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AHEAD Test and Discussions ORAL PATHOLOGY

1.

Double teeth is an anamoly most commonly found in-

11.

Chronic alcoholics may present with the features of

a)

permanent incisors

b) permanent canines

a) erosion

b) resorption

c)

primary incisors and canines

d) primary molars

 

c)

abrasion

d) attrition

2. Enamel hypoplasia is presented with all except

12.

It is necessary to avoid the ingestion of tetracyclines between the age groups from

a) Reduction in volu me of matrix

 

b) pits and grooves on the enamel surface

a)

4months to 7 years

b)

1 year to 3 year

c) enamel with fewer pris ms

 

c)

4month to 10 month

d) 7

month to 5 year

d) incomplete calcification

 

3. Hypomineralized enamel characterizes with following except

a) Enamel appears white and opaque

13. Which of the following statement is incorrect about pul pitis

 

a) Carbohydrates is the most important aetiological factor

b) tooth may appear pigmented buff, orange, or brown quickly chipped and worn away

b) dental caries is the commonest cause

c) bacteria can also reach the pulp by other local routes

c) organic matrix of hypomineralized enamel remains acid-soluble

d) trauma to dentine and/or pulp may cause pulpitis and/or reactionary changes in the pulpodentinal

d) failure of the ameloblasts to fully calcify

 

4. Which of the following is an acquired disorder

14. Which of the following cyst arises from glands of Serres

a)

Gemination

b) fusion

a)

odontogenic keratocyst

b) dentigerous cysts

c)

concrescence

d) none

c)

radicular cysts

d) ) paradental cyst

5. All of the following are the features seen in congenital syphilis except

15.

A constant feature associated with radicular cyst is

a)

impacted tooth

b) missing tooth

a) infection of the tooth germ by spirochaetes

c)

non vital tooth

d) anomalous

tooth

b) Hutchinson's incisors

   

c) hypomineralized changes in the enamel

16. High recurrence rate of keratocysts is due to all factors except

d)Moon’s molars

 
   

a) satellite cysts

 

6. Causes of hypercementosis can be all except:

b) difficulty of surgical removal

 

a) Paget’s disease b) periapical inflammation

c) focal areas of active growth of the cyst wall

c)

cleidocranial dysplasia

d) mechanical stimulation

d) cystic contents have a low soluble protein level

7. Trans mission of S. mutans occurs mainly through

17. Epstein pearls are

 

a)

saliva

b) skin

 

a) same as enamel pearls

c)

mother to child

d) blood transfusion

b) imperfection in the tooth bud

 
 

c) seen in vitamin D deficiency

8. Which of the following statement is incorrect about dental caries

d) small keratin cysts of newborn infant

a) Caries prevalence increases when populations become exposed to sucrose-rich diets

18. Cyst resembling the bunch of grapes is

 

a) Gingival cyst

 

b) Intrinsic sugars are more damaging than extrinsic sugars

b) developmental lateral periodontal cyst

c) dentigerous cyst

 

c) Sucrose is the most cariogenic sugar

d) OKC

d) Frequency of sugar intake is of more importance than total amount consumed

19. Most cases of pulpitis are caused by

 
 

a) injudicious cavity preparation

9. Which of the following zone is an area of active reminer alization

b) chemical irritation from sterilizing agent

c) bacterial invasion from bloodstream

 

a) surface zone

 

d) bacterial invasion from carious lesion

b) body of the lesion

 

c) dark zone

20. Which of the following lesion resembles frog’s belly

d)

translucent zone

 

a) ranula

 
 

b) Retention mucocele

10.

Pathological attrition may result from

c) extravasation mucocele

a) excessive intake of acid beverages

d) dermoid cyst

b) faulty tooth brushing

   

c) abnormal occlusion

d) habits of pipe s moking

Academy of Higher Education and Advancements in Dentistry (A.H.E.A.D) R-704, New Rajinder Nagar, New Delhi 110060.

Ph: 011 - 28743814, 25716297, 9810187297.

Email- ahead_academy@yahoo.com

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AHEAD Test and Discussions ORAL PATHOLOGY

1. ans: c: Double teeth are more common in the primary than in the permanent dentition, the prevalence in different series ranging from 0.5-2.5 per cent for the primary and 0.1-0.2 per cent for the permanent dentitions. The incisors (and also the canines in the primary dentition) are most frequently affected and the condition may be bilaterally symmetrical. In the primary dentition the majority of cases involve the anterior mandibular teeth.

2. ans: d: In enamel hypoplasia the ameloblasts fail to produce a normal volume of matrix but any matrix which is produced generally becomes as fully mineralized as normal enamel. Enamel hypoplasia presents clinically as pits or grooves in the enamel surface, or as a general reduction in the thickness of the whole enamel. The defective enamel has fewer prisms than normal and they may run in abnormal directions. In some cases no prism structure can be seen.

3. ans: c: Hypomineralized enamel results from a failure of the ameloblasts to fully calcify the previously formed matrix, and generally such enamel appears clinically as white and opaque. After eruption it may become and be pigmented buff, orange, or brown quickly chipped and worn away. Much of the organic matrix of hypomineralized enamel remains acid-insoluble and is often preserved in sections of decalcified specimens.

4. ans: c: Concrescence is an acquired disorder in which the roots of one or more teeth are united by cementum alone after formation of the crowns. This is most frequently seen in the permanent dentition where the roots of teeth develop close together (for example, between maxillary second and third molars) or following hypercementosis associated with chronic inflammation.

5. ans: c: This disease produces characteristic hypoplastic changes in the enamel of permanent incisors and first molars due to infection of the tooth germ by spirochaetes. The mesial and distal surfaces of the incisors taper towards the incisal edges rather than toward the cervical margin, giving a 'screwdriver' appearance, and the incisal edges usually have a central notch (Hutchinson's incisors). These changes are most obvious in the maxillary central incisors. The occlusal surfaces and occlusal thirds of the crowns of the first molars are covered by small globular masses of enamel (Moon's molars or mulberry molars).

6. ans: c: Hypoplasia and aplasia of cementum are uncommon. In cleidocranial dysplasia there is a lack of cellular cementum following the deposition of acellular cementum

7. ans: c

· species that may be associated - actinomycetes

· low plaque pH favours proliferation of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli

· level of mutans streptococci in plaque increased by sucrose consumption

- non-mutans streptococci, e.g. mitis group

· transmission

of S. mutans oc curs mainly from mother to child

8. ans: b

· caries prevalence increases when populations become exposed to sucrose-rich diets

· extrinsic sugars are more damaging than intrinsic sugars

· sucrose is the most cariogenic sugar

· frequency of sugar intake is of more importance than total amount consumed

9. ans: a

· a dynamic physicochemical process involving dissolution and repreciptation of mineral

· caries progression is usually a slow process

· zonation of the early (white spot) lesion reflects different degrees of demineralization

· four zones usually seen: translucent zone (1 per cent loss), dark zone (2-4 per cent loss), body (5-25 per cent loss), surface zone (intact)

· surface zone is an area of active remineralization

· the morphology of the lesion differs in pits and fissures compared with approximal surfaces

10. ans: c: Pathological attrition may result from:

(1) abnormal occlusion - either developmental or following extractions; (2) bruxis m and habits suchas tobacco andbetelchewing; (3) abnormal tooth structure, for example amelogenesis imperfecta, dentinogenesis imperfecta

11. ans: a: A similar pattern oferosion may also be seen in other patients with gastro -oesophageal reflux, for example chronicalcoholics, where gastric reflux is probably associated with chronic gastritis

12. ans: a: It is particularly important to avoid tetracyclines from 4 months to about 7 years of age if severe clinical discoloration of the permanent dentition is to be prevented.

13. ans: a · bacterial infection is the most important aetiological factor

Academy of Higher Education and Advancements in Dentistry (A.H.E.A.D) R-704, New Rajinder Nagar, New Delhi 110060.

Ph: 011 - 28743814, 25716297, 9810187297.

Email- ahead_academy@yahoo.com

www.aheadacademy.com

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AHEAD Test and Discussions ORAL PATHOLOGY

· dental caries is the commonest cause

· bacteria can also reach the pulp by other local routes

· trauma to dentine and/or pulp may cause pulpitis and/or reactionary changes in the pulpodentinal

14. ans: a

· derived from epithelial residues of the tooth-forming organ

· the main cyst types derived from each residue are:

- dental lamina rests/glands of Serres

(i) odontogenic keratocyst

- reduced enamel epithelium

(i) dentigerous cysts

(ii) paradental cyst

- rests of Malassez

(i) radicular cysts

15. ans: c : apical, residual, or lateral sub-types

· apical is commonest type

· associated with non-vital tooth

· apical radiolucency indistinguishable from a periapical granuloma

· may be symptomless

· enlargement of cyst leads to bone expansion

16. ans: d

· tendency to recur related to difficulty of surgical removal

- thin, easily ruptured wall

- projections into cancellous spaces easily torn

- satellite cysts in capsule

· cyst enlargement involves

- focal areas of active growth of the cyst wall

- extension of proliferating areas along cancellous spaces

- production of bone resorbing factors

17. ans: d: Gingival cysts are of little clinical significance. They are common in neonates when they are often referred to as Bohn's nodules or Epstein's pearls. Most disappear spontaneously by 3months of age. They arise from remnants of the d ental lamina which proliferate to form s mall keratinizing cysts.

18. ans: b: Occasionally, developmental lateral periodontal cysts are multilocular and may be described by theadjective 'botryoid' because of their resemblance to a bunch of grapes (botryoid odontogenic cyst).

19. ans: d

· bacterial infection is the most important aetiological factor

· dental caries is the commonest cause

· bacteria can also reach the pulp by other local routes

· trauma to dentine and/or pulp may cause pulpitis and/or react ionary changes in the pulpodentinal

20. ans : a: Ranula is a clinical term used to describe a swelling of the floor of the mouth which is said toresemble a frog's belly .It is not a pathological diagnosis. Histologically, most ranulae are mucous extravasa tion cysts. Occasionally, a ranula may extend through the mylohyoid muscleand present in the submandibular area or neck, referred to clinically as a plunging ranula.

Academy of Higher Education and Advancements in Dentistry (A.H.E.A.D) R-704, New Rajinder Nagar, New Delhi 110060.

Ph: 011 - 28743814, 25716297, 9810187297.

Email- ahead_academy@yahoo.com

www.aheadacademy.com

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