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Clock Makers and Clock Manufacture in the North East of England - Celebrated Clock Manufacturers from the Golden Age of Northern Horology

Clock Makers and Clock Manufacture in the North East of England - Celebrated Clock Manufacturers from the Golden Age of Northern Horology

Di Anon

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Clock Makers and Clock Manufacture in the North East of England - Celebrated Clock Manufacturers from the Golden Age of Northern Horology

Di Anon

Lunghezza:
42 pagine
30 minuti
Pubblicato:
Apr 16, 2013
ISBN:
9781447490470
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

This vintage text contains a comprehensive guide to the clock makers and clock manufacture in the north east of England, being a discussion of celebrated clock manufacture from the golden age of northern horology. Containing a wealth of interesting historical information and a plethora of detailed illustrations, this volume will appeal to those with a keen interest in the history and development of English clock manufacture, and it would make for a worthy addition to collections of allied literature. The chapters of this book include: A History of Clocks and Watches, Clock Making in York, Clockmaking in Wensleydale, Clockmaking in Craven, Clockmaking in Halifax, and Clockmaking in York. We are republishing this vintage book now in an affordable, modern edition complete with a specially commissioned new introduction on the history of clocks and watches.
Pubblicato:
Apr 16, 2013
ISBN:
9781447490470
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore

See Book Description


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Anteprima del libro

Clock Makers and Clock Manufacture in the North East of England - Celebrated Clock Manufacturers from the Golden Age of Northern Horology - Anon

York

A Note on Clockwork

A CLOCK is essentially a counting machine, its principle the controlled wasteage of stored power. Thus the modern clock upon the mantelpiece is merely a refined version of the first domestic clock which hung upon the walls of our English homes. Our modern clock has, perhaps, a balance-wheel oscillating quickly to and fro, each oscillation taking place in a given and known period of time. The rest of the machine is a mere exercise in mechanics, its details governed by the assumption that the balance-wheel will continue to oscillate at the given rate. The swing of the balance-wheel, then, provides the basic time-unit; the rest of the machine is merely counting these oscillations, doing a division sum, and presenting the answer on the dial in terms of hours and minutes. Interfere in any way with that period of time in which the balance-wheel swings, making it go faster or slower, and the clock will fail to show correct time because it is still doing its division sum on the premiss that the balance-wheel is still oscillating at the given rate. The timekeeping part of the clock, then, is the balance-wheel, and on it all the rest depends.

Or our modern clock has a pendulum. Again that pendulum is our timekeeper, because the interval of time in which it swings this way or that is known, and can be calculated precisely according to its length. Interfere with that length, and once again the counting machine has lost the essential condition of its accuracy.

Or we own the still-more-modern electric clock. Here again the principle is just the same; the clock is still counting and doing its division sum, but this time the given premiss is the number of times per second that the mains current alternates. The mains are doing the timekeeping here, and circumstances may cause variation reflected in erratic timekeeping by all the slave-clocks working on these mains.

The earliest English clock with which we need concern ourselves had a rude and heavy balance-wheel. The period of its swing (which, as we have seen, was the fundamental factor) was governed not by a hair-spring, as in modern clocks, but by (a) its mass, (b) the power of the driving-weight. To make a clock that would keep approximate time was not therefore a difficult matter, since any error in computing the mass of a balance-wheel required to swing in a given interval of time could be offset by making the driving-weight heavier or lighter as required. Its accuracy could be checked

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