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CELTA Assignment 1

Rodrigues

Name: Maira Aymone

Language Related Task


January 2013

Class: Part-time CELTA

A. Ive been waiting here for two hours.


1. Meaning I was waiting here two hours ago for something/someone I am still waiting for something/someone at the present time. 2. Form 3. Pronunciation 4. Eliciting Draw a timeline and put pictures of a man waiting for a date. In picture 1 he looks happy and theres a clock showing the time. In picture 2 he looks unhappy. There is a blank speech bubble and the clock shows that two hours have gone by.
now future Pic1 Pic 2

Subject + Have/has been + verb (ing) Contraction: I + have = Ive /aIv/ Short /i/ on been Stress on /wei/ in wating

Ask: Do we know when the man started waiting for his date? 2 hours ago. Is he still waiting? Yes What do you think he is saying? I 5. Concept Questions When did the man arrive at the place? 2 hours ago his date? Yes 6. Anticipated Difficulties and Solutions Form: Students may get confused about when to use Present Perfect and Present Perfect Progressive Explain that in the PPP for shorter, temporary actions or situations, e.g.: Ive been living here for a week My parents have lived in Brazil all their lives Phonolog y: Concept: 1 Students might not use contraction and use long sound in been The students may not understand that the man is still Drill correct pronunciation emphasising the contraction (ve) and /i/ Use clear visuals (pic 1 and 2 plus timeline) Is the man still waiting for

waiting at present time. Other: Students may try to use the form with state verbs such as be, like, love, etc. Explain that these verbs cannot be used with the Present Perfect Progressive

B. It suits you. versus


1. Meaning

It fits you.

Fits: It is not too big or too small for you. It is the right size. Suits: It is the right colour/style for you, it looks good on you.

2. Form

Subject + Present Simple + Object

3. Suit ui is pronounced like (s t) Pronunciation 4. Eliciting Show a picture of a woman wearing clothes that are too big for her Ask: Are her clothes the right size for her? No Show a picture of the same woman wearing clothes that are her size Ask: Are her clothes the right size now? Yes What can you say to her? It Show a picture of a man wearing a business suit and a Mohican hairstyle. Ask: Does his haircut go with his clothes? Does it look good? No Show a picture of the same man with conservative hairstyle. Ask: Does his haircut match his clothes now? Yes What can you say to him? It 5. Concept Questions Are her clothes the right size for her? clothes? 6. Anticipated Difficulties and Solutions Form: Students may not use correct 3rd person form of Present Simple (+s) Students may not pronounce suit correctly (s t) Students may confuse the uses of suit and fit Remind students of 3rd person (+s), highlight form on the whiteboard and then drill Drill correct pronunciation and use phonemics on the whiteboard Fit refers to size and shape Suit refers to colour, style Does it look good? The man could look uncomfortable about his haircut in the picture. Emphasise that Does his haircut look good along with his

Phonolog y: Concept:

Other: 2

Some students may think the Mohican haircut looks fine on

the man.

the hairstyle and his outfit dont really go well so they get the idea.

C. I wish I didnt live in London


1. Meaning I live in London I dont want to live in London, but I have to. 2. Form Subject + base form + subject + past simple (positive) didnt + base form (negative) 3. Live (l v), not (l v) as in alive Pronunciation Weak t in didnt 4. Eliciting Show picture 1: a man stands in front of a house looking unhappy. On the backdrop you can see a double-decker and the Big Ben. A sign by the house reads home. Ask: Where is he? In London man happy? No Does he live in London? Yes Is the

Show picture 2: The man is imagining himself holding a magic lamp (thought bubble). Theres big cross over the Big Ben/double decker. He is saying something (blank speech bubble). Point at the lamp and ask: what is this for? To make wishes What could the man be saying? I wish 5. Concept Questions Does he want to keep living in London? No Did he really find a magic lamp or is he imagining it? He is imagining it. Can he go away from London now if he wants to? No, he has to live there 6. Anticipated Difficulties and Solutions Form: Phonolog y: Concept: 3 Students may put wish in the past too (I wished) Students may pronounce live as in alive / Strong t in didnt Students might confuse wish with want Highlight form on the whiteboard and then drill it. Drill correct pronunciation and use phonemics on the whiteboard Emphasise that wish refers to situations that are impossible/unlikely (hence the

man imagining a magic lamp) Other: Students may use wish for things that are possible in the future Explain that we use hope instead. Give examples: I hope you pass your exams (not I wish you pass) I hope you feel better tomorrow (not I wish you feel better)

D. - Would you mind opening the window?


1. Meaning 2. Form Please open the window. Would you mind + verb(ing) + object

- Not at all.
Thats OK / Sure. Not at all The sounds of not/at/all are blended together

3. Would is weak /wd/ Pronunciation Stress is on mind and on the verb(ing) on all 4. Eliciting

Tell students: I'm hot. What should I do? Open the window I am far from the window. What should I do? Ask a student near the window to open it. I want to be polite. What question should I ask (starting with would)? Would you mind? Would you mind? No? So how can you give me a polite answer? Not at all 5. Concept Questions Do I want to open the window? Yes Can I open the window myself? No Am I asking for permission to open the window? No 6. Anticipated Difficulties and Solutions Form: Students may not use verb(ing) and use base form instead Students may stress would or you Students may pronounce the words not at all separately. Concept: Students may think I am asking for permission to open the window Would you mind opening the window is a request and Would you mind if I opened the window is asking for permission. They are both polite forms. If you were at someones house you would use the Highlight form on the whiteboard and then drill it Drill correct pronunciation

Phonolog y:

second form.

Bibliography: SWAN, M. (2005) Practical English Usage. Oxford University Press, pp. 121, 183, 324, 458, 608, 618.