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Bloody Wimmin' (NHB Modern Plays)

Bloody Wimmin' (NHB Modern Plays)

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Bloody Wimmin' (NHB Modern Plays)

valutazioni:
4/5 (5 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
63 pagine
39 minuti
Pubblicato:
Apr 3, 2015
ISBN:
9781780015934
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

The protests at Greenham Common were a political landmark of the eighties. But how much did Greenham impact on the fight for nuclear disarmament, the progress of the women's movement and the culture of protest itself?

From the author of Chimerica, first staged at the Tricycle Theatre in 2010 as part of the Women, Power and Politics season.

'hilarious' - Whatsonstage.com

Pubblicato:
Apr 3, 2015
ISBN:
9781780015934
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore

Lucy Kirkwood is a British playwright and screenwriter whose plays include: The Welkin (National Theatre, 2020); Mosquitoes (National Theatre, 2017); The Children (Royal Court Theatre, 2016); Chimerica (Almeida Theatre and West End, 2013; winner of the 2014 Olivier Award for Best New Play, the 2013 Evening Standard Best Play Award, the 2014 Critics’ Circle Best New Play Award, and the Susan Smith Blackburn Award); NSFW (Royal Court, 2012); small hours (co-written with Ed Hime; Hampstead Theatre, 2011); Beauty and the Beast (with Katie Mitchell; National Theatre, 2010); Bloody Wimmin, as part of Women, Power and Politics (Tricycle Theatre, 2010); it felt empty when the heart went at first but it is alright now (Clean Break and Arcola Theatre, 2009; winner of the 2012 John Whiting Award); Hedda (Gate Theatre, London, 2008); and Tinderbox (Bush Theatre, 2008). She won the inaugural Berlin Lee UK Playwrights Award in 2013.


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  • (4/5)
    This classic Ibsen play is about a woman who has ambitions beyond her modest life, and her beauty has captured a number of men who are willing to help her meet those ambitions. She has no scruples, and will do anything to get what she desires. It is a quick and easy read, and keeps you turning the pages until you reach the final, startling ending.
  • (4/5)
    I recommend it for the compactness of the story, the solid foreshadowing, and the ending. The play is about control, Hedda's mastery at controlling others and her despondency when her greatest attempt fails. The end came back to me often over next few days.
  • (5/5)
    I'd never read any Ibsen before and was astonished by this - its psychological depth compared to its economy was amazing, even for drama. Hedda Gabler, the ferociously intelligent, dangerously cruel, yet ultimately pitiable protagonist defies easy categorisation.

    I can't imagine why I've waited till now to read it - I saw that there was a new production of it on in London and thought, ooh, I should give that a go. It was another of those "to read" books that's been on the pile for years.

    It's a pile I really need to mine more often at this rate.
  • (3/5)
    Why, oh why, do I get the impression that Ibsen didn't like his female protagonists very much?

    Or, in other words, is there a specific reason that both Nora (from A Doll's House) and Hedda are written as two rather silly women, both incapable of a rational thought?

    Surely, exploring the theme of individuals trapped in situation which they want to escape from has more to offer than half-baked schemes, lies, deception, and artistic illusions?

    Ugh...
  • (4/5)
    Read this for a Lit class... Gosh, Hedda Gabler was not very nice.
  • (3/5)
    This is a short play that packs a punch! It also has an exciting ending. A Wikipedia quote says "Depending on the interpretation, Hedda may be portrayed as an idealistic heroine fighting society, a victim of circumstance, a prototypical feminist, or a manipulative villain." So you can decide!
  • (4/5)
    Hedda is kind of a stuck-up, manipulative, hopelessly romantic to the point of nihilistic woman, with an unsubsidiable pride and exaggerated sense of aestheticism. This is an extremely difficult character to portray that when I read the script, I just love Hedda and in some way see myself in her but when seeing it onstage she was such a bitch I just needed to punch her on the face 8-}. Anyways, the character's ambiguity and openness to interpretation is precisely what to love I guess
  • (3/5)
    What a bitch and what a great role. I could see her character translated into a corporate-type taking on the glass ceiling -- ruthless and manipulative. A timeless character.
  • (4/5)
    I'm not sure what Mr. Ibsen intended when he created the character of Hedda Gabler, but she is the perfect example of a person who is admired for her position, but is completely unworthy of that admiration. She is the hateful bully that gets away with it because no one wants to believe it of her. In the end, her death is an indication of how manipulation of others doesn't give you what you want - it just makes you hate yourself and your life. The tragedy is that Hedda wasn't satisfied until she had ruined the lives around her first.
  • (4/5)
    Even though I'm a fan of master composer Ibsen, this one I've strangely neither seen staged, nor read before. I'm really glad I did now! It's an unusual play, both in plot (revolving mostly around trying to stage your mundane life to try and evoke some excitement) and in it's protagonist. Hedda is not very likeable - she's nasty, condecending, full of herself and not as clever as she would like to think, but in all that she makes up for a memorable and rare character. As are all of them, by the way. This play provides a great cast of slighlty heightened but very relateable people, whose lives fall into pieces through Ibsen's usual revelation of their life lies. But it's subtly done here, understated and hinted, making the play sneaky and more surprising than Ibsen's plays normally are. Even the inevitable female suicide in the end is more an act of taking matter in one's own hands than one of desperation. All in all, surely one of Ibsen's finer plays. Can't wait to see it on stage.
  • (4/5)
    This classic Ibsen play is about a woman who has ambitions beyond her modest life, and her beauty has captured a number of men who are willing to help her meet those ambitions. She has no scruples, and will do anything to get what she desires. It is a quick and easy read, and keeps you turning the pages until you reach the final, startling ending.
  • (4/5)
    I can't decide whether to hate Hedda or feel pity for her… She is one of the most conniving women I have ever read about, yet she doesn't seem to get any enjoyment out of it. I would love to see this on the stage.