Trova il tuo prossimo libro preferito

Abbonati oggi e leggi gratis per 30 giorni
Dried & True: The Magic of Your Dehydrator in 80 Delicious Recipes and Inspiring Techniques

Dried & True: The Magic of Your Dehydrator in 80 Delicious Recipes and Inspiring Techniques

Leggi anteprima

Dried & True: The Magic of Your Dehydrator in 80 Delicious Recipes and Inspiring Techniques

valutazioni:
3/5 (1 valutazione)
Lunghezza:
321 pagine
1 ora
Pubblicato:
May 10, 2016
ISBN:
9781452148700
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

Dehydrators have transitioned from the kitchens of the world's best chefs onto the wedding registry—and this book reveals why. There's no dinner party with friends, school lunchbox, or weekend-backpack dry bag that isn't made more delicious and nutritious thanks to a dehydrator. In this book are the secrets of creating who-knew treats: all kinds of jerky, fruit leathers, savory vegetable crisps, flavor-packed powders that add oomph to your cooking, and perfect melt-in-your-mouth meringues. Eighty recipes include ways to incorporate your dried creations in your baking, cooking, and cocktails. Maybe you didn't know you needed a dehydrator. Now you do!
Pubblicato:
May 10, 2016
ISBN:
9781452148700
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore

Sara Dickerman is the author of Secrets of Great Second Meals, Bon Appetit: The Food Lover’s Cleanse, and Dried & True. She cooked in restaurants for many years, starting in California at Campanile and Chez Panisse before moving to Seattle. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Saveur, Seattle magazine, Bon Appetit, Food & Wine, and Slate, for which she won a James Beard Award. She has also served as the restaurant critic for The Stranger and the food editor of Seattle magazine, and she has been a regular guest on her local NPR affiliate. She lives in Seattle with her husband and two children.

Correlato a Dried & True

Libri correlati
Articoli correlati

Anteprima del libro

Dried & True - Sara Dickerman

Text copyright © 2016 by Sara Dickerman.

Photographs copyright © 2016 by Chronicle Books LLC.

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher.

ISBN 9781452148700 (epub, mobi)

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data:

Names: Dickerman, Sara 1971- author.

Title: Dried & true : 80 big-flavored dehydrator projects for fruits,

vegetables, powders, jerky, and more / Sara Dickerman.

Other titles: Dried and true

Description: San Francisco : Chronicle Books, [2016] | Includes index.

Identifiers: LCCN 2015039650 | ISBN 9781452138497 (pbk. : alk. paper)

Subjects: LCSH: Cooking (Dried foods) | LCGFT: Cookbooks.

Classification: LCC TX826.5 .D53 2016 | DDC 641.6/14--dc23 LC record

available at http://lccn.loc.gov/2015039650

Designed by Alice Chau

Photographs by Lori Eanes

Food styling by Randy Mon

Chronicle Books LLC

680 Second Street

San Francisco, California 94107

www.chroniclebooks.com

CONTENTS

Introduction 8

DRYING FOOD 8

Choosing a Dehydrator 12

STACKING DEHYDRATORS 12

RECTANGULAR BOX DEHYDRATORS 12

Accessories and Tools 14

AIRTIGHT CONTAINERS 14

BLENDER 14

CANDY THERMOMETER 14

CHERRY PITTER 14

FOOD MILL 14

FOOD PROCESSOR 14

JERKY GUN 16

LABELER 16

MANDOLINE 16

MICROPLANE AND OTHER GRATERS 16

NONSTICK FRUIT-LEATHER SHEETS 16

NONSTICK MESH SHEETS 16

NOTEBOOK AND PEN 16

OFFSET SPATULA 17

PEELERS 17

RULER 17

SHORT-BRISTLED BRUSH 17

SILICA GEL PACKETS 17

SPICE GRINDER 17

SPIDER 17

STEAMER 17

TIMER 17

Keys to Successful Dehydrating 18

HUMIDITY AND MOISTURE 18

GIVE YOURSELF TIME 18

DON’T GET STUCK 18

CHOOSING THE RIGHT SPOT FOR THE DEHYDRATOR 18

CHOOSING THE RIGHT FOODS 19

PREPARING FOODS FOR DRYING 19

SPACING OUT FOOD ITEMS ON TRAYS 19

JUDGING DONENESS 19

IF YOU GO TOO FAR 20

CLEANING UP 20

STORING THE RESULTS 20

METHODS TO IMPROVE YOUR DEHYDRATING 21

Dipping 21

Blanching 21

Conditioning 21

REHYDRATING 21

PREPARING RAW OR LIVING FOODS 21

CHAPTER 1: FLAVOR BOOSTERS 22

Basic Garlic Powder 24

Mom’s Roast Beef Seasoning, Smokified 24

Turmeric-Ginger-Lime Powder 25

Turmeric-Ginger-Lime Zinger 25

Kimchi Powder 26

Kimchi Mustard 26

Pesto Dust 29

Umami Dust 30

Umami Butter 30

Dried Black Olive Crumble 31

Bloody Mary Salt 32

Herbes de Provence Salt 33

Rack of Lamb with Herbes de Provence Salt 35

Rose Sugar 36

Rose-Cardamom Shortbread 38

Citrus Sugar 39

Seasoned Bread Crumbs 40

Chicken with Parmesan Crust 41

Dried Shrimp 42

Little Uncle’s Chile Shrimp Jam 44

CHAPTER 2: ALTERED FRUIT 46

Agave-Kissed Sour Cherries 48

Dried Cherry Cream Scones 49

Vermouth Dried Cherries 50

The Dried Cherry Manhattan 52

Dried Orange Cranberries 53

Raspberry Chamomile Tisane 55

Port Wine Grapes 56

Yogurt-Coated Raisins 57

Dried Cinnamon Apples 58

Apple Chips 59

Sweet Vanilla Pear Slices 60

Orange Blossom Apricots 63

Dried Brandied Plums 64

Earl Grey Plum Clafouti 66

Orange Chips 68

Candied Bittered Grapefruit Peel 71

Dried Pineapple with Chai Spices 72

Chile-Lime Mangos 75

CHAPTER 3: FRUIT LEATHERS AND PANS 76

Red Plum–Basil Leather 78

Blackberry-Blueberry Leather 80

Apricot-Raspberry Leather 83

Rhubarb-Banana Leather 84

Pan de Albaricoque 85

Pan de Higo 87

CHAPTER 4: VEGETABLES TRANSFORMED 88

Dried Caramelized Onions 90

Caramelized Onion Dip 92

Ginger-Soy Green Bean Crisps 93

Sesame Kale Crisps 95

Parmesan Kale Crisps 96

Spicy Butternut Crisps 97

Tangy Zucchini Crisps 98

Pimentón Chickpeas 99

Dried Sweet Fennel Fans 100

Curried Parsnip, Carrot, and Beet Ribbons 102

Dried Marinated Cherry Tomatoes 105

Semidried Tomato Petals 106

Dried Roasted Red Bell Peppers 108

Rose Harissa 109

CHAPTER 5: JERKY 110

Teriyaki Beef Jerky 113

Salt-and-Pepper Beef Jerky 115

Chipotle-Garlic Beef Jerky 116

Buffalo Jerky with Gin Botanicals 117

North African–Spiced Lamb Jerky 118

Malaysian-Style Pork Jerky 120

Shredded Pork Jerky 122

Garlic-Sage Turkey Jerky 123

Smoky Maple Salmon Jerky 125

CHAPTER 6: CRISPY NIBBLES 126

Mustard Rye Croutons 128

Thyme-Scented Crostini 129

Crackly Thyme Crostini with Goat Cheese, Peppers, and Olives 130

Caraway-Flax Crackers 133

Za’atar Pita Chips 134

Bananas Foster Trail Mix 135

Seedy No-Grain Granola 136

Spiced Dulce de Leche Granola 137

Strawberry-Coconut Muesli 139

Vanilla Meringues 140

Stracciatella Meringues 142

CHAPTER 7: BACKPACKING RECIPES 144

Apple-Cinnamon Oatmeal 146

Buttermilk-Huckleberry Pancake Mix 147

Earthy Mushroom Soup 148

Red Bell Pepper Quinoa Pilaf 151

All-in-One Shrimp and Grits 153

Saffron Risotto 154

Skillet Potatoes 156

Lemon Zest Hummus for the Road 157

Other Uses for Your Dehydrator 158

MAKING YOGURT 158

CANDYING FLOWERS 158

RISING BREAD DOUGH 159

DRYING PASTA 159

REVIVING STALE CRACKERS 159

MAKING DOG TREATS 159

DRYING BOTANICALS FOR CRAFTS 159

DRYING KIDS’ ART IN A PINCH 159

Dehydration Chart for Common Foods 160

Index 166

INTRODUCTION

This book is a guide to using a home dehydrator creatively. I had long been a fan of dried fruit and beef jerky, but I purchased them from grocery and specialty stores. Eventually I began to see ambitious chefs incorporating dried elements into their work, from flavorful powders to little nuggets of chewy fruits and vegetables. I got curious and proposed an article on the subject to my editor at Slate, and acquired my first food dehydrator. I played around with drying strawberries, cherries, and even watermelon. I continued to experiment with drying herbs, meats, fish, vegetables, fruits, and even flowers, and I shared ideas with friends for how to best use their dehydrators.

I found that most sources of information on dehydration were less playful than I like to be in the kitchen. I wanted a book full of bold flavors, timely ingredients, and fun ideas for presentation. And so I wrote this book. In these pages, I cover the basics: Preparation, drying, and storage of almost any food you might think of drying. The recipes also invite you to do more, to harness the dehydrator not just as a practical tool but as a means to delightful results. With its help, you can make such items as pesto powder and citrus sugar, elegant vanilla pear slices and kid-pleasing fruit leathers, rustic chipotle jerky and hearty dried mushroom soup for backpacking. I’m confident you’ll discover—as I have—that the food dehydrator can be a winning and versatile kitchen addition.

DRYING FOOD

Is it sunny as you read this? Is there a gentle breeze stirring? If so, you have what it takes to dry food, because Earth’s atmosphere is the oldest, largest dehydrator there is. Drying food as a means of preservation is older than history, no doubt older than agriculture itself. Somewhere along the way, a Stone Age hunter happened to chew on a leathery strip of old meat, and beef jerky was born. And the first raisins were probably a cluster of shriveled wild grapes that some gatherer picked and stored for future use.

Simple as it was, the calculated drying of food items was a huge development; it was a bet on the future and a premeditated act of planning. Drying made it possible to extend a healthful diet beyond the immediate stages of a fresh kill or a windfall of fresh edible plants. When food is purged of most of its moisture, it no longer provides a good habitat for the rascally strains of bacteria, yeasts, and molds that can ruin it. (Some microbes, however, do help preserve food through the process of fermentation.) Dried food is also lighter and thus more portable than moist food, helping to ensure nutrition even as people traveled and explored new territories.

Drying is still a major means of preserving food. Rice, seafood, pasta, grains, legumes, meats, fruits, spices, and vegetables are all still commonly dried for storage in countries around the world. The majority of the world’s population still survives without a home refrigerator, so without dried food, there would be a constant struggle against spoilage.

Throughout history, drying processes became more complex and efficient. People discovered that fruits and vegetables dried more quickly if elevated off the ground by even a rustic mesh of branches. They learned that dairy could be dried too. In the thirteenth century, Marco Polo observed Tartar armies drying milk in the sun, so they could carry the resulting powder with them on their journeys. People also found that fish and meat dried better and more safely with the addition of salt. And smoke was often used as a part of the drying and preservation process of fish and game.

Today there are several mechanical means of drying food. Industrial techniques like freeze-drying work to very efficiently preserve food. Freeze-drying systems first freeze food, and then warm it gently, under very low air pressure. In this environment, the ice in these foods turns into a gas, skipping the liquid stage. The process leaves behind a crunchy, structurally sound version of the dried food—like uncannily crisp peas and raspberries—which can be simply rehydrated by soaking in water. Unfortunately, such freeze-drying systems aren’t designed or priced with the home cook in mind; they cost thousands of dollars.

Old processes such as heat (like the sun) and air circulation (like the wind) are still used as well. Commercial facilities have large dryers that pass warm air over apricots and apples or strips of meat en route to jerky. The most straightforward versions of these dryers simply vent damp air away from the drying chamber like a clothes dryer does; others cool and recirculate the air with a heat pump.

Our home food dehydrators are simply more compact versions of the hot-air and venting method. They come in a few shapes and sizes, but all rely on the circulation of warm air to draw moisture away from ingredients to dry them. Because the technology is relatively simple and inexpensive, we are lucky; we can use dehydrators for an expansive variety of at-home food projects. This book will focus on just that, from basics like dried apricots to more involved projects like lamb jerky.

It is ironic, perhaps, that I would be writing a book about dehydration. Rainy Seattle, where I live, isn’t a place where you typically think of things drying out. If you take a look at the U.S. government’s Mean Annual Relative Humidity map, my home in Seattle sits in the middle of a green splotch, indicating annual humidity average of about 73 percent, about twice that of Phoenix. But I consider my hometown’s lack of aridity a good test—it means that if I can make amazingly tasty snacks, meals, and edible gifts with my home dehydrator, then you can too. If you happen to live in Phoenix, you’ll just be able do it more swiftly.

I came to dehydration as a skeptic. Why would I want to dry my own foods when grocery stores all around me sell beef jerky, fruit leathers, and dried fruit galore? There is no driving need for me to dry my own food. I’m not a raw foodist, so I’m not concerned about the temperature at which my food is prepared. I don’t have, say, an apple orchard that would require my saving vast quantities of produce. I don’t backpack often enough to require dried meals in great quantities.

In my case, the line between need and pleasure is consistently blurred. And when used with a spirit of curiosity and fun, the food dehydrator delivers big on delight. Working at home, with the best foods I can grow or purchase, I am able to get an incredibly wide range of fresh, intense flavors with my dehydrator. Fresh herbs are transformed into vivid seasoning powders, grass-raised beef and lean buffalo make for the most flavorful jerky I’ve ever tasted, and crunchy little seeds can be made into satisfying crackers and granolas (many of which are gluten-free, too!).

I’m not alone in using dehydrators to make familiar ingredients into something new. Modern chefs are making candied tuiles out of fruits and vegetables for dramatic, crispy garnishes. They are powdering hand-foraged herbs and dusting plates with dramatic speckles of green, and drying seafood to make homemade versions of classic Chinese sauces. Though it’s not the flashiest tool in today’s highly technical kitchens, the dehydrator helps the cook explore flavor and textural variation.

I do have some practical reasons for using a dehydrator as well—it’s a great tool for preserving the season. As I write this paragraph, apricots are just coming into full flush in our markets, and I know I can save them for the future by putting them in the dehydrator today. Later on, I may decide to make pan de higo, the Spanish-inspired fruit and nut pâté, which is heaven with a wedge of

Hai raggiunto la fine di questa anteprima. Registrati per continuare a leggere!
Pagina 1 di 1

Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di Dried & True

3.0
1 valutazioni / 0 Recensioni
Cosa ne pensi?
Valutazione: 0 su 5 stelle

Recensioni dei lettori