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Thin Places: The Ottawan Anthology

Thin Places: The Ottawan Anthology

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Thin Places: The Ottawan Anthology

Lunghezza:
163 pagine
2 ore
Pubblicato:
Apr 15, 2020
ISBN:
9781988253282
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

Fourteen authors, fifteen short stories, one poem, local publisher (and Winner of the 2020 Faces of Ottawa, Favourite Publisher), local editor, and our very own Codi Jeffreys penning its foreword!

All with underlying themes of parallel universes or alternative realities.

Ottawa, are you ready to see what incredible literary richness this awesome city has to offer?!

Originally planned to be released late spring/early summer, unfortunately due to the Covid-19 outbreak, its print edition must be delayed (but don't you fret! It is most definitely still in the works!)

But for the short term, an ebook will be made available! (What better time to catch up on your reading now that we're all stuck in our homes!)

Foreword by Codi Jeffreys
Editor-in-Chief: Michel Weatherall
Editor: Nancy Laflamme

Jana Begovic
Brigitte Boulay
Summer Breeze
Tawnis Commanda
George Foster
Genevieve V. Georget
Matthew Lalonde
John C. Nash
John W. Partington
Dr. Ian Prattis
Sara Scally
Laurie Stewart
Michel Weatherall
Jamieson Wolf

Pubblicato:
Apr 15, 2020
ISBN:
9781988253282
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore

Author, Publisher, Printer, Imagination-weaver.Michel Weatherall is a native of Ottawa, Canada and lives with his wife and two children

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Thin Places - Michel Weatherall

Foreword

I think I learned to read even before I could talk or so it seems. I’m probably exaggerating but I do know that once I first started, you would be hard pressed to find me without a book. I would devour anything and everything, from comic books to the classics in all genres. I just loved to escape into the writer’s world.

Today is pretty much the same story, if you’ll pardon the pun. I’m never without a good book on the go and the only thing that has changed since is that I’ve become a bit more picky about what I read. As someone once told me, life is too short to waste on a bad book. I wouldn’t say that makes me a judge of good or bad books, as everyone has their own tastes, but it does make me a bit more selective on my authors. I will give each one a book or two but then if nothing strikes me, I move on to someone else ...yes even some of the well known authors.

With all that in mind, I’m also a huge fan of supporting local, so when Ottawa author Michel Weatherall dropped off one of his books for me to read over a year ago, I thought okay, why not? What have I got to lose?

I did have something to lose! Hours upon hours of reading that book and the series that followed!

Michel is a great local author but not only that, he believes, like I do, in supporting local and with this, his latest endeavour, Thin Places, an anthology of numerous local Ottawa authors, that you are about to read, you too will discover what we have right here in our own backyard.

Not to single Michel Weatherall out, but not only is his writing extraordinary, he is also the founder of ARISE: The Rise of the Indie-Author and has his own publishing company, Broken Keys Publishing, all of which goes toward supporting and helping the local authors here in our Nation’s Capital.

When Michel invited me to write the foreword for this anthology, without even having read any of the stories, I knew it would be an easy yes for several reasons:

One: I was honoured to be involved in something Michel was taking upon himself to help others and support local.

Two: I believe in what Michel does; I know he knows only the best in Ottawa and their rich diversity of literary talents.

Three: Michel is a good friend and like him, I’m very excited to read this anthology so let me stop talking and writing so we can all get right to it. Happy reading!

Codi Jeffreys

Preface

I have often been asked, how long have I been writing? There are two answers to this question. I suppose, like so many authors, I have always written. I can never remember a time I didn’t write in one form or another.

The other answer is, April of 2015, because that is when I published my first book, The Symbiot; so the second answer is, five years. And what a five years it has been! A virtual whirlwind! The interviews, TV, radio, media, events, publications, but most importantly and most excitedly, the people you meet!

I have since learned Ottawa is rich in literary talent. So many creative minds, so many incredible ideas, so many writers, amateur or otherwise! What I have found this wellspring lacks however, is venues and opportunities.

With a background of over thirty years in print/publishing I have witnessed and experienced the changes in these industries, in business models, technology and adaptability over the decades. Traditional publishing houses are struggling. Coped, in my opinion, with an inherent lack of knowing what is truly good or not, publishing decisions based upon what will sell rather than truly innovative or genuine, creates a sterile market, often, and sadly, devoid of creativity.

My ambition for Thin Places: The Ottawan Anthology, is that opportunity, for both our creative writers of Ottawa and the people of Ottawa themselves, to connect and see what this incredible city truly has to offer! This anthology will showcase local literary talent, many of an amateur level and never previously in print.

This collection of short stories all revolve around the theme of parallel or alternative universes —but not necessarily sci-fi —as indeed this collection runs the gamut of genres! This anthology includes comedies, poetry, drama, dystopia, sci-fi, horror, fantasy and cosmic-horror. (As well as several subtle crossovers!)

Although originally planned to be in print edition (which will still occur), due to the current Covid-19 pandemic, quarantines, states of emergency and temporary closure of non-essential services, its print publication will be delayed. In the meantime, we will move forward with the release of its ebook.

Enjoy. Ottawa has so much more to offer!

Michel Weatherall

Editor-in-Chief,

Broken Keys Publishing

The Tidal Wave

by Genevieve V. Georget

"Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, and sorry I could not travel both."

Robert Frost

He tells me that the fabric was grey with streaks of red and yellow running through it. At least, that’s what he remembers.

He said that he stepped on the bus, looked around and for whatever reason, chose that one seat, next to that one girl, in that one moment. I suppose it would be easy for me to say that it wasn’t supposed to be this way. That everything about my life that I know to be true should have turned out differently. Because that trip should have turned out differently. But instead, I sit at this computer, writing these words, while the birds sing and the rain falls and my family wakes. All because of how that trip turned out.

This moment is a result of that moment. A split second occurring forty-five years earlier that created the parameters of this beauty I get to call life.

One Universe creating another. Or as some might call it, a decision.

My uncle was one of four siblings. Two girls and two boys. My mother would describe my uncle as a man of determination and servitude. A man of nobility and integrity. He wore sweater-vests and wool jackets and stood tall in the face of his commitments. Though all four children were born of legacy and tradition, my uncle was the one who had every intention of carrying on our family’s heritage until his dying days.

Our family comes from a long lineage of justice-seeking humanitarians. From politicians to lawyers to Supreme Court judges. Seeking truth and creating change is embedded in our DNA.

My uncle was 21 years old when he finished his undergrad and found himself in that in-between stage of life. Between adolescence and adulthood. Between holding on and letting go. Between standing still and moving forward.

He lived at home in Toronto when it was time for him to begin law school. Out of duty and respect, he fell in line and his admission to the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Law was being carved in stone. Like all other generations before him, it seemed that decision had already been made.

Even those with their future set forth before them have time for romance. And in my uncle’s case, it was a match approved and destined for longevity. Her name was Evelyn and she was everything our family could have hoped for; strong family roots, great professional aspirations and the perfect brown eyes.

They had met on campus and it only took one date at a local pub over beer and nachos for them to start talking about the life they could build for themselves. She was going to become a doctor, specializing in children’s medicine. He was going to become an Environmental lawyer, and together, they were going to change the world. They would have children and a home made of brick and happily live out the next generation of expectations.

But then my uncle climbed the steps of that bus and made space for everything to change. Her name was Jane and she had an empty seat next to her and an empty seat across from her. Grey fabric with red and yellow streaks. My uncle stood in the aisle of the bus and made a decision. He chose the seat next to Jane. One Universe creating another.

They were both headed to Windsor from Toronto. Jane, on her way to visit family, and my uncle, on route to visit Evelyn, who had returned to her parent’s home for summer break. My uncle sat next to the stranger, threw his weekend bag under the seat in front of him, and settled in for the five-hour bus ride.

My uncle was a quiet man and not generally one for small talk. But the trip was long and his seatmate was friendly. Jane said hi. My uncle smiled and said hello in return. Two tiny words. A Universal shift.

Over the course of the next couple of hours, Jane and my uncle dove into pleasant conversation. They spoke of their families and their schooling and their plans for the future. My uncle told Jane about his passion for law and she shared her desire to become a schoolteacher. They spoke quietly and easily. The hours passing by without either of them noticing.

At this point, it would be easy to think that we were embarking on a new love story. Boy meets girl. Boy falls in love with girl. Boy changes life plans to be with girl. But that’s not what happens here. It’s not that kind of story.

My uncle actually never sees Jane again once the bus arrives in Windsor. In fact, my uncle hardly speaks of her ever again. And yet, her impact has left its mark all over his life. And my mother’s life. And my life. Because, in a moment of curious inquiry, Jane asks my uncle if he had ever considered applying to the University of Western Ontario’s law program in London, Ontario. The answer is an obvious no. Because that’s not what we do and that’s not the school where we go. The decision had already been made. The path had already been laid out. Or had it? Is our path ever fully paved until we step foot directly on it? Is every decision a different stone leading the way?

Something that Jane said must have pierced through my uncle’s predestined exterior and started to seep into his bones. A breadth of possibility began to unfold before him and with the tiniest bit of courage; he began to consider a life entirely written by his own hand. And while my uncle’s Earth began to shift on its axis, the bus came to an unexpected stop for a quick maintenance check. In London, Ontario.

Passengers were told that they would have an hour before the bus would be on its way again. So, with a swiftness that my uncle had never experienced in himself before, he asked Jane to hold his seat while he got off the bus, grabbed the nearest taxi and made his way to the law school office at the University of Western Ontario.

He applied on the spot and took the same taxi back to the bus station, grabbing his seat next to Jane and continuing on their trip, thinking nothing of what he had just done. And this is where it starts to happen. Like an earthquake happening at the bottom

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