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Answers to College Level Biology Exams

Answers to College Level Biology Exams

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Answers to College Level Biology Exams

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266 pagine
3 ore
Pubblicato:
Dec 26, 2011
ISBN:
9781465769176
Formato:
Libro

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This book contains about 120 pages of old exams given from fall, 2007, through spring, 2011, along with the answers, study tips, etc. The questions can also be used as a source of vocabulary words because each multiple-choice question on such exams typically contains five or six scientific terms. The genetics section will be especially helpful, mainly because the questions require that you learn how to answer them by multiplying fractions instead of doing a Punnett square. The questions are sorted into areas such as cell biology, chemistry, evolution, etc. You'll also discover that some teachers use the same questions over and over again. There is a link to both the print and e-versions of OUTWITTING COLLEGE PROFESSORS in the introduction.

Pubblicato:
Dec 26, 2011
ISBN:
9781465769176
Formato:
Libro

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Answers to College Level Biology Exams - Jr John Janovy

BIOLOGY EXAM QUESTIONS

John Janovy, Jr.

Smashwords Edition

Copyright © John Janovy, Jr., 2011

This ebook contains copies of all exams given in a couple of large lecture section college biology courses from 2007 through 2010, along with the answers. I hope this document helps you get better grades. There is no guarantee that your own instructor will use questions similar to these, but the material covered in these exams is very standard for introductory biology courses at the college level. I did not take the time to re-number any questions; they’re simply sorted according to subject. Also, you’ll probably discover that teachers may use the same questions over and over again. In all these exams, students were asked to choose the BEST answer. The answers are underlined, although in a few cases they may also be in bold, or bold italics, and I’ve made comments about some questions.

NOTE: Questions #57 – 100 in the final exam for BIOS 103, spring, 2011, may have been based in part on material supplied by a textbook publisher. For that reason, the answers to them are provided free (as they were to the students that semester). To get these free answers, go to

http://www.johnjanovy.com/FINALBIOS10311.pdf.

The best way to use this material is to (a) make a vocabulary list from the questions, and (b) learn, or decide, why the wrong answers are incorrect, in addition to making sure you know why the underlined answers are correct. The best way to use a vocabulary list is to ask the three questions: (1) What is it? [Answer with a noun or noun phrase.]; (2) What is its function? [Answer with a verb or verb phrase.]; and (3) Why was it discussed or used in class? [This question is very important and will help put your answers to the first two questions into a proper context.]

NOTE: If you have questions about any of these questions, then copy the question into an e-mail and send it to me, along with your answer, to jjparasite@hotmail.com. Be sure to put BIOSCI Exam in the subject line.

I also recommend OUTWITTING COLLEGE PROFESSORS: AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO SECRETS OF THE SYSTEM (available on Smashwords - http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/601004

or in print at http://www.createspace.com/5688713).

Table of Contents:

Chapter 1 – The nature of science

Chapter 2 – Baby biochemistry

Chapter 3 – Cell biology and metabolism

Chapter 4 – Genetics

Chapter 5 – Organismic biology

Chapter 6 – Evolution

Chapter 7 – Ecology

Chapter 8 – The Big Picture in biology

BIOS 101 - Outcomes

*****

Return to Table of Contents

Chapter 1 – The nature of science

1. A scientific hypothesis is (a) a true statement. (b) a false statement that scientists try to prove true. (c) a prediction that can be demonstrated to be false. (d) a general explanation for natural phenomena. (e) a prediction that cannot be demonstrated to be false.

2. What is a null hypothesis? (a) a prediction of no difference between experimental and control groups. (b) a prediction that there will be a difference between the control and experimental groups. (c) an untestable prediction. (d) a non-scientific hypothesis.

3. In order to do experiments in biology, you will need (a) cooperative organisms that you can acquire. (b) a design that includes a testable hypothesis. (c) a design that should include an alternative testable hypothesis. (d) a means of quantifying your results. (e) All of these.

4. Following a scientific experiment, the observed difference between your control and experimental groups (a) should be zero. (b) must be zero. (c) could be zero or some other value. (d) must not be zero. (e) None of these answers is correct.

5. Biology can be considered an historical science because (a) experiments can be done many times. (b) chemistry and math are commonly used in biological research. (c) evolution is the central unifying theme of biology. (d) paradigms guide much of biological research.

6. Proximal questions (a) usually begin with the word how. (b) usually begin with the word why. (c) tend to address problems of origin. (d) tend to address problems of evolution. (e) All of these.

7. Ultimate questions (a) usually begin with the word why. (b) tend to address problems of origin. (c) tend to address problems of evolution. (d) are often of historical importance. (e) All of these.

8. The statement If you put a million tons of CFC’s into the atmosphere every year for 65 years, the ozone layer will not be changed can be considered (a) a testable null hypothesis. (b) an experimental design with a control group. (c) a prediction that cannot be falsified. (d) a non-scientific assertion. (e) All of these.

9. The statement You can burn tropical forests at the rate of 50 acres/minute for fifty years and this act will have no effect on human welfare, global politics, or global economics can be considered (a) a testable null hypothesis. (b) an experimental design with a control group. (c) a prediction that cannot be falsified. (d) a non-scientific assertion. (e) None of these.

10. Paradigms are (a) predictions of no difference between control and experimental groups. (b) views about nature that tend to determine acceptable lines of research and acceptable results of that research. (c) evidence used to answer questions about cell function. (d) predictions that cannot be falsified.

39. Which of the following questions are typical of those asked by biologists designing experiments? (a) Were all my original group members identical? (b) How do I measure the qualities present in both the experimentals and controls? (c) Are there some alternative hypotheses to explain my results? (d) All of these. (e) None of these.

1. A scientific hypothesis is (a) a true statement. (b) a false statement that scientists try to prove true. (c) a prediction that can be demonstrated to be false. (d) a general explanation for natural phenomena. (e) a prediction that cannot be demonstrated to be false.

2. What is a null hypothesis? (a) a prediction of no difference between experimental and control groups. (b) a prediction that there will be a difference between the control and experimental groups. (c) an untestable prediction. (d) a non-scientific hypothesis.

3. In order to do experiments in biology, you will need (a) cooperative organisms that you can acquire. (b) a design that includes a testable hypothesis. (c) a design that should include an alternative testable hypothesis. (d) a means of quantifying your results. (e) All of these.

4. Following a scientific experiment, the observed difference between your control and experimental groups (a) should be zero. (b) must be zero. (c) could be zero or some other value. (d) must not be zero. (e) None of these answers is correct.

5. Biology can be considered an historical science because (a) experiments can be done many times. (b) chemistry and math are commonly used in biological research. (c) evolution is the central unifying theme of biology. (d) paradigms guide much of biological research.

6. The statement If you put a million tons of CFC’s into the atmosphere every year for 65 years, the ozone layer will not be changed can be considered (a) a testable null hypothesis. (b) an experimental design with a control group. (c) a prediction that cannot be falsified. (d) a non-scientific assertion. (e) All of these.

7. The statement You can burn tropical forests at the rate of 50 acres/minute for fifty years and this act will have no effect on human welfare, global politics, or global economics can be considered (a) a testable null hypothesis. (b) an experimental design with a control group. (c) a prediction that cannot be falsified. (d) a non-scientific assertion. (e) None of these.

8. Paradigms are (a) predictions of no difference between control and experimental groups. (b) views about nature that tend to determine acceptable lines of research and acceptable results of that research. (c) evidence used to answer questions about cell function. (d) predictions that cannot be falsified.

1. A scientific hypothesis is (a) a false statement that scientists try to prove true. (b) a true statement that scientists try to prove false. (c) a prediction that can be demonstrated to be false. (d) a true statement about nature. (e) a prediction that scientists must demonstrate is true.

2. What is a null hypothesis? (a) a prediction that there will be a difference between the control and experimental groups (b) a prediction of no difference between experimental and control groups (c) an untestable prediction (d) a prediction that scientists fail to reject (e) a non-scientific hypothesis.

3. Which of the following questions are typical of those asked by biologists designing experiments? (a) Were all my original group members identical? (b) How do I measure the qualities present in both the experimental and control groups? (c) Are there some alternative hypotheses to explain my results? (d) All of these questions should be asked.

4. If you measured the height of all the people in this room, then made a frequency distribution from the data, what would be the dependent variable? (a) height (b) numbers of people of a particular height (c) number of people in the room (d) mean height (e) any of these.

5. In order to do experiments in biology, you will need (a) cooperative organisms that you can acquire. (b) a design that includes a testable hypothesis. (c) a design that should include an alternative testable hypothesis. (d) a means of quantifying your results. (e) All of these.

6. In biology, organisms are sometimes considered uncooperative if (a) they evolve. (b) they cannot be easily cultured in large numbers. (c) they quickly multiply if provided with minimal food and water. (d) they exhibit genetic variations. (e) they exhibit superfecundity.

7. Superfecundity refers to the observed fact that (a) species have variable traits that can be inherited. (b) more individuals are produced than survive to reproduce. (c) environmental conditions tend to determine which genetic variants are most successful at reproducing. (d) environmental conditions produce genetic variants. (e) All of these answers are correct.

8. The Darwinian principles most well supported by observations include the following: (a) Species have variable traits that can be inherited. (b) More individuals are produced than survive to reproduce. (c) Environmental conditions tend to determine which genetic variants are most successful at reproducing. (d) All of these answers are correct.

9. The statement If you put a million tons of CFC’s into the atmosphere every year for 65 years, the ozone layer will not be changed can be considered (a) an hypothesis for an experiment with a control group. (b) an experiment involving cooperative organisms. (c) a prediction that cannot be falsified. (d) a testable null hypothesis. (e) All of these.

10. The statement If we burn tropical forests at the rate of 50 acres/minute for fifty years, this act will have no effect on human welfare or global economics can be considered (a) an hypothesis for an experiment with a control group. (b) an experiment involving cooperative organisms. (c) a prediction that cannot be falsified. (d) a testable null hypothesis. (e) None of these.

11. Paradigms are (a) views about nature that tend to determine acceptable lines of research and acceptable results of that research. (b) predictions that cannot be falsified. (c) predictions of no difference between control and experimental groups. (d) views about nature that lead to untestable predictions. (e) None of these answers is correct.

12. A good example of life’s uniformity can be seen in the (a) general manner in which nucleic acids are assembled. (b) sequence of DNA nucleotides in various campus plant species. (c) primary structures of enzymes in campus plants. (d) characteristics that distinguish one campus plant species from another (e) None of these answers is correct.

13. A good example of life’s enormous diversity superimposed on uniformity can be seen (a) in use of DNA nucleotide sequences to construct a phylogeny. (b) in genetic differences between roses and oak trees. (c) in the numbers of different enzymes found in a cell. (d) among students at UNL. (e) All of these.

39. A scientific fact is best defined as (a) observations or data. (b) an assertion by scientists. (c) the conclusions resulting from test of a hypothesis. (d) ideas that support a theory. (e) Any of these things could be considered facts for a person writing a freshman biology textbook.

40. Which of the following issues requires an understanding of how science actually operates? (a) the consequences of climate change (b) the global supply and use of fossil fuel (c) the economic impact of technological innovations (d) the social and economic costs of illness (e) all of these.

1. A scientific hypothesis is (a) a false statement that scientists try to prove true. (b) a true statement that scientists try to prove false. (c) a prediction that can be demonstrated to be false. (d) a true statement about nature. (e) a prediction that scientists must demonstrate is true.

2. What is a null hypothesis? (a) a prediction that there will be a difference between the control and experimental groups (b) a prediction of no difference between experimental and control groups (c) an untestable prediction (d) a prediction that scientists fail to reject (e) a non-scientific hypothesis.

3. Which of the following questions are typical of those asked by biologists designing experiments? (a) Were all my original group members identical? (b) How do I measure the qualities present in both the experimental and control groups? (c) Are there some alternative hypotheses to explain my results? (d) All of these questions should be asked.

4. Superfecundity refers to the observed fact that (a) species have variable traits that can be inherited. (b) more individuals are produced than survive to reproduce. (c) environmental conditions tend to determine which genetic variants are most successful at reproducing. (d) environmental conditions produce genetic variants. (e) All of these answers are correct.

5. The statement If we burn tropical forests at the rate of 50 acres/minute for fifty years, this act will have no effect on human welfare or global economics can be considered (a) an hypothesis for an experiment with a control group. (b) an experiment involving cooperative organisms. (c) a prediction that cannot be falsified. (d) a testable null hypothesis. (e) None of these.

6. Paradigms are (a) views about nature that tend to determine acceptable lines of research and acceptable results of that research. (b) predictions that cannot be falsified. (c) predictions of no difference between control and experimental groups. (d) views about nature that lead to untestable predictions. (e) None of these answers is correct.

7. A good example of life’s uniformity can be seen in the (a) general manner in which nucleic acids are assembled. (b) sequence of DNA nucleotides in various campus plant species. (c) primary structures of enzymes in campus plants. (d) characteristics that distinguish one campus plant species from another (e) None of these answers is correct.

8. A good example of life’s enormous diversity superimposed on uniformity can be seen (a) in use of DNA nucleotide sequences to construct a phylogeny. (b) in genetic differences between roses and oak trees. (c) in the numbers of different enzymes found in a cell. (d) among students at UNL. (e) All of these.

1. A scientific hypothesis is (a) a false statement that scientists try to prove false. (b) a true statement that scientists try to prove true. (c) a true statement about nature. (d) a prediction that scientists must demonstrate is true. (e) a prediction that can be demonstrated to be false.

2. What is a null hypothesis? (a) a prediction that there will be some difference between the control and experimental groups (b) a prediction that scientists must reject (c) a prediction that scientists cannot reject (d) a prediction of no difference between experimental and control groups (e) a non-scientific hypothesis.

3. Which of the following questions are typical of those asked by biologists designing experiments? (a) Were all my original group members identical? (b) How do I measure the qualities present in both the experimental and control groups? (c) Are there some alternative hypotheses to explain my results? (d) Can my prediction actually be tested? (e) All of these questions should be asked.

4. If you calculated the final grades of all the people in this room, then made a frequency distribution from the data, what would be the independent variable? (a) grade percentages (b) numbers of people with a particular grade (c) number of people in the room (d) class average (e) any of these.

5. If you calculated the final grades of all the people from BIOS 101 classes over the past ten years, then made frequency distributions from the data, what would be the dependent variables? (a) grade percentages (b) numbers of people with a particular grade (c) number of people in each of the classes (d) class averages (e) any of these.

6. If you calculated the final grades of all the people from all BIOS 101 instructors’ classes over the past ten years, then made frequency distributions from the data, what observations would help you think like a scientist? (a) class averages (b) amount of overlap between the distributions (c) number of people in each of the classes (d) class average difference between years (e) all of these.

7. In order to do experiments in biology, you will need (a) a design that includes a testable hypothesis. (b) cooperative organisms that you can acquire or observe. (c) a means of manipulating the conditions under which observations are made. (d) a means of quantifying your results. (e) All of these.

8. In biology, organisms are most useful for laboratory experiments if (a) they evolve. (b) they quickly multiply when provided with food, water, and potential mates. (c) they exhibit genetic variations. (d) they are large enough to study without a microscope. (e) all of

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