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Olympians: Hades: Lord of the Dead

Olympians: Hades: Lord of the Dead

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Olympians: Hades: Lord of the Dead

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (22 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
80 pagine
1 ora
Pubblicato:
Oct 7, 2014
ISBN:
9781466878600
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

Volume 4 of the highly acclaimed Olympians series!

Hades: Lord of the Dead tells the story of the great God of the Underworld and one of the most famous of all Greek myths: Hades' abduction of Persephone and her mother's revenge. Be prepared to see a new side of Persephone in this dynamic adaptation of the story of the creation of the seasons.

In Olympians, O'Connor draws from primary documents to reconstruct and retell classic Greek myths. But these stories aren't sedate, scholarly works. They're action-packed, fast-paced, high-drama adventures with monsters, romance, and not a few huge explosions. O'Connor's vibrant, kinetic art brings ancient tales to undeniable life in a perfect fusion of super-hero aesthetics and ancient Greek mythology. This title has Common Core connections.

Hades is a Kirkus Reviews Best Children's Book of 2012

Pubblicato:
Oct 7, 2014
ISBN:
9781466878600
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore

George O’Connor is the creator of the New York Times bestselling graphic novel series Olympians, in addition to serving as the illustrator of the Captain Awesome series. He is also the author and illustrator of the picture books Kapow!, Ker-splash, and If I Had a Triceratops. He resides in his secret Brooklyn, New York, hideout, where he uses his amazing artistic powers to strike fear in the hearts of bad guys everywhere!

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Olympians - George O'Connor

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4.4
22 valutazioni / 12 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    This is an excellent retelling of the abduction of Persephone. Deeply grounded in their primary sources, the characters also feel very modern and accessible. I'm especially impressed that Mr. O'Connor has let Persephone's voice come through while still telling the traditional story.

    The story and the art convey the story vividly, without being too graphic for a young audience (or for the adults who are probably more worried about graphic depictions than they really need to be {and by 'adults' here, I really mean 'me'}).

    I enjoyed reading this as much as my 9 year old nephew enjoyed it - high praise, right there :)
  • (4/5)
    A fairly decent adaptation of the myths.
  • (3/5)
    Very fun and interesting take on Hades and especially on the Hades/Persephone mythstory; never thought of her as a rebellious Goth girl, but when one is the queen of the underworld, I suppose that side comes out.
  • (4/5)
    When I read the fifth volume of this series I realized that I had inadvertently skipped over the fourth volume. I requested it on interlibrary loan and it didn't take long to show up. This volume focuses on the tale of Hades, Persephone and Demeter. I loved the version of the story they gave. It didn't cast Hades as a villain. I liked learning about how Demeter's behavior affected the humans and their treatment of the gods. As usual there were wonderful historical notes that made me all kinds of happy. The art style did a great job of showing the difference between Hades and the earth and Olympus.
  • (5/5)
    Wow, what a great opening to a book, a personal tour through the Greek Underworld. Really amazing work from one of my favorite GN writers and artist. And I love the Notes at the back. Show your work!
  • (5/5)
    Another stunning interpretation of the Greek myths in O'Connor's Olympians series.
  • (3/5)
    The Olympians series takes a different spin on the myth of Persephone, Hades and Demeter (always one of my favorite myths) and almost turns it into a gothic love story. Although a fresh take on the story, it was not as enjoyable as the others in this series.
  • (3/5)
    I started reading this book not knowing it was part of a series. Thankfully it wasn't confusing and there was no need to read the previous volumes to understand what was going on. There was enough explanation in the beginning for anybody to be able to understand, even if this was their first story on Hades and Persephone.The artwork, while detailed and colorful, was not very good in my opinion. It's probably just my tastes, but I didn't like the art very much though that didn't stop me from reading.The two main characters, Hades and Persephone are portrayed a little differently than they usually are in other stories about them. In this story Hades seemed kind and caring in this novel. He was also pretty lonely and a bit awkward. Persephone, in this comic, chose on her own to stay with Hades for half of the year. It was also nice to see how Persephone changed while staying down in Hades.So while this was an interesting take on a popular myth, to me it seemed more informational rather than being a story.
  • (5/5)
    Our tale begins in the land of the dead. We hear what it's like when we die--how we meet Hermes who guides us to the river Styx, the need for a coin to pass down the river, the river Lethe where we forget everything, and the waiting...the endless waiting. But this is only the beginning of the story. But the true tale is about the abduction of Persephone, also known as Kore, by the Lord of the Dead, Hades. And the destruction and sorrow it causes on the mortal world as Persephone's mother, Demeter, searches the world over for her.And what a tale it is. I've always been fascinated by Greek and Romany mythology and I love how O'Connor puts this book together. It's an easy read, but he gives so much information to the reader and lays it out much better than the boring old books I remember reading about Greek myths. O'Connor makes the world come to life by the story he weaves and by giving personality to the gods that we meet so that we can understand why they did what they did. In every other tale Hades comes off as a villain, but here we see he really isn't. He's just lonely and looking for a chance to have a shot at a relationship. This is an excellent book to introduce Greek mythology and now I really want to read the other books in the series as well.One of my favorite parts of the book is actually at the end, the little feature at the back that talks about the different characters, who they are, and other details to help you learn more about the Greek world. Even better, from a librarian perspective, they have a bibliography! A list of websites and recommended reading list to go to get more information.I really like the artwork in this book. It has such great use of color and shadow in the depictions of the world, especially the underworld. Instead of depicting it all flames and fire (which seems to be something some artists like these days) it's more of a darker, almost hopeless place...much like it's described as in the original myths. It might be a bit creepy for really young readers, but middle schoolers and above will enjoy it. I enjoyed most of the character design, although at times it looks like Hades has a goatee (I think it would actually fit him well) and he looks a bit...well too much like an emo kid. I mean I know he's depressed and all, but..couldn't he be less of a blue shade? Overall though I do like the depiction of the other characters, especially the depiction of the many handed ones, the Hekatonchieres.This is the perfect companion for people that have been enjoying the Percy Jackson series by Rick Riordan and want to know more about the Greek/Roman gods and how they work. It would be ok for elementary school age (3rd and above) but they would probably need to read it with a parent. But this would be an excellent book for a middle or high schooler (or even adult) that wants to learn more about the world of Greek mythology. I can't wait to read the previous volumes and to read what comes next. I give this book 5 out of 5 stars.A review copy of this book was provided by Gina at FirstSecond.
  • (4/5)
    Reason for Reading: Next in the series.What a long wait it has been for the fourth volume in this series! Another great entry in the series with fabulous artwork. O'Connor's depictions of Persephone are fantastic, picturing her in a unique Goth style which seems quite appropriate for the Queen of the Dead. While the book is titled Hades, it really tells the story of Persephone and to a lesser degree Demeter which is a twist on the usual telling of this tale which focuses on Demeter and how the seasons came to be in most retellings. O'Connor has taken licence and retold the story addressing Persephone's feelings, attitude and actions which are usually not referred to. This makes for a refreshing story for someone familiar with the tale and adds a fun twist to the myth. I'm not sure I totally agree with this take on the tale, as I've always related to Demeter in this myth (must be my maternal instincts) but since the intended audience is children I think it is a great new view to an old tale that kids will relate to. Some of my favourite things about this series is the author's note, the portrait pages and the detailed "Notes" at the back. This is full of quite scholarly information about not just the particular myth but many aspects of Greek mythology and a treasure trove of interesting tidbits and even a veteran reader will learn a new fact or two! I can't find any references to what the next book will be, but I'm sure at one point I heard it was going to be on Poseidon. Whatever it is I just hate having to wait a year between volumes :(
  • (5/5)
    This is the fourth book in the graphic series The Olympians by George O’Connor. This is an amazing retelling of the story of Hades and Persephone. I was just captivated by the beauty of the drawings and the passion of the characters. With tons of research into the myths, George O’Connor has created a story that weaves together all the bits and pieces. This telling of the Hades myth is not only touching but opens up a humanity in the Greek Gods that I believe was often missing in the more serious versions. Hades is portrayed as a man who has been given a job to do. He is shrouded in darkness but he is not evil.Persephone has more personality in George O’Connor’s story than she has been given before. Here is a young woman smothered by her overprotective mother. Though Hades took her against her will, he is willing to give her more freedom than she ever had before and a chance to become the woman she wants to be.Then there is Demeter, Persephone’s mother, who nearly destroys the world with her grief at the loss of her daughter. Through a connection with Hecate she is able to find her daughter.In the end, this is a powerful story that can be enjoyed by girl or boy. It’s dark but romantic and I can’t wait to pick up more.
  • (5/5)
    Published by First Secondpublication date 1/31/12received from NetGalley for reviewWhat a great idea! Graphic novels about Greek mythology. I was unaware of this series until I saw the Hades book on NetGalley. I read this book with my son (age 10) in less than an hour. Due to the current climate of mythology in children's books, he has become fascinated with the Greek Pantheon. This is a wonderful, action packed, retelling of the classic Hades-Persephone-Demeter myth. Unlike the books I has to read in school, this book is far from boring. It is fast paced, has wonderful pictures, and is a great retelling of the myth. There is nothing objectionable in this book, Hades looks like the Lord of the Underworld but does not look frightening, nor is he mean or evil towards Persephone. My son's response when we finished, "Mom, can we get the other books? You know I love this stuff." I highly recommend this book, as well as others in the series, for anyone who enjoys mythology. It is a wonderfully exciting way for children to learn about the stories of the the ancients.