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Neven Maguire’s Complete Baby and Toddler Cookbook: 200 Quick and Easy Recipes For Your New Baby

Neven Maguire’s Complete Baby and Toddler Cookbook: 200 Quick and Easy Recipes For Your New Baby

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Neven Maguire’s Complete Baby and Toddler Cookbook: 200 Quick and Easy Recipes For Your New Baby

Lunghezza:
408 pagine
3 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 15, 2015
ISBN:
9780717169405
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

Neven Maguire, Ireland’s most trusted chef and busy father of two, is here to show you how to give your child the best start in life with honest-to-goodness recipes and advice.

Good nutrition is the most important investment you can make for your child’s future, but starting out is always daunting for any parent. There are so many questions: when to wean, which foods to offer first, and which ones to avoid?

In this brand new collection of recipes for babies and toddlers, Neven takes the worry away from introducing your baby to solid food for the first time and gives you plenty of inspiration to encourage your little one to develop a life-long love of delicious and nutritious eating.

With helpful daily meal planners and 200 delicious and easy-to-follow recipes, this trusty guide will take you from your baby’s first tastes, through all the stages of weaning, right up to family mealtimes and beyond. Recipes include purées, mashed foods, finger foods, lumpy foods, chopped foods, sharing family foods and even the occasional family-friendly treat!

The book also includes advice on the organic debate, allergies, essential equipment and setting goals for your baby every step of the way.

All baby and toddler recipes supported by the First 1000 Days and the Irish Nutrition and Dietetic Institute.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 15, 2015
ISBN:
9780717169405
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore

From a very young age, one of Neven Maguire’s favourite pastimes was to shadow his mother in the kitchen, watching her cook. He began experimenting with ingredients in the home kitchen at the tender age of 10 and his pastime soon became his passion. Neven went on to train in some of the highest-profile restaurants in the world and, in 2001, he took over MacNean Restaurant, turning a local establishment into a national phenomenon. His highly popular Nation’s Favourite Food Fast! won an Irish Book Award and his widely acclaimed MacNean Restaurant Cookbook, Nation’s Favourite Food and Nation’s Favourite Healthy Food were all nominated. His first book for babies and toddlers, Neven Maguire’s Baby & Toddler Cookbook, won the Maternity and Infant Best Family Cookbook award, which was voted, tested and approved by parents. He lives in Blacklion, Co. Cavan, with his wife, Amelda, and young twins, Connor and Lucia.

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Anteprima del libro

Neven Maguire’s Complete Baby and Toddler Cookbook - Neven Maguire

Macmillan

INTRODUCTION

AS A BUSY WORKING DAD, my family inspires my food habits. I try to feed my twins, Connor and Lucia, healthy, nutritious food whenever possible. It is something that I am passionate about: good nutrition is the most important investment you can make for your child’s future.

But starting out is always daunting for any parent.

There are so many questions about when to wean, which foods to offer first, which ones to avoid – yet our parents and grandparents seemed to sail through the process! I learned my love and respect of good food from my mother; spending time in her kitchen was an education. To anyone who asks me at my demonstrations how they can instill a love of nutritious food in their children I always answer the same way: education. First, equip yourself with the basics about seasonal ingredients, local produce and cooking. Then encourage your little one from a very young age to be involved with food: from shopping and preparing to helping out with cooking when the time is right.

Offering your baby and toddler a nutritious diet now will stand to them for the rest of their lives. Getting the right nutrition for babies and toddlers can ensure a lifetime of good health, reducing the risk of obesity and heart disease and even improving skills such as reading and writing. Through my role as ambassador for First 1,000 Days, I have learned a lot about the impact that good nutrition can have on the long-term health of children, so all weaning and toddler recipes have been reviewed and approved by First 1,000 Days. My hope is that this book combines traditional common sense and wholesome ingredients with the very latest nutritional advice on what is best for your baby from 6 months through to toddlerhood.

My wife Amelda and I know how hard it can be for families with young children to consistently provide the best nutrition. Parents want to do the best for their kids, but it’s not easy to cook and, at that, to cook healthily. We’re still new to this, but we wanted to share what we’ve learned along the way.

Now Connor and Lucia eat what we eat. I love it when the twins try something new and come back for more. Watching their tastes evolve is very satisfying; it’s so important that children are exposed to a wide range of foods at an early age so that their taste buds develop in a healthy way.

I hope that this book will be a trusty guide that will take you from your baby’s first tastes, through all the stages of weaning, right up to family mealtimes and beyond.

Wishing you and your family a life-long love of good eating!

From our kitchen to yours,

Neven

STAGE 1 (ABOUT 6 MONTHS):

RUNNY FIRST PURÉES

WHEN TO WEAN

The Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) recommends that babies are weaned at about 6 months of age, but no earlier than 17 weeks. However, weaning should not be delayed beyond 6 months. Of course, every baby is different, so look out for the signs:

No longer seems satisfied with a full milk feed.

Demands increasingly frequent milk feeds over a period of time over one week.

Usually sleeps well at night and naptimes, but is starting to wake up earlier and earlier.

Starts taking an interest in food – may be reaching out for food and begins to watch other people eating.

Well able to sit up with support and head control is evident.

Chews on hand and dribbles more frequently.

I think a parent’s instinct is very powerful, so if you feel your baby is ready, you’re probably right. However, if your baby doesn’t seem interested after a couple of attempts, you could always leave it another few days and then try again. The FSAI’s guidelines on weaning in the table opposite are quite helpful.

THE STAGES OF WEANING

The weaning process takes place in three stages, starting with the first spoon feeds when the baby is between 4 to 6 months old and finishing at 12 months. Babies who start weaning at 6 months will move through Stage 1 more quickly than babies who start weaning at a younger age, meaning that Stage 1 may only last about two weeks for some children. If your child is ready for weaning before 6 months, I have included lots of extra options in the meal planner here to help you out.

WORRIED ABOUT ALLERGIES?

Never avoid particular foods due to a suspected food allergy or intolerance. This can lead to a restricted diet and a poor intake of important nutrients. All allergies must be diagnosed by a doctor.

GLUTEN

Gluten is a type of protein found in wheat, rye, barley and oats. Gluten should be introduced gradually in tiny amounts at about 6 months of age, increasing the amount and frequency slowly over the next 4–6 weeks.

THE ORGANIC DEBATE

Whether to feed your child organic food or not is a question many parents ask when they’re beginning the weaning process. At present there is no definitive scientific evidence that pesticide levels in ordinary foods are harmful, and organic foods are not nutritionally superior to non-organic foods, but some people choose to eat organic produce as a personal preference. It can be an environmentally friendly option, particularly when the food is grown in Ireland, but it’s undoubtedly more expensive, so it’s really up to you as a parent.

TOP TIPS

All equipment used in food preparation must be sterilised until the infant is 12 months old.

Prepare infant meals in bulk and then freeze small 25g portions in ice cube trays.

Flash freeze the filled ice cube trays for about 4 hours. Once the cubes are frozen solid, quickly pop out the cubes into ziplock bags. Make sure you label and date the bags with a waterproof marker.

Rotate foods according to date and ideally use meals within one month to ensure the best flavour and nutritional value.

Ideally defrost frozen food (covered) in the fridge overnight or leave at room temperature if you forget, transferring it to the fridge as soon as it has defrosted. Use within 24 hours.

Never refreeze any foods that have been taken from the freezer and thawed.

Reheated food must be piping hot all the way through and then left to cool slightly before offering it to your infant. Always check the temperature before offering food to an infant.

Don’t reheat food more than once and don’t keep an infant’s unfinished meal for a later meal once saliva has been introduced from the spoon, as it can breed bacteria.

Don’t be too alarmed if your baby rejects a particular food that you have decided to introduce. It can actually take 10 to 15 attempts before your baby will accept a new taste, so be persistent!

ESSENTIAL EQUIPMENT

Baby high chair

Small plastic spoon

Small plastic bowl

Bib

Clean damp cloth

Food processor or mini blender

Steamer

Ice cube trays

Steriliser for bowls and spoons

Beaker

STAGE 1 OF WEANING

During the first stage of weaning, it’s important to remember that milk is still the most important food for your baby. Solids at this stage are merely ‘first tastes’ and fillers, which should be increased very slowly. We found that by always offering some of the milk feed first, we ensured that the twins’ daily milk intake didn’t decrease too rapidly during the first month of weaning. And don’t forget that breast or formula milk should still be the main milk drink for the first year of life. Cooled boiled water can be offered as extra fluid.

This very early stage of weaning is all about first tastes and exploration, so it’s important to wean your baby on as wide a range of foods as possible in this section. During this stage it’s also important that an infant becomes familiar with taking food from a spoon. Expect a mess and some food waste as babies get used to this new experience of eating. It can take time and patience. Babies who start weaning at 6 months of age will move through Stage 1 more quickly than infants who start weaning at a younger age.

When the twins were being weaned, we introduced one new food at a time. We allowed two days in between new foods being introduced and generally gave it to them at their lunch (around 11am) so that we could keep an eye out for any possible reactions. Use a high chair that they are secured into, but never leave an infant alone during feeding.

Start with 1 to 2 teaspoons of baby rice or a nice smooth vegetable purée. Over time you can slowly build up the amount of non-milk food given at one feed. When an infant is taking about 5 teaspoons (or one cube) at lunchtime, add in a second spoon feed at a different time of day. The idea is to gradually build up to 2 or 3 spoon feeds per day. Aim to give your baby more vegetables than fruit in the early stages of weaning to stop them from developing a sweet tooth. Once your baby is happily taking vegetable and fruit purées, it is recommended that you mix in some puréed iron-rich foods, such as meat, fish, well-cooked eggs (from 6 months), beans and lentils.

STAGE 1 GOALS

Texture: Slightly thicker purée without lumps.

Number of meals per day: Two to three meals per day, approximately one or two cubes for each meal.

Milk feeds: Breastfeed on demand or give the usual amount of formula, offering solids after a feed. Take care when introducing solids not to reduce your baby’s milk intake, as milk is still the most important factor in growth and development.

STAGE 1: FIRST TASTES MEAL PLANNER

*These charts are intended only as a guide. How much your baby eats will depend on many factors, including weight. Some babies may only want one solid feed a day and some may prefer to have a second meal at teatime instead of early morning, as suggested here. Remember, breast or formula milk is still the main drink and cooled boiled water can be offered as extra fluid.

STAGE 1: AFTER FIRST TASTES MEAL PLANNER

*These charts are intended only as a guide and will depend on many factors, including weight, so don’t feel anxious if your baby seems to want a little more or less than the recommended serving.

CARROT PURÉE

Loved by most babies, this has to be one of the most popular weaning foods. However, it’s important to remember to give babies a balanced diet and to introduce a variety of foods to ensure they grow up to enjoy a wide variety of flavours and textures. Makes 380g (15 cubes)

500g carrots

125ml freshly boiled water

Top and tail the carrots, then peel and cut into thin slices, each about 2–3mm. Place in a saucepan, cover with the water and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat to medium, cover with a lid and simmer for 12–14 minutes, until tender.

Purée in a food processor until smooth and then leave to cool. Spoon the purée into ice cube trays and freeze as described here.

BUTTERNUT SQUASH PURÉE WITH CINNAMON

Although this makes a lot, most babies absolutely love the flavour of butternut squash. It’s perfectly fine to introduce small amounts of herbs and spices to your baby’s diet as soon as you start the weaning process. Makes 675g (27 cubes)

1 butternut squash

good pinch of ground cinnamon

4–6 tbsp breast or formula milk or freshly boiled water

Preheat the oven to 200°C/400°F/gas mark 6. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Cut the butternut squash in half lengthways and scrape out the seeds and membrane. Sprinkle with the cinnamon and place cut side down on the lined baking sheet. Bake for 40–45 minutes, until tender. Leave to cool.

Scoop out the butternut squash flesh with a spoon and purée in a food processor with the milk or water. Spoon into ice cube trays and freeze as described here.

TURNIP PURÉE

Turnip purée can be given as one of your baby’s first tastes, and as they move through the weaning stages it’s ideal for mixing with other vegetables to make for more interesting flavours. My twins particularly liked it with carrot and potato. Makes 750g (30 cubes)

1 turnip (about 900g)

150ml freshly boiled water

Peel the turnip and cut into small even-sized cubes approximately 2cm in size. Place in a steamer and cook for 16–18 minutes, until tender.

Blend in a food processor, adding enough of the water to make a smooth purée. Leave to cool, then spoon into ice cube trays and freeze as described here.

CREAM OF CARROT PURÉE

This technique can be used with any vegetable. Bulking it out with the baby rice makes it a much more substantial meal. Makes 600g (24 cubes)

225g carrots

50ml freshly boiled water

2 tbsp baby rice

340ml breast or formula milk

Top and tail the carrots, then peel and cut into thin slices, each about 2–3mm. Place in a saucepan with the water and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat to medium, cover with a lid and simmer for 12–14 minutes, until tender. Purée in a food processor and cool.

Mix the baby rice with the milk to make a smooth purée, then fold into the carrot purée.

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