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REHS1438-03 March 2004 Special Instruction i02066887 Installation and Initial Start-Up Procedure for G3500C and G3500E
REHS1438-03 March 2004 Special Instruction i02066887 Installation and Initial Start-Up Procedure for G3500C and G3500E

REHS1438-03

March 2004

Special Instruction

i02066887

Installation and Initial Start-Up Procedure for G3500C and G3500E Engines

SMCS Code: 1000

Electric Power Generation G3516C (S/N: RWA1-Up; TJB1-Up; TJC1-Up; DKR1-Up) G3516E (S/N: GHP1-Up; SLY1-Up) G3520C (S/N: GDB1-Up; GHC1-Up; GHE1-Up; B9P1-Up; CWW1-Up;

CWY1-Up)

G3520E (S/N: HAL1-Up; GHM1-Up; GHR1-Up; SXY1-Up)

Table of Contents

Introduction

1

Requirements for the Electrical System

2

Grounding Practices

2

Welding on Electronically Controlled Engines

3

Service Tools

3

Connecting Cat ET with the 171-4401 Communication Adapter II

5

Terminal Box

6

Junction Box

9

Customer’s Wiring

10

Required Connections

11

Optional Connections

14

Unused Terminals

16

Wiring for the Emergency Stop Circuit

17

Wiring for the Gas Shutoff Valve (GSOV)

19

Wiring for Monitoring the Generator’s Output Power

22

Inputs for the Modes of Operation

23

Initial Start-Up Procedure

25

Adjusting the Governor

27

1

Introduction

Do not perform any procedure in this Special Instruction until you read this information and you understand this information.

This Special Instruction provides the following information for G3500C and G3500E Engines:

Requirements for the electrical system

Proper grounding practices

Proper welding practices

Required service tools

Electrical components and electronic components

Wiring connections and the corresponding functions that are available to the customer

Initial start-up procedure

Governor adjustment procedures

Reference: Information from the following sources will be needed for this Special Instruction:

Data from a complete fuel analysis that is entered into Caterpillar Software, LEKQ6378, “Methane Number Program”

The engine’s performance Data Sheet from the engine’s Technical Marketing Information (TMI)

Operation and Maintenance Manual, SEBU7681

Systems Operation/Testing and Adjusting,

RENR5978

Troubleshooting, RENR5944, “G3516C and G3516E Engines”

Troubleshooting, RENR5979, “G3520C and G3520E Engines”

Requirements for the Electrical System

All of the wiring must conform to all of the codes that are applicable to the site. When you route the wiring, avoid acute bends and sharp edges. To protect the wiring harnesses, route the harnesses through metal conduit. A liquid tight conduit is recommended. Use proper support and alignment in order to avoid strain on the conduit.

Electrical power must be supplied to the junction box that serves as the main distribution panel for the engine control system. The engine control system requires a clean 24 VDC power supply that is capable of supplying 30 amperes of continuous power.

The maximum allowable AC ripple is 150 millivolts AC peak to peak. For the wiring, the maximum allowable voltage drop is 1 VDC from the power supply to an Electronic Control Module (ECM) or to an actuator.

The power supply for the engine control system must be separate from the power supply for the starting motor.

Grounding Practices

Proper grounding is necessary for optimum engine performance and for reliability. Improper grounding will result in electrical current paths that are uncontrolled and unreliable.

Uncontrolled electrical circuit paths can result in damage to main bearings, to crankshaft bearing journal surfaces, and to aluminum components. Uncontrolled electrical circuit paths can also cause electrical activity that may degrade the engine electronics and communications.

For the starting motor, do not attach the battery negative terminal to the cylinder block.

Use an electrical ground strap to connect all metal cases that contain electrical components or electronic components to the cylinder block.

Do not connect the negative terminal from the electrical power supply directly to the cylinder block. Connect the negative terminal from the electrical power supply to the negative terminal “” on the engine mounted junction box.

Ground the cylinder block with a ground strap that is furnished by the customer. Connect this ground strap to the ground plane.

Use a separate ground strap to ground the battery negative terminal for the control system to the ground plane.

Rubber couplings may connect the steel piping of the cooling system and the radiator. This causes the piping and the radiator to be electrically isolated. Ensure that the piping and the radiator are continuously grounded to the cylinder block. Use ground straps that bypass the rubber couplings.

Ensure that all grounds are secure and free of corrosion.

2

Welding on Electronically Controlled Engines

Proper welding procedures are necessary in order to avoid damage to electronic controls. Perform welding on the engine according to the following procedure.

1. Set the engine control to the “STOP” mode.

2. Turn OFF the fue l supply to the engine.

3. Disconnect the negative terminal from the battery.

4. Disconnect the engine’s electronic components from the wiring harnesses: ECM, throttle actuator, actuator for the turbocharger compressor’s bypass, fuel metering valve, and sensors.

5. Protect the wiring harnesses from welding debris and/or from welding spatter.

NOTICE Do NOT use elec trical components (ECM or ECM sensors) or electronic component grounding points for grounding the welder.

6. Connect the welder’s ground cable directly to the engine component that will be welded. Place the clamp as close as possible to the weld in order to reduce the possibility of welding current damage to the engine bearings, to the electrical components , and to other engine components.

7. Use standard welding procedures to weld the materials together.

3

Service Tools

The tools that are listed in Table 1 are required in order to enable a service technician to perform the electrical installation procedures and the initial start-up.

The Caterpillar Electronic Technician (Cat ET) is designed to run on a personal computer.

Cat ET can display the following information:

Parameters

Diagnostic codes

Event codes

Engine configuration

Status of the monitoring system

Cat ET can perform the following functions:

Perform diagnostic tests.

Calibrate sensors.

Download flash files.

Set parameters.

Table 1 is a list of required service tools.

Table 1

 

Service Tools

Pt. No.

Description

Functions

N/A

Personal Computer (PC)

The PC is required for the use of Cat ET.

“JERD2124”

Software

Single user license for Cat ET Use the most recent version of this software.

“JERD2129”

Software

Data subscription for all engines

171-4400 (1)

Communication Adapter Gp

This group provides the communication between the PC and the engine.

7X-1414

Data Link Cable As

This cable connects the communication adapter to the service tool connector on the engine.

237-7547

Adapter Cable As

This cable connects to the USB port on computers that are not equipped with a serial port.

8T-8726

Adapter Cable As

This cable is for use between the jacks and the plugs of the sensors.

151-6320

Wire Removal Tool

This tool is used for the removal of pins and of sockets from Deutsch connectors and AMP connectors.

1U-5804

Crimp Tool

This tool is used for work with electrical connectors.

146-4080

Digital Multimeter

The multimeter is used for the testing and for the adjusting of electronic circuits.

7X-1710

Multimeter Probes

The probes are used with the multimeter to measure voltage in wiring harnesses without disconnecting the harnesses.

156-1060 or

Emission Analyzer Tool

This tool is used to measure the level of emissions in the engine’s exhaust. The 156-1060 measures the levels of four different compounds. The 156-1070 measures the levels of six different compounds. Either tool may be used.

156-1070

(1) The 7X-1700 Communication Adapter Gp may also be used.

Note: For more information regarding the use of Cat ET and of the PC requirements for Cat ET, refer to the documentation that accompanies your Cat ET software.

4

Connecting Cat ET with the 171-4401 Communication Adapter II

2.

Connect cable (2) to the RS-232 serial port of PC (1).

The engine’s battery supplies the communication adapter with 24 VDC. Use the following procedure to connect Cat ET to the engine’s control system.

1. Set the engine control to the OFF/RESET mode.

system. 1. Set the engine control to the OFF/RESET mode. Illustration 1 Left side view (1)

Illustration 1

Left side view

(1) PC (2) 196-0055 Serial Cable or the 160-0141 Serial Cable (3) 171-4401 Communication Adapter II (4) 207-6845 Adapter Cable (5) 7X-1414 Data Link Cable (6) Terminal box

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Note: Items (2), (3), and (4) are part of the 171-4400 Communication Adapter Gp.

5

Note: If your PC is not equipped with a serial port, use the 237-7547 Adapter Cable As in order to connect to the U SB port. Connect one end of the adapter to the end of cable (2). Connect the other end of the adapter to a USB port on the PC.

3. Connect cable (2) to communication adapter (3).

4. Connect cable (4) to communication adapter (3).

5. Connect cable (4) to cable (5).

6. Connect cable (5) to the service tool connector on terminal box (6).

7. Set the engine control to the STOP mode. The engine should be OFF.

If Cat ET and the communication adapter do not communicate with the ECM, refer to Troubleshoo ting, “Electronic Service Tool Will Not Communicate With ECM”.

20 Cylinder Engines

For 20 cylinder engines, if Cat ET displays Duplicate Type on data link. Unable to Service”, check the harness code for the slave ECM.

The harness inside terminal box (6) has a jumper wire (harness code) that connects terminals J3-29 and J3-60. The ECM that is connected to the harness reads the harness code. This allows the ECM to operate as the slave ECM. The jumper wire must be connected in order for the Cat ET to communicate with the modules. The jumper wire must be connected in order for the engine to crank. The jumper wire must remain connected in order for t he engine to run.

Check the continuity between terminals J3-29 and J3-60. Verify that the jumper wire is in good condition. Make repairs, as needed.

Terminal Box

Note: The terminal box is designed to remain mounted on the engine. The mounting hardware includes isola tors. Do not move the terminal box to a remote location. Moving the terminal box could result in wiring problems and in reduction of the service life of the components inside the terminal box.

c o m p o n e n t s inside the terminal box. Illustration 2

Illustration 2

Rear view

(6) Terminal box (7) Emergency stop button

g01059049

6

Terminal box (6) contains the electronic control modules. Connectors on the back of the terminal box connect the engine’s wiring harnesses to components inside the terminal box. The ignition harnesses are routed directly from each ECM to the ignition tran sformers.

Illustration 3 shows the components that are inside of the terminal box of a 16 cylinder engine.

that are inside of the terminal box of a 16 cylinder engine. Illustration 3 Components inside

Illustration 3

Components inside the terminal box on a 16 cylinder engine

(1) ECM (2) Ground strap for the ECM (3) ECM connectors J2/P2 (4) ECM connectors J1/P1 (5) Ignition harness

(6) J10/P10 connector for the terminating resistor for the CAN data link (7) Service tool connector J5 for Cat ET (8) J6 connector for the customer (9) J9 connector for the engine harness

g01059113

(10) J7 connector for the engine harness (11) J8 connector for the detonation sensors

Illustration 4 shows the components that are inside of the terminal box on a 20 cylinder engine.

7

Illustration 4 Components inside the terminal box on a 20 cylinder engine (1) Master ECM

Illustration 4

Components inside the terminal box on a 20 cylinder engine

(1) Master ECM (2) Slave E CM (3) Ground s trap for the master ECM (4) J3/P3 co nnectors for the slave ECM (5) Master E CM connectors J2/P2 (6) J4/P4 co nnectors for the slave ECM (7) Master E CM connectors J1/P1

(8) Ground strap for the slave ECM (9) Ignition harness for the left bank (10) Igniti on harness for the right bank (11) Servic e tool connector J5 for Cat ET (12) J10/P1 0 connectors for the terminatin g resistor for the CAN data link

8

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(13) J6 con nector for the customer (14) J9/P9 connectors for the engine harness (15) J7/P7 connectors for the engine harness (16) J8/P8 connectors for the detonation sensors

Junction Box

The junction box serves as the main distribution panel for the engine’s electrical power. The junction box contains al l of the circuit breakers for the engine. The junction box also contains the magnetic switches for the electric starting motors.

Illustration 5 shows the junction box.

starting motors. Illustration 5 shows the junction box. Illustration 5 The junction box is located on

Illustration 5

The junction box is located on left side of the engine.

(1) Junction box (2) 2.5 amp circuit breaker for the engine control (3) 10 amp circuit breaker for the customer

(4) 35 amp circuit breaker for the engine control’s main power supply (5) 2.5 amp circuit breaker for the start command from the ECM

9

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(6) Positive terminal for the connection of the engine’s power supply (7) Negative terminal for the connection of the engine’s power supply

Customer’s Wiring

To properly wire the engine for the requirements of the specific application, the customer must be aware of several inputs and outputs that are associated with the engine’s control system. The following list includes some examples of the inputs and outputs:

Emergency stop

Electrical power supply for the control system

Start-up and shutdown

Engine speed and governing

Status of engine operation

The 9X-7147 Connector Plug is available for the customer in order to fabricate a wiring harness to the customer connector on the engine mounted terminal box. A 16 to 18 AWG size of wire may be used. The 9X-7147 Connector Plug mates with the J6 connector on the back of the terminal box. Refer to Illustration 6.

on the back of the terminal box. Refer to Illustration 6. Illustration 6 40 − pin

Illustration 6 40 pin J6 connector

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Note: The 40pin connector is secured with a retaining bolt that is tightened to a torque of 2.25 ± 0.25 N·m (20 ± 2.00 lb in).

Some of the wiring connections are required. Some of the wiring connections are optional. The connections that are requir ed are identified in Table 2. The connections that are optional are identified in Table 3.

10

Required Connections

Table 2

 

40-Pin Connector J6 Required Connections

Terminal

Description

Functions and Comments

10

Emergency stop

Terminal 10 is provided as an option for a customer supplied emergency stop button.

   

20

Digital return

Terminal 10 must be connected to terminal 20 in order for the engine to run. If this circuit is open, the engine will not start. When this circuit is opened during operation, an emergency stop shutdown is activated:

If the ECM is controlling the gas shutoff valve, the ECM will de-energize the gas shutoff valve. The fuel is immediately shut off.

The ignition is immediately shut off.

For details, refer to “Wiring for the Emergency Stop Circuit”.

36

Digital return

This terminal provides a ground for the following switch inputs from the customer. Some of the inputs are required and some of the inputs are optional.

Auto

Start/Run

Stop

Timing setting

On/Off grid

Driven equipment

Normal stop

Idle/rated input

21

Fuel control rela y’s +Battery

The Gas Shutoff Valve (GSOV) may be controlled by the engine’s control system or by the customer’s equipment.

 

Fuel control relay’s +Battery

31

For details on these terminals, refer to “Wiring for the Gas Shutoff Valve (GSOV)”.

9

Driven equipment

This input indicates when the driven equipment is ready for operation. This input must be connected to terminal J6-36 in order for the eng ine to run.

When this input is connected to terminal J6-36, the engine can be started.

When this input is not connected to terminal J6-36, the engine will not crank.

An event code will be generated if this input is not connected to terminal J6-36 within a period of time that can be programmed with Cat ET.

If the engine is running and this input is disconnected from terminal J6-36, the ECM will immediately shut down the engine by removin g the voltage from the GSOV. The fuel supply is immediately shut off. The engine cooldown will not occur.

11

(continued)

(Table 2, contd)

 

40-Pin Connector J6 Required Connections

Terminal

Description

Functions and Comments

29

Start/Run

If these inputs are not wired correctly, the ECM will activate a diagnostic code.

 

Stop

19

These inputs are provided by the customer’s equipment. The inputs control the engine’s mode of operation.

 

The transitions between the inputs must occur within 1/10 second.

These inputs must return through terminal J6-36.

When terminal 29 is grounded to terminal J6-36, the normal sequence for start-up is initiated. After start-up, the engine will continue to run.

If the engine is running and terminal 19 is grounded to terminal J6-36, the sequence for a normal shutdown is initiated. If the cooldown is programmed, the engine operates for the cooldown period prior to shutdown.

40

Idle/Rated Input

This input must be grounded to terminal J6-36 in order for the engine to run at rated speed.

When this input is open, the engine will run at the idle speed that is programmed with Cat ET.

When the engine oil pressure is greater than the setpoint for the engine speed and this terminal is grounded to terminal J6-36, the engine will run at rated speed.

30

Normal stop

This input must be grounded to terminal J6-36 in order for the engine to run.

The grounding of terminal 19 to terminal J6-36 is recommended for normal shutdown.

If this input is not grounded to terminal J6-36, the engine will not crank. If the engine is running and the circuit is opened, the engine will shut down.

If the ECM is controlling the gas shutoff valve, the ECM will remove the voltage from the GSOV. The engine will shut down. The cooldown does not operate.

If the customer’s equipment is controlling the GSOV, the customer’s equipment must remove the voltage from the GSOV. The engine will shut down. The cooldown does not operate.

No diagnostic codes or event codes are provided for this input.

Because the cooldown will not operate for this input, this input is not recommended for normal shutdown.

12

(continued)

(Table 2, contd)

 

40-Pin Connector J6 Required Connections

Terminal

Description

Functions and Comments

4

Unswitched +Battery (2.5 amp)

These terminals provide the primary source of switched electrical power to the engine control system.

   

14

Switched + Battery

The unswitched 24 VDC is always available as an output at terminal 4 when the 2.5 amp circuit breaker in the junction box is switched ON. The output is intended for use by a customer supplied engine control switch.

The engine control switch provides the 24 VDC through terminal 14 to the following components during operation in the Auto mode, in the Start/Run mode, and in the Stop mode:

Master ECM

Slave ECM (if equipped)

Integrated Temperature Sensing Module (ITSM)

Fuel metering valve

For more information on these terminals, refer to “Inputs for the Modes of Operation”.

3

Kilowatt signal

If the generator is equipped with an EMCP II+ system, these terminals are not used.

   

13

Return

These terminals are only required if the customer supplies a wattmeter for monitoring of the generator’s output power.

For more information, refer to “Wiring for the Generator’s Output Power”.

 

Desired Speed Input

The desired speed input may be supplied by a 0 to 5 V analog signal or by a 4 to 20 mA signal.

 

The method for the desired speed input must be selected with Cat ET.

5

+5 V for the speed potentiometer

The ECM provides the +5 V supply to the potentiometer. The potentiometer provides the signal input for the desired speed. The signal input ranges from 0 to 5 volts.

25

Signal +

Provide an input of 0 VDC for minimum high idle. Provide an input of 5 VDC for maximum high idle.

15

Return -

It is not necessary to use a potentiometer. The 0 to 5 V signal may be provided by a PLC or by a load share control.

35

Shield

37

4 to 20 mA desired speed (+ input)

The 4 to 20 mA is an optional method for providing the desired speed input.

 

4 to 20 mA desired speed (input)

27

If the 4 to 20 mA method is used to control the desired speed, the 0 to 5 V input for the speed must be disabled.

 

Provide an input of 4 mA for minimum high idle. Provide an input of 20 mA for maximum high idle.

The 4 to 20 mA is an isolated input. The positive “+” input must be in the same circuit as the negative “-” input.

13

Optional Connections

Table 3

 

40-Pin Connector J6 Optional Connections

Terminal

Description

Functions and Comments

1

Fused 24 VDC

This connection provides a fused 24 VDC power supply for the customer. The electrical power is provided to terminal 1 via the junction box. The electrical power is always available when the 10 amp circuit breaker in the junction box is switched ON.

11

-Battery

This connection can provide a maximum of 10 amperes.

39

Auto

If this input is not wired correctly, the master ECM will activate a diagnostic code.

The transitions for the input must occur within 1/10 second.

This input must return through terminal J6-36.

When terminal 39 is grounded to terminal J6-36, the master ECM is ready to start the engine.

For a remote start input, the customer must provide an additional switch between terminal J6-36 and terminal 29 (Start/Run).

When this method is used, the normal sequence for start-up is initiated. When the remote start switch is opened, a normal shutdown is initiated. If the cooldown is programmed, the engine operates for the cooldown period prior to shutdown.

24

Fuel control relay’s return

If the engine harness connector for the GSOV is not used, this terminal is an option for a customer supplied harness to the solenoid for the GSOV.

The customer may connect a harness between this terminal and terminal J6-21. For details, refer to “Wiring for the Gas Shutoff Valve (GSOV)”.

28

On/Off grid

If the generator will be connected to a grid, this input must b e used.

This input c hanges the generator’s “Grid Status” parameter to “ON” or to “OFF”.

When this terminal is not grounded to terminal J6-36, the “Grid Status” is “OFF”. The engine’s control sys tem governs the engine according to the “Governor Gain” parameters.

When this terminal is grounded to terminal J6-36, the “Grid Status” is “ON”. The engine’s control sys tem governs the engine according to the “Auxiliary Governor Gain” parameters.

14

(continued)

(Table 3, contd)

 

40-Pin Connector J6 Optional Connections

Terminal

Description

Functions and Comments

23

Engine failure

The engine’s control system will activate this output when the control system causes the engine to be shut down.

When this output is activated, this output is connected to ground.

This output is capable of sinking 0.3 amperes.

32

Crank terminate

The engine’s control system activates this output when the engine’s rpm increases to the crank terminate speed. The crank terminate speed can be programmed with Cat ET.

This output remains activated until the engine’s rpm is reduced t o zero.

When this outpu t is activated, this output is connected to ground.

This output is capable of sinking 0.3 amperes.

8

Desired timing

This input is provided in order to control the base timing of the engine.

When this input is an open circuit, the engine control will use the “First Desired Timing”.

When this input is grounded to terminal J6-36, the engine control will use the “Second Desired Timing”.

Refer to Systems Operation/Testing and Adjusting for additional information on the “Desired Timing” parameters.

33

Active alarm

This output is activated if the engine’s control system detects an alarm condition.

During an alarm condition, this output is connected to ground.

This output is capable of sinking 0.3 amperes.

22

Run relay

This output is activated when the engine begins to crank. The output remains active until the beginning of engine shutdown.

When this output is activated, this output is connected to ground.

This output is capable of sinking 0.3 amperes.

15

(continued)

(Table 3, contd)

 

40-Pin Connector J6 Optional Connections

Terminal

Description

Functions and Comments

7

Cat Data Link +

These connections provide the means for communicating the status of the engine control system, of various engine components, and of sensors.

17

Cat Data Link

The Cat Data Link can be connected to the Customer Communication Module (CCM). For information on connecting the CCM, refer to the most recent literature for the CCM.

When the Caterpillar Software for the CCM is loaded on a personal computer, the program uses this data link in order to obtain engine information via the CCM.

12

Emergency stop indicator

These terminals are provided for the customer to use as an indicator of an emergency stop. This circuit is normally open.

2

Emergency stop indicator

When the engine mounted emergency stop button is pressed, this circuit closes.

This circuit does not affect engine operation. For details, refer to “Wiring for the Emergency Stop Circuit”.

18

Manual prelube

At the time of this publication, this output is not used.

Unused Terminals

Table 4

40-Pin Connector J6 Unused Terminals

6

16

26

34

38

16

Wiring for the Emergency Stop Circuit

The emergency s top buttons must be properly wired in order to immediately stop the engine in case of an emergency situation. An emergency stop button is provided on the engine.

An emergency stop button is provided on the engine. Illustration 7 Rear view of a 20

Illustration 7

Rear view of a 20 cylinder engine

The 16 cylinder engine does not have a J3/P3 connector.

(1) J6 connector (2) J1/P1 connectors (3) J3/P3 connectors on engines with 20 cylinders (4) J9 connector (5) Engine mounted emergency stop button

g01060570

The circuit for the emergency stop is normally closed. If the emergency stop button is pressed, the circuit is opened. Electrical power to the ignition system is immediately removed by the engine’s control system. If the engine’s control system is controlling the GSOV, the ECM immediately removes the voltage from the GSOV. The flow of fuel is stopped.

NOTICE Emergency shutoff controls are for EMERGENCY use ONLY. DO NOT use emergency shutoff devices or controls for normal stopping procedure.

In addition to the normally closed electrical circuit for emergency stopping, the emergency stop button is mechanically connected to another circuit that is normally open. When the emergency stop button is pressed, the o ther circuit is closed. This other circuit does not affect engine operation. This other circuit is available to the customer via terminals J6-2 and J6-12. These t erminals are provided for the customer to use as an indicator of an emergency stop.

Illustration 8 is a wiring diagram of the engine mounted emergency stop button’s circuit.

If the custom er does not supply an additional emergency stop button, a jumper wire must be installed between terminals J6-10 and J6-20.

17

Illustration 8 Schematic of the engine mounted emergency stop button’s circuit The configuration for a

Illustration 8 Schematic of the engine mounted emergency stop button’s circuit The configuration for a 20 cylinder engine is shown. The 16 cylinder engine does not have a slave ECM.

The customer may supply an additional emergency stop button. The contacts of the emergency stop button must be normally closed. If the customer supplies more than one emergency stop button, the buttons must be wired in series in order to operate properly.

Illustration 9 is a wiring diagram of the engine mounted emergency stop button and an additional customer supplied emergency stop button.

g01060931

customer supplied emergency stop button. g01060931 Illustration 9 Schematic of the engine mounted emergency

Illustration 9 Schematic of the engine mounted emergency stop button’s circuit and a customer supplied emergency stop button The con figuration for a 20 cylinder engine is shown. The 16 cylinder engine does not have a slave ECM.

18

g01064 395

Wiring for the Gas Shutoff Valve (GSOV)

The GSOV must be energize-to-run. The GSOV may be supplied by the customer or by Caterpillar. The GSOV may be controlled by the engine’s control system or by the customer’s equipment. The GSOV is also called the fuel control relay.

The ECM can supply a maximum continuous current of 1.5 amperes to the GSOV. A relay must be installed if the GSOV requires a continuous current that is greater than 1.5 amperes.

When the engine’s control system controls the GSOV, the ECM suppl ies voltage to the GSOV. The valve opens in order to allow fuel to flow to the engine. When voltage is removed from the GSOV, the valve closes and th e fuel flow stops.

When the customer’s equipment provides voltage to the solenoid for the GSOV, the equipment must include the necessary logic in order to ensure that the GSOV opens and the GSOV closes at the appropriat e times.

Usually, the GSOV is installed when the piping for the fuel is i nstalled at the site. The components in the circuit for the GSOV are identified in Illustration 10.

the circuit for the GSOV are identified in Illustration 10. Illustration 10 Left side view of

Illustration 10

Left side view of a 20 cylinder engine

The 16 cylinder engine is similar.

(1) J1/P1 connectors (2) J7 connector (3) J6 connector

(4) Engine harness connector for the fuel control relay

19

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There are three options for wiring the GSOV. The options are described in the following paragraphs.

The GSOV is controlled by the customer’s equipment. In this case, the circuit for the engine’s control system must be closed. Otherwise, an open circuit diagnostic code will be activated and the engine will not start. Refer to Illustration 11 for an example of thi s type of installation.

a m p l e o f t h i s type of installation. Illustration 11

Illustration 11 The GSOV is controlled by the customer’s equipment. The circuit for the engine’s control system is closed.

The GSOV is controlled by the engine’s control system. The engine harness is used for the connection. The customer may supply an additional switch in the electrical circuit for the GSOV. If the customer does not provide an optional switch, the J6 connections must be closed. Refer to Illustration 12 for an example of this type of installation.

20

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Illustration 12 The GSOV is controlled by the engine’s control system. The GSOV is controlled

Illustration 12 The GSOV is controlled by the engine’s control system.

The GSOV is controlled by the engine’s control system. The GSOV is connected to a harness that is provided by the customer. The customer may supply an additional switch in the electrical circuit for the GSOV. Refer to Illustration 13 for an example of this type of installation.

g01063421

13 for an example of this type of installation. g01063421 Illustration 13 The GSOV is controlled

Illustration 13 The GSOV is controlled by the engine’s control system. The GSOV is connected via a harness that is provided by the customer.

21

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Wiring for Monitoring the Generator’s Output Power

The ECM monitors the generator’s output power in order to accurately control the air/fuel ratio. The ECM uses an output from one of the following sources in order to monitor the generator’s output power:

Electronic Modular Control Panel II+ (EMCP II+)

Programmable Logic Controller (PLC)

Wattmeter

The PLC and the wattmeter are also called power sensors.

If the generat or is equipped with the EMCP II+, information on the engine load is provided via the CAT data link. The wiring is installed at the factory. No additiona l connections are needed.

If the generator is not equipped with the EMCP II+, information on the engine load must be provided by a power sensor.

The power sensors output to the ECM must be an analog signal with a range of 0 to 4.8 VDC. The power sensor’s output must have a linear relationship with the generators output power. The accuracy of the wattmeter’s output must be within one percent of the generator’s actual output power.

The engine’s control system includes parameters that allow the ECM to accurately estimate the generator’s output power. The values for these parameters are modified by using Cat ET. To identify the parameters for the wattmeter, Cat ET labels the parameters Generato r Output Power Sensor”.

22

For details on these parameters, refer to Systems Operation, Testing and Adjusting, RENR5978, “Electronic Control System Parameters”.

Illustration 14 is a wiring diagram for a typical power sensor.

14 is a wiring diagram for a typical power sensor. Illustration 14 Schematic of the power

Illustration 14

Schematic of the power sensor’s input

For the actual wiring, refer to the generator’s schematic diagram. The potentiometer is optional. For further information, refer to Troubleshooting, “Ganerator Output Power Sensor - Calibrate”.

g01064159

Inputs for the Modes of Operation

The engines co ntrol system has three active modes of operation: Start/Run, Auto, and Stop. The mode of operation is determined by three inputs on the J6 connector. A mo de is activated when the terminal for the mode is connected to the digital return.

Table 5 lists the valid combinations of the inputs which are determined by the positions of the engine’s control.

Configurations that are not shown in Table 5 will activate a diagnostic code. The transition between inputs must occur within 1/10 second. If the transitions do not occur within 1/10 second, a diagnostic code will be activated.

Illustration 15 is a schematic of the modes’ inputs and of the switched +Battery supply to the engine’s control system.

Table 5

Valid Configurations of Terminals for the Engine’s Mode of Operation

Mode

 

Input

Terminal 29

Terminal 19

Terminal 39

Off/Reset

No (1)

No

No

Start/Run

Yes (2)

No

No

Yes

No

Yes

Auto

No

No

Yes

Stop

No

Yes

No

(1) The “No” indicates that the terminal is not connected to terminal 36. (2) The “Yes” indicates that the terminal is connected to terminal 36.

indicates that the terminal is connected to terminal 36. Illustration 15 Schematic of the inputs and

Illustration 15

Schematic of the inputs and of the switched +Battery supply to the engine’s control system

The configuration for a 20 cylinder engine is shown. The 16 cylinder engine does not have the slave ECM.

23

g01060955

Off/Reset – When none of the inputs are connected, the engine is in the Off/Reset mode. The switched +Battery supply to the engine’s control system is off. Any active diagnostic codes are cleared.

Start/Run The engine start sequence will begin when terminal J6-29 is connected to terminal J6-36. Switched +Battery power is supplied to the engines cont rol system. The engine will run until terminal J6-29 is disconnected from terminal J6-36. When terminal J6-29 is disconnected, the normal shutdown sequence is initiated. If the cooldown feature is programmed, the engine will operate for the cooldown period prior to shutdown.

Auto – When terminal J6-39 is connected to terminal J6-36, the engine’s control system is in the AUTO mode. Switched +Battery power is supplied to the ECM. The engine will not start unless terminal J6-29 is also connected to terminal J6-36. This can be accomplished with a customer supplied remote start switch.

When terminals J6-29 and J6-39 are connected to terminal J6-36, the engine start sequence will be initiated. T he engine will run until terminal J6-29 is disconnected from terminal J6-36. When terminal J6-29 is disconnected, the normal shutdown sequence is in itiated. If the cooldown feature is programmed, the engine will operate for the cooldown period prior to shutdown. The engine’s control system will remain in the Auto mode.

In the Auto mode, terminal J6-29 is used to control both the engine start sequence and the shutdown sequence.

Stop If the e ngine is running, the shutdown sequence will begin when terminal J6-29 or terminal J6-39 is disconnected from terminal J6-36 and terminal J6-19 is connected to terminal J6-36. If the cooldown feature is programmed, the engine will operate for the cooldown period prior to shutdown. In this mode, the switched +Battery power is still supplied to the ECM.

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Initial Start-Up Procedure

9.

Connect a properly calibrated emissions analyzer to the exhaust stack.

Ensure that all of these factors are in proper condition prior to the initial start-up: engine installation, driven equipment, all of the related hardware, and electrical connections. Failure to perform the commissioning procedure could result in unsatisfactory operation.

Perform the following procedure for the initial start-up and for start-up after major maintenance and/or repair.

1. Verify that the connections between the engine’s control system and the customer’s equipment are connected properly.

2. If the information on the generator’s output power is provided by a power sensor, check the power sensor’s offset voltage. Refer to Troubleshooting, “Generator Output Power Readings Do Not Match”. Continue with this procedure after you have minimized the power sensor’s offset voltage.

3. Connect Cat ET to the service tool connector. Refer to “Connecting Cat ET with the 171-4401 Communication Adapter II”.

4. Set the engine control to the STOP mode. Test each emergency stop button before the engine is started in order to verify that the engine’s control system generates a E264 event code.

After the operation of each emergency stop has been verified, set the engine control to the Off/Reset mode.

Note: Check the generator’s protective devices prior to start-up. Some of the generator’s protective devices can only be checked during engine operation.

5. Check the generator’s protective devices for proper operation.

6. Turn on the jacket water heater. Verify that the heat is set to 45 to 65 °C (113 to 150 °F).

Note: The engine may be difficult to start if the jacket water coolant temperature is below 43 °C (110 °F).

Note: The spark plugs may become fouled with moisture condensation if the engine is cranked and the jacket water coolant temperature is below 43 °C (110 °F).

7. Inspect the inlet air system. Make sure that the system does not leak. Make sure that the system is free of debris.

8. Inspect the fuel supply system. Make sure that the system does not leak. Make sure that the system is free of debris. Blow any debris from the fuel lines.

10. Perform the daily inspection and all of the daily maintenance procedures that are scheduled in Operation and M aintenance Manual, SEBU7681, “Maintenance Interval Schedule”.

11. Set the engine c ontrol to the STOP mode. Use the “Monitoring System” screen from the “Service” drop-down menu on Cat ET to view the default settings of the trip points for the alarms. Adjust the settings, if necessary.

For the neces sary values of the operating parameters, refer to the applicable Data Sheet on engine performance in the engine’s Technical Marketing Information (TMI).

12. Use the “Configuration” screen from the Service dr op-down menu on Cat ET to view the configuration parameters.

Note: Use the data from the gas analysis and from Caterpillar Software, LEKQ6378, “Methane Number Program” in order to determine the correct settings for the Fuel Quality” and the “Gas Specific Gravity” parameters.

a. View the par ameters that are listed in Table 6. Program the parameters, if necessary.

Incorrect programming of the parameters may lead to complaints about performance and/or to engine damage. For details, refer to Systems Operation, Testing and Adjusting, RENR5978, “Electronic Control System Parameters”.

Note: If the generator set is equipped with an EMCP II+ system, it is not necessary to program the “Generator Output Power Sensor Scale Factor” and the Generator Output Power Sensor Offset”.

Table 6

Configuration Parameters for G3500C Engines

Timing Control

“First Desired Timing”

“Second Desired Timing”

Air/Fuel Ratio Control

“Fuel Quality”

“Gas Specific Gravity”

“Fuel Specific Heat Ratio”

“Desired Emission Gain Adjustment”

“Air/Fuel Proportional Gain”

“Air/Fuel Integral Gain”

Speed Control

25

(con tinued)

(Table 6, contd)

Configuration Parameters for G3500C Engines

“Low Idle Speed”

“Minimum High Idle Speed”

“Maximum High Idle Speed”

“Engine Accel. Rate”

“Desired Speed Input Configuration”

“Governor Type Setting”

“Engine Speed Droop”

“Governor Proportional Gain”

“Governor Integral Gain”

“Governor Derivative Gain”

“Auxiliary Proportional Governor Gain 1”

“Auxiliary Integral Governor Gain 1”

Auxiliary Derivative Governor Gain 1”

Start/Stop Control

“Driven Equipment Delay Time”

“Crank Terminate Speed”

“Engine Purge Cycle Time”

“Engine Cooldown Duration”

“Cycle Crank Time”

“Engine Overcrank Time”

“Engine Speed Drop Time”

“Engine Pre-lube Time Out Period”

Monitoring and Protection

“High Inlet Air Temp Load Set Point”

Power Monitoring

“Generator Output Power Sensor Scale Factor”

“Generator Output Power Sensor Offset”

“Engine Output Power Configuration”

“Engine Driven Accessory Load Configuration”

Information for the ECM

En gine Serial Number”

“Equipment ID”

“Customer Password #1”

“Customer Password #2”

“Total Tattletale”

13. Turn ON the fuel supply to the engine. Verify that no gas is leaking. Verify that the gas does not flow past the GSOV.

26

leaking. Verify that the gas does not flow past the GSOV. 26 Unburned gas in the

Unburned gas in the inlet manifold and/or in the exhaust manifold can ignite when the engine is started. Personal injury and/or property damage can result. Use this procedure to clear the engine and the exhaust system of unburned gas:

Before starting an engine that was stopped by ter- minating the ignition system, turn the gas supply OFF. Crank the engine for approximately 15 sec- onds in order to clear any unburned gas from the engine and the exhaust system.

14. Start the engine.

The engine will accelerate to low idle rpm. Operate the engine at low idle. Verify the following conditions:

Proper engine oil pressure

No fluid leaks

No gas leaks

Several attempts may be required for the initial start-up before air is purged from the fuel lines.

Note: If the engine will not start, use Cat ET to check for diagnostic codes and for event codes. Correct any active conditions before you attempt to start the engine again.

15. After the engine is running, test the operation of each emergency stop button.

After each test, reset the emergency stop button and set the engine control to the Off/Reset mode. Then restart the engine. After all of the emergency buttons have been tested, use Cat ET to clear the event codes from the ECM.

Note: Some of the generator’s protective devices can be checked prior to start-up. Some of the generator’s protective devices can only be checked during engine operation.

16. Check the generator’s protective devices for proper operation.

17. Increase the engine speed to high idle rpm. Verify that the engine is stable.

If the engine is unstable, perform the following procedure.

a. Record the values for these parameters:

“Governor Proportional Gain”

“Governor Integral Gain”

“Governor Derivative Gain”

25.

Verify that the NO x emissions are above the desired full load setting.

b. Set the values for the “Governor Proportional Gain”, “Governor Integral Gain”, and “Governor Derivative Gain” parameters to zero.

c. Adjust the “Fuel Quality” parameter until the engine becomes stable and the exhaust oxygen is approximately four percent. Verify that the exhaust port temperatures are below the setpoint for a warning.

d. Adjust the primary governor. Refer to “Adjusting the Governor”.

18. Select the “Information” drop-down menu in order to view the status parameters. Review the values of the status groups on Cat ET. Verify that the pumps for the cooling system are operating. Verify that the cooling system temperatures and the cooling system pressures are within the correct operating ranges.

19. Close the main circuit breaker for the generator in order to engage the generator.

Note: When the engine load exceeds 25 percent, the air/fuel ratio control will operate in the feedback mode.

20. Slowly ramp the load up to 30 percent.

Note: When the air/fuel ratio control is in the feedback mode, the Fuel Correction Factor (FCF) may no longer be 100 percent. The ECM may adjust the FCF in o rder to compensate for the fuel quality and for the ambient conditions.

21. Set the De sired Emission Gain Adjustment” to a value of “100”.

22. Verify tha t the value of the “Generator Real kW” parameter in Status Group 1 is within 1 percent of the generator’s output power.

If the reading on Cat ET is not within one percent of the generator’s output power, refer to Troubl eshooting, “Generator Output Power Readings Do Not Match”.

When the v alue of the “Generator Real kW” parameter is within 1 percent of the generator’s output power, continue with this procedure.

23. Slowly ramp up to 50 percent load. Allow the

jacket water coolant temperature to reach 75 °C (167 °F).

24. Slowly ramp up to 70 percent load. Verify that the engine i s stable.

If the engine is unstable, adjust the auxiliary governor. Refer to “Adjusting the Governor”.

27

26. Slowly ramp up to 100 percent load. Verify that the engine is stable.

If the engine is unstable, adjust the auxiliary

governor. Refer to “Adjusting the Governor”.

27. Verify that the value of the “Generator Real kW” parameter is within 1 percent of the generator’s output power.

28. Adjust the “Desired Emission Gain Adjustment” parameter in order to obtain the values of emissions that are required at the site.

To lean the air /fuel mixture, decrease the gain adjustment.

To richen the a ir/fuel mixture, increase the gain adjustment.

A small change in the “Desired Emission Gain

Adjustment” causes a large change in the actual exhaust emissions. For example, an adjustment of one percent in the parameter’s value will result in a change of 20 to 40 ppm in the actual level of NO x .

When you adj ust the exhaust emissions, make a small change in the value of the gain. Wait until the system stabilizes. Check the emissions again. Repeat the p rocess until the desired emissions level is achieved.

Use the emis sions analyzer in order to verify that the values of emissions meet the requirements

of the site.

29. Record the data from all of the status groups on Cat ET. Save the data for future reference.

Adjusting the Governor

The response of the throttle actuator can be adjusted with the Caterpillar Electronic Technician (Cat ET). Use Cat ET to change these three parameters:

Proportional gain

Integral gain

Derivati ve gain

The default values should be sufficient for initial start-up. However, the values may not provide optimum performance.

These adjustments are provided in order to obtain optimum responses to changes in the load and in the speed. The adjustments also provide stability during steady s tate operation.

If you have a problem with instability, always

investigate other causes before you adjust the governor. For example, diagnostic codes and unstable gas pressure can cause instability.

When you adjust the primary governor, make sure that the “Grid Status” parameter is “Off”. When you adjust the auxiliary governor, make sure that the Grid Status parameter is “On”.

To change the proportional gain, the integral gain, or the derivativ e gain, use the “Real Time Graphing” feature on the “Information” drop-down menu of Cat ET. The graph provides the best method for observing the effects of your adjustments.

After you make adjustments, always test the stability by interrupting the engine speed and/or load. Operate the engine through the entire range of speeds and of loads in order to ensure stability.

Note: Adjustment of the proportional gain directly

affects the speed of the throttle actuator when there

is a differe nce between the actual engine speed and

the desired engine speed. An excessive increase of

the proportional gain may amplify instability.

To set the proportional gain, increase the proportional gain until the actuator becomes unstable. Slowly reduce the proportional gain in order to stabilize the actuator. Observe that the engine operates properly with little overshoot or undershoot.

The adjustment of integral gain dampens the actuator’s response to changes in load and in speed. Increasing the integral gain provides less damping. Decreasing the integral gain provides more damping. To reduce overshoot, decrease the integral gain. To reduce un dershoot, increase the integral gain.

Note: An increase of the integral gain may require a decrease of the proportional gain in order to maintain

a stable operation.

Illustration 16 shows some typical curves for transient responses.

28

16 shows some typical curves for transient responses. 28 Illustration 16 Typical response curves g01017530 (Y)

Illustration 16

Typical response curves

g01017530

(Y)

Engine speed

(X)

Time

(1)

The prop ortional gain is too high and the integral gain is too low. There i s a large overshoot on start-up and there are secondary o vershoots on transient loads.

(2)

The prop ortional gain is slightly high and the integral gain is slightly lo w. There is a slight overshoot on start-up but the response to transient loads is optimum.

(3)

The prop ortional gain is slightly low and the integral gain is slightly high. There is optimum performance on start-up but slow respo nse for transient loads.

(4)

The pro portional gain is too low and the integral gain is too high. The r esponse for transient loads is too slow.

(5)

The res ponse to transient loads is adjusted for optimum performan ce.

Decrease the derivative gain until a slow, periodic instabili ty is observed. Then, slightly increase the derivative gain. Repeat the adjustments of the proportional gain and of the integral gain. Continue to increas e the derivative gain and readjust the proportional gain and the integral gain until stability is achieved and the engine’s response to changes in load and in speed is optimized.

Illustration 17 is a graphic representation of adjusting the deriv ative gain.

Illustration 17 The increased width of the line for the actuator voltage indicates that the

Illustration 17

The increased width of the line for the actuator voltage indicates that the throttle actuator is more active as the derivative gain increases.

g01017541

(Y)

Actuator voltage

(X)

Time in seconds

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