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Jewish Cookery Book: On Principles of Economy

Jewish Cookery Book: On Principles of Economy

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Jewish Cookery Book: On Principles of Economy

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5/5 (1 valutazione)
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228 pagine
3 ore
Pubblicato:
Oct 16, 2012
ISBN:
9781449423957
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

This marvelous culinary historical volume provides housekeeping and household-management advice as well as daily menu suggestions. Originally published in 1871, it was written to help new immigrants adapt to life in the New World while maintaining their religious heritage; and it even includes a Jewish calendar as well as recipes for home doctoring. Levy’s cookbook follows Jewish law regarding cooking for the Sabbath, Passover, and other Jewish holidays; and it provides great detail about how to organize the household, and what steps to follow in conducting Jewish activities. The medicinal recipe section provides recipes for various ailments as well as cautions for visiting the sick. The book offers practical, down-to-earth advice for American-born Jews who did not have the benefit of a traditional Jewish education. 

This facsimile edition of Esther Levy's Jewish Cookery Book was reproduced by permission from the volume in the collection of the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Massachusetts. Founded in 1812 by Isaiah Thomas, a Revolutionary War patriot and successful printer and publisher, the Society is a research library documenting the life of Americans from the colonial era through 1876. The Society collects, preserves, and makes available as complete a record as possible of the printed materials from the early American experience. The cookbook collection includes approximately 1,100 volumes.
Pubblicato:
Oct 16, 2012
ISBN:
9781449423957
Formato:
Libro

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Jewish Cookery Book - Esther Levy

This edition of Esther Levy's Jewish Cookery Book was reproduced by permission from the volume in the collection of the American Antiquarian Society (AAS), Worcester, Massachusetts. Founded in 1812 by Isaiah Thomas, a Revolutionary War patriot and successful printer and publisher, the Society is a research library documenting the life of Americans from the colonial era through 1876. AAS aims to collect, preserve, and make available as complete a record as possible of the printed materials from the early American experience. The cookbook collection includes approximately 1,100 volumes.

Jewish Cookery Book, published in Philadelphia in 1871 by W. S. Turner, was written to assist European immigrants new to American kitchens and society. It was the first Jewish cookbook published in America, and only the second written in English.

OTHER BOOKS IN THE AMERICAN ANTIQUARIAN COOKBOOK COLLECTION

American Cookery, by Amelia Simmons

The Canadian Housewife's Manual of Cookery

Cottage Economy, by William Cobbett

The Compleat Housewife, by Eliza Smith

The Cook Not Mad

Dainty Dishes, by Lady Harriet E. St. Clair

Dairying Exemplified, by Josiah Twamley

Fifteen Cent Dinners for Families of Six, by Juliet Corson

The Hand-Book of Carving

How to Mix Drinks, by Jerry Thomas

Miss Leslie’s New Cookery Book, by Eliza Leslie

Mrs. Owen’s Illinois Cook Book, by Mrs. T.J.V. Owen

Mrs. Porter’s New Southern Cookery Book, by Mrs. M.E. Porter

The New England Cook Book 

The Physiology of Taste, by Jean A. Brillat-Savarin

The Times’ Recipes, by The New York Times

A Treatise on Bread, by Sylvester Graham

Vegetable Diet, by William Alcott

What to Do with the Cold Mutton

OR PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMY,

ADAPTED FOR JEWISH HOUSEKEEPERS,

WITH THE ADDITION OF MANY

USEFUL MEDICINAL RECIPES,

AND OTHER VALUABLE INFORMATION,

RELATIVE TO HOUSEKEEPING

AND DOMESTIC MANAGEMENT

BY ESTHER LEVY

INTRODUCTION BY JOAN NATHAN

Jewish Cookery Book copyright © 2012 by American Antiquarian Society. Introduction copyright © 2012 by Andrews McMeel Publishing, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without written permission except in the case of reprints in the context of reviews.

Andrews McMeel Publishing, LLC

an Andrews McMeel Universal company

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www.andrewsmcmeel.com

ISBN: 978-1-4494-2395-7

Library of Congress Control Number: 2012938410

ATTENTION: SCHOOLS AND BUSINESSES

Andrews McMeel books are available at quantity discounts with bulk purchase for educational, business, or sales promotional use. For information, please e-mail the Andrews McMeel Publishing Special Sales Department: specialsales@amuniversal.com

INTRODUCTION

by JOAN NATHAN

In nineteenth-century America, German cuisine was the first to influence the mainstream of American-Jewish life, with about 150,000 German Jews having settled in the country by the time of the Civil War. The earliest cookbooks in English in which Jewish recipes were included stemmed from the tradition of these German forbearers, most of whom were adherents of Reform Judaism in this nineteenth-century Age of Enlightenment. By midcentury, they had pronounced kashrut incompatible with the enlightened spirit of the age.

Then along comes Esther Jacobs Levy, author of Jewish Cookery Book: on principles of economy, adapted for Jewish housekeepers, with the addition of many useful medicinal recipes, and other valuable information, relative to housekeeping and domestic management, the first kosher cookbook in America. This book, published in Philadelphia in 1871, gives us insights into Judaism and the way people lived. Having undertaken the present work with the view of proving that, without violating the precepts of our religion, a table can be spread, which will satisfy the appetites of the most fastidious, she wrote, Some have, from ignorance, been led to believe that a repast, to be sumptuous, must unavoidably admit of forbidden food. We do not venture too much when we assert that our writing clearly refutes that false notion. . . . The want of a work of this description has long been felt in our domestic circles.

Born Esther Jacobs, Mrs. Levy was an English Jew living in Philadelphia. Little is known about her except that she registered the book herself at the Library of Congress. According to the Philadelphia census of 1870, an English-born Esther Levy lived in the home of Judah Isaacs, a Dutch physician, and was a clerk in a store. In the census of 1880 there was no Esther Levy. She may have remarried or died in the interim. No record exists of an Esther Levy buried during this period in any of the Jewish cemeteries of Philadelphia.

Her recipes come from the different backgrounds of Jewry— English, German, Sephardic, and American. In the 1870s, the New York Times published one of the book's recipes for wosht, or sausage (beef or lamb, of course) and rice with ginger and poached eggs, without acknowledging the source.

First and foremost, though, this is an American book. Local dandelion greens are used in salads, and corn is cooked in a fritter resembling oysters, a popular nineteenth-century dish. In a nod to southern cooking just after the Civil War, she includes a recipe for southern cornbread with saleratus, or aerated salt, called baking soda today. She also lists two ochre soups. But tomatoes, a relatively new ingredient in the colonies, are used only for sauce, not fresh as we eat them. And, of course, living in Philadelphia, she gives a home recipe for cream cheese.

But it is also a Jewish kosher cookbook with lots of our old friends in different guises. Like Lady Judith Montefiore, who in 1846 wrote the first Jewish cookbook in England, The Jewish Manual, Levy includes a dish for Coogle, or Pudding of Peas and Beans, clearly hamim or cholent with a crust. She has recipes for stewed fish balls, the predecessor of gefilte fish; as well as matzo cleis, made out of crumbled matzo, ginger, and nutmeg as they were done in Germany. These came into the American vernacular dubbed feathery Alsatian balls about sixty years later with Manischewitz.

I have always been fascinated by this book, which in many ways feels very modern but is also a reflection of the past. Levy has a recipe for curry, still an exotic dish a hundred years later. In her recipes, written before beef was brought to Philadelphia via refrigerated railroad cars, she suggests making goose for special meals. She shows a great deal of knowledge about the cuts of meat and how to know when it is fresh. If young, it (a turkey) has a smooth, black leg, with a short spur, and the eyes are full and bright; if fresh, the feet are supple and moist; if stale, the eyes will be sunk and the feet dry.

Lettuce, often called herbs, was used for salads, soups, and with other vegetables as in an old Sephardic dish for peas, salad, and salmon. The herbs should be nice and fresh. They will improve in flavor by laying in spring water an hour or two. It is very important that they should be carefully washed, picked, and dried, before using.

Mrs. Levy suggests the main dinner meal take place on Sunday, to accommodate the workweek of the Jewish shopkeeper. According to custom, preparation for the Sabbath meal was carried out on Friday—it was enjoyed, however, on Sunday, when husbands are at home, then something good must be prepared in honor of the lords of the household.

I could go on and on. Have fun and try some of these old recipes that connect us all to our early past in America.

OR PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMY,

ADAPTED FOR JEWISH HOUSEKEEPERS,

WITH THE ADDITION OF MANY

USEFUL MEDICINAL RECIPES,

AND OTHER VALUABLE INFORMATION,

RELATIVE TO HOUSEKEEPING

AND DOMESTIC MANAGEMENT

PREFACE

As every book appears incomplete without a preface, we will say a few words to the Jewish public. Having undertaken the present work with the view of proving that, without violating the precepts of our religion, a table can be spread, which will satisfy the appetites of the most fastidious. Some have, from ignorance, been led to believe that a repast, to be sumptuous, must unavoidably admit of forbidden food. We do not venture too much when we assert that our writing clearly refutes that false notion. The contents of our Book show how various and how grateful to the taste are the viands of which we may lawfully partake. We submit it to the attention of our sisters in faith. From the days of our mother, Sarah—when her husband bids her make cakes for his celestial guests—Jewesses have not disdained attending to culinary matters. Indeed, one of the qualities attributed to the model woman of the book of Proverbs is, that she riseth while it is yet night and giveth provision to her household. We of the present age may not be quite so industrious, but we cannot be charged with being dilatory in doing that which contributes to the comfort of our families.

That the ability to cook well, and to present our aliment in different ways, is calculated to preserve the health and to embrace the pleasures of home, cannot possibly be denied. We have labored to further that most desirable object. And if, together with the directions we have given in a material point of view, those also will be heeded which we have offered regarding the observance of some of our practices, we trust that our efforts will redound to the spiritual welfare of our co-religionists, and secure for ourselves their kind approbation.

INTRODUCTION

) coshered and porged by a butcher, that is, to take out the veins and sinews, which are prohibited. Then lay the meat in cold water for an hour, afterwards on a perforated board, sprinkling salt on all sides, for about an hour. It must remain there in order to draw out the blood forbidden to our people, after which it must be rinsed under the hydrant, and wiped with a cloth; likewise, all the utensils used for that purpose must be well rinsed.

We must have the Sabbath food prepared on Friday; and it is customary to break off a piece of the dough of two loaves, which are made in commemoration of an ancient offering, and burn it, accompanying the action with a blessing. At sundown the Sabbath lamps must be lighted with a special blessing.

In every rank of life, those deserve the greatest praise who best acquit themselves of the duties which their stations in life require. Indeed, apart from any advantage we may desire, we should try to be equal to the task that nature seems to have imposed on us, in order that we may maintain the dignity of our character as rational beings. It frequently occurs that before impressions of duty are made on the mind, ornamental education commences, and it ever after takes the lead. Thus, what should be only an embellishment, becomes the main business of life. There is no opportunity for attaining a knowledge of family management at school, and during vacation all subjects that might interfere with amusement are avoided. The direction of a table is no inconsiderable branch of a lady's business, as it involves judgment in expenditure, respectability of appearance, the comfort of one's household, and of those who partake of the hospitality thereof.

In carving, some people haggle meat so much as not to be able to help half a dozen persons decently from a large joint or tongue. If the daughters of the family were to take the head of the table, under the direction of their mother, they would fulfil its duties with grace, in the same easy manner as an early practice in other domestic duties gradually fits them for their fulfilment in after years. Habit alone can make good carvers. If a lady has never been accustomed, while single, to think of family management, let her not upon that account fear that she cannot attain it. She may consult others who are more experienced, and acquaint herself with the necessary quantity of the several articles of family expenditure, in proportion to the number it consists of the proper prices to pay, etc.

When young ladies marry, they continue to employ their own maids in the capacity of housekeepers, who, supposing they are more attached to the interests of their employers than strangers, become very valuable servants. To such, the economical observations in this work will be as useful as those for cooking. It is recommended, however, strictly to observe both, which, in the course of a year or two, will make them familiar with what is requisite. By good hours, especially early breakfast, a family becomes more regular in its habits, and much time is saved. If orders be given soon in the morning, there will be more time to execute them, and servants, by doing their work with ease, will be more equal to it, and fewer of them will be necessary.

Without suspecting any one's honesty, still, as mistakes may have been made unintentionally, it is prudent to weigh meats, sugar, etc., when brought in, and compare with the charge. The butcher should be ordered to send the weight with the meat, and the cook to file the checks, to be examined when the weekly bill shall be delivered.

Much confusion and trouble are saved when there is company, if servants are required to prepare the table and sideboard in a similar manner, daily. All things likely to be wanted should be in readiness. Sugars of different qualities kept broken; currants washed, picked, and kept perfectly dry; spices ground, and kept in very small bottles, closely corked; not more than will be used in four or five weeks. Every article should be kept in its proper place, for much waste may thereby be avoided.

In preparing for the Passover, which generally commences in the middle of spring and lasts eight days, every particle of leaven must be out of the house by ten o'clock of the preceding morning. On the same day, 14th of Nisan, or on the previous eve, the house must be thoroughly cleaned from dirt, and everything be in perfect order.

With what pleasurable emotions a Jewish woman must anticipate the time when she will see everything looking so brilliantly clean, and mostly new. Indeed, we all should be delighted, when we reflect that so much cleanliness is a preparation for becomingly celebrating our wonderful deliverance from bondage.

It is customary, when the synagogue service is over, for the master of the house to sit down to a table prepared with Passover cakes, parsley, chervil, horseradish, a lamb bone, and baked eggs, as well as wine, usually made in this country with raisins. The Passover cakes are placed between napkins. The herbs are placed upon a plate, together with a glass of salt water or vinegar, prepared for Passover, and a mixture made of chopped apples and raisins, and almonds rolled in cinnamon balls; all of these being symbolical of events of the past, in the history of our people. The humblest Jewish servant must sit at the table during the prayers, which occupy three-quarters of an hour before supper.

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