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Fast Fashion: A Cut from Clothing Poverty with Exclusive New Content

Fast Fashion: A Cut from Clothing Poverty with Exclusive New Content

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Fast Fashion: A Cut from Clothing Poverty with Exclusive New Content

valutazioni:
4/5 (1 valutazione)
Lunghezza:
41 pagine
37 minuti
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Feb 12, 2015
ISBN:
9781783606863
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

Fast Fashion: A cut from Clothing Poverty marks the two-year anniversary of the disastrous collapse of the Rana Plaza factory in Bangladesh on 24 April 2013.

Featuring a new introduction along with a chapter from the previously published Clothing Poverty: The hidden world of fast fashion and second-hand clothes, Andrew Brooks stitches together the events of the Rana Plaza tragedy with the hidden world of fast fashion, providing a short but enlightening exposé of the global commodity chains which perpetuate poverty.
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Feb 12, 2015
ISBN:
9781783606863
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore

Andrew Brooks is a lecturer in development geography at King’s College London. His research examines connections between spaces of production and places of consumption, and particularly the geographies of economic and social change in Africa. Fieldwork has taken him to India, Papua New Guinea and across Africa. Research in Africa has included extensive investigations of markets and politics in Malawi and Mozambique as well as Chinese investment in Zambia.


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Fast Fashion - Andrew Brooks

Poverty

Introduction

On 24 April 2013 the Rana Plaza building in Savar, Bangladesh, collapsed, killing 1,134 people and injuring a further 2,500. Rana Plaza had housed clothing factories stacked unsafely on top of one another in a multi-storey structure. Production lines inside Rana Plaza made new ‘fast fashion’ designs for export around the world to shops including JC Penny and Matalan in the US and UK. ‘Fast fashion’ is a term first coined by retailers to describe the way in which the traditional spring-summer and autumn-winter fashion seasons have been replaced by a constantly evolving collection of new styles. Fast fashion also captures the way in which garment workers in low- and middle-income countries are compelled to produce garments quickly and relentlessly to meet deadlines for export. While new fashionable clothes are relatively cheap to buy for consumers in Europe and North America, to keep costs down the cost of labour is squeezed and wages for workers are often driven down to a bare minimum. Factories are located in poor countries and workers experience long hours, low pay and poor working conditions; like those that were found at Rana Plaza.

Images of the collapsed plaza spread from Bangladesh around the world. The unprecedented scale of the disaster meant there was an immediate public outcry, but the tragedy has also become a moment around which wider calls for action have coalesced. Labour unions, campaigning NGOs and concerned individuals have demanded improvements in working conditions throughout the fast-fashion sector. Foremost has been the attention-grabbing Fashion Revolution day of action on the anniversary of the collapse of Rana Plaza. The campaign seeks to challenge everyone to think about the chain between consumers and the people who make clothes. Fashion Revolution’s simple message is based around getting people to use Twitter and other social media to post a photo of their outfit and ask clothing companies ‘Who made my clothes?’ Such a simple act can help draw attention to the campaign, but more powerful actions are required. One of the most immediate calls for action has been for compensation for the Rana Plaza victims, yet at the time of writing companies including Benetton, Mango and Walmart had refused to make adequate payments into the compensation fund, which was still $8.5 million dollars short of the minimum of $30 million required.¹ Benetton is among the worst offenders, having yet to pay a penny into the fund. Yet attention should not just focus on the firms which were caught up in this horrific industrial accident, but also the broader structural violence in the clothing sector, which plays

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