Trova il tuo prossimo libro preferito

Abbonati oggi e leggi gratis per 30 giorni
An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

Leggi anteprima

An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

valutazioni:
3/5 (138 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
43 pagine
41 minuti
Pubblicato:
Apr 20, 2015
ISBN:
9781623959784
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge is a short story with a twist by American author, Ambrose Bierce. Set during the American Civil War, "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" is the story of Peyton Farquhar, a Confederate sympathizer condemned to death by hanging from Owl Creek Bridge. This story has been hailed as an early pioneer in "stream of consciousness" storytelling.
This Xist Classics edition has been professionally formatted for e-readers with a linked table of contents. This eBook also contains a bonus book club leadership guide and discussion questions. We hope you’ll share this book with your friends, neighbors and colleagues and can’t wait to hear what you have to say about it.

Xist Publishing is a digital-first publisher. Xist Publishing creates books for the touchscreen generation and is dedicated to helping everyone develop a lifetime love of reading, no matter what form it takes



Pubblicato:
Apr 20, 2015
ISBN:
9781623959784
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore


Correlato a An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

Libri correlati
Articoli correlati

Anteprima del libro

An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge - Ambrose Bierce

Questions

I.

A man stood upon a railroad bridge in northern Alabama, looking down into the swift water twenty feet below. The man's hands were behind his back, the wrists bound with a cord. A rope closely encircled his neck. It was attached to a stout cross-timber above his head and the slack fell to the level of his knees. Some loose boards laid upon the ties supporting the rails of the railway supplied a footing for him and his executioners—two private soldiers of the Federal army, directed by a sergeant who in civil life may have been a deputy sheriff. At a short remove upon the same temporary platform was an officer in the uniform of his rank, armed. He was a captain. A sentinel at each end of the bridge stood with his rifle in the position known as support, that is to say, vertical in front of the left shoulder, the hammer resting on the forearm thrown straight across the chest—a formal and unnatural position, enforcing an erect carriage of the body. It did not appear to be the duty of these two men to know what was occurring at the center of the bridge; they merely blockaded the two ends of the foot planking that traversed it.

Beyond one of the sentinels nobody was in sight; the railroad ran straight away into a forest for a hundred yards, then, curving, was lost to view. Doubtless there was an outpost farther along. The other bank of the stream was open ground—a gentle slope topped with a stockade of vertical tree trunks, loopholed for rifles, with a single embrasure through which protruded the muzzle of a brass cannon commanding the bridge. Midway up the slope between the bridge and fort were the spectators—a single company of infantry in line, at parade rest, the butts of their rifles on the ground, the barrels inclining slightly backward against the right shoulder, the hands crossed upon the stock. A lieutenant stood at the right of the line, the point of his sword upon the ground, his left hand resting upon his right. Excepting the group of four at the center of the bridge, not a man moved. The company faced the bridge, staring stonily, motionless. The sentinels, facing the banks of the stream, might have been statues to adorn the bridge. The captain stood with folded arms, silent, observing the work of his subordinates, but making no sign. Death is a dignitary who when he comes announced is to be received with formal manifestations of respect, even

Hai raggiunto la fine di questa anteprima. Registrati per continuare a leggere!
Pagina 1 di 1

Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

3.1
138 valutazioni / 7 Recensioni
Cosa ne pensi?
Valutazione: 0 su 5 stelle

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    Dark, sad, morbid and lovely!
  • (5/5)
    My favorite short story. Bierce was brilliant.
  • (4/5)
    An extremely effective study of the state of mind of a man about to be hanged, during the Civil War. The vivid realism is undoubtedly enhanced by the fact that Bierce himself was a member of the Union Army. Perhaps he even was involved in a similar execution?
  • (5/5)
    A near perfect shorty story. I remember reading this, and seeing a television adaptation in class, while I was in junior high and being blown away. I wasn't used to being blown away by books we were supposed to read for school and this was one of the first times where I got an inkling of what fiction could do...though at the time I didn't really understand that; all I knew was that it was very cool.
  • (4/5)
    I remember this story first from watching the Twilight Zone episode it was based on. A man facing death, finds a way to escape, or does he? I would recommend The Secret Miracle by Jorge Borges if you liked this.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed this short storybook very well, as well as the last section about the reading club advice. I think that even if you're not a part of a reading club, they're still helpful questions to ask yourself to reflect on any literary work that you read.
  • (5/5)
    In Asia, aphorism is a high art; there, the greatest of poems may be said in one breath. In the West, our greatest poems come in books numbered twelve, and only the greatest of men can remember the length of them.However, we still maintain our aphorists, though often consider them as comical wits, would do well to remember the skill of indicating truth is with them. There is the poet, Nietzsche, who is also a philosopher and who summed up the goal of the aphorist well: "It is my...more In Asia, aphorism is a high art; there, the greatest of poems may be said in one breath. In the West, our greatest poems come in books numbered twelve, and only the greatest of men can remember the length of them.However, we still maintain our aphorists, though often consider them as comical wits, would do well to remember the skill of indicating truth is with them. There is the poet, Nietzsche, who is also a philosopher and who summed up the goal of the aphorist well: "It is my ambition to say in ten sentences what everyone else says in a whole book — what everyone else does not say in a whole book." There is the politician, Disraeli, who found that ruling men meant understanding a plural and remarkable simplicity. There is the self-concerned wit Wilde, who told us that genius lies in misunderstanding and is so widely and unknowingly quoted that it is a cliche.Speak what you will of Twain, but Bierce is America's entreant into the minute art; Twain would admit as much, himself. Indeed, Clemens considered 'The Occurance at Owl Creek Bridge' to be the single greatest short story of all Americans.The man who copies the Psalms onto a grain of rice has condensed space, but the author who places the depth of a book into a short story has condensed meaning. The utterly deliberate and unfettered Owl Creek is a difinitively superior work, just as the man who strikes the bull's eye with his arrow by chance is never the equal to the one that may do so at his leisure.There is an old French film which makes an excellent adaptation of this work, and which was once featured on the Twilight Zone, if that lends any notion of its quality.