Trova il tuo prossimo libro preferito

Abbonati oggi e leggi gratis per 30 giorni
Frugal Feasts: The Chicken Chapter

Frugal Feasts: The Chicken Chapter

Leggi anteprima

Frugal Feasts: The Chicken Chapter

Lunghezza:
145 pagine
1 ora
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Sep 17, 2015
ISBN:
9781326419691
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

Eating well doesn't have to be expensive. In fact, some of the tastiest dishes are crafted from the most humble of ingredients. The Frugal Feast series will explore some of the best ways to make the most out of decidedly inexpensive staple items. In this, The Chicken Chapter, the humble chicken is dissected into its separate parts, and we are taken on a culinary journey through the loving preparation of each, as we explore just how and why we should eat everything but the cluck.
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Sep 17, 2015
ISBN:
9781326419691
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore


Correlato a Frugal Feasts

Libri correlati
Articoli correlati

Anteprima del libro

Frugal Feasts - J P Waldron

Frugal Feasts: The Chicken Chapter

Frugal Feasts: The Chicken Chapter

For Stan

By J P Waldron

Copyright © 2015 by J P Waldron

All rights reserved. This book or any portion thereof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the express written permission of the publisher except for the use of brief quotations in a book review or scholarly journal.

ISBN 978-1-326-41969-1

First Printing: 2015

Introduction

Chicken. It’s cheap like the budgie, but I am sure much more tasty, not to mention substantial. However, much like a lot of domesticated budgerigars and other exotic birds, before we pull a plucked and gutted chicken off the supermarket shelf, its life may well have been just as frustrated and confined.

The relationship that we have with animals is confusing. Some we keep as pets, which we adore, look after, and spend a fortune on vet bills trying to ensure that their lives are as long and as comfortable as can be. Others, we cram into barns and warehouses by the thousand so they can barely move, ‘nourish’ with cheap feed that’s laced with antibiotics and growth hormones so they fatten unnaturally quickly, and then truck off to unceremonious slaughter en masse, their lives lived and cut short as quickly and as cheaply as possible.

Pigs get the worst of this treatment, undoubtedly, but chickens – be they broilers or layers – are just a cluck and a wattle behind.

Battery farmed chicken is cheap in every sense of the word – even if you don’t speak budgie. These animals are not loved, and the meat that they yield is flabby, tasteless and watery. When they’re lined up in their cellophane wrappers on the supermarket shelves, you can actually see the ammonia burns on their ankles where their feet have been removed. This is caused by being forced to stand and peck around in an ever-increasing pile of their own shit for the miserable 6 weeks of their existence. Sure, you can buy 2 for a fiver – but why would you want to? From a cook’s point of view there is very little good that can be said about the meat that is taken from these wretched creatures in the kitchen. And from a human being’s point of view, well – if you ask me, factory farming is nothing short of Hitlerian, there’s no other word for it; the dark, gas-chamberesque barns a present day Auschwitz to which too many of us turn a blind eye.

This, of course, is just my personal opinion. There are millions up and down the country and no doubt billions around the world who evidently find this level of perpetual animal cruelty acceptable. They must do, for they part with their hard-earned cash and pay for it to happen, subsequently lining the pockets of the Gestapo perpetrators of such activities.

I could harp on for a long time about animal welfare and food politics. At the end of the day, whilst there’s a market for cheap meat, it will be produced and sold. 2 chickens for a fiver is a cracking price – one that really makes you wonder how on Earth the supermarket and the farmer can both make a profit from these animals that will have lived a whole 6 weeks before slaughter. The price, indeed, is testimony to how poorly the chickens must have existed.

However, I’m not going to try and discourage you from eating chicken, or any meat for that matter. But, what I would like to do is try and encourage you to source free range birds, ideally from a butcher, when you buy your chicken.

As consumers, it is indeed up to us to take some responsibility for the meat that ends up in our tummies. If we all stopped buying factory farmed meat and dairy, it would stop being produced. It’s as simple as that – but it will mean making some sacrifices.

With a free range bird, a fiver won’t even buy you one whole bird. In fact, you will probably be looking at parting with about 6 quid for just 1 at the supermarket, and as much as 8 or 9 quid from the butcher. And, if you wanted to go the whole hog and source organic birds, then these’ll cost you between £8 and £9 at the supermarket, to as much as £15 at the butcher’s.

Obviously these prices don’t marry with what might be considered ‘sensible’ home economics – especially for those living on a budget. However, I firmly believe that cost should not be the primary motive when it comes to our meat purchase choices. Animal welfare, frankly, should be the primary consideration and that means that ‘free range’ should be the absolute minimum standard that we should buy. This means that chicken is going to cost you at least twice as much, which, if you’re living on a budget, will probably mean that you would only be able to eat it half as often. But, ask yourself – is this really such a bad thing? One of the main reasons that the minimum standards of farming practices have sunk so low over the past 50 or 60 years is the fact that the majority of us have come to expect a piece of meat to adorn our plate at every single meal that we eat (and indeed, we expect it to be cheap as well). This huge demand has created the huge pressures on farmers up and down the country to supply. And the result is the battery farms that produce

Hai raggiunto la fine di questa anteprima. Registrati per continuare a leggere!
Pagina 1 di 1

Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di Frugal Feasts

0
0 valutazioni / 0 Recensioni
Cosa ne pensi?
Valutazione: 0 su 5 stelle

Recensioni dei lettori