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British Fairy Tale Pathfinderi

By Holly Jackson For LIS 601, Fall 2012

Table of Contents Getting Started (Introduction) 3 Resources for Beginning your Research/Looking for Books .....4 How to Locate Resources7 Subject Headings.7 Keywords....7 Call Numbers to Search...7 Guides to the Literature ..8 Bibliographies .9 Reference Sources .10 General Encyclopedias...10 Subject Encyclopedias...................................................................................................11 Dictionaries........................................................................................................................11 Directories..........................................................................................................................12 Handbooks and Manuals....................................................................................................13 Biographical Sources.........................................................................................................14 Geographical Sources........................................................................................................15 Government Sources......................................................................................................................15 Periodical Articles.........................................................................................................................16 E-Journals..........................................................................................................................16 Databases...........................................................................................................................17 Audiovisual Materials....................................................................................................................18 Websites........................................................................................................................................18 Research Centers...........................................................................................................................18 Important People...........................................................................................................................19 Research Assistance......................................................................................................................19

Getting Started (Introduction) Fairy tales started as an oral tradition many generations ago, so a lot of the history of fairy tales is more verbal than physically written. If you're looking for the history of fairy tales and their origins, it is hard to place because the tales started off in a spoken form before they were ever written down. However, some of the oldest known written fairy tales are from circa 1300 B.C. in Egypt, which shows that there is a long history of written tales as well. (For more on this, see The Encyclopedia of Fantasy as a good starting place.) Because of their oral tradition, the written forms of these tales may also have some differences in the way that they are told, though the core of the tale may be the same. For British fairy tales, one of the earliest written tales is Beowulf, an Anglo-Saxon epic poem, the bestknown early work in English literature, which was written somewhere around the 8th century. (For more on this, see The Oxford Companion to Fairy Tales: British and Irish Fairy Tales.) From there, many other tales have emerged in the culture, often passed along from person to person and eventually, for the most part, ending up in collections of fairy tales amassed by various collectors. Today, fairy tales permeate films, books, music, art, toys, marketing strategies, businesses, childhood experiences, and really, culture in general. One of the main issues that researchers and students can run into when looking into the topic of British fairy tales is whether or not to search under the country Great Britain or England as the region is known under both terms. Subject headings that can be searched for fairy tales from this region can be searched using both terms, so searching under both can yield more results than simply searching for one; for example, searching for fairy tales -- England and also searching for fairy tales -- Great Britain will come up with different results that are both useful. Another issue with the topic is considering other important fairy tale compilers, like the Grimm Brothers. The Grimm Brothers were important to Germany, but not to Britain, so when searching for British Fairy Tales, it is important to focus on compilers and producers of fairy tales who are from England and not Germany or France or Italy or any of the other countries that major names in the fairy tale field have come from before.

Resources for Beginning your Research/Looking for Books Some good starting resources for this topic at the University of Kentucky can be found online through the library catalogue, located throughout different regions of Young Library, or possibly in the Science Library or even in the Education Library. When first looking for books at the University of Kentucky, it is important to access the catalog, known as InfoKat, though libraries.uky.edu. Once you go to the webpage, you will see this screen:

The search area with tabs towards the top of the screen (with the first tab reading Books+) is what youll want to use. Here is an explanation of what those tabs can help you do related to locating books: Books+ - This tab searches InfoKat for all of the print materials (books, journals, periodicals, newspapers, plus microfilms and microfiche) that can be found in the library itself. Quick Search - This tab searches World Cat Local, which can locate books not only in the libraries at the University of Kentucky, but also at other local libraries and libraries all over the world. This is very useful if a search in InfoKat is not turning up any results for a title. If that is the case, search in the Quick Search tab to see if another local library has it. If they do, you can go to the Services tab at the top of the webpage and go to the Interlibrary Loan page and request it. If youve never used interlibrary loan, going to this webpage will take you to FAQs, instruction pages, and basic information to help guide you through the process of requesting books that the library does not have that you would like to use in your research.

Consider looking at these texts for information on the tales and what you could study in regards to the genre of British fairy tales:

British and Irish Fairy Tales. The Oxford Companion to Fairy Tales. Ed. Jack Zipes. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. Electronic Access. InfoKat Record with link to electronic access: http://infokat.uky.edu/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=3123093 This entry provides a great overview of the topic of British and Irish Fairy Tales, breaking the topic down into four sections, including the medieval period, the banishment of the fairies, the return of the fairies, and the 20th-century revival. Here, readers will find out more about each period, including example tales and authors for each section.
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Clute, John and John Grant, eds. The Encyclopedia of Fantasy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 1997. Print. Library of Congress call number: PN3435 .C55 1997 (Young Library, 5th floor) This is the first comprehensive encyclopedia of the fantasy field. It covers fantasy-literature, film, television, opera, art, and comics, including fairy tales in these fields. This is a large and rather detailed source that can be rather useful when writing about fairy tales in general (that entry is over three pages long) or how they intersect with other areas, for example, science fiction. The fairy tale entry does a great job of connecting fairy tales to other areas and to different time periods and places and giving examples of important people and texts that readers could use from those references.
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Heiner, Heidi Anne. Sur La Lune Fairy Tales. Web. 2012. <http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/ > Sur La Lune Fairy Tales is a website created by a former student that started as a class project and continued long after the class ended. Here, you can find annotated fairy tales, their histories, illustrations, similarities across cultures, modern interpretations, and more to help with your research. It is a great resource and easy to navigate.

Jacobs, Joseph. English fairy tales; and, More English fairy tales. Ed. Donald Haase. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2002. Print. Library of Congress call number: GR141 .J33 2002 (Young Library 4th Floor) You can also view the 1890 version of Joseph Jacobss English Fairy Tales on Wikisource at: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/English_Fairy_Tales Here, you can find fairy tale collections from Victorian England, originally published in 1890 and 1894 by Joseph Jacobs, a folklorist, literary critic, and historian. These collections include 87 tales, along with original illustrations, reprinted in a newer volume in the printed version. This collection is a great starting place for researchers and students to see a collection of tales, whether they read one or two or the whole collection to see what they are like. The illustrations also offer another perspective of the time, as they present a viewpoint through the eyes of someone who has experienced reading the tale.
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Zipes, Jack, ed. Victorian fairy tales: the revolt of the fairies and elves. New York: Routledge, 1991. Print. Library of Congress call number: PR1309.F26 V5 1991 (Young Library 5th Floor) This source is an anthology of fairy tales written by some of the most notable writers of the Victorian period. Twenty-two tales are presented chronologically by authors like Charles Dickens, Lewis Carroll, Oscar Wilde, Rudyard Kipling, and Edith Nesbitt, presenting British fairy tales from the 19th century. Most of the tales are printed with their original illustrations. Jack Zipes adds an introduction to the collection as a whole and to each tale individually, presenting background material on the authors and the roles that the fairy tale played in Victorian society.
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How to Locate Resources Subject Headings One of the best ways to search is by using subject headings. These are sets of terms that classify materials related to specific topics, so that when you look in a catalog or database, you can find more articles and books that specifically relate to your field or topic. Here are some subject headings you may want to try for British Fairy Tales in InfoKat: Fairy tales -- England Folklore -- England Fairy tales -- Great Britain Folklore -- Great Britain Fairy tales -- Great Britain -- Early works to 1800 Fairy tales -- Great Britain -- Juvenile literature Fairy tales -- England -- Juvenile literature Fairy tales -- England -- London -- Early works to 1800

If youre looking or more of the history and criticism of British fairy tales, you can also check out these subject headings: Fairy tales -- England -- history and criticism Fairy tales -- Great Britain -- history and criticism

Keyword Search Terms Another way to search is by using keywords, like some of the following: Search using the term fairy tales and England, connecting them with the Boolean operator AND so that both are linked together in the search. Search using folklore and England, linking the two together. Since fairy tales are a part of folklore, this is also a good search term. You can also search for the same things, substituting Great Britain for England: fairy tales AND Great Britain folklore AND Great Britain

Possible Call Numbers to Browse If you don't know exactly what you're looking for and just want to go browse in the stacks of books, a good area to start might be the GR141 area, which deals specifically with English folklore and fairytales. This is located on the 4th floor of Young Library in the North Wing.

Guides to the Literature The Oxford Companion to Fairy Tales. Ed. Jack Zipes. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. Electronic Access. InfoKat Record with link to electronic access: http://infokat.uky.edu/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=3123093 The Oxford Companion to Fairy Tales is very useful, with a searchable, alphabetical index of terms that you can use. While it may have a few glitches in terms of clicking B and still have A terms showing, for example, you can still find what you need when looking for anything related to fairy tales. As mentioned in the introduction, there is a nice section specifically on British and Irish Fairy Tales, but overall this is a great guide to fairy tale literature. The Oxford Companion series is known for its excellent work with different literature fields, so these are often great starting places for literature-based research. When it comes to the field of British fairy tales, you may also want to consider annotated collections of fairy tales as guides to the literature as well. These include annotations by scholars, assisting you in understanding what is going on in the tale and what it might mean in terms of the story and also the culture during that time. Here is an annotated collection you may want to read through: Tatar, Maria, ed. The Annotated Classic Fairy Tales. New York: Norton, 2002. Print. Library of Congress call number: PN6071 .F15 A66 2002 (Special Note: This is in the Education Library, which is at 205 Dickey Hall. Dickey Hall is near the northeast edge of campus on Scott Street and is where education classes as held.) Maria Tatar is one of the most respected names in the fairy tale field and she has published quite a bit related to fairy tales, making her Annotated Classic Fairy Tales an edition worth using in your research. It contains many illustrations accompanying the tales, as well as annotations exploring their historical origins, their cultural complexities, and their psychological effects.
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Bibliographies Sometimes finding a bibliography can be as simple as looking at a helpful source you may have already looked at, like on the Sur La Lune website. There, if you click on Annotated Tales at the top of the page, a helpful literature guide, you can scroll to the bottom to see four Great Britain-specific tales. Each of these has its own bibliography of recommended sources that can lead you to find some great sources of information related to British fairy tales (and not just that one specific tale). Start at this link for the annotated tales: http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/talesindex.html Then, choose any of the tales there at the bottom under the Joseph Jacobs section (Great Britain). Once you click on it, youll be directed to the site for that specific tale. There, to the left, there should be some options starting with Annotated Tale. Click on Bibliography to get a fairly lengthy list of sources for you to start searching. You can also check out sources like this: Thompson, Stith. Motif-Index of Folk Literature. Charlottesville, VA: InteLex Corp, 2004. Electronic Access. You can view this source online at: http://infokat.uky.edu/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1749323 Simply follow the link in the record where it says Internet Access. This six volume index is a classification of motifs in folk narratives and is a great resource linking terms to sources so that you can make further connections in your research. It lists terms in alphabetical order by mythological motif, animal, and tabu, and connects terms to where you can find them in other works, which is incredibly useful. It is available online and is easy to navigate, making it a source that you do not have to go far to use if you have a computer. Or, if you were simply looking for a bibliography of British fairy tales, you could use this: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/English_Fairy_Tales This is an electronic version of the revised third edition of English Fairy Tales by Joseph Jacobs from 1890, including illustrations. It is a great source to see a listing of the fairy tales considered British from the title page right on the main page. Then, if you want to read the stories online, you simply need to click the story title to be taken to the storys webpage.

Reference Sources Some good starting places for reference sources would be in the Reference section of Young Library, in the West Wing on the 2nd floor. Here, like the rest of the library, sources are in order by Library of Congress call number, so conducting a search in InfoKat may be useful if you know a certain source or type of source that you are interested in. Following the same advice as the Locating Books section would really help in finding reference books. Some general areas of reference sources are explained in more detail below, including general encyclopedias, subject specific encyclopedias, dictionaries, directories, handbooks and manuals, biographical sources, and geographical sources: General Encyclopedias Encyclopedia Mythica. 2012. Web. <http://www.pantheon.org> This source is an electronic encyclopedia that deals not only with mythology and religion, but also with folklore, including fairy tales. It is a good general source that includes fairy tales and is easy to navigate with an easy to find search bar at the top of the page. They have an entire folktales section that is really great for looking up fairy tale related entries. Haase, Donald, ed. The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Folktales & Fairy Tales. Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing Group, 2008. Print. Library of Congress call number: GR74 .G73 2008 (Young Library 2nd floor Reference) This source covers almost everything related to fairy tales, from their origins in antiquity to modern day representations and has a global and multicultural scope, including tales and references to creatures from all over the world. This encyclopedia encompasses three volumes and is organized in alphabetical order. Many entries are illustrated and are often cross-listed, making it easy to compare entries and understand relationships between characters, places, and tales. **If you look around the GR section near The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Folktales & Fairy Tales, youll find other useful reference sources related to folktales and fairy tales, including other encyclopedias.
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Subject Encyclopedias Alexander, Marc. A companion to the folklore, myths & customs of Britain. Stroud: Sutton, 2002. Print. Library of Congress call number: GR141 .A39 2002 (Young Library 4th floor) This is an excellent encyclopedia to reference when looking for folklore or fairy tale references that are specific to England. Marc Alexander includes images with several of his entries, with several color pages of images in the center of the work. Arranged alphabetically, this source contains entries of varying length, with several relating to fairy-related topics alone. A good place to look for subject specific material would be to go to the GR141 section on the 4th floor of Young Library and look around where this subject encyclopedia is. You may find some other great sources there. Dictionaries Searching the GR141 section on the 4th floor of Young Library is the best place to find dictionaries related to British fairy tale specific terms, though general dictionaries, like the Oxford English Dictionary, which is one of the best dictionaries available, could also provide not only a definition of the term you wish to know a definition for, but also the history of it. Sometimes combining both a general dictionary definition, along with a specialized dictionary definition of a term can help gain a fuller understanding of a term, especially when it comes to fairy tales and other fictional terms. Simpson, Jacqueline and Stephen Roud. A Dictionary of English Folklore. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2003. Print. Library of Congress call number: GR141 .S573 2000 (Young Library 4th floor) You can also view this source online at: http://infokat.uky.edu/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=3188517 Simply follow the link in the record where it says Internet Access. This dictionary provides very detailed entries for each term, offering readers a fuller understanding of what terms like cauls or hill figures mean, but also providing short references to people as well, like Joseph Jacobs, who the authors attribute to Jenny Greenteeth, a creature of a fairy tale said to catch children and drown them in pools. This is a great resource for those interested in looking up relevant terms in English folklore.
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Briggs, Katharine M. A Dictionary of British Folk-Tales in the English Language. Great Britain: IUP, 1970. Print. Library of Congress call number: GR 141 .B69 (pt. A v.1; pt. A v.2; pt. B v.1; pt. B v.2) (Young Library 4th floor) While it may be from the 1970s, this is a great collection of folk narratives and folk tales from England. Katharine Briggs includes the original tales, as told by word of mouth, untranslated with the exception of a few tales that were in medieval Latin. This resource is excellent for actually reading tales and referencing original material for research.
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Directories Ashliman, D.L. Folklinks: Folk and Fairy-Tale Sites. 2006. Web. <http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/folklinks.html> This website, compiled by D.L. Ashliman, is a great directory containing lists of search engines, encyclopedias and general reference works, research libraries, electronic text indexes, directories of electronic text sites, directories of folk and fairy-tale sites, libraries of electronic texts, general fairy-tale sites, individual stories and tales, film and fairy tales, storytelling, for children, parents, and teachers, organizations and journals, and foreign-language sites. Anything that you would like to find relating to the field, it can help direct you to. There may not be much cause to use a directory, as most things youll need are the tales themselves, research and criticism, and perhaps a citation manual or two. If you need to know a scholar or look someone up, I recommend looking at the two scholars listed in the People section below.

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Handbooks and Manuals The handbooks and manuals that are useful related to the topic of British fairy tales are citation handbooks for when you are writing about the tales or including them in your work. Here are the three most commonly used citation manuals and a little about why you might use each: The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 7th edition This is the most helpful for any kind of humanities or general education class. MLA is probably the most common writing style. If you do not want to purchase the actual citation manual, the Purdue OWL website is absolutely fantastic at explaining how to construct MLA citations. You can visit their website at: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/

The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition This is the most helpful for any kind of social sciences course psychology, sociology, or even education. The Purdue OWL website is absolutely fantastic at explaining how to construct APA citations as well. You can visit this website at: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition This style is most helpful for literature, history, and the arts. Purdue OWL also has a fantastic website for Chicago citations at http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/717/01/, though the 16th edition of the actual manual is online too at http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/16/contents.html

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Biographical Sources With the topic of British fairy tales, there are multiple routes that you could take for biographical sources: If you were interested in biographies of the compilers of British fairy tales, you may want to start with Joseph Jacobs since he is one of the most widely recognized compilers of British fairy tales. A possible biography you might use for him might be from the Australian Dictionary of Biography since he was born in Australia (http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/jacobs-joseph-6817). There are multiple databases available through the University of Kentucky that would also work too. A good recommendation would be to look at the Biographical Information Research Guide put together by Rob Aken, a Reference Librarian at Young Library. You can access this guide at http://libguides.uky.edu/Biog. Research guides put together a list of resources for students in an organized way, separating them into tabs like Books, journals & and electronic resources and Literary figures which would be helpful for this topic. Databases like the Dictionary of National Biography may also be useful for searching for deceased compilers like Joseph Jacobs. This is an excellent biographical database for people who have passed on and who were important in some regard. Joseph Jacobs has a decent sized entry in this database. If you are interested in the biographies of the scholars of fairy tales, you may want to look at sources in the Biographical Information Research Guide, but with the names of scholars like Jack Zipes and Maria Tatar, who you can read more about in the Important People section below.

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Geographical Sources Barnes, Ian. The Historical Atlas of the British Isles. Yorkshire: Pen and Sword Books, 2011. Print. Library of Congress call number: G1811 .S1 B376 2011 (Special note: This is in the Science Library, which is also where our Map Library is located. The Science Library is also known as the King Library and is behind the Presidents House in Maxwell Place.) This source would be excellent if you are interested in studying the history of the British Isles and the movement of people into and around the British Isles as relates to the movement and spread of fairy tales. If youre interested in how tales ended up where they did, perhaps you want to check this out to see where people were moving around to and from in Britain during different time periods as this atlas does an excellent job of showing movements through Britain clearly during different time periods from early periods of its existence through more modern times. There are not a lot of geographical sources specifically related to British fairy tales, but there are a lot of maps and resources related to England and places where you can trace the movement of people and possibly the tales.
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Government Sources There are not really any government sources that relate specifically to British fairy tales. The closest government source for this topic would be to research more about the British Poet Laureate, who has written a few fairy tales. You can learn more about her and the Poet Laureate post at http://www.royal.gov.uk/TheRoyalHousehold/OfficialRoyalposts/PoetLaureate.aspx

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Periodical Articles

There are many ways to access periodical articles relating to British fairy tales through the University of Kentucky Libraries website. Articles - This tab is a general area to look for articles in Academic Search Complete. It can be useful, but I recommend using other sources for academic articles before this tab. E-journals - If you know the name of a journal you want to use an article from, this tab can be very useful. You simply type in the journal title (minus the initial The that starts the title) and a search will be conducted to see if the University of Kentucky Libraries have the journal youre looking for. Some good recommendations for journals with articles relating to British fairy tales might be: Marvels and Tales This is a peer-reviewed journal that has a multidisciplinary, global focus on fairy tales. Folklore: Electronic Journal of Folklore This journal publishes articles related to the fields of folklore studies, comparative mythological research, cultural anthropology, and other fields that are related to these, like fairy tales.

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Databases - This is great if you know a database that you want to search, like Academic Search Complete, JSTOR, or another database that UK Libraries has. You can also search the databases alphabetically to see what is offered. It may be best to search for more literature-specific databases rather than general humanities databases like Academic Search Complete and JSTOR though. The main literature-specific database available at the University of Kentucky is Literature Online. This database searches the MLA International Bibliography, one of the largest and most respected English literature databases, as well as ABELL, the Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature. Keyword Searches One of the easiest ways to search in a database is to just input some keywords. Here are some recommendations for searching for articles in Literature Online for this topic: English fairy tales British folklore British fairy tales Subject Heading Searches You can also search using subject headings, which search for articles that all have the same subject heading assigned that you are searching for. With Literature Online, there is a very nice option to search for Author/Subject and select from a list. I recommend clicking on that link for selecting from a list and searching for fairy tales. You will find that you can select options like fairy-tale archetypes, fairy-tale conventions, fairy-tale motifs, fairy tales, and other options that are relevant to your research. If you just search under these terms, you will search more than just English fairy tales, but it will give you a broader view of the field. If you want to limit your search to British fairy tales, simply type in something like England into the keyword search box with fairy tale or whatever subject you selected in the subject search box.

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Audiovisual Materials A lot of movies have been made about fairy tales. One of the most reliable sources to find movies, especially if they are named after the original tale, is http://www.imdb.com, the International Movie Database. To search for British fairy tale film adaptations, look at a list of British fairy tales, like the Joseph Jacobs title page at http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/English_Fairy_Tales and then search for a title. For example, searching for Jack and the Beanstalk turns up several exact matches and a few partial matches. To see if the University of Kentucky has any of these films, simply type in the film name into InfoKat to see if it is available through the library. If it is, you can get it through the AudioVisual desk in the basement of Young Library. Another option for seeing a film is to watch it on Netflix, if it is available on there, or through another film site. If you do not subscribe to these sites, many of them offer free trials of between a week to a month that may be worth trying to see if they are worth subscribing to.

Websites Some useful websites might be Amazon (amazon.com), Barnes and Noble (barnesandnoble.com), and Google Books (books.google.com) where you can purchase or even view/preview collections of British fairy tales.

Research Centers The Sussex Centre for Folklore, Fairy Tales, and Fantasy at the University of Chichester is one research center to know when it comes to British fairy tales. They are located in West Sussex in the United Kingdom and can be found on the web at http://www.sussexfolktalecentre.org/ Their focus is on the importance of fairy tales as a creative force both in literature and culturethe founding impulse for the Centre is related to the specific locale of Sussex and its surrounding region. This area is rich in examples of all three kinds of narrative, ranging from folk narratives of various kinds, through literary fairy tales written in, as well as about, Sussex to major works of fantasy and myth by Sussex residents.

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Important People Maria Tatar is an American scholar who is well-respected in fairy tale studies and folklore studies and has published many books in these fields. Her expertise is in childrens literature, German literature, and folklore. See her webpage here: http://people.fas.harvard.edu/~tatar/Maria_Tatar/About_Me.html Select Bibliography: Tatar, Maria. The classic fairy tales: texts, criticism. New York: Norton, 1999. Print. Library of Congress call number: GR550 .C57 1999 (Young Library 4th floor) Tatar, Maria. Off with their heads!: Fairy tales and the culture of childhood. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1992. Print. Library of Congress call number: GR550 .T38 1992 (Young Library 4th floor) Jack Zipes is an American scholar who has written, edited, and presented many books, papers, articles, and presentations on the topic of fairy tales throughout his career, becoming a necessary name to know in the field of fairy tale studies. He has written on fairy tales, their evolution, and their social and political role in civilizing processes, according to his biography on Wikipedia. See his webpage here: http://gsd.umn.edu/people/emeritiprofile.php?UID=zipes001 Select Bibliography: Zipes, Jack David. Victorian fairy tales: the revolt of the fairies and elves. New York: Routledge, 1991. Print. Library of Congress call number: PR1309.F26 V5 1991 (Young Library 5th floor) Zipes, Jack David. Why fairy tales stick: The evolution and relevance of a genre. New York: Routledge, 2006. Print. Library of Congress call number: PN3437 .Z58 2006 (Young Library 5th floor) Research Assistance If you would like further assistance after going through this research guide, please feel free to contact me or to drop by the Reference Desk on the 2nd floor of the Young Library. There are reference librarians on staff at different times throughout the year, so be sure to check the William T. Young Library website for hours: http://libraries.uky.edu/WTYL Holly Jackson Young Library Reference Graduate Assistant holly.allyce.jackson@uky.edu

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Image source: http://windling.typepad.com/editing/other-books.html Image source: http://www.betterworldbooks.com/the-oxford-companion-to-fairy-tales-id-0198601158.aspx iii Image source: http://us.macmillan.com/theencyclopediaoffantasy/JohnClute iv Image source: http://www.amazon.com/English-Fairy-Tales-More-Classic/dp/1576074269 v Image Source: http://www.amazon.com/Victorian-Fairy-Tales-Revolt-Fairies/dp/0415901405 vi Image Source: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/annotated-classic-fairy-tales-maria-tatar/1100151391 vii Image source: http://www.betterworldbooks.com/the-greenwood-encyclopedia-of-folktales-and-fairy-tales-3volumes-id-0313334412.aspx viii Image source: http://www.amazon.com/Companion-Folklore-Myths-Customs-Britain/dp/0750923598 ix Image source: http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/Dictionary-English-Folklore-JacquelineSimpson/9780198607663 x Image source: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/a-dictionary-of-british-folk-tales-in-the-english-language-part-akatherine-m-briggs/1112935739 xi Image source: http://www.amazon.com/HISTORICAL-ATLAS-BRITISH-ISLES-Swanston/dp/1848844999
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