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Quick & Easy Mexican Cooking: More Than 80 Everyday Recipes

Quick & Easy Mexican Cooking: More Than 80 Everyday Recipes

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Quick & Easy Mexican Cooking: More Than 80 Everyday Recipes

valutazioni:
4/5 (6 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
250 pagine
2 ore
Pubblicato:
Apr 29, 2011
ISBN:
9781452105376
Formato:
Libro

Nota del redattore

From tacos to churros…

Prepare a spread of traditional Mexican cuisine for your next meal, from tacos to churros and agua fresca, too. Each of the 80+ recipes can easily be made in under an hour, making this the ideal cookbook to pull out for a weeknight or an impromptu weekend shindig.

Descrizione

Es verdad! You can cook Mexican food on a weeknight in under one hour. Using readily available ingredients and familiar techniques, this easy-to-use cookbook makes Mexican cuisine doable for cooks at any skill level. Tacos, taquitos, flautas, burritos, and even classic Mexican desserts like Churros and cinnamon-scented Arroz con Leche (rice pudding) are just a taste of the more than 80 straightforward recipes. With dishes for every meal of the dayplus refreshing drinks such as agua frescas and potent margaritas—Quick & Easy Mexican Cooking adds spice to any kitchen.
Pubblicato:
Apr 29, 2011
ISBN:
9781452105376
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore

Cecilia Hae-Jin Lee writes about food for numerous magazines and newspapers. She lives in Los Angeles.

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Anteprima del libro

Quick & Easy Mexican Cooking - Cecilia Hae-Jin Lee

Quick & Easy Mexican Cooking

More than 80 Everyday Recipes

By Cecilia Hae-Jin Lee

Photographs By Leigh Beisch

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

PANTRY NOTES

GLOSSARY OF MEXICAN INGREDIENTS

GUIDE TO MEXICAN CHEESES

USEFUL UTENSILS FOR COOKING MEXICAN FOOD

1 SALSAS, TORTILLAS, AND MORE

Rooster's Beak Salsa

Smoky Chipotle Salsa

Roasted Tomatillo Salsa

Mango Salsa

Chunky Avocado Dip

Red Enchilada Sauce

Ancho Chile Sauce

Achiote Paste

Herbed Pumpkin Seed Mole

Corn Tortillas

Baked Tortilla Chips

2 SALADS

Carne Asada Salad

Festive Corn Salad

Cactus Salad

Jícama Salad

Avocado Salad

Chilled Bean Salad

Cilantro-Lime Dressing

Avocado Dressing

3 SOUPS

Chilled Avocado-Lime Soup

Lentil Soup

Soup Of The Seven Seas

Tortilla Soup

Yucatan Lime And Chicken Soup

Chicken And Hominy Soup

Meatball Soup

Beef Stew

4 VEGETABLES AND SIDE DISHES

Refried Beans

Black Beans

Roasted Poblano Chiles

Fried Potatoes With Poblano Chiles

Aztec Zucchini

Fried Chayote Squash

Spicy Corn On The Cob

Vegetarian Quesadillas

Mexican Rice

Mexican Fondue

5 POULTRY AND EGGS

Ranch-Style Eggs

Lenten Eggs

Stuffed Peppers

Overstuffed Chicken Sandwiches

Chicken Baked In Creamy Chipotle Sauce

Chicken With Mole Sauce

Chicken Enchiladas With Green Chile Sauce

Crispy Chicken Taquitos

Summer Chicken Tacos

Turkey Chilaquiles

6 BEEF AND PORK

Shredded Beef

Beef Flautas

Beef Enchiladas With Red Sauce

Seasoned Skirt Steak

Steak Fajitas

Grilled Tampico-Style Steak

Breaded Steak

Pork Tostadas

Spicy Pork Rubbed With Achiote Paste

7 FISH AND SHELLFISH

Shrimp Cocktail

Ceviche

Veracruz-Style Fish

Grilled Salmon With Creamy Cilantro Sauce

Tilapia With Chipotle Sauce

Baja-Style Fish Tacos

Crab Enchiladas With Green Mole

Grilled Shrimp Burritos

8 DESSERTS AND SNACKS

Rice Pudding

Mango Pudding

Mangoes With Chile And Lime

Plantains With Vanilla And Cinnamon Cream

Sweet Corn Ice Cream

Mexican Wedding Cookies

Churros

Three Milks Cake

Chile-Spiced Peanuts

9 BEVERAGES

Mango Refresher

Tamarind Punch

Hibiscus Punch

Cinnamon-Rice Drink

Hot Corn Drink

Mexican Hot Chocolate

Margarita On The Rocks

Strawberry Margaritas

Cactus Fruit Cocktails

QUICK AND EASY MEXICAN MENUS

MAIL-ORDER SOURCES

BOOKS ON THE FOODS, COOKING, AND CULTURE OF MEXICO

INDEX

TABLE OF EQUIVALENTS

Copyright

INTRODUCTION

Living in Los Angeles, I was introduced to Mexican cuisine at a young age. I don’t know if the first dish I tried was the beef enchiladas smothered in red sauce and cheese from the school cafeteria or the spicy burritos I got from the taco truck down the street. Growing up, I had my share of fake nachos and imposter tacos in hard shells that came from shrink-wrapped boxes, but I also had my fill of homemade tamales and steaming bowls of menudo.

However, my real education in Mexican cuisine began when my parents bought a Mexican grocery store in the San Fernando Valley.

It was the summer before I started high school, the early ’80s, and the height of Valley Girl culture. After school, our friends would find my siblings and me, still in our Catholic-school uniforms, running the cash register, taking inventory, and stacking boxes and boxes of tomatoes. The banda music would be blaring from the radio while we worked beneath a canopy of colorful piñatas, their tissue-paper fringe flapping in the breeze of the swamp cooler.

I learned how to pick the perfect avocado, how to wrap corn husks to make giant stacks of tamales, and how to clean the spikes off nopalitos without pricking my fingers.

I experimented with varieties of peppers, made my way through bowls of salsa, and devoured papayas doused with lime juice and chili powder.

Our customers and friends would bring us culinary wonders from their kitchens—bowls brimming with pork meatballs, moist cakes sprinkled with cinnamon, and handmade tortillas still warm from their stoves. From these abuelas (grandmas) and tías (aunts), I learned secrets of each family’s mole, where to get the best chocolates, and how to turn out rows and rows of enchiladas without even breaking a sweat.

I took these lessons with me to college, perfecting my soups, making my salsas spicier, and learning more of the street Spanish I have yet to master. After graduation,

I lived in Mexico and tasted the real flavors south of the border. Strangers would invite me into their kitchens where we would cook, sing, and laugh together.

The origins of Mexican food go back centuries to the culture of the Aztec, the Maya, the Toltec, and the Olmec. The nomadic Maya began to farm the land. They ate corn tortillas, made bean paste, hunted wild game, fished from the ocean, and enjoyed the tropical fruits of the region. The Aztec added to this already developed pantry the fire of chile peppers and the wonderful flavors from cacao. Then throw in the culinary influence of the Spanish, who brought wheat, domesticated animals, grain mills, and cheesemaking. With more visitors and traders to Mexico, the cuisines of France, Portugal, West Africa, the Caribbean, and South America were added to the mix, and we have the modern Mexican menu that is alive and kicking today.

A wonderful example of the richness of Mexican entrees is mole, which is a term used for a variety of thick sauces that vary in color and flavor depending on the ingredients. Each region has its own variation. Oaxaca, the heart of Mexico in both geography and food, has several different varieties. One of the most popular kinds, mole poblano, is an excellent example of how history and contact with various cultures were necessary to shape the dish. A bowl of mole poblano might contain peanuts, sesame seeds, anise, cinnamon, black pepper, sugar, salt, garlic, onion, cloves, coriander, tomato, raisins, lard, and chocolate. The individual ingredients made their way to Mexico at different times, but all of them together create a complex and delicious dish that could have only originated in Mexico.

Even American food has infiltrated the kitchens south of the border with the invention of Tex-Mex cuisine. Although the marriage of American fare and Mexican delicacies probably happened centuries ago, the term Tex-Mex started as a reference to the Texas-Mexican railway around 1875. The term wasn’t used to describe food until the latter half of the twentieth century. Items such as chili con carne, fajitas, and tortilla chips all emerged from this culinary marriage and what we know as Mexican food in America has been largely shaped by this history.

Traditional Mexican food was cooked over an open fire on iron skillets (called comals) or in ceramic pots. There was no oven cooking, per se, but food was fried, steamed, or boiled. From this way of cooking emerged long-stewed meats boiled into soups, shredded into fillings flavored with chile pastes and nuts, and wrapped up in a blanket of tortillas. Seafood from the coastal lands added more flavors to the diet.

Today, we get to enjoy centuries of food traditions with minimal effort. Mexican food is so popular that ingredients are readily available almost anywhere. Although there is a time and a place for spending long hours slaving over a hot stove, I believe that we can enjoy the best of the feast without too much labor.

I’ve simplified the recipes that I’ve carried along from my youth, picked up along the way, and researched from my travels. I can still get a weeknight dinner on the table without compromising the delicious flavors and complex aromas that make Mexican food one of my favorite cuisines of all time.

I wrote this book hoping I could inspire home cooks to get out and bury their noses in fragrant bouquets of fresh cilantro, experiment with wonderfully fiery chiles, and explore the regional flavors of Mexico for themselves. So, get out the metate (mortar), cradle the ripe tomatoes in your hands, and get ready to start the culinary journey of a lifetime.

PANTRY NOTES

The Mexican pantry is filled with fragrant herbs, fresh vegetables, and dried chiles. The good news is that you probably have many of the necessary ingredients in your pantry already, but feel free to check the glossary if any of them are unfamiliar to you.

I’ve divided the ingredients list into three sections. The A-list includes those used most often and found in a Mexican kitchen. The B-list has items that you should have around if you want to make Mexican food often.

The C-list ingredients are those used for special dishes and worth having if you’re an adventurous cook and want to expand your Mexican food repertoire.

Luckily, it’s easy these days to find the ingredients you’ll need to make delicious Mexican food at home. Even your non-Latino supermarket will likely have many of the items you need to get started. So, roll up your sleeves and get ready for your Mexican food adventure. Let’s get cooking!

A-LIST

INGREDIENTS

BEANS

CHEESES

(see Guide to Mexican Cheeses,)

CILANTRO

CINNAMON

CORN

CUMIN

GARLIC

JALAPEÑO PEPPERS

LIMES

ONIONS

RICE

SERRANO CHILES

TOMATOES

TORTILLAS

VANILLA

B-LIST

INGREDIENTS

ANCHO CHILES

CANNED CHIPOTLE PEPPERS

CHILI POWDER

CREMA

MASA

NO PALES

PLANTAINS

POBLANO or PASILLA CHILES

TOMATILLOS

C-LIST

INGREDIENTS

ANNATTO SEEDS

CHAYOTE

EPAZOTE

HOMINY

JAMAICA

JÍCAMA

PILONCILLO

PRICKLY PEARS

TAMARIND PODS

Glossary of Mexican

INGREDIENTS

ANCHO CHILE: The dried version of either poblano or pasilla chiles, this milder chile is often ground and made into powder for flavoring recipes.

ANNATTO (ACHIOTE) SEEDS: Annatto are the seeds and the surrounding red pulp

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  • (4/5)
    Simple yet detailed. Most ingredients are readily available in my location.