Trova il tuo prossimo libro preferito

Abbonati oggi e leggi gratis per 30 giorni
SAP Service Management: Your Successful Implementation Guide

SAP Service Management: Your Successful Implementation Guide

Leggi anteprima

SAP Service Management: Your Successful Implementation Guide

valutazioni:
4/5 (8 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
314 pagine
1 ora
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Nov 18, 2014
ISBN:
9781310675607
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

Now, you might be wondering why someone would write yet another book on SAP. Well, when I looked at the market, and read through the Plant Maintenance book, I realized there was a gap in the material. There was very little material that talked about Service Management. While there is a lot of overlap between SM and PM, there is a lot of additional integration that happens between sales and distribution that isn’t really covered in any of the books I’ve found.
This book is both how to manual and a reference guide. The idea is that the initial sections of the book will provide you with a quick start guide to implementing service management. Then I provide a walk through to see how the process will look for the user, and finally all the individual pieces of configuration that make up the process. It will guide you through the configuration in all of the following areas:
* Service Orders
* Service Notifications
* Repair Sales Orders
* Technical Objects
* as well as the all the integrations points within those areas.
It even includes bonus material for dealing with third party service.
This is THE comprehensive guide to SAP Service Management configuration.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Nov 18, 2014
ISBN:
9781310675607
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore

Mike’s SAP Expertise is in Customer Service/Service Management, Variant Configuration and Sales Distribution. Mike focuses on the technical development of SAP applications using ABAP, ABAP Objects, BSP and ABAP Web Dynpro. Mike began working in SAP in 1995 as an intern who needed to learn how to implement Variant Configuration in R/3 3.0F. Mike worked at SAP and Deloitte before becoming an independent consultant. Mike created Paper Street Enterprises (PSE) in 2006 with a mission to provide the best consulting knowledge in SAP Service Management and Variant Configuration. PSE focused on helping small to midsized manufacturing companies implement and streamline their service and engineering processes. Mike has worked in the mining equipment, telecommunications equipment and high tech manufacturing industries to realize the full potential of SAP Service Management and Variant Configuration. In 2008, Mike began the journey into application design. The first application, called Rapier, provided an out of the box customer self-service SM website using BSP technology. Mike became an SAP Partner in 2011 and received his first ABAP Add-on SAP certified. Since then, he’s led the development of SAP applications has evolved into a suite of products called Renovation that focuses on simplifying and streamlining the Service Management processes. Renovation includes a Service Management dashboard, and multiple other applications to make using SAP SM easier. Renovation continues to grow and evolve into the premier Service Management application suite. In 2012, Mike (Paper Street Enterprises) and Mike Golden (Discrete Manufacturing) created the joint venture of JaveLLin Solutions, LLC. Mike Piehl is the Chief Technical Officer, responsible for all the systems and development initiatives. He is the expert in Service Management and Variant Configuration.


Correlato a SAP Service Management

Libri correlati
Articoli correlati

Anteprima del libro

SAP Service Management - Mike Piehl

SAP Service Management

Your Successful Implementation Guide

Published by Mike Piehl at Smashwords

Copyright 2014 Mike Piehl

Discover other titles by Mike Piehl

SAP Service Management – Advanced Configuration Guide

Smashwords Edition, License Notes

This ebook is licensed for your personal enjoyment only. This ebook may not be re-sold or given away to other people. If you would like to share this book with another person, please purchase an additional copy for each recipient. If you’re reading this book and did not purchase it, or it was not purchased for your use only, then please return to your favorite ebook retailer and purchase your own copy. Thank you for respecting the hard work of this author.

Contents

Part A - Blue Printing

Major Business Processes

Master Data

Notifications/Call Center Processing

Service Order Processing

Sales and Warranty

Shipping and Receiving

Technical

Part B - Scenarios

In-House Repairs

On-Site Repairs

Part C - The Service Management Process

Part D - Configuration

Enterprise Structure

Definition – Plant Maintenance

Assignment – Plant Maintenance

Master Data in Plant Maintenance and Customer Service

Basic Settings

Technical Objects

Maintenance and Service Orders

Functions and Settings for Order Types

General Data

Partner

Scheduling

Completion Confirmations

Define Control Parameters for Completion Confirmation *

Set Screen Templates for Completion Confirmation *

Basic Settings

Print Control

Setting for Display of Costs *

Quotation Creation and Billing for Service Orders

Maintenance and Service Notifications

Notification Creation – Notification Types

Notification Creation – Notification Content

Notification Creation – Partners

Notification Processing – Response Time Monitoring

Notification Processing – Additional Functions

Notifications Processing – Notification Print Control

Notification Processing – User Status for Notification

Sales

Sales Documents – Customer Service

Sales Documents – Sales Document Header

Sales Documents – Sales Document Item

Basic Functions – Availability Check and Transfer of Requirements

SD Master Data

Part E - Frequently Asked Questions

Part F - Conclusion

Part G - About the Author

Introduction

Now, you might be wondering why someone would write yet another book on SAP. Well, when I looked at the market, and read through the Plant Maintenance book, I realized there was a gap in the material. There was very little material that talked about Service Management. While there is a lot of overlap between SM and PM, there is a lot of additional integration that happens between sales and distribution that isn’t really covered in any of the books I’ve found.

So I decided that I could not be the only one looking for more information in the field, so I began my journey of walking through the PM/SM/SD configuration and began documenting the configuration. I then tried to think of everything I knew about service and did my best to add it to this guide. I hope you find it useful.

How to read this book

The majority of this book should be used a reference guide. I expect very few people to read this from start to finish. The idea is that the initial sections of the book will provide you with a quick start guide to implementing service management, a walk through to see how the process will look for the user, and then all the individual pieces of configuration that make up the process.

You’ll notice that in the table of contents, certain sections have an asterisk after them (*). Those are the sections I believe you MUST configure every time you setup service management. While some of them may only need to be configured once for an entire company, all of them must be configured at least once for each implementation.

That’s not to say that the other sections are less important. Just they contain features that may or may not be useful to an implementation. If you want to get the most out of service management, I encourage you to look through everything. But if you’re in a hurry and want to get service management up and running right now, pay close attention to each section with the (*) or read the section on Scenarios.

In addition, I’ve laid the configuration portion of the book out in the sequence of how I tend to configure things. For me, I start at the Service order, confirmations, and then onto the notifications and finally the sales orders. The reason for this is that these pieces build upon each other. The service order is the lowest level of the structure. If you start there, the configuration of the notification and sales order will have the pieces you need already completed. This helps minimize the number of times you visit a piece of configuration (barring a new business requirement).

Blueprinting

This section will give you a great starting point for your blueprinting in any organization. If you can get the answers to all of these questions, then you are likely to have a very solid implementation. Getting as much of the information up front will make your life significantly easier in the configuration process. This section has been broken up in several key sections including master data, call center/notifications, service order processing (the actual repair), sales and warranty, shipping and receiving and finally technical. These cover the main processes within service management.

One of the best pieces of advice I can give you is to translate the business terminology to SAP terminology early on. There is nothing worse than getting the requirements configured only to find that you completely misunderstood a process.

Major Business Processes

This one simple question usually has the most impact on the service blueprint, at least in my experience.  You need to understand what processes your customer currently uses.  Once you understand what those processes are, you should be able to map them to SAP relatively easily.  Inevitably, some of the processes won’t be mentioned, so do your best to ask about each of these in detail.

In-House Repairs

This is the standard SAP repair processing.  This will involve sales orders, deliveries, service orders and often notifications.  There are a lot of variations that can be built into this standard process, and you’ll want to understand if any of them apply.  Some of the variants include:

* Are Loaned Items offered to customers?  Are they offered to all customers or only customers who have purchased a premium service of some time?

* How does scrapping need to handled for customer own equipment?

* Is it fixed price billing?  Time and Material billing?

* How many in a day/week/month?

Exchange

This process is a variation of the standard repair process.  The exchange is simply sending a new unit to the customer before receiving the customer’s unit.  This is often offered as a premium service to customers.  Some questions that need to be addressed for this process include:

* How does billing occur?  Is the customer billed as soon as the exchange is sent, and credited upon receipt of the customer’s equipment? Or is the customer billed after the unit is received and repaired?

* Are brand new units sent as an exchange?  Or are refurbished units sent as an exchange?

* What happens to the repaired inventory?  Is it stocked as a new number or different valuation type? Is it put back into stock as new?  Does it need to go to a special inventory location?

* Does the repair of exchange need to be tracked separately?  Does it require its own service order type? Does it need special scheduling, for example all standard repairs must be done first before working on any exchange units?  It is first come, first serviced?

* Is it fixed price billing or Time and Material billing?

* How many in a day/week/month?

On-Site/Field Service

On-site or Field Service is usually the easier process.  Typically this consists of a service order that gets charged time and expenses.  However, like everything else, there are a lot of processes that can be combined with on-site service.

* How do you deal with components needed for the On-Site work?  Are the parts sent to customer directly?  Do you use trunk stock where your technicians carry their own stock?  Do you charge the customers for the shipping of parts?  Do you ever use customer’s parts in the order and if so, do you need to account for those in any of the processes?

* Do you use sub-contractors or 3rd parties to perform any on-site work?  Do you need to track items like per-deim? Hotel? Airfare?

* Do you track or charge for travel time?

* Do you schedule your technicians?  Do you need a calendar of events to know who is where?

* How are costs currently tracked/entered?  Do the technicians enter the information?  Is the information sent to someone on-site?

* How many in a day/week/month?

When dealing with field service, it’s important to realize that there are several standard ways of initiating the process. You can choose to create a repair sales order and let that generate the service order. The other alternative is creating a service order directly from the notification. In my experience, this method is typically for quoting or perhaps for on-site/field service.  This will vary from client to client, but I’ll always recommend that you keep your processes similar whenever possible (so make your field service orders work similar to your in-house repairs if you perform in-house repairs).

Return for Credit

The easiest of the service processes, the simple return for credit.  No repairs, no replacements, just a credit.  Some additional pieces to consider include:

* How does the stock need to be handled when it is returned?  Does it need to be sent to quality, repairs or production before issuing the credit?

* How is the process handled if the material is damaged upon return?  Is credit still issued?  Is it partially credited?  Is it repaired, and if so, where does the cost go?

* When is it returned to stock?  Can it go back to unrestricted inventory as is, or does it need to be a different valuation type or a different material?

* How many in a day/week/month?

Return for Replacement

This is a gray area as far as I’m concerned in the service world.  This could actually fall under the repair process and be executed like a service exchange, or it could just be a return order, with another sales order (free or paid) order to follow up.

* The biggest thing that drives this one way or the other is finance.  If it should count for or against your

Hai raggiunto la fine di questa anteprima. Registrati per continuare a leggere!
Pagina 1 di 1

Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di SAP Service Management

3.9
8 valutazioni / 2 Recensioni
Cosa ne pensi?
Valutazione: 0 su 5 stelle

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    The first and fantastic book by Mike on Service Management. It would have been great if process flow had been discussed.
  • (5/5)
    This is a great book for a Business Analyst who is planning to implement SAP Service Management in any Service Industry.