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Best of British Tractors

Best of British Tractors

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Best of British Tractors

valutazioni:
5/5 (1 valutazione)
Lunghezza:
351 pagine
58 minuti
Pubblicato:
Jun 30, 2020
ISBN:
9781782819264
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

Best of British Tractors is a celebration of the pioneers and innovators of British farming machinery whose names have become synonymous with our most famous tractors: David Brown, Ferguson, Leyland, Marshall and Nuffield.

This colourful ebook charts the history of these British companies and the machines they have produced, tractors that are loved the world over for their quality and longevity.

Author Liam McCann profiles the greatest models from the likes of Allis-Chalmers, Ivel, JCB, Muir-Hill, Bristol and Saunderson. Each entry includes a brief history of each tractor and a box with all their specifications, helping us to understand what makes them so special.

Most of all, this affectionate tribute shows how these tractors have changed the landscape of British farming and become part of the fabric of country life.

Pubblicato:
Jun 30, 2020
ISBN:
9781782819264
Formato:
Libro

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Best of British Tractors - Liam McCann

V

Chapter 1

Allis-Chalmers

Allis-Chalmers was formed when Edward Allis, Fraser & Chalmers, Gates Iron Works, and Dickson’s Manufacturing merged in 1901. Edward Allis was an entrepreneur who bought struggling businesses and turned them round. His company began producing steam engines in the 1860s but it went into liquidation in 1873. He bounced back and by the time his sons, Charles and William, took over in 1889 it was prosperous once more. By 1900, the Allis Company was the largest builder of steam engines in North America.

Thomas Chalmers was a Scottish immigrant who arrived in the US in around 1842. He soon found himself running a business building ploughs and farm machinery, mining equipment and boilers. The Dickson family, meanwhile, were forging a reputation as a machine company specialising in locomotives and internal combustion engines.

After the famous merger they enjoyed a decade of prosperity but financial difficulties led to a reorganisation in 1912. The new Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Company entered the farm machinery business and introduced its first tractor, the 10-18, in 1914. The 1920s brought widespread mechanisation to farms across the continent and by the end of the decade tractors and farm equipment accounted for 60% of sales.

The company enjoyed continued success in the 1930s with its WC, B and C models. Allis-Chalmers were awarded defence contracts during World War Two, and the technological advances made during the conflict allowed them to provide machines with far more power throughout the 1950s and ’60s. The dollar was weak against the pound at the time so a manufacturing base was established in Totton in the UK. Offices were then set up in Herefordshire to manage the European end of the business.

Farm equipment operations were sold to German brand Klockner-Humboldt-Deutz in 1985 but tractor production continued under the Deutz-Allis name until 1989. The company was then sold again and renamed AGCO. This company continued building tractors under the AGCO-Allis name until 2001.

Allis-Chalmers

MODEL B

The Allis-Chalmers Model B was designed by Brooks Stevens and built by Harry Merritt, manager of Allis-Chalmers’ tractor division in the early 1930s. Most tractors were being used on farms of more than 100 acres but the Allis B was marketed to farmers with smaller holdings and it became one of the best-selling tractors in the company’s history. With 125,000 units sold, it finally put the horse out of business on most small farms. The Model B was a light and versatile rowcrop tractor that required less maintenance than horses and was therefore cheaper. Such was its success that the company introduced an even smaller tractor, the Model G, in 1948.

SPECIFICATION

Fuel: Petrol

Engine capacity: 2.1 litres

Cylinders: 4

Power: 22hp

Operating RPM: 400 - 1400

Weight: 934kg

Top speed: 8mph

Length / width / height: 2.80 / 1.34 / 1.95 (m)

Years of production: 1938 - 1957

Allis-Chalmers

D270

The D270 replaced the English version of the Model B in July 1954. There were few differences between the two, with only the tinwork (rolled metal on the body) being altered, as well as a few small upgrades to the linkage (a snap-coupler was added) and powertrain. Two engines were available: a petrol-paraffin version pumped out 23 horsepower while a later diesel variant boasted 27 horsepower from its Perkins P3-TA engine. As with the Model B, it had a four-speed transmission, 12-volt electric starter and a hydraulic system that was soon improved.

SPECIFICATION

Fuel: Petrol

Engine capacity: 2.1 litres

Cylinders: 4

Power: 23hp

Operating RPM: 400 - 1650

Weight: 1134kg

Top speed: 12mph

Length / width / height: 3.04 / 2.12 / 1.98 (m)

Years of production: 1954 - 1957

Allis-Chalmers

D272

The D272 was marketed as an all-new tractor but it was really a 270 with more small upgrades. A three-cylinder Perkins diesel was available with 31 horsepower but the trend at the time was to use the four-pot petrol (28hp) or the petrol-paraffin mix (26hp) that was known as TVO (tractor vaporising oil). It was marketed as the ‘tractor you couldn’t afford to be without’ as it promised to make better use of your existing tools, had heavy-duty independent brakes, a swinging drawbar, independent power takeoff and optional power-assisted variable tread (PAVT).

SPECIFICATION

Fuel: Petrol

Engine capacity: 2.1 litres

Cylinders: 4

Power: 28hp

Operating RPM: 400 - 1650

Weight: 934kg

Top speed: 13mph

Length / width / height: 2.79 / 1.98 / 1.60 (m)

Years of production: 1957 - 1960

Allis-Chalmers

ED40

The ED40 was the all-new tractor the British farming community had been waiting for. It was unveiled to local dealers in Harrogate in late November 1960 and made its public debut at the Smithfield Show in December. It was powered by a 2.3-litre direct-injection diesel engine that had been developed by Harry Ricardo (which was similar to that used in the Ferguson 35) but it suffered in the cold and wasn’t the company’s most reliable unit.

It had a dual-range four-speed gearbox giving eight forward speeds and two in reverse. As automatic draft control was still covered by Ferguson’s three-point patents, the ED40 used a rather crude adjustable stop to control the plough depth. At £622 for the top-of-the-range

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