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Home and Away: Simple, Delicious Recipes Inspired by the World's Cafes, Bistros, and Diners

Home and Away: Simple, Delicious Recipes Inspired by the World's Cafes, Bistros, and Diners

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Home and Away: Simple, Delicious Recipes Inspired by the World's Cafes, Bistros, and Diners

valutazioni:
5/5 (1 valutazione)
Lunghezza:
396 pagine
2 ore
Pubblicato:
Mar 13, 2017
ISBN:
9781551526744
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

Randy and Darcy Shore take readers on a global tour through food, from the steamy noodle shops of Seoul to the wood-fired grills of Istanbul and funky dives of San Francisco. These recipes remind us of how food informs our ideas around community and identity, and how it shapes our experience of and appreciation for other cultures.
Pubblicato:
Mar 13, 2017
ISBN:
9781551526744
Formato:
Libro

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Home and Away - Randy Shore

INTRODUCTION

I like a big first bite. I like sauce, gravy, broth, and spicy heat. Give me the satisfying slurp of soft tofu, the chew of crusty bread, and the crispy edges of just about anything fried, grilled, or baked, and I will be one happy guy.

I learned these things about myself on the road during two years of living out of a backpack eating on a budget that was meager by any reckoning.

But I ate well.

You have to keep your eyes open for those little corner restaurants, hole-in-the-wall dives packed with locals eating the specialty of the house. Sometimes they are a little dingy, though not always. Often they have poor signage or none at all.

I recall the moment my palate and my life changed forever. I was standing shoulder to shoulder with the morning rush in a tiny noodle shop on a side street in Seoul, Korea. The temperature was well below freezing, and condensation was running freely down the windows, fed continuously by huge steaming pots of broth. The floor was a deep, muddy puddle, and the serving counter was littered with slopped soup and stray noodles.

The menu was entirely in Korean, a sure sign that I was not supposed to be there. I muscled my way to the counter and pointed at the bowl being noisily consumed by the man next to me. What I got back was a steaming bowl of delicious broth and chewy noodles with a raw egg cracked on top.

No one had ever tried to feed me a raw egg before, and the look of horror on my face must have been apparent to the noodle man, who told me with mute gestures to stir the egg in slowly. As I followed his instruction, a new kind of noodle was created, a tender, very rustic mix of egg white and yolk.

I knew at the moment that I was in a magical place, not so much geographically as emotionally. Travel rule no. 1: Try everything, because you never know.

My traveling partner Simon and I soon found ourselves at another dingy diner, this time on the edge of a huge parking lot near a major tourist attraction.

Minutes after our jerky ordering pantomime, a huge iron dish arrived at the table full to the brim with pieces of raw baby octopus, calamari, blocks of tofu, fiery kimchi, broth, and a generous dollop of chili flakes. Our server lit a gas ring under the pot, handed us our chopsticks, and disappeared. When he returned, the cauldron was bubbling furiously. As his final gesture, he dropped a load of fat noodles into the pot.

We dove in, stuffing this miraculous and seemingly random collection of ingredients into our mouths as fast as humanly possible. In spite of the bitter cold, we were soon wiping the sweat from our faces and necks while issuing grunts of pure pleasure.

Every trip since has been a quest for authenticity.

On a recent visit to Turkey, my wife Darcy and I ensconced ourselves in a local hotel sandwiched between an acreage of wholesalers and Istanbul’s old fishing port, a brisk walk from the city’s main attractions.

Around nine p.m., we could see a large knot of laborers forming down the block—the lineup for a local cafeteria. We joined a fast-moving queue and arrived with shocking efficiency at the cash register. Our tray was loaded with half a roasted chicken, fried fish, green salad, beans in a delicious sauce, bulgur pilaf, and freshly baked bread for about the price of a fast-food combo for one. Travel rule no. 2: Follow the hardhats. They know where to eat.

One balmy night, we found ourselves at a lovely outdoor restaurant in the resort town of Kusadasi, a place popular with both Turks and foreign tourists. We examined the menu and were disappointed to find it filled with burgers and pizza. However, the moment we made a move to find someplace better, our server appeared wondering if we wouldn’t prefer to see the Turkish menu. Of course we did. Our meal was excellent. Recipes for the Turkish flatbread known as Lahmacun, Urfa Kebabs, and vibrant Choban Salad are all detailed in these pages. In holiday towns, restaurants often have two menus, one for tourists and another for their local clients. Travel rule no. 3: Ask what the locals eat.

Looking back now, nearly every day on the road presented an opportunity to discover a local secret, learn how to consider food in a new way, and indulge in the visceral pleasure of eating.

And as the world shrinks, you don’t have to go nearly as far to find great home-style food from the old country, whatever country that might be. Waves of immigrants from every corner of the globe carry their food traditions with them wherever they go. Little places, mom-and-pop shops, serve their compatriots and neighbors cheek-by-jowl in the low-rent neighborhoods of nearly every major city on the planet.

The chefs and gifted cooks interviewed for these pages are unanimous in their deep nostalgia for neighborhood diners and the tasty, unpretentious food they serve. And they are as fond of Chinese-American chow mein, burgers, and grilled-cheese sandwiches as they are of the authentic and exotic.

Moroccan tagine, Asian noodles in soup, Turkish kebabs, smoky Tuscan-style tomato sauce with pasta, British venison stew, American pulled pork—they are all simple and delicious. Food is a thread that links us all to the past, to our homes and our ancestors. It is also a means of communication, a way to bridge cultures and build community. These are uniquely comforting foods that people serve with pride, the foods they want to share so you can love them as they do.

If you scout around your hometown, you will soon find wonderful culinary enclaves. Some are obvious: Chinatowns from San Francisco to Brooklyn to Mexico City are festooned with lanterns and bursting with the aromas of fresh seafood and simmering bones. But as the edges blur, you are just as likely to find North African food, Jewish delis, and ramen houses all sharing the same block. Soon there are no lines at all, and you find yourself topping your tacos with kimchi as though Mexican-Korean fusion is the most natural thing in the world.

Within days of arriving home from our most recent trip, Darcy and I began to work out recipes for the most memorable dishes we experienced. None of it was fancy, but all of it was delicious. What we appreciated most of all were the everyday meals made with beans, bulgur, and cheap cuts of meat and poultry.

We have attempted to replicate the feel and the flavor of those dishes using familiar techniques and ingredients that are widely available in our grocery stores or easily found in ethnic markets. In some cases, it took months of trial and error to get the food tasting and looking as we remembered it. There were some heated debates along the way, but what a payoff!

We hope you love these recipes as much as we do.

—Randy Shore with Darcy Shore

EAST ASIA & AUSTRALASIA

Korean Fried Tofu

Volcanic Soba Noodle Salad with Chili Garlic Prawns

Easy Asian Spring Rolls

Pork and Ginger Sui Mai

Northern-Style Fried Lamb Dumplings

Braised Pork Belly with Crunchy Rice

Spicy Peanut Noodle Bowl

White Miso Ramen

Chashu Pork Ramen

Lemongrass Chicken Curry

Bibimbap Burger with Cucumber Pickle

Korean Beef Ribs

Hong Kong Lunchbox Fried Rice

Chinese Barbecue Pork (Char Sui) with Gai Lan

Pad Thai with Prawns

Dolsot Udon

MaPo Tofu with Szechuan Chili Oil

Soy and Honey Braised Chicken

Flank Steak with Ginger Sticky Rice

Shanghai Noodles

Kimchi Bokkeumbap

Chicken Zucchini Gai Ding

Sake Soy Sockeye with Miso Slaw

Beef Chow Fun

Gochujang

KOREAN FRIED TOFU

Randy spent a total of three days in Korea more than thirty years ago, but never forgot the food. The ingredients and techniques aren’t much different from those used by Japanese or Chinese cooks, but the flavor palate leans heavily to fiery chili, pungent alliums, and meaty soy. Fried tofu incorporates all three. Serve with Cucumber Pickle (p. 26) and extra sauce for dipping.

THE SAUCE

2 TBSP LIGHT SOY SAUCE

2 TBSP GOCHUJANG

THE TOFU

1 LB (500 G) MEDIUM OR FIRM TOFU

1 TSP KOSHER SALT

1 TSP SESAME SEEDS

3–4 TBSP CANOLA OIL

4 GREEN ONIONS, SPLIT AND CUT INTO 2-IN (5-CM) LENGTHS

In a small bowl, whisk sauce ingredients and set aside.

Cut tofu in half lengthwise and slice each half into 8 squares about ⅜ in (1 cm) thick. Season tofu on both sides with salt and set on a paper towel.

In a dry frying pan on medium heat, toast sesame seeds until lightly browned. Set aside. In same pan, warm oil and carefully add tofu slices in batches without crowding. Fry until golden, about 5 minutes a side. (The second side always seems to crisp up quicker than the first.) Add green onions and stir until wilted, about 30–60 seconds.

Remove onions with a slotted spoon and toss with sauce.

Arrange tofu on a serving platter and top with onions and sesame seeds.

Makes 4 servings as an appetizer.

GOCHUJANG IS A FERMENTED SOY AND CHILI PASTE, UNIQUE TO KOREAN COOKERY. LOOK FOR IT IN A GOOD ASIAN MARKET.

VOLCANIC SOBA NOODLE SALAD WITH CHILI GARLIC PRAWNS

This is a cold dish, which is also smoking hot. The harmony of cold, fresh vegetables and fiery, chili-based dressing is a classic yin and yang experience with Korean provenance.

Young ginger

6 OZ (175 G) DRIED SOBA NOODLES

1 TBSP LIGHT SOY SAUCE

2 TBSP CANOLA OIL

2 TSP SESAME OIL

¼ CUP (60 ML) SEASONED RICE VINEGAR

3 TBSP GOCHUJANG

1 TBSP GRATED GINGER

1 CUP (250 ML) THINLY SLICED NAPA CABBAGE

¼ CUP (60 ML) SLIVERED GREEN ONIONS

¼ CUP (60 ML) JULIENNED RED BELL PEPPER

½ CUP (125 ML) JULIENNED ENGLISH CUCUMBER

12 CHILI GARLIC PRAWNS (THIS PAGE)

1 TBSP SESAME SEEDS, FOR GARNISH

1 LIME, CUT IN WEDGES, FOR GARNISH

In a large pot, cook soba noodles until tender but firm, according to package directions. Drain and plunge into ice water. Drain thoroughly and refrigerate in a colander for 30 minutes.

In a large bowl, whisk soy sauce, canola and sesame oils, vinegar, gochujang, and ginger. Add soba noodles and Napa cabbage and toss with tongs until thoroughly coated.

To serve, place noodles in bowls and top with green onions, bell peppers, and cucumber. Top with Chili Garlic Prawns, sesame seeds, and lime wedges.

CHILI GARLIC PRAWNS

The alleys of Bangkok’s red light district are lined with little wagons, each equipped with a bed of smoldering embers and piled high with tiny skewers of spicy seafood, from squid and octopus to tiny finfish and prawns. They are irresistible. Serve a platter of these skewered prawns at your next party and watch them disappear.

¼ CUP (60 ML) SRIRACHA SAUCE

2 TBSP HONEY

2 TBSP LIME JUICE

2 TBSP MINCED CILANTRO

2 TSP KOSHER SALT

2 TBSP MINCED GARLIC

2 TBSP CANOLA OIL, PLUS EXTRA

24 PRAWNS, PEELED

In a large bowl, whisk Sriracha, honey, lime juice, cilantro, salt, garlic, and oil and set aside.

With a paring knife score the back of each prawn about ¼ in (6 mm) deep and remove any dark material. Place prawns in marinade and cover with cling film. Refrigerate for 1 hour. Soak 6 bamboo skewers in water for 30 minutes and skewer 4 prawns on each.

Preheat grill to high. Wipe grill with vegetable oil and cook prawns until firm and opaque, about 2–3 minutes a side.

Or, on stove in a non-stick frying pan on medium-high heat, warm ½ tbsp canola oil and fry prawns until just cooked through, no more than 2 minutes a side.

Makes 6 servings as an appetizer; 4 servings as a main served with Volcanic Soba Noodle Salad.

PRAWNS COME IN A HUGE RANGE OF SIZES. A 16/20 COUNT OR EXTRA JUMBO IS A NICE SIZE FOR SKEWERS.

EASY ASIAN SPRING ROLLS

This is our simplified version of crispy pork spring rolls, a fusion of Chinese and Vietnamese flavors.

THE ROLLS

3 CUPS (700 ML) CANOLA OIL, FOR FRYING

¾ LB (375 G) GROUND PORK

1 TBSP FISH SAUCE

½ TSP KOSHER SALT

¼ TSP WHITE PEPPER

1 ½ TSP WHITE SUGAR

1 CARROT, PEELED AND COARSELY GRATED

1 CUP (250 ML) COOKED RICE VERMICELLI*

2 TBSP FLOUR

12 CHINESE SPRING ROLL WRAPPERS

1 CUP (250 ML) BEAN SPROUTS

MAKING SPRING ROLLS IS A FUN FAMILY PROJECT, BUT LET THE ADULTS DO THE DEEP-FRYING.

THE DIPPING SAUCE

¼ CUP (60 ML) SEASONED RICE VINEGAR

1 TBSP MINCED GINGER

2 BIRD CHILIES, SLICED

In a large heavy-bottomed pot on medium to medium-high heat, warm oil to 350°F (180°C).

In a large mixing bowl, crumble pork and season with fish sauce, salt, pepper, and sugar. Add carrots and vermicelli and thoroughly mix with your hands.

In a small bowl mix flour with just enough water to make a wet paste. Lay a spring roll wrapper diagonally in front of you and place ¼ cup (60 mL) meat mixture and 1 tbsp bean sprouts in a 3-in (8 cm) row near the closest point. Pick up point closest to you and roll halfway to cover filling. Press as you roll to ensure filling is firmly packed. Pick up right and left points and fold them toward the center. Dip your finger in flour paste, wet remaining edges, and finish rolling. Ensure edges seal.

In a bowl, combine rice vinegar, ginger, and chilies. Set aside.

Place spring rolls, 3 at a time, in hot oil and fry for 5 minutes. Drain on a paper towel for 2 minutes. Serve with Dipping Sauce.

Makes 12 rolls.

*TO PREPARE THE VERMICELLI, PLACE 2½ OZ (75 G) DRY NOODLES IN A BOWL AND COVER WITH 1

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