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The Fourth Branch

The Fourth Branch

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The Fourth Branch

Lunghezza:
63 pagine
59 minuti
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Jan 21, 2013
ISBN:
9781301962952
Formato:
Libro

Descrizione

Why do republics rise then fall? What is it about Mankind that makes us seemingly unable to rule ourselves? What can be done about it? What are the pluses and minuses of the Fourth Branch solution? This book explores and answers all these questions and more.

We look into the factors that have given rise to great societies and the sociological inevitability that eroded their greatness. The same acid dissolves the core of every great nation, commonwealth or empire... Political corruption.

This book suggests such a paradigm shift in political privilege it will at first be a bit shocking. The elite of every color will condemn this book and those that read it. The more angry the detractors are, however, the more right this book is. So, I guess you should expect controversy whenever you talk about The Fourth Branch.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Jan 21, 2013
ISBN:
9781301962952
Formato:
Libro

Informazioni sull'autore

A native Vermonter, my ancestors include both Daniel Webster, a Hessian, and French explorers, who came to the New World with Samuel D Champlain. Growing up in Montpelier Vermont, during the 1970's gave me an interesting perspective. I have watched the town grow up with me. When I was a kid. My sister and I would walk to school. Many times in below zero weather. On our way we would stop in Saroni's Country store ogling his candy. (He had the largest candy shelf of any store in Montpelier back then). After taking 5 or 10 minutes we would drop .05 cents. Off we would go, candy in hand, face, and clothes, walking through the cold, to school. Then Old man Saroni, hair sticking out every which way, (he didn't own a comb nor did he care to use one), would call my Dad at his store and pick on him over it. My family was clothed from Nates apparel. Saroni's and Nates are gone, the town has changed and I have moved away, but change is the nature of life.I grew up on stories of family exploits and tragedies. Vermont life back in the day was hard, and the rugged people who lived here told stories to pass the cold winter nights, as they fed the wood stove. My grandfather would often say on those below zero nights, “Can't heat this sheep shed.” Uncle Rolly would tell me tales of Vermont's past, like the time the governor was caught in a storm and sought shelter in a cave with a hobo, or the abandoned town of Kingsbury or maybe Kingston, I forget... next to his hunting camp. Apparently I had an ancestor/relation who was hanged an innocent man, Ace Magoon. His story became a Vermont legend and was largely responsible for outlawing capital punishment in Vermont.I worked for the same company for 30 years and am now retired and writing. For 10 of those 29 I have been a Journeyman. It has been rewarding in many ways and stifling in others. The duality of existence. Labor conditions the mind to be placid and focused while, as saint Aquinas said, “Routine is a gift from God.” It frees our minds to follow ideas to their logical end and explore possibilities in thought, while being productive. In working at a job for so long I have had the benefits of routine.I regularly use Learning Company courses. They range from Math to Philosophy and everything in between. I particularly enjoy the economics, history and philosophy. I have always been a reader. When I was a kid my passion was Science Fiction. I read every sci-fi book in my school's library. After graduating High School I turned to philosophy and history. World War II fascinated me for awhile. If I had to say what my favorite epoch to read about now is, I would have to say, the Ancient World.I hope you enjoy all my books!


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Anteprima del libro

The Fourth Branch - John Pepin

The Fourth Branch

John Pepin

Copyright John Pepin 2013

Smashwords Edition

Introduction

I was pondering this question one evening; Is there a way to restrain the Elite from abusing the power invested in them, their constant press to move towards oppression and their blatant abuse of political power, if so then how? So that government serves all and is not served by all. The next morning I had an idea. Here is the main problem...

Human governments have all shown themselves to be deficient, in that they have all become undermined and corrupted by the very people, appointed or elected, to maintain them. This has led to the downfall of city states, empires and nations of men. History, philosophy and psychiatry all tell us that the weak link is the human being. Yet it it is the human being that is entrusted with the protection of the societal myth... the founding principles if you will. The powerful seek more power and are above their own laws, they are in fact, Thrasymachus' heirs. That person invested with political power, the ultimate of secular powers, will use that power to enrich him or herself at cost to the rest of humanity. People are people, we are all susceptible, because of our nature.

Whenever human beings are involved with anything, no matter the importance, we bring egos, self interest and personal animosity to the table. We are driven by emotions the greatest among us no less than the least among us. Any government constituted by men and administered by men will be deficient in this way. It is inherent in the rule of men over Man.

We all have egos the bigger the man the bigger the ego. No matter if he is a he... or a she. When we administer anything our ego grows. As it grows it becomes sensitive to any slight. Bureaucracy provides the perfect environment for a person's ego to grow. Nurturing that sense of entitlement and superiority to the masses. Bureaucracy providing an avenue of unrestrained power to frustrate entrepreneurs, it creates security from oversight by government red tape, and a union, if there is one, enhances this quality of bureaucracy. If the bureaucrat is lower paid than the proletariat, he or she is righteously offended, and if the public servant is paid more, their sense of arrogance grows with their wealth. Both attitudes lower the quality of the work that comes from our public servants, and creates an environment that grows regulation, in both scope and reach.

When self interest is rightly understood, it is a good thing, and a right motivator. But when self interest supersedes reason... it is called egoism. The egoist has, yes, a bloated ego... but more to the point, the egoist is only concerned with personal self interest. The egoist puts his or her self interest above all others no matter the cost. Egoism is, simply put, is absolute self interest. Because of the ability of the bureaucrat to create regulation and evade law, Government is a magnet for the egoist.

No one among us is immune to personal disputes especially the egoist. It is the nature of social living. We must test each other to see what is and is not acceptable. Sometimes this goes too far or rubs an inflated ego wrong and personal animosity results. This animosity can dramatically interfere with the workings of any social organization, especially a hierarchical one like government. Egoists are likely to do things that stop production until their personal feelings are assuaged. In the private sector competition provides a feed back mechanism, people must be self controlled, but in government bureaucracy, egoists have found an rich ecological niche.

Look at the person who runs for office whether locally or nationally. They usually seek to get their projects through government red tape while stymieing the projects of their competitors. This was referred to by Joseph Schumpeter. Once a person has become wealthy by capitalism they immediately become socialists. This allows them to close the door they came through to obtain their wealth, on other would be competitors, with a clear conscious. Overtly, they are forwarding the cause of social equality, but they are really protecting their own narrow personal interests. Political office is rife with these people. Examine your own local town fathers and see for yourself if this isn't true.

As Bastiat said, politicians consider the people as lab rats, to be manipulated as the Elite see fit in their great social experiments. In their hubris, the socialist politician believes that if only the nature of humanity could be changed, their social experiments could improve the lot of Mankind. They don't understand that changing the nature of man will never work. We have become the way we are over many millennium

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