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Mutiny: 1991 and I Was There

Mutiny: 1991 and I Was There

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Mutiny: 1991 and I Was There

Lunghezza:
104 pagine
43 minuti
Pubblicato:
Mar 14, 2019
ISBN:
9781643506883
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

Truth is that my colleagues and I would not have taken our snapshot cameras out onto the streets one day BEFORE that Saturday morning when it seemed that all hell had broken loose all over Moscow! But the several of us, off duty, were sitting in the Belgrad II Hotel, listening to the chaos on the streets through open windows when someone shouted, "Hey, with all the excitement out there the Militia Boys with their big black-and-white-striped batons will be preoccupied! Let's go shoot some pictures, whatchasay???" And the ultimate results are the 100 or-so street-level snapshots, 50 of which are displayed for your perusal in this publication (finally!), my share of the bold efforts of myself and four or five of my fellow Cleared American U.S. Embassy Guards during those dreary three days of uncertainty deep behind that dark Iron Curtain of Soviet Mother Russia...

Pubblicato:
Mar 14, 2019
ISBN:
9781643506883
Formato:
Libro

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Anteprima del libro

Mutiny - Gene Blackwell

Mutiny

1991 and I Was There

Gene Blackwell

Copyright © 2018 Gene Blackwell

All rights reserved

First Edition

PAGE PUBLISHING, INC.

New York, NY

First originally published by Page Publishing, Inc. 2018

ISBN 978-1-64350-687-6 (Paperback)

ISBN 978-1-64350-689-0 (Hardcover)

ISBN 978-1-64350-688-3 (Digital)

Printed in the United States of America

Table of Contents

From USSR to CIS Overnight—and I Was There!

The Rest of the Story

2007, Bellaire, Texas

Excerpted from Vladamir Pozner’s Eyewitness Volume

Mu-tiny (myõõt’’n-ĕ)n., pl. -nies [< earlier mutine, to rebel < :Fr. mutiner· mutin, mutinous movere, MOVE] revolt· against and,- often, forcible resistance to constituted authority; esp., rebellion of soldiers’ or sailors against their officers – vl. –nied, .-ny-ing to participate in a mutiny;· revolt against constituted authority.

Preamble

Truth is that my colleagues and I would not have taken our snapshot cameras out onto the streets one day before that Saturday morning, when it seemed that all hell had broken loose all over Moscow! But the several of us, off duty, were sitting in the Belgrad II hotel, listening to the chaos on the streets through open windows, when someone shouted, Hey, with all the excitement out there, the Militia Boys with their big black-and-white-striped batons will be preoccupied! Let’s go shoot some pictures, whatcha say? And so it was done! And it was something we would not have even considered doing on the most peaceful of previous days. And the ultimate result are the one hundred or so street-level snapshots, fifty of which are displayed for your perusal in this publication (finally!)—my share of the bold efforts of myself and four or five of my fellow cleared American US embassy guards during those dreary three days of uncertainty deep behind that dark Iron Curtain of Soviet Mother Russia.

Mutiny

Yes. I know! Nobody in the US news media called what happened in August of 1991 in Moscow a mutiny. The powers that be at that time (just as now) did not want anyone getting the idea that a military mutiny could successfully do away with one government and replace it with another. But that’s exactly what happened in 1991 when the once mighty, supremely brutal, completely totalitarian USSR tried to impose their will a little too far on the people of Russia. Commander in Chief Gorbachev’s Kremlin office, after he had fled to his Black Sea dacha with his eight powerful bodyguards, ordered his Red Army, Navy, and Air Force to take steps to eliminate the newly first-ever freely elected president of the Russian Federation, Boris Yeltsin.

But what those usurping conspirators didn’t count on was something like a million citizens appearing on all sides of Mr. Yeltsin’s office building (he called it his White House) before the tanks showed up to blast the new chief executive into oblivion. And they certainly did not expect all three branches of the Red Military as well as, ultimately, the notorious A Team (see the Pozner book excerpts) to tell them that they would not fire upon their ·own people, but that’s exactly what they told them. And the first to refuse to start the slaughter were the Red Army tankers who were first to arrive at their target destination on the banks of the Moskva River. The commander of the half dozen or so great heavily armored war machines that had made it through the citizen-erected antitank barricades refused to give the command to his troops to open fire. Rather, he ordered them to relocate and deploy into defensive positions so as to deter any military force that may be sent behind them. It was a wonderful metamorphosis, a marvelous thing to watch as the

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