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Trachodon Issue 1

Trachodon Issue 1

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Trachodon Issue 1

Lunghezza:
65 pagine
59 minuti
Pubblicato:
Nov 27, 2010
ISBN:
9781452411484
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

In Jo Ann Heydron's "Shoebox," a young woman learns how her disabled sister will forever affect her life. In "Bumpo's Honey" by Tom Weller, parents are forced to contemplate a bleak future for their son. Taylor Altman gives us two powerful ruminations on youth, and Chris Dombrowski creates a pair of strange dialogues with modern life. Jewelry maker Amy Tavern takes us on a tour of her creative process, offering ruminations on the nature of art. Wesley Middleton takes us inside Brooklyn's UrbanGlass, a vibrant center of artisan culture.

Pubblicato:
Nov 27, 2010
ISBN:
9781452411484
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore

TRACHODON Magazine publishes today's best fiction by today's best writers, and nonfiction on themes of artisan culture, appearing twice yearly in paperback and ebook formats. Our mission is to connect readers and writers using every channel available, through a chapbook-sized publication, with a nod to the little magazines of the past while using all of today's technologies.

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Anteprima del libro

Trachodon Issue 1 - Trachodon Magazine

Trachodon Issue 1 Summer/Fall 2010

A dinosaur of a little magazine

Editor & Founder

John Carr Walker

Associate Editor

Katey Schultz

Copyright 2010 Trachodon

Smashwords Edition

ISSN: Pending

Published twice yearly by Trachodon Publishing LLC as a paperback and ebook.

Visit our website for special offers, subscriptions, and submission guidelines.

Trachodon

PO Box 1468

Saint Helens, OR 97051

editor@trachodon.org

www.trachodon.org

Smashwords Edition, License Notes

This ebook is licensed for your personal enjoyment only. This ebook may not be re-sold or given away to other people. If you would like to share this book with another person, please purchase an additional copy for each recipient. If you're reading this book and did not purchase it, or it was not purchased for your use only, then please return to Smashwords.com and purchase your own copy. Thank you for respecting the hard work of our authors.

Trachodon welcomes submissions of fiction and nonfiction during the months of April-May and October-November online. Poetry is currently by invitation only; poets are free to query with a bio statement and description of work. Note that essays, articles, profiles, and other journalistic works should be about craft movements, antiquated processes, or artisan culture. Nonfiction writers are encouraged to query first. Fiction may be any style, on any theme or topic, up to 6000 words in length. Please read our expanded guidelines by visiting our website or mailing us a stamped, self-addressed envelope.

Table of Contents

Editor's Note

By John Carr Walker

Shoebox

A short story by Jo Ann Heydron

Thing For Raven & What Do You Want Your Computer To Do?

Two poems by Chris Dombrowski

Part Of The Process: One year of a jewelry maker's transformation

As essay by Amy Tavern

Artist's Statement

Amy Tavern on her recent work

Bumpo's Honey

A short story by Tom Weller

The Magician & Blemish

Two poems by Taylor Altman

Welcome To The Free Zone: The transformative power of Brooklyn's UrbanGlass

An article by Wesley Middleton

Bare Bones

A column by associate editor Katey Schultz

Contributor Biographies

John Carr Walker

Editor's Note

Since January of 2010, when I founded Trachodon, a print magazine of lit, art, and artisan culture, I’ve heard three questions over and over: 1) Are you out of your mind? 2) Is there a nice, quiet place I can take you until the trip wears off? 3) What is a Trachodon, and why are you naming your lit mag after one?

For now, I’ll tackle the third question.

Trachodon was a dinosaur that in all likelihood never existed. People thought it existed: extensive fossils were discovered in Montana, and a skeleton was even assembled and displayed publicly in New York before the taxonomy was called into question. Eventually, it was considered nomen dubium—a dubious name. In other words, what they thought was, wasn’t.

I suppose I’m a sucker for honest public mistakes. There’s something innocent and idealistic about forging ahead with what you know now. The foundations of knowledge are built on things that seemed right at the time. After all, second-guessing is the start of serious inquiry, and there can be no second-guessing without first-guesses first.

In the case of Trachodon, however, too much had already happened to lay the name to rest, dubious or not. One of the first complete skeletons to be found and assembled on American soil, the fossilized remains caused a stir far beyond the realm of serious paleontology. The beast, as originally hypothesized, was an enormous vegetarian with gnashing cheek teeth and a duck bill, at once nightmarish and cuddly—the kind of dinosaur you wouldn’t mind having a beer with, but not one you’d want to meet in the pub’s back alley. There were Trachodon toys, and they sold up there with T-Rex and Triceratops. By the time science called foul, the story had grown too large to be derailed by mere facts.

I’m an even bigger sucker for stories, particularly when damning the vicissitude of facts. Trachodon was no longer a mere dinosaur, but had in fact become a story. It had gone from noun to narrative. A series of events to a collection of scenes.

As a writer and editor, I know that stories, whether fictional, factual, or poetic, aren’t so much made as they are allowed to become. In my case, one word gave me the name for my lit mag, suggested its aesthetic, defined its mission, and embodied the kind of process—that is, hard work meets cosmic accident—in which I take such delight. I want Trachodon the magazine to tell a nice parallel story to Trachodon the dinosaur. I want it to be this weird, sort of impossible thing. Something that’s up for debate because it’s always leaning a little toward the unreasonable. And, maybe, to be something that’s never quite finished. Being a print

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