT HUEN SAO, RIGHT GO DA 3. LEFT HUEN SAO, LEFT GO DA 4. RIGHT HUEN SAO, RIGHT HA DA 5. LEFT HUEN SAO, LEFT HA DA 6. RIGHT HA DA, RIGHT JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, DOUBLE TALK SAO TO RIGHT JUK TEK 7. LEFT HA DA, LEFT JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, DOUBLE TALK SAO TO LEFT JUK TEK
231

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 9 (cont)

8. RIGHT HA DA, RIGHT JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO TO DOUBLE TALK SAO TO RIGHT OOU TEK

9. LEFT HA DA, LEFT JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO TO DOUBLE TALK SAO TO LEFT OOU TEK

232

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCISE SET # 10


THIS SECTION IS SIMILAR TO JUN FAN WING CHUN SECTION # 8

1. LEFT WOANG PAK WITH RIGHT MIDDLE JIK DUM TEK 2. RIGHT KAO SAO ON LOWER ARM 3. RIGHT JUK TEK 4. RIGHT WOANG PAK WITH LEFT MIDDLE JIK DUM TEK 5. LEFT KAO SAO ON LOWER ARM 6. LEFT JUK TEK 7. LEFT WOANG PAK WITH RIGHT MIDDLE JIK DUM TEK 8. RIGHT KAO SAO ON LOWER ARM 9. RIGHT OOU TEK

233

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCIS SET # 10 (cont)

10. RIGHT WOANG PAK WITH LEFT MIDDLE JIK DUM TEK 11. LEFT KAO SAO ON LOWER ARM 12. LEFT OOU TEK 13. RIGHT HA DA 14. LEFT WOANG PAK WITH MIDDLE WOANG JERN 15. LEFT HA DA 16. RIGHT WOANG PAK WITH MIDDLE WOANG JERN 17. RIGHT HA DA 18. LEFT WOANG PAK WITH MIDDLE CHUNG CHUIE 19. LEFT HA DA 20. RIGHT WOANG PAK WITH MIDDLE CHUNG CHUIE
234

JEET KUNE DO DUMMY EXERCIS SET # 10 (cont)

21. RIGHT HA DA 22. LEFT WOANG PAK WITH LEFT FAK SAO 23. LEFT HA DA 24. RIGHT WOANG PAK WITH LEFT FAK SAO 25. RIGHT HA DA, RIGHT JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, DOUBLE TALK SAO TO RIGHT JUK TEK

26. LEFT HA DA, LEFT JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, DOUBLE TALK SAO TO LEFT JUK TEK 27. RIGHT HA DA, RIGHT JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, DOUBLE TALK SAO TO RIGHT OOU TEK 28. LEFT HA DA, LEFT JAO SAO, DOUBLE JUT SAO, DOUBLE TALK SAO TO LEFT OOU TEK

235

BRUCE LEES RANKING SYSTEMS


There was no ranking in classical Gung Fu, but a color ranking system based on the yin and yang had been devised Jun Fan (Bruce Lee) There are eight ranks in the Jun Fan System and in Jeet Kune Do. Note: the two curved arrows surrounding the yin and yang symbol are omitted for simplicity in illustration. Bruce Lee used this ranking system from 1965 to about 1968. This was both for Jun Fan Gung Fu, the Tao of Chinese Gung Fu and Jeet Kune Do. Tacky Kimura was at the highest level with fourth rank. Both James Lee and Dan Inosanto was third rank. This ranking system began about Match 1968, and was disbanded somewhere in 1969. Dan Inosanto reinstated this ranking in his backyard school in 1970 and dropped it out in 1974. The Jun Fan Gung Fu Clan in pursuit of Jeet Kune Do Concepts Ranking system was reinstated in 1988 by Tacky Kimura and Dan Inosanto.

8 Rank Sijo (Founder of the system) and Sigung (Grandfather of the system)

th

Unranked Beginning student

Unranked - Beginner

1st Rank Intermediate student

2 rank Advanced student, eligible for Apprentice instructor level Junior 1 rank After six months to one of training
st

nd

3rd rank Associate instructor level 1 rank - Intermediate student


st

4 rank Full instructor level Junior 2n rank advanced and intermediate student

th

5 rank Senior instructor level 2 rank Advanced and senior student 6 rank Dan Inosanto 3 rank - Instructor level
rd th nd

th

7th rank Tacky Kimura 4 rank Instructor level


th

5th rank Sijo (Founder of the system) Sigung (Grandfather of the system)

8th rank Bruce Lee Sijo (Founder of the system) Sigung (Grandfather of the system)

236

237

SINGLE

STICK (SOLO BASTON)

SINGLE STICK ANGLES 1 -12 ANGLES 112

STROKING VILLABRILLE LAMECO

MEASURE THE DISTANCE ANGLES 1 -5 BLOCKING INSIDE SWEEP OUTSIDE DEFLECT WING BLOCK HIGH AND LOW SHIELD ROOF UMBRELLA FOLLOW UMBRELLA CROSS BLOCK OR WIPE PASS DROP STICK FRILAY SCOOP RUDIMENTARY BLOCKING POINT UP POINT DOWN POINT OUT STRICKING DRILLS LOBTIK WATIK FOREWARD THRUST BACK AND THRUST PUNYO (FOREHAND AND BACK STRIKE) REDONDO ABENIKO BACALA BROKEN STRIKING FLIUDING STRIKING REPETATIVE STRIKING ABCEDARIOUS EXAMPLE INSIDE SWEEP CHECK AND RETURN

238

SINGLE
DISARMS

STICK (cont) (SOLO BASTON)

SNAKE VINE STRIP SECTORS AGAINST FOREHAND STRIKE AND BACKHAND STRIKE SUMBRADA BOX PATTERN PUNYO SUMBRADA PUNYO SUMBRADA WITH TAKE OUT (INSIDE AND OUT) PUNYO ATAPI CHAMBER POSITION HUBUB LUBUD INSIDE HUBUD LUBUD OUTSIDE STRIKE CONTROL DRILLS (CARENZA) FOREWARD TWIRL AND PAT BACKWARD TWIRL AND PAT UNDERARM SWITCH REVERSE UNDERARM SWITCH CHAMBER PIYUNG ROOF OR UMBRELLA CHAMBER SWITCH PIYUNG ROOF OR UMBRELLA BEHIND BACK SWITCH FOREWARD TWIRL SWITCCH THRUST STRAIGHT KICK OVER SWITCH ALPHABET FOUR CORNERS INCLUDE THEORY OF HIP MOVEMENT WHEN STRIKING MAKE RELATIONSHIP TO BOXING

239

SINGLE

DAGGER (SOLO DAGA)

PASS SLASH AND THRUST DRILLS (PST) STRIKING ONE THROUGH EIGHT GRIPS: A. PICAL (HAMMER GRIP) B. SAK SAK (THRUST) DISARM: A. EJECTION B. STRIPE GET OTHER DRILLS FROM LUCAY LUCAY, INOSANTO, SULITE TWO PERSON DRILL: PERSON #1 SAK SAK POSITION PERSON #2 PICAL POSITIONS PERSON #1 ANGLE SIX ATTACK (FOREHAND THRUST) PERSON #2 BLOCKS WITH BLADE CHECK AND PASS THE KNIFE PERSON #1 ANGLES SEVEN (BACKHAND THRUST) PERSON #2 BLOCKS WITH BLADE AND LOCK WRIST WITH V LOCK TWIST OUTWARD BRINGING BOTH KNIVES INTO POSITION SO THEYRE FACING PERSON #1 NWARD DISARM PEERSON #1 THRUST INWARD DISARM PERSON #1 STEPS BEHIND INTO THROAT SLASH AND ARM BRAKE

240

JOINT

LOCKS - WRIST

LOCKS

1. FIGURE FOUR 2. REVERSE WRIST LOCK 3. CHICKEN WING HORIZONTAL 4. CHICKEN WING VERICAL 5. BENT ELBOW WRIST LOCK 6. VERICAL WRIST LOCK 7. GOOSE NECK 8. STRAIGHT ARM GOOSE NECK

241

ARM

LOCKS - ELBOW

LOCKS

1. STRAIGHT ARM BAR 2. BENT ARM BAR 3. REVERSE BENT ARM (HAND) 4. REVERSE BENT ARM (BICEP) 5. HIP LOCK 6. BRANCH UP (GROUND) SEVEN VARIABLES 7. BRANCH DOWN (GROUND) SEVEN VARIABLES 8. FIGURE FOUR (GROUND) 9. BRANCH DOWN WRIST LOCK

242

FINGER

LOCKS - LEG

LOCKS

1. FINGER LOCKS 2. SKIN GRABBING 3. TRIGGER LOCK 4. ONE FINGER LOCK 5. TWO FINGER LOCK 6. REVERSE FINGER LOCK 7. COMPRESSION FINGERS LOCK

LEG
1. FIGURE FOUR 2. ANKLE LOCK

LOCKS

243

MODIFIED WING CHUN


BASIC ARM POSITION ON GUARD TAN SAO BONG SAO FOOK SAO QUAN SAO GOANG SAO CHUN SAO JAO SAO GUM SAO PAK SAO LOP SAO HUEN SAO PO PAI BIL GEE CHOAP CHUIE GUA CHUIE CHUNG CHUIE SAT SAO PALM UP DEFLECTION WING HAND DEFLECTION ELBOW UP FOREARM DOWN DEFLECTION PALM UP LOW WING DEFLECTION INSIDE HARD INWARD & DOWNWARD BLOCK OUTSIDE ADVANCING HAND RUNNING HAND DISENGAGE PINNING HAND SLAPPING HAND PULLING HAND CIRCLING HAND DOUBLE PALM STRIKE FINGER JAB HALF FIST BACKFIST VERTICAL FIST KNIFE HAND PALM DOWN

SENSITIVITY TRAINING (STICKY HANDS) DRILLS: PARRY HARMONIOUS SPRING REPOSTE WOANG PAK (CROSS PARRY) BONG SAO DRILL (WING HAND DEFLECTION ELBOW UP) UNMATCHED STANCES A. SWITCH WITH LOP SAO B. SWITCH WITH TAN SAO C. DON CHI ONE HAND CHI SAO (STICKY HAND) D. CHI SAO DOUBLE HANDS (STICKY HANDS) CENTER LINE THEORY CENTER LINE SIX QUARDENTS: 1. OUTSIDE HIGH FORWARD 2. INSIDE HIGH FORWARD 3. OUTSIDE MID FORWARD 4. INSIDE MID FORWARD 5. OUTSIDE LOW FORWARD 6. INSIDE LOW FORWARD

244

MODIFIED WIN CHUN (cont)


OUTSIDE HIGH REAP INSIDE HIGH REAR OUTSIDE MID REAR INSIDE MID REAR OUTSIDE LOW REAR INSIDE LOW REAR TRAPPING: HIGH REFERENCE - MATCHED LEADS PAK SAO GUA CHUIE PAK SAO LO P SAO GUA GHUIE LOP SAO GUA CHUIE LOP SAO CHUNG CHUIE LOP SAO CHUNG CHUIE - HUENG SAO GUM SAO CHUNG CHUIE PAK LOP SAO GUA CHUIE HUENG SAO JUT SAO NOY PAK SAO WING CHUNG DUMMY: (MOOK JONG) YIP MAN BOOK MOI YAT BOOK MODIFIED JKD VERSION #1 JKD VERSION #2 FREELANCE EQUIPMENT: WING CHUN DUMMY (MOOK JONG) ONE TWO LB. HAND WEIGHTS DRILLS: MECHINAL SENSITIVITY TRAINING BLIND FOLD REACTION SPEED JIK CHUNG CHUIE (STRAIGHT BLAST)

245

KALI HANDS
GUNTING: (SCISSORS) HORIZONTIAL VERTICLE SPLIT INSIDE PARRY BICEPT DESTRUCTION INSIDE PARRY EYE RAKE INSIDE PARRY WITH SLBOW HIT ATOPI INWARD BACKHAND BACKHAND CONTROLLING A PUNCH GET HIT CATCH HOOK REDIRECT DESTROY SLIP CONTROLLING KICK ON MID TO HIGH LINE GET HIT CATCH HOOK REDIRECT DESTROY EVADE DESTRUCTIONS: (JOINTS & NERVES) HAND LEG FOOT DRILLS: PUSH HANDS HUBUD LUBUD 1. INSIDE HUBUD LUBUD (CONTROLLING) 2. INSIDE HUBUD LUBUD (WITH ELBOW TRAP) 3. INSIDE HUBUD LUBUD (WITH ELBOW ROLL) 4. OUTSIDE GRAB HUBUD LUBUD 5. OUTSIDE GRAB WITH ELBOW ROLL HUBUD LUBUD
246

BOXING
FOOTWORK SHUFFLE FORWARD AND BACKWARD (STEP AND SLIDE) SHUFFLE FORWARD AND BACKWARD (SLIDE STEP) COVER LEFT, COVER RIGHT EVASION AND SHUFFLE OFFENSIVE SKILLS JAB CROSS HOOK UPPERCUT OVERHAND ELBOW KALI SLAP ELBOWS DEFENSIVE SKILLS CATCH HOOK REDIRECT DESTUCTION AND DEFLECTION (ELBOWS) BOB WEAVE SLIP COVER EVADW DRILLS REFLEX SPEED TIMING SHADOW BOXING CIRCUIT TRAINING STATIC TRAINING FREELANCE DRILLS COORDINATION DRILLS COMBINATION DRILLS 1 2 SERIES CATCH AND SLIP SERIES
247

FOOTWORK
FRONT HORSE BOX PATTERN X PATTERN TRIANGLE RIGHT STANCE LEFT STANCE CAT STANCE (RIGHT) CAT STANCE (LEFT) RIGHT SIDE STANCE (ANGLE 1 POSITION) LEFT SIDE STANCE (ANGLE 2 POSITION) CROSS STANCE (FORWARD) CROSS STANCE (BACKWARD) CROSS SPIN (FORWARD) CROSS SPIN (BACKWARD) HALF SPIN RIGHT LEAD LEFT LEAD SHUFFLE (FORWARD, BACKWARD, LATERAL) 1. STEP AND SLIDE (FORWARD - BACKWARD) 2. SLIDE AND STEP (FORWARD - BACKWARD) 3. COVER LEFT - COVER RIGHT 4. STEP AND SLIDE, SLIDE AND STEP, COVER LEFT, COVER 5. RIGHT, FORWARD AND BACKWARD, USING ANGULATION SEMPOK: (BEHIND FOOTWORK) DEMPOK: (FRONT FOOTWORK) FOOT SECTORS 1 THROUGH 6

250

SINAWALLI SIX COUNT DRILLS


(DOBLE BASTON)
1. ABCEDARIO 2. KOBB KOBB 3. BACKHAND KOBB KOBB 4. HEAVEN 5. STANDARD 6. EARTH 7. ROOF HEAVEN 8. ROOF STANDARD 9. ROOF EARTH 10. UMBRELLA HEAVEN 11. UMBRELLA STANDARD 12. UMBRELLA EARTH 13. ABENIKO HEAVEN 14. ABENIKO STANDARD 15. ABENIKO EARTH 16. ALTO DE BAJO HEAVEN 17. ALTO DE BAJO STANDARD 18. DOUBLE ODD SIX HEAVEN 19. DOUBLE ODD SIX STANDARD 20. DOUBLE ODD SIX EARTH 21. ODD SIX HEAVEN 22. ODD SIX STANDARD 23. ODD SIX EARTH 24. BACALA HEAVEN 25. BACALA STANDARD 26. BACALA EARTH 27. SPLIT BACALA HEAVEN 28. SPLIT BACALA STANDARD 29. SPLIT BACALA EARTH 30. SUNGKITE HEAVEN 31. SUNGKITE STANDARD 32. SUNGKITE EARTH 33. UPWARD FIGURE EIGHT HEAVEN 34. UPWARD FIGURE EIGHT STANDARD 35. UPWARD FIGURE EIGHT EARTH
251

SINAWALLI SIX COUNT DRILLS


(DOBLE BASTON) (cont)

36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44.

DOWNWARD FIGURE EIGHT HEAVEN DOWNWARD FIGURE EIGHT STANDARD DOWNWARD FIGURE EIGHT EARTH HORIZONTAL FIGURE EIGHT HEAVEN HORIZONTAL FIGURE EIGHT STANDARD DOWNWARD FIGURE EIGHT EARTH RICE POUNDING GRIP BOTH ENDS DOWN RICE POUNDING GRIP RIGHT END UP, LEFT END DOWN RICE POUNDING GRIP LEFT END UP, RIGHT END DOWN

45. DRILLS: A. SINAWALLI TIADA (CIRCULING, CLOCKWISE, COUNTER CLOCKWISE) B. SINAWALLI STANDING C. SINAWALLI KNEELING D. SINAWALLI GROUNG E. ALTERNATING BETWEEN A, B, & C 45. SINAWALLI BOX PATTERN 46. SINAWALLI OUT OF BOX PATTERN (FREE LANCE) 47. SINAWALLI WITH OBSTRUCTION A. CHAIR B. BENCH C. LOW WALL D. LOW CEILING E. BUSHES F. ETC.

252

SINAWALLI (DOBLE BASTON)


EIGHT AND TWELVE COUNT DRILLS

VILLABRILLE
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. VILLABRILLE EIGHT COUNT RIGHT VILLABRILLE EIGHT COUNT LEFT VILLA BRILLE EIGHT COUNT RIGHT AND LEFT VILLABRILLE TWELVE COUNT RIGHT TO LEFT VILLABRILLE TWELVE COUNT LEFT TO RIGHT

LACOSTE EIGHT COUNT


A. B. C. D. LACOSTE HEAVEN LACOSTE STANDARD LACOSTE EARTH LACOSTE HEAVEN, STANDARD, EARTH

253

CABELAS SERRADA SYSTEM

1. 2. 3. 4.

ONE TO TWELVE NUMBERING SYSTEM ONETO TWELVE LOCK AND BLOCK IN SEQUENCE FOOT REPLACEMENT DRILLS ONE TO TWELVE LOCK AND BLOCK WITH FOOT REPLACEMENT IN SEQUENCE 5. ONE TO TWELVE LOCK AND BLOCK WITH BASTON AND EMPTY HAND IN SEQUENCE WITH FOOT WORK 6. ONE TO LOCK AND BLOCK WITH BASTON AND DAGA IN SEQUENCE WITH FOOT WORK 7. ONE TO TWELVE LOCK AND BLOCK OUT OF SEQUENCE WITH FOOT WORK 8. ONE TO TWELVE LOCK AND BLOCK IN SEQUENCE WITH FOOT WORK AND DISARMS 9. ONE TO TWELVE LOCK AND BLOCK OUT OF SEQUENCE WITH FOOT WORK AND DISARMS 10. FREE LANCE ALL NUMBERS WITH DIARMS 11. FREE LANCE ALL NUMERS WITH DISARMS AND THROWS 12. IN SEQUENCE ONE TO TWELVE WRENCHING DRILLS WITH FOOT WORK 13. OUT OF SEQUENCE WRENCHING DRILLS WITH FOOT WORK 14. FREE LANCE ALL NUMBERS WRENCHING DRILLS

254

TUMBLING AND FALLING


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. FORWARD ROLL BACKWARD ROLL RIGHT SHOULDER ROLL FORWARD RIGHT SHOULDER ROLL BACKWARD LEFT SHOULDER ROLL FORWARD LEFT SHOULDER ROLL BACKWARD DIVE AND FORWARD ROLL

PREPARE FOR FALLING 8. ROLL BACK RIGHT 9. ROLL BACK LEFT 10. ROLL BACK 11. FALLING BACK RIGHT FROM STANDING POSITION 12. FALLING BACK LEFT FROM STANDING POSITION 13. FALLING BACK FROM STANDING POSITION 14. ROLL BACK FROM KNEELING POSITION 15. ROLL BACK RIGHT FROM KNEELING POSITION 16. ROLL BACK LEFT FROM KNEELING POSITION 17. ROLL BACK FROM KNEELING POSITION

255

The Symbolism Behind the Filipino Martial Arts Logo

1. The Universal triangle 2. The circle represent the Creator; from continuous motion 3. The Kali triangle: love, compassion, humility 4. The stick, the core of the Filipino martial art. The first weapon taught, from which to learn all other weapons 5. The blade (points upward toward Life), is taught after the stick 6. The fist represents the empty hand art of the Philippines 7. The half moon symbolizes the half of the Philippines (Southern Philippines) which were never under Spanish rule, and also the moonlight which was the only time Kali practitioners could safely practice their art during Spanish rule 8. The four parts of the circle represents the four saints called upon by Kali practitioners: Saint Michael, Saint Gabriel, Saint Uriel, and Saint Raphael 9. Ancient K for kali, kalirodman 10. Ancient E for eskrima, estocado and estke 11. Ancient S for silat

Inosanto Academy

256

MY VIEW ON JKD
By Bruce Lee 1962
Some instructors of marital arts favor forms, the more complex and fancy the better. Some, on the other hand are obsessed with super mental powers (like Captain Marvel or Superman). Still some favor deformed hands and legs, and devote their time on fighting bricks, stones, boards, etc. To me the extraordinary aspect of JKD lies in simplicity. JKD is simply the direct expression ones feeling with the minimum of movements and energy. Every movement is being so of itself without the artificialities which people tend to complicate it. The easy way is always the right way, and JKD is nothing at all special; the closer to the true way of JKD, is less wastage of expression there is. Instead of facing combat in it such ness, quite a few systems of martial art accumulate fanciness that distort and cramp their practitioners and distract them from the actual reality of combat, which is simple and direct and non-classical. Instead of going immediately to the heart of things, flowery forms and artificial techniques (organized despair) are ritually practiced to simulate actual combat. Thus instead of being in combat, these practitioners are idealistically doing something about combat. Worse still, super mental this and spiritual that are ignorantly incorporated until these practitioners are drifting further and further into the distance of abstraction and mystery that what they do resembles anything from acrobatics to modern dancing but the actual reality of combat. All of these complex nesses are actual futile attempts to arrest and fix the ever changing movements in combat and dissect and analyze them like a corpse. Real combat is not fixed and very much alive. Such means of practice (a form of paralysis) will only solidify and condition what was once fluid and alive. When you get off sophistication and what not and look at it realistically these robots (practitioners that is) are blindly devoting to the systematic uselessness of practicing routines or stunts that lead nowhere. JKD is to be looked through without fancy suits and matching tiers, and it will remain a secret when we anxiously look for sophistication and deadly techniques. If there are really any secrets at all, they must have been missed by the seeking and striving of its practitioners (after all, how many ways are there to come on an opponent without too much form the natural course?) JKD values the wonder of the ordinary and the cultivation of JKD is not daily increase, but daily decrease. Being wise in JKD does not men adding more, but to be able to get off with ornamentation and be simply simple, like a sculptor building a statue not by adding but by hacking away the unessential so that the truth will be revealed unobstructed. In short, JKD is satisfied with ones bare hand without the fancy decoration of colorful gloves which tend to hinder the natural function of the hand. Art is expression of self. The more complicated and restrictive a method is, the lesser the opportunity for the expression of ones own original sense of freedom. The techniques, though they play an important role in the early stage, should not be too restrictive, complex or mechanical. If we cling to them we will become bound by their limitation. Remember, you are expressing the technique and not doing toe technique. When someone attacks it is not technique number one (or is it technique number two, stance two sections four) that you are doing, but the moment youre aware that he attacks you simply in like sound and echo without deliberation. It is as though when I call you, you answer me, or when I throw something to you, you catch it, thats all.

257

THE ART OF BRIDGING THE DISTANCE


AN attack can rarely succeed unless one can lodge oneself at the correct distance AT THE MOMENT it is launched. A parry is most likely to succeed if it can be made just as the opponent is AT THE END of his lunge. Many a chance to riposte is missed by the defender stepping back out of distance when he parries. To these examples must be added the obvious importance of choosing the correct measure (as well as time, cadence) when making a counter-attack by stop hit on time hit. The tactical use of changes of measure, that is stepping forwards and backward, should also be studied. Variations of measure will make it more difficult for the opponent to time his attacks or preparation. A fighter with a good sense of distance, or one who is difficult to reach to launch an attack, may often be brought to the desired measure by progressive shortening of a sense of step backward or by the movement known as gaining on the lunge.

258

DISTANCE AS ATTACK
The first principle for fastest contact in distance attack is by using the lunge to get at the closet. In kicking: the leaning shin/knee side kick In striking: the finger jab to the eye (Note: Study both the progressive targets chart as well as the progressive weapons chart.) The second principle is economical initial (non-telegraphic) - Latent motor training forwards intuition. The third principle is correct on-guard position to facilitate freedom in movement, ease small phasic bent-knee position. The fourth principle is constant shifting of footwork to secure correct measure (Broken rhythmto confuse opponents distance while control ones own). The fifth principle is catching opponents moment of weakness, physically as well as psychologically. The sixth principle is correct measure for explosive penetration. The seventh principle is quick recovery or appropriate follow-up.

259

BRUCE LEES SCIENTIFIC STREET DEFENSE


AKA JEET KUNE DO

TIMMING

DISTANCE

SPEED & RYTHMN

AGGRESSIVNESS

THE MATCH

ATTACK SAA IPA PIA IA HIA FIA STOP THRUST KICK

COUNTER ATTACK

OFFENSE DEFENSE

TIME THRUST KICK

4 BASIC OFFENSE DEFENSE

COUNTER TIME

YIELDING PARRY

RIPOSTE ABC ABD

RECOVER

RENEWED ATTACK

DEFENSE 260

BRUCE LEES SCIENTIFIC STREET DEFENSE


AKA JEET KUNE DO TERMINOLOGY

1. SAA = SINGLE ANGULAR ATTACK 2. SDA = SINGLE DIRECT ATTACK 3. IPA = INDIRECT PROGRESSIVE ATTACK 4. PIA = PROGRESSIVE INDIRECT ATTACK 5. IA = INDIRECT ATTACK 6. HIA = HAND IMMOBILIZATION ATTACK 7. FIA = ABC ATTACK BY COMBINATION 8. ABD = ATTACK BY DRAW 9. RIPOSTE = IN FENCING A SWIFT THRUST MADE AFTER PARRYING AN OPONENTS LUNGE (SWIFT RETURN)

261

TRAINING AND DISCIPLINE


JEET KUNE DO is training and discipline toward the ultimate reality in self-defense, the ultimate reality in simplicity. A true JKD man never opposes force or gives way completely. Be pliable as a spring. Be the complement not the opposition to opponents strength. Make his technique your technique. You should respond to any circumstances without any prearrangement, your action should be like the immediacy of a shadow adapting to a moving object against the sun. Your task is simply to complete the other half of the oneness spontaneously. There is nothing to try to do in the final stage of JKD, opponent, self, techniques, are all forgotten. Everything simply flows. The true art of JKD is not to accumulate but to eliminate. Respond like an echo. Adapt like a shadow. Strike like an arrow. Totality and freedom of expression toward the never changing opponent should be the goal of all practitioners of JKD. When you understand the root of JKD you will know all its manifestations.

JEET KUNE DO

Bruce Lee

262

TAKES DOWNS & SWEEPS

JEET KUNE DO

1. REAR TAKEDOWN 2. FRONT TAKEDOWN 3. REAR SWEEP 4. FRONT SWEEP 5. TWO FINGER TAKE DOWN 6. WRIST TORQUE TAKEDOWN 7. FIGURE 4 TAKEDOWN 8. UNDER ARM LOCK TAKEDOWN 9. HANDSHAKE WRIST THROW 10. ARMBAR TAKEDOWN 11. ELBOW UP TAKEDOWN 12. AIKI JITSU TAKEDOWN

263

FOUR RANGES OF COMBAT


1. KICKING 2. PUNCHING 3. TRAPPING 4. GRAPPLING

JEET KUNE DO

THREE PHASES OF LEARNING JKD


1. 2. 3. SHARPENING (LEARNING) OF THE TOOLS (TECHNIQUES) UTILIZING OF THE TOOLS (HOW TO USE THE TECHNIQUES IN COMBAT SITUATIONS) DISSOLVING OF THE TOOLS (DEVELOPING FIGHTING SKILLS TO WHERE THEY ARE PURELY INSTINCTIVE AND INSTANT REFLEX)

THE THREE RS OF JEET KUNE DO


REALISTIC RELATIONSHIP OF THE OPPONENTS RHYTHM

JEET KUNE DO PHILOSOPHY 1.


2. STRICTLY FOR COMBAT AND SELF-DEFENSE APPLICATIONS. NO SPORT ASPECTS OR FLOWERY TECHNIQUES. ALL TECHNIQUES ARE NON-CLASSICAL, SIMPLE AND DIRECT.

3.

INDIVIDUALITY, EACH JKD PRACTITIONER NEEDS TO EXPRESS THE TECHNIQUES WHICH FIT HIS/HER OWN PHYSICAL SIZE, BUILD, HANDICAPS, PERSONALITY AND MARTIAL ARTS BACKGROUND.
264

JEET KUNE DO GENERAL TRAINING FORMAT


BASED UPON THE ORIGIONAL OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA JKD TRAINING PROGRAM
1. Loosening and stretching exercises 2. Gung Fu coordination punching drills 3. Hand speed drills (bil jee or fist) 4. Front snap kick from natural stance 5. Displacement / shifting footwork drills 6. Forward lunge footwork drills 7. Front snap kick from JKD stance with shuffle footwork 8. Body rotation power striking drills with focus gloves 9. Power punching with focus gloves and footwork 10. Basic JKD snap punch from JKD stance (both right and left lead) 11. Basic side kick / back kick drill from natural stance (use kicking pad) 12. Displacement footwork for side kicks 13. Basic side kick from natural stance at kicking shield 14. Burning foot side kick from JKD stance at kicking shield 15. JJD backhand from JKD stance 16. Combination punching (right backhand, left snap punch, right cross power punch 17. JKD hook kick to leg 18. Side stomp kick to leg 19. JKD Gung Fu blocking drills 20. Stationary kicking drills with focus gloves 21. Elbow striking drills 22. Knee striking drills at legs (must use partner) 23. Basic blocks and counters 24. Basic cross energy drills

265

BREAKHOLDS
FRONT CHOKE:
1. Using both of your arms, simultaneously strike both of your opponents arms at the bend of he arm, and pin them against your chest, one or more right knees to groin or low midsection, then double iron palm strike to opponents face or side of neck. 2. Two finger nerve gouge to throat. Aiki-Jujitsu take down-into opponent with right foot stepping straight into opponent. 3. Right palm strike to face as your left hand grabs opponents right wrist, apply wrist torque take down on his right hand. 4. Left bar wrist lock or S lock. 5. Double ear slap, then both hands wrap around the neck of opponents, pulls his head down (your elbows tucked in close to each other for protection), then apply a series of knee strikes. 6. Right heel hand to chin, and fingers dig into eye sockets forming a tight grip onto face of opponent. 7. Double eye gouge, double thumb gouge into eye sockets, foot stomp into instep. 8. Right punch into bicep, wrist torque take down on opponents right hand. 9. Right strike or punch to groin, apply over the shoulder arm break, over your left shoulder against his right arm. 10. Left foot steps back at a 45 angle as your torso turns counter- clockwise to the left, as your right arm is raised (elbow straight) and is pointed to the ground, consequently breaking opponents grip and pulling him off balance. To follow up with a forearm or elbow strike to his face. 11. Same as #10 but follow up with side kick. 12. Knee to groin fist choke. 13. Knee to groin stomach choke. 14. Simply turn and walk away. 15. Two fingers to the throat (nerve center) as he steps back in response to the pain, follow up with a burning foot side kick. 266

JKD GRAPPLING RANGE


BASIC APPLICATION DRILLS
RIGHT OUTSIDE RIGHT (Right Punch Right Outside Tan) Rear Takedown Front Takedown Front Wrist Lock Rear Wrist Lock Hanging Choke Figure 4 Take Down Vertical Hand Push Down Two Finger Take Down Wrist Torque Take Down Forehead Aiki Takedown Over The Shoulder Armbar LEFT OUTSIDE RIGHT (Right Punch Left Outside Pak) Wrist Torque Takedown Rear Takedown Two Finger Takedown Front Wrist Lock Over The Shoulder Armbar Vertical Hand Pushdown Hanging Choke Finger Push LEFT INSIDE RIGHT (Right Punch Inside Tan) Basic Wrist Lock Combination Armbar / Wrist clock Rear Take Down (From Outside) Front Armbar Underarm Lock Fist Choke Stomach Choke RIGHT INSIDE RIGHT (Right Punch Right Inside Pak) Basic Wrist Lock Combination Armbar / Wrist Lock S Lock Rear Takedown (from the inside) Wrist Torque Takedown Stomach Choke RIGHT OVER RIGHT (LOW) (Right Low Punch Right Outside Sweep Basic Wrist Lock Combination Armbar / Wrist Lock Bar Hammer Lock Rear Take Down Hanging Choke LEFT UNDER RIGHT (LOW) (Right Low Punch Left Inside Sweep) Bar Hammer Lock Wrist Torque Takedown LEFT OVER LEFT (Left Punch Left Outside Tan) Rear Sweep Elbow Up Wrist Lock

267

TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF JEET KUNE DO


AS PRESENTED BY THE JKD ASSOCIATION

The JKD as taught and promoted by the JKD association Is based on the non classical, combat modified Chinese American Gung Fu System with influences from boxing and fencing as it was developed by Bruce Lee and taught and taught at the Oakland, California JKD School and co instructed by James Yimm Lee.

FOUR RANGES OF COMBAT KICKING-PUNCH TRAPPING-GRAPPLING THREE PHASES OF LEARNING JKD 1. Sharpening (learning) of the tools. 2. Utilization of the tools (techniques). 3. Dissolving of the tools (developing pure instinct and reflex in combat. THE THREE Rs OF JEET KUNE DO Realistic Relationship of the opponents Rhythm. STRICTLY FOR STREET SELF-DEFENSE JKD is only for street combat and self-defense. There are no sport aspects, no flowery forms, no acrobatics. JKD is scientific street fighting. NON-CLASSICAL JKD techniques are simple, direct, and functional, without any traditional, classic maneuvers. There is no chambering or unnecessary movements

HAND TECHNIQUES The hand techniques (fist and open hand) are some of the fastest and hardest hitting in existence today. They are fast, deceptive and powerful. The JKD hands are a cross of techniques from Wing Chun and Alis style of boxing, also using some concepts from fencing . KICKING JKD emphasis low level kicking due to its combat aspects. The kicks are quick, strong, and geared to disable an assailant immediately. BLOCKING JKD utilizes few blocks and most of those are deflections with evasive footwork . GRAPPLING Our extended system of JKD incorporates techniques from Ju-Jitsu such as joint-locks, throws, chokes, and sweeps in order to enhance its street effectiveness. SIMPLICITY No flash, no fancy moves, no acrobatics. Keep it simple, keep it effective. PHYSICAL & MENTAL BENEFITS JKD training provides physical conditioning, develops balance and coordination, builds up cardio-respiratory endurance and stamina, and helps in confidence, self-esteem, and mental discipline.

INDIVIDUALITY
The original JKD is our base, our nucleus. We still grow by using workable combat techniques from other sources. The HKD practitioner expresses the techniques which fit his/her own physical build, personality, and martial arts background.

268

IN MEMORY OF
Punong Guro Edgar Sulite

September 25, 1957- April 10, 1997 Kali/Eskrima Founder of Lameco Eskrima System Sining ng Lameko Eskrima

269

Guro Teddy Lucay Lucay

IN MEMORY OF

October 4, 1945 March 30, 1996 KALI /JKD Senior Instructor under Sifu/Guro Dan Inosanto
270

IN MEMORY OF
Sifu James Yimm Lee

January 20, 1920 - December 28, 1972


Before meeting Bruce Lee, James Yimm Lee was already a well known Sil Lum Gung Fu instructor and Iron Palm Master in Oakland, California. He was also an amateur boxer, a bodybuilder, and a welder by occupation. He is responsible for making Bruce Lees personal Gung-Fu and Jeet Kune Do training equipment. James was the elder of the JKD clan and was also "second in command" there. He converted his garage to a Jeet Kune Do studio, and conducted Jeet Kune Do and Gung Fu classes to a select group of dedicated students. He leaves behind a legacy of excellence that is still talked about in the Martial Arts community to this day. 271

IN MEMORY OF
Bruce Lee

November 27, 1940 July 20, 1973 Founder of Jeet Kune Do

IN MEMORY OF
Brandon Lee

February 1, 1965 - March 31, 1993 Son of Bruce Lee

272