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The Wine Lover's Diet

The Wine Lover's Diet

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The Wine Lover's Diet

Lunghezza:
158 pagine
1 ora
Pubblicato:
Jun 25, 2013
ISBN:
9781604146998
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

The Wine Lover’s Diet is a joyous book that supports the nutritional and psychological aspects of my profession. Food is more than fuel, and the table is more than a chemical experiment.

When you have finished this book, you will learn why some have called it “The Joyous Swindle.” Why the Wine Lover’s Diet is new and very, very different.

In the current fad of denying ourselves the pleasures of eating, out of fear of fat, many of us have become afraid of our basic instincts and even of our own bodies.

Food should be satisfying and fulfilling, not just filling. The overwhelming evidence of nutritional science corroborates this view: the time-proven foods such as butter and eggs, fish and lean meat and high-nutrient vegetables, give us the satisfaction and variety we need to function at our best. It’s the man-made foods that undo us: the sugars and refined flours that not only displace good food but also cause unwanted hormonal reactions.

This book makes a vital distinction between the “rich” and “poor” carbohydrates. Good dietary advice is a matter of distinctions, not fads and promotions. Don’t listen to any advice on the order of “eating only fruit in the morning,” or the promise of “eating more and losing weight.” The daily intake of carbohydrates in this country is about 300 grams — a lot. I have found, among my patients, that by lowering this to half or less they not only feel better but also steadily lose weight.

Pubblicato:
Jun 25, 2013
ISBN:
9781604146998
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore

Contributors to the book included: Dr. Richard Kunin is a world-recognized authority on diet and nutrition. His landmark books, MegaNutrition and MegaNutrition for Women (McGraw-Hill, New York) were the result of his pioneering work, with Linus Pauling, in founding the Orthomolecular Medical Society. Dr. Tom Bassler, founder of the American Medical Association Running Program, is the author of The Whole Life Diet (M. Evans). As a lecturer and hospital director, his focus has been on the link between exercise and whole foods in diet. He was one of the first medical investigators to explore the dangers of “trans fats.” For many years he conducted an annual physician component of the Boston Marathon! Nutrition Analyst Team A: Robert Burger, Team A leader; Kate Richiger, Kate Hanna, Bonnie Madden, Jean deBouvier. Nutrition Analyst Team B: Joe Harrington, published author and Team B leader; Nan Patmont Sawl, Desiree Reuther, Christine Sherick and Doc Joseph Gragg. The Wine Institute has contributed not only illustrations for this book, but also the free use of its research files. But don’t let all this data obscure the simplicity of this diet.

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The Wine Lover's Diet - Richard Kunin

FOREWORD

Listen to Your Body!

By Richard Kunin, M.D.

The Wine Lover’s Diet is a joyous book that supports the nutritional and psychological aspects of my profession. Food is more than fuel, and the table is more than a chemical experiment. The uses of wine are many; some of them medical, but surely its greatest endorsement is that wine delights us.

In the current fad of denying ourselves the pleasures of eating, out of fear of fat, many of us have become afraid of our basic instincts and even of our own bodies.

Food should be satisfying and fulfilling, not just filling. The overwhelming evidence of nutritional science corroborates this view: the time-proven foods such as butter and eggs, fish and lean meat and high-nutrient vegetables, give us the satisfaction and variety we need to function at our best. It’s the man-made foods that undo us: the sugars and refined flours that not only displace good food but also cause unwanted hormonal reactions.

This book makes a vital distinction between the rich and poor carbohydrates. Good dietary advice is a matter of distinctions, not fads and promotions. Don’t listen to any advice on the order of eating only fruit in the morning, or the promise of eating more and losing weight. The daily intake of carbohydrates in this country is about 300 grams — a lot. I have found, among my patients, that by lowering this to half or less they not only feel better but also steadily lose weight.

TO THE READER…

About Our Contributors

Dr. Richard Kunin is a world-recognized authority on diet and nutrition. His landmark books, MegaNutrition and MegaNutrition for Women (McGraw-Hill, New York) were the result of his pioneering work, with Linus Pauling, in founding the Orthomolecular Medical Society.

Dr. Tom Bassler, founder of the American Medical Association Running Program, is the author of The Whole Life Diet (M. Evans). As a lecturer and hospital director, his focus has been on the link between exercise and whole foods in diet. He was one of the first medical investigators to explore the dangers of trans fats. For many years he conducted an annual physician component of the Boston Marathon!

Nutrition Analyst Team A: Robert Burger, Team A leader; Kate Richiger, Kate Hanna, Bonnie Madden, Jean deBouvier.

Nutrition Analyst Team B: Joe Harrington, published author and Team B leader; Nan Patmont Sawl, Desiree Reuther, Christine Sherick and Doc Joseph Gragg.

The Wine Institute has contributed not only illustrations for this book, but also the free use of its research files. But don’t let all this data obscure the simplicity of this diet.

Introduction

As you will learn, the beauty of this diet is its simplicity. Diets based on measuring and weighing are doomed to eventual failure; and diets that take the joy out of eating are also doomed.

When you have finished this book, you will learn why some have called it The Joyous Swindle. Why the Wine Lover’s Diet is new and very, very different.

You’ve seen a low-carb diet before. Back in the day of the Atkins diet, the nutritionists scoffed — but now carbohydrate limitation is well-known. The problem is that many diets, like Atkins, go overboard, claiming no carbs needed. You must have about 55 carbs a day minimum. And an all-protein diet is equally bad as a no carb diet. There are all kinds of new evidence that red meat is good for you — but in moderation. Diets like Atkins do not stress the importance of exercise. It is vital. And you must factor in alcohol — including the benefits of wine as food. The sustainable food movement is right on!

Slow food has a special meaning after all these years of Alice Waters and Michael Pollan — both of Berkeley, California. As this book insists throughout, the best advice for a diet-conscious person is to cook more meals at home. That means avoiding fast food from the names we know all too well, and manufactured food from the frozen food aisles of your grocery store. Farmers’ markets are here to stay, even though some are trendy and over-priced. The organic movement will eventually take root: it’s a matter of economy-of-scale. One does not have to be an environmental activist to get it. What does wine have to do with it? Recall, again, how Julia Child always had a glass of white or red by her side as she taught the art of French cooking!

CHAPTER 1

What’s Wine Got to Do With It?

Water, taken in moderation, cannot hurt anyone

—Mark Twain

When first hearing about The Wine Lover’s Diet, everyone asks, does wine help you lose weight? No, that’s not the idea. Is it that wine has proven health benefits? Sure, as we’ll see, in moderation — but that’s not the idea. Well then, does wine have any dietary dangers? Yes, but only in the sense that it stimulates appetite.

This is, after all, what an aperitif (such as wine) is — something to stimulate the appetite.

Where, then, does diet come in? Simply this: the idea of this book is how to have all the benefits of wine without the apparent caloric drawbacks. And this: how to use wine to improve your food intake!

Enjoy wine — enjoy a better diet. We’re so used to hearing calories in, calories out as if there’s nothing one can do to avoid a few extra pounds if you drink wine. Nonsense!

As we will see, calories are only a measure of the heat it takes to metabolize a food or beverage. A normal drink of any of the common alcoholic beverages is about 100 calories. (Add more if you cotton to the exotic mixes of fruits and liqueurs modern bars love to experiment with.) Think of a 12-oz. can of beer, a 2-oz. shot of vodka, gin, brandy, scotch, bourbon, or a 4-oz. glass of red or white wine.

There are many variables here: spirits served by machine at an airport bar usually are only 1-1/2 oz., some beers are ‘light’, and a good restaurant will pour five ounces of wine per glass. Thank God for the human hand!

If you drink two or three glasses of wine a day, a moderate amount for most adults, you’ll add about 300 calories to your diet that day. If you limit yourself to a single glass, perhaps of an exceptional wine, more power to you. If your doctor tells you this is too much for you, believe her. If you lie to your doctor, you’re only lying to yourself.

Calories are only one part of the story

The old idea was that weight gain or loss was simply a matter of the caloric value of what you put in your mouth. And that exercise contributes only a way of burning calories.

Finally, in the second decade of the twenty-first century, even the "medicine

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