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Illustrated Handbook of Western European Costume: Thirteenth to Mid-Nineteenth Century

Illustrated Handbook of Western European Costume: Thirteenth to Mid-Nineteenth Century

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Illustrated Handbook of Western European Costume: Thirteenth to Mid-Nineteenth Century

Lunghezza:
344 pagine
13 ore
Pubblicato:
Feb 4, 2014
ISBN:
9780486149127
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

This valuable survey uses theatrical costumes as contemporary clues to the wearing apparel that was in vogue in Italy, Spain, France, Germany, and Flanders from 1260 to 1840. Enhanced with the author's charming, accurately rendered illustrations, the study meticulously describes more than 200 costumes. Immensely useful to costume and cultural historians. 176 black-and-white illustrations.
Pubblicato:
Feb 4, 2014
ISBN:
9780486149127
Formato:
Libro

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Illustrated Handbook of Western European Costume - Iris Brooke

ILLUSTRATED HANDBOOK OF WESTERN EUROPEAN COSTUME

THIRTEENTH TO MID-NINETEENTH CENTURY

TWO VOLUMES BOUND AS ONE

VOLUME ONE: THIRTEENTH TO SEVENTEENTH CENTURY

IRIS BROOKE

DOVER PUBLICATIONS, INC.

Mineola, New York

Bibliographical Note

This Dover edition, first published in 2003, is an unabridged republication of the following two volumes bound as one: Western European Costume: Thirteenth to Seventeenth Century, And Its Relation to the Theatre (Volume One) and Western European Costume: Seventeenth to Mid-Nineteenth Century, And Its Relation to the Theatre (Volume Two) originally published in 1939 and 1940, respectively, by George G. Harrap & Co. Ltd., London. The only significant alteration consists in moving all thirty-two color plates (from both volumes) into a full-color insert after page 144 of Volume One.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Brooke, Iris.

[Western European costume . . . and its relation to the theatre]

Illustrated handbook of Western European costume, thirteenth to mid-nineteenth century / Iris Brooke.

    p. cm.

Two volumes bound as one.

An unabridged republication of the following two volumes bound as one: Western European costume, thirteenth to seventeenth century, and its relation to the theatre (volume one) and Western European costume, seventeenth to mid-nineteenth century, and its relation to the theatre (volume two), originally published in 1939 and 1940 respectively by George G. Harrap & Co., Ltd., London—Verso t.p.

Includes index.

eISBN 13: 978-0-486-14912-7

  1. Costume—Europe—History. I. Title.

GT270.B73 2003

391’.0094—dc21

2002041669

Manufactured in the United States of America

Dover Publications, Inc., 31 East 2nd Street, Mineola, N.Y. 1150l

VOLUME ONE : THIRTEENTH TO SEVENTEENTH CENTURY

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION.

THIRTEENTH CENTURY.

FOURTEENTH CENTURY.

FIFTEENTH CENTURY.

SIXTEENTH CENTURY.

VOLUME TWO : SEVENTEENTH TO MID - NINETEENTH CENTURY

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

THE THEATRE OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY.

SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY DRESS.

THE THEATRE OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.

EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY DRESS .

THE BEGINNING OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY.

INDEX TO BOTH VOLUMES.

ILLUSTRATIONS

PLATES IN COLOUR*

I. GERMAN (1260).

II. GERMAN (1300).

III. ITALIAN (1340).

IV. ITALIAN (1370).

V. SPANISH (1414).

VI. ITALIAN (1440).

VII. FLEMISH (1460).

VIII. FRENCH (1480)

IX. FRENCH, ITALIAN, GERMAN, AND FLEMISH (1460).

X. ITALIAN (1494).

XI. GERMAN (1505).

XII. GERMAN (1538).

XIII. ITALIAN (1533).

XIV. FRENCH (1570).

XV. SPANISH (1585).

XVI. FRENCH (1599).

ILLUSTRATIONS IN THE TEXT

1. (1260) The simple gown, cloak, and head-dress of the thirteenth century (German).

2. (1280) The crespin, barbette, and fillet, together with the more decorative etceteras worn by a lady of quality (French).

3. (1296) The feminine adaptation of the garde-corps, with hood (French).

4. (1230) Horizontal stripes and a long jewelled belt liven the monotony of the standard lines worn in Germany.

5. (1260) French fashions.

6. (1260) The Italian style of following the classical lines.

7. (1210) Bands of embroidery used to decorate masculine tunics (German).

8. (1260) Different arrangements of the braies and hose, and the two most general fashions for men.

9. (1280) Lavish application of jewels, worn by courtly gentlemen, and the simple ungirdled dress of the well-dressed lady of the late thirteenth century (German).

10. (1300) Peasant style. Coif and cap and soled hose (Italian).

11. (1450) The hood.

12. (About 1250) Two versions of the garde-corps, as worn by men (French).

13. (1330) An Italian lady of quality.

14. About 1370) An unusual high-waisted dress, with a train (Italian).

15. (1340) The hood and cloak and delightful Italian variations in feminine fashions.

16. (1337) The simpler styles of the Italian people.

17. (1390) French version of the sideless surcote and the latest method of head-dressing.

18. (1361) Knuckle-length sleeves, with buttons to the elbow, the ‘ tippet’ finish of the upper sleeve, and the then prevalent fashion for fastening the cloak at the shoulder. The lady’s head-dress is the ‘ Kruseler’ (German).

19. (1340) (A) Parti-coloured tunic, with a ‘lipped’ sleeve. (B) ‘ Fitchet’ and split skirt together with a more loosely frilled veil (German).

20. (1360) (A) Unusual variation of the ‘tippet’ or band round the arm. (B) The Spanish sideless surcote cut all in one ; note the ‘lipped’ sleeve of the gown beneath and the laced sleeves of the shift.

21. (1319) Danish version of sideless surcote with the old method of securing the cloak, wimple, and head veil.

22. (1380) (A) The ‘ garnache, ’ or cape-sleeved super-tunic. (B) Very formal arrangement of the hair in metal casings (French).

23. (1390) (A) A net worn over the hair. Hanging sleeve and ‘ fichets.’ (B) The short, waisted tunic with buttons and a neck-chain as decoration, long-pointed toes (French).

24. (1395) (A) ‘ Dagging ’ and the use of bells for decorative purposes. (B) ‘ Houpelande ’ (German).

25. (1395) Various arrangements of bells (German) .

26. (1400). The ‘ Kruseler,’ with the sides pinned under the chin (German).

27. (1400) Two arrangements of the hood, lipped sleeve, and split skirt decorated with embroidered bands (German).

28. (1430) (A) The shortened ‘ houpelande ’ bag-sleeves, and beaver hat. (B) Rolled head-dress (Dutch).

29. (1440) Enveloping draperies of a Spanish lady.

30. (1440) Italian peasant styles.

31. (1414) The employment of ‘ dagging’ on all possible garments (French).

32. Evolution of the hood.

33. (1440) Peculiar Italian fashions in men’s hats

34. (1445) Exaggerated interpretations of the caped-sleeved tunic (Italian).

35. (1428) Fantastic Italian fashions.

36. (1427) Low-waisted German style.

37. (1450) (A) The short-skirted, wide-shouldered tunic, typical of the latter half of the century. (B, C, and D) The hennin, horned, and rolled head dresses (French).

38. (1470) Fantastic German hats.

39. (1480) Variations of the abnormally abbreviated gar ments and three varieties of the brimless hat (French).

40. (1440) Italian ‘ houpelande ’ with sleeves turned back.

41. (1490) Striking fashions in patterned hose, and short slashed doublet of Venetian origin (Italian).

42. (1490) Sleeveless over-tunic (German).

43. (1460) The detachable sleeve (German).

44. (1490) Exaggerated ribbon-slashing and netted hair (French).

45. (1480) A simple Italian doublet, with hood attached.

46. (1400) Italian peasant fashions.

47. (1410) The bag-sleeve and waisted gown without girdle (Dutch).

48. (1430) Heavy Dutch styles following the prevalent fashions.

49. (About 1400) A gathered skirt and sweeping dagged sleeves (Italian).

50. (1490) A German hennin head-dress with formal plaits ; short, tight-fitting over-tunic.

51. (About 1460) Two varieties in a double-pointed head-dress (French).

52. (1490–1500) Three German styles of waisted gowns and stiffly arranged head-dresses.

53. (1440) Variations of the more familiar fifteenth century fashions (Flemish).

54. The adaptation of the same style by four different countries. (A) Italian, i486; (B) French, 1500; (C) German, 1500; (D) Flemish, 1487.

55. (1460) Fur-edged German garments

56. (1470) Four head-dresses worn by German women.

57. The Italian fashion for hair nets and pearls. (A) 1489 ; (B) 1500; (C) 1464.

58. (1430) Quaint head-dress of Italian lady.

59. 60. 61. }(1480) Italian arrangements of the hair during the latter half of the century.

62. (1500) (A) Waist-length doublet and long-hose with a long-sleeved gown. (B) The waisted gown with flowing skirts more typical of the previous century (French).

63. (1505) A style from Portugal, with an amusing fashion in hairdressing.

64. (1537) The gigantic sleeves, short waist, and full skirts, fashionable in both Germany and Italy (Italian).

65. (1500) Slashed sleeves and the use of tiny bows to hold the more minute slashings in place (Italian.

66. (1510) The striking differences between the Italian and German fashions of 1510.

67. (1514) Quaint fashion in Dutch bonnet, with the hair drawn through the sides.

68. (1520) German cap.

69. (1515) Several variations in French fashions.

70. (1515) A typical French lady.

71. (About 1500) Typically transitional fashions from the fifteenth to the sixteenth century (French).

72. (1523) The Spanish hair net.

73. (1515) Slashed hose and short doublet were worn at the same time as the full-skirted tunic (French).

74. Fashions in hose decoration. (A) French ; (B) Italian; (C) Venetian; (D) German.

75. (1530) Ornate variations in the fashionable manner (French)

76. (About 1540) (A) Low-rounded neckline and slashed sleeves; (B) Full-gathered skirts and slashed boots (German).

77. (1520) Vivid contrasts in German, French, and Venetian fashions.

78. (1571) (A) German and Swiss ‘ Plunder-hose ’ (B) French ‘ trunks ’ and ‘ Venetians ’

79. (1585) German ‘ Plunder-hose’.

80. (1534) Curious hour-glass waist of German lady.

81. (1540) Contrasting (A) Italian and (B) German fashions.

82. (1560) French fashions in head-dressing.

83. (1556) The puff-sleeved gown worn all over Europe (German).

84. (1563) The short-waisted doublet and very full trunk-hose stuffed with horse-hair and rags (French)

85. (1570) Trunk-hose, with canions, pease-cod doublet, and short, flared cloak (French)

86. (1580) The fantastically bombasted suits of the fashion- able French dandy of the 1580’s.

87. (1580) Full bombasted ‘ Venetians’ (German).

88. (1590) The Venetian mode carried to exaggerated length of absurdity (Italian).

89. (1565) Contrasting styles of (A) Venetian; (B) French, and (C) German origin; the Venetian cloak, swathed, the French short and dapper, the German fur-lined and bunched into gathers.

90. (1527) The semi-shaped jacket of Bavarian cut worn over the Spanish farthingale (German).

91. (1585) The French farthingale, pointed lace ruff, and pointed stomacher.

92. (1585) Back view of the French farthingale, with bombasted sleeves.

93. (1581) (A) Venetian; (B) Spanish, and (C) Dutch fashion of the same date.

94. (1580) The Spanish farthingale (French).

95. (1590) Peculiar Italian fashions in hairdressing and neck-wear.

* For this edition, all the color plates are bound together between pages 144 and 145 of Volume One. Their original page positions appear above.

INTRODUCTION

IN view of the highly finished productions of period plays and adaptations from the old masters of dramatic art to be seen in the theatre of to-day, it seems hardly credible that a little over a century and a half ago the production of any play, however ancient its origin, was performed in the contemporary habits of the actors and actresses—little or no attempt being made to reproduce the author’s original vision of his work.

With the advancement of interest in so-called ‘ Period plays ’ and films of historical interest, a wider knowledge is perhaps desirable of how any playwright or author originally saw his characters clothed.

The purpose of this book, then, is to give some of the more unusual styles and fashions worn since the theatre commenced to be a leading interest in Western Europe, and also to give the names of several authors whose work may possibly be utilized for theatrical purposes again.

That the early dramatists wrote much that has not been used on the stage or screen is an undoubted fact, and many themes for very attractive productions are still to be found in the plots of the old Italian, Spanish, and very early French authors.

The northern European countries were probably too concerned with the religious aspect of the theatre to adventure far into the fields of romance and fantasy, and it was not until the end of the sixteenth century that the secular stage was an established feature in Germany and Holland.

A rather difficult problem arises here concerning thesimplest means of classing the various countries or dukedoms that went to the eventual composition of Germany as we know it to-day.

As this book does not pretend to give an historical and geographical record, it will perhaps be easier to follow if they are collectively alluded to as ‘ Germany ’ Strictly speaking, the term is rather wide of the mark, because each and every division had its own particular style and fashion, and it would be almost an impossible task to sort and name them all. I must, therefore, plead the excuse that their relativity to the theatre is practically negligible.

For those who are not consulting this book in a theatrical light, but merely from the point of view of contrasting styles in European clothing, there are sufficient examples in the ensuing pages to give quite a comprehensive knowledge of the various differences in cut and style without plunging into the intricacies of the history and geography of Germany.

It must be borne in mind that, although at certain times the clothes worn in two different countries at corresponding dates are strangely different, it is quite probable that they might

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