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Alle montagne della follia

Alle montagne della follia

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Alle montagne della follia

valutazioni:
3/5 (231 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
127 pagine
Pubblicato:
6 nov 2015
ISBN:
9788865963432
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione


QUESTO LIBRO È A LAYOUT FISSO

Durante una spedizione in Antartide, uno studioso viene a conoscenza, da un collega partito in avanscoperta, del rinvenimento di un’immensa catena montuosa e delle tracce di un’antica civiltà, le cui creature, ibernate,vengono battezzate “Antichi”.
In una successiva ricognizione, resasi necessaria per una strage verificatasi al campo base, scoprirà i bastioni di una gigantesca città e l’ingresso di un tunnel scavato in quelle stesse montagne, dove vivrà avventure tali da condurlo sull’abisso della follia.
Cosa nasconde realmente l’immensa distesa ghiacciata dell’Antartico?

Howard P. Lovecraft (1890 – 1937) è considerato il padre della narrativa gotica americana.
Tra le sue opere: Storia e cronologia del Necronomicon (1927), I sogni della casa stregata (1932).
Pubblicato:
6 nov 2015
ISBN:
9788865963432
Formato:
Libro

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Alle montagne della follia - Howard P. Lowecraft

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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    After decades of hearing about this writer, I've read him. There is not one line of dialogue in his writing. It is an amorphous mass of description, much like pointillistic painting with words. I like it, but it is a bit rich for my blood as a steady diet. I shall use him as my brandy alexander, my cherry cordial, my Black Forest cake slice, between more palatable writers.At the Mountains of Madness is a brilliant horrific story, building consistently, although much is left to the imagination, especially with the carvings and sculptures on the walls at varying levels of the narrator's descent. The reader who digests Lovecraft must, by necessity, have a vivid imagination, as he paints the picture with a light darkness and lets the reader interpret the depth of that darkness. I'm glad, though, that finally I took the plunge and am looking forward to reading more by this master.
  • (2/5)
    I actually think that to properly enjoy this book, you need to be a) a teenage boy who says "whoooa!" a lot (or have fond memories of being one) or b) on drugs. Its appeal, in that sense, is not unlike outdoor music festivals or a lot of '60s psychedelic rock - i.e completely lost on me. Whatevs, different strokes for different folks etc etc.There were some moments in this book that were... a bit frightening. Like when Lake and co were initally poking about the SPOOKY ALIEN THINGS and you're just like NO BRO LEAVE THAT ALONE. But then it's approximately several million pages of the narrator looking at FRIGHTENING SCULPTURES, and then encountering GIANT ALBINO BLIND PENGUINS (I can't lie, those were pretty cool). And then they run away from something that he later describes as "the primal white jelly" (and here I will be a teenage boy: hur hur hur). It's not my thing, but I probably just haven't got the right mindset for it, DUUUUDE.
  • (4/5)
    At the Mountains of Madness is a tense and sinister novella that continually hints of dark things waiting in the shadows. Like all great (rather than simply good) horror writing it's not what Lovecraft does say but what he hints at that makes this so spine tinglingly goodA classic novella that has not dated and still works 80 years on from being written.
  • (3/5)
    I listened to the audiobook read by William Roberts. Roberts' narration is excellent. You can hear the stress and anxiety in the storyteller at all the appropriate times. This is a fun pulp horror story along the vein of Whiteout and Alien.
  • (4/5)
    A novella written in the early 1930s and set in Antarctica during that time period. A team of explorers discover a many-millions-of-years old city on the far side of known territory, encountering in the process two ancient races only hinted at in some of the oldest of human mythologies. Usually categorized as horror but to my mind equally science fiction, the story is told in florid language which nevertheless pulls the reader inexorably towards each new dreaded revelation. There are many references to places and myths common in Lovecraft's other works, and familiarity with those might make this more chilling. One aspect I found particularly meaningful was several references to Sir Douglas Mawson (my favorite Antarctic explorer), including a contemporaneous expedition he was on in a nearby area of Antarctica. Lovecraft also worked into the story the then-new theory of continental drift. All-in-all, quite enjoyable, although I imagined a couple of even more horrible disclosures than those produced by the finale.
  • (4/5)
    A very detailed account of a scientific expedition into the Antarctic that serves as a warning to other expeditions. The story is written as a first person account of some horrific and fantastic events that uncover proof of the existence of an civilization that predates any previous civilization by millions of years. Lovecraft's attention to minute detail might dissuade some from finishing this novella, but it also helps add to the suspense that is built throughout.
  • (3/5)
    An expedition to the Antarctic uncovers an ancient race of beings and their civilization. Also, giant, sightless penguins.What can I say? I was curious about this author, having heard of Cthulhu references from my friends who are scifi fans, so I thought I should try him. Now that I have, I am perfectly willing to leave him alone. The writing is pedantic. I was listening to the audio version and found myself tuning out to large swaths of descriptions and not missing a thing. The author tries to give the impression of imminent danger and oppressive evil, but I couldn't take him seriously because everything he described as "blasphemous" and "diabolic" and "sinister" seemed like very interesting stuff to me. How could serious scientists see all that evidence for another civilization and only feel oppressed by evil? Where is the open mind? Where the scientific distance?Well, perhaps we are to think that they were upset by the bunches of dogs and men which were killed in the camp, but they don't seem so. They just poke around and get on with business, taking a flight to explore the next day. About that exploration? They deduce a lifetime worth of knowledge in one afternoon of looking at cartouches and statues about this civilization. Nope. I don't buy it. Also, the creature which drives them mad? Really? Scared, OK, but mad? Nah.And all of this was supposedly written to keep other explorers from going to the area. Are you kidding me? Any scientist worth their salt would be off there in a hot flash after reading this because far from proving there were "unnameable horrors" lurking there, they describe a fascinating culture with great possibilities. For all the foreboding (and there was a LOT of it) in this story, the climax of horror is a real letdown.The audio narrator, Edward Herrmann, was a pleasure to listen to, which is probably the only reason I listened to the end.
  • (4/5)
    At the Mountains of Madness is unusual among Lovecraft's works, as its two halves are very different from each other. The first half of the story concerns the initial stages of an expedition to the Antarctic. This part of the book is excellent. We have an interesting setting with environmental difficulties, a few colorful characters, and above all, a riveting plot.In the second half of the book, much of the protagonist's time is spent viewing illustrations carved into the walls of a dead city. This segment goes through the history of one or two of Lovecraft's monstrous species that lived on Earth in ages past. The history is covered methodically and with great detail (more than anyone could actually glean from interpreting wall carvings), interrupting the plot with a vast quantity of background information that is not used in the story. As an analogy, imagine if Tolkien interrupted "The Fellowship of the Ring" halfway through and inserted a bunch of material from the Silmarillion or the Appendices.The first half of the story is good for anyone who likes adventure and horror. The second half may be of particular interest to Lovecraft fans who want to know more about the workings and history of the Mythos; most of Lovecraft's original stories are far more vague and mysterious than "At the Mountains of Madness." While this background info has a certain utility, I think its length and detail weaken the story, and therefore I would only recommend "At the Mountains of Madness" to a person who has already enjoyed some of Lovecraft's other works and wants to know more about the Mythos.
  • (5/5)
    "At the Mountains of Madness" contains four tales from H.P. Lovecraft, one of the foremost writers of horror.The first tale is the titular "At the Mountains of Madness" which follows a team of explorers as they venture into the unknown territory of the Antarctic. The group splits into two camps, one establishing a base while the other begins exploring. The reports they radio back, of mountains higher than any they'd ever encountered, with strange crystalline formations that appeared almost manufactured rather than natural, of the cavern uncovered by accident and the strange creatures they found frozen in large blocks of ice, excite the team at the base camp, and they cannot wait to join the others. A strong overnight storm delays that meeting, and the next morning, worry sets in when no word is received from the explorers. The base camp can't even reach them on the radio. Fearing that the explorers might be in danger, a two-man team sets out from the base camp to find out what happened to the others."The Shunned House" presents a tale of a house with a troubled history. Renters don't stay for long, and those that do seem to quickly waste away into illness and death though they were the strongest, healthiest of people. A young man convinces the owner of the property to allow him to spend the night in the house and discovers the true nature of the evil residing underneath its foundation.In "The Dreams in the Witch-House", a student finds cheap room and board in a building known to locals as the Witch-House. Tales of the strange goings on spurred him into renting the room directly below the attic, hoping that his stay in such a house will further his studies into mathematics and their relation to magic. But he gets much more than he anticipated as strange dreams of an old hag and her rat-like familiar with a human face take their toll on him both physically and mentally."The Statement of Randolph Carter" is a quick tale of two young men who search an old cemetery with the hope of communicating with the spirits. Unfortunately for one of them, the spirits have something else in mind.These four tales provide a great example of early horror that relies more on atmosphere, glimpses of strange creatures or shadows, and the slow build of tension rather than page after page of blood and guts and gore to scare the wits out of you. As the characters in Lovecraft's tales slowly inch closer and closer to what you know is going to be something awful, you shift uncomfortably in your chair, feel like you're taking part in the tale rather than reading it, and wind up exhausted from the adventure. I still feel that way even after a second reading of the stories. This is a great collection of tales, perfect for fans of horror.
  • (3/5)
    I have read a few HP Lovecraft stories, and they have all disappointed me. This one is actually a novella, and I liked it much more. I can actually see form this story why people might enjoy his work.This story has all the usual Lovecraft themes--exploration (Antarctica this time), strange happenings, strange beings, fear. And the usual narrator saying "It was so awful I can't actually say it!" which drives me crazy. This narrator, though, did actually finally explain what he saw--but not what his co-pilot saw that caused a breakdown. An improvement nonetheless!I do think that the novella format allowed Lovecraft to get into the meat of the story. There is lots of description, and a map or illustration might have been nice--but I have my own in my head now. I also read this on the Serial Reader app, so maybe text versions do have some illustrations. I wonder how close what is in my head is what Lovecraft was trying to describe.I do still think I would have enjoyed Lovecraft's work a lot more if I had found it in middle or high school. I was obsessed with Agatha Christie at the time.
  • (3/5)
    Elder Things, Shoggoths, and Tekeli-li, Oh My!Felt more drawn out and repetitious in its audiobook format (which I picked up as an Audible Daily Deal) than I remember it in print, which I had read several times previously. Perhaps the shock factor has worn off.The professorial tone by narrator Edward Herrmann (in the Blackstone Audio 2013 edition) suited the material (which is an explorer warning a future expedition not to go to Antarctica due to the horrors that they will find there) but it reduced the level of excitement and fear.This edition contained only the novella of about 50,000 words/5 hours narration. Some editions contain other Cthulhu Mythos stories and/or bonus introductory material. I thought the Modern Library print edition of "At the Mountains of Madness" edited by S.T. Joshi with an introduction by China Miéville was excellent.
  • (4/5)
    This is my third audiobook of Lovecraft’s classic sci-fi story of Antarctic explorers who discover an abandoned alien city whose murals tell the true history of the earth. The narrator of the story is a New England college professor unnerved by having his beliefs about the past demolished. I heard Wayne June read the man as a sober middle class man of action and Edward Herrmann read him as an upper-class WASP scholar. Another reviewer took the words out of my mouth by noting that William Roberts told the tale in the air of a 1940s newscaster, say, Lowell Thomas. He meant that as a criticism but I think Robert’s tone fits the story well. He gives a very emotive reading, sounding like an old man who has lost his certainties at the end of his life.
  • (3/5)
    Um andere Wissenschafter von ähnlichen Expeditionen abzuhalten, legt ein Überlebender Zeugnis von den schrecklichen und phantastischen Geschehnissen ab, welche er anlässlich einer Antarktis-Expedition in den 1930ern erleben musste: Damals entdeckten die Wisenschaftler zunächst unerklärliche fossile Spuren, später Relikte einer vormenschlichen Hochkultur, schließlich kam es zu einer Katastrophe...In "Berge des Wahnsinns" vermischt H. P. Lovecraft die Genres: Es handelt sich um eine abenteurliche Horrorgeschichte mit phantastischen Science-Fiction-Elementen sowie sozialutopischen Ansätzen. H.P. Lovecraft knüpft dabei an den von ihm geschaffenen Cthulhu-Mythos an, verweist auf das fiktive (in seinen Werken immer wieder auftauchende) geheime Buch "Necronomicon" und stellt auch Bezüge zu E. A. Poes Roman "Die denkwürdigen Erlebnisse des Arthur Gordon Pym" her. Trotzdem bleibt das Werk auch ohne Kenntnis dieser Werke verständlich.Überzeugen kann das Buch jedoch nur ansatzweise: Während zunächst der rastlose, mit geologischen und paläontologischen Begriffen gespickte, nüchterne Bericht eines Wissenschaftlers Spannung erzeugt und den Leser fesselt, vertändelt sich H. P. Lovecraft im weiteren Verlauf seiner Erzählung mit der Wiedergabe einer Chronik jener phantastischen, vormenschlichen Zivilisation, die der Ich-Erzähler alleine aufgrund von gefundenen Reliefs detailgetreu wiederzugeben in der Lage ist. Dies wirkt wie ein Stilbruch zu Lasten der Spannung und Glaubwürdigkeit der Erzählung. Ebenfalls kritisch anmerken möchte ich die fast schon inflationäre Benutzung mancher Wörter und daraus resultierender Wiederholungen.