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Daughter of the Reich: A Novel

Daughter of the Reich: A Novel

Scritto da Louise Fein

Narrato da Marisa Calin


Daughter of the Reich: A Novel

Scritto da Louise Fein

Narrato da Marisa Calin

valutazioni:
4/5 (24 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
14 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 12, 2020
ISBN:
9780062964076
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

For fans of The Nightingale and All the Light We Cannot See, a spellbinding story of impossible love set against the backdrop of the Nazi regime.

She must choose between loyalty to her country or a love that could be her destruction…

As the dutiful daughter of a high-ranking Nazi officer, Hetty Heinrich is keen to play her part in the glorious new Thousand Year Reich. But she never imagines that all she believes and knows about her world will come into stark conflict when she encounters Walter, a Jewish friend from the past, who stirs dangerous feelings in her. Confused and conflicted, Hetty doesn't know whom she can trust and where she can turn to, especially when she discovers that someone has been watching her.

Realizing she is taking a huge risk—but unable to resist the intense attraction she has for Walter—she embarks on a secret love affair with him. Together, they dream about when the war will be over and plan for their future. But as the rising tide of anti-Semitism threatens to engulf them, Hetty and Walter will be forced to take extreme measures.

Will the steady march of dark forces destroy Hetty's universe—or can love ultimately triumph…?

Propulsive, deeply affecting, and inspired by the author's family history, Daughter of the Reich is a mesmerizing pause-resister filled with vivid characters and a meticulously researched portrait of Nazi Germany. In this riveting story of passion, courage and morality, Louise Fein introduces a bold young woman determined to tread the treacherous path of survival and freedom, showing readers the strength in the power of love and reminding us that the past must never be forgotten.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 12, 2020
ISBN:
9780062964076
Formato:
Audiolibro


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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    Just phenomenal! Once you start, you won’t put it down until you’ve read the whole story!
  • (4/5)
    This well-researched novel is set in Germany in the years before the war. Hetty Heinrich is 12 in 1933, daughter of a high ranking Nazi newspaper editor, and totally immersed in the Nazi cause. She eventually falls in love with Karl, a Jewish friend, and her beliefs slowly change. It was interesting how the children were indoctrinated in Nazi beliefs from a early age, but I still find it hard to understand how a whole nation could let this happen. A lot can be learned today from this horrific time in history. Good book!
  • (3/5)
    I see most people are writing glowing reviews of this, and in terms of the historical value and the view point of the main character, I can completely agree. This was an interesting tale of WWII told from the POV of a young girl who was embroiled, through her school and family, in the harsh and extremist views of the Nazis. Difficult to understand those views and really quite difficult to read, as this book did not hold back on the attitudes toward Jews. Where it fell flat for me was the maturity of the MC. She begins the story around age 12/13 I believe, just before the war began, but as the war progressed and her experiences became dark and conflicted, I didn't see any growth in her character. She still felt very pubescent to me and I would have thought this would have been an atmosphere for her to mature very quickly. Many thanks to the publisher and LibraryThing for providing me with an advanced copy. This opinion is my own.
  • (3/5)
    The Daughter of the Reich by Louise Fein tells the story of Hetty Henreich, a young German girl growing up in Germany as the daughter of a Nazi SS officer surrounded by anti-semitism. She falls in love with a Jewish boy, Walter, who causes her to see her world and thoughts much differently. I struggled with this book both in delivery and writing style. Louise is a very immature young teen at the beginning of the book and the writing style lacks nuance and growth. I appreciate the story the writer was going for, it was ambitious to do so both authentically and with respect. For me, it didn’t work. That said, I realize I’m in the minority here and that’s okay. Historical Fiction is a huge genre, particularly WWII. This is a double edged sword. Many stories are being told that need to be. However, the bar is then set very high for comparison. Thank you to LibraryThing as well as William Morrow for the Advanced Reader Copy and the opportunity to review The Daughter the Reich.
  • (4/5)
    Louise Fein’s novel Daughter of the Reich is loosely based upon her father’s family history. Fein’s father was one of the lucky Jews who managed to escape Hitler’s clutches before that became impossible. He and his young wife were taken in by England in 1933 on a temporary visa, and he remained there on a “temporary” basis until finally being granted citizenship in 1946.The novel’s narrator is Hetty Heinrich, the daughter of a high-ranking Nazi officer with grandiose ambitions. The story begins in 1929 when seven-year-old Hetty accidentally falls into a lake’s deep water and has to be rescued by Walter, a friend of her older brother Karl. Of course, the entire Heinrich family is grateful to Walter, including Hetty’s father – even though Walter is a Jew. Now, flash forward to August 1933, and things are very different. Hitler is becoming more and more powerful, but it is happening so gradually that the inevitableness of what is to come is not immediately apparent. Even Karl and Hetty, four years after Hetty’s rescue by a Jewish boy, are succumbing to the anti-Jewish propaganda that now dominates their world. Karl and Walter are no longer friends at all, and Hetty is fast becoming convinced of her own racial superiority. But for Hetty, that begins to change on the day that she encounters Walter again and feels the strong mutual attraction between them. Theirs, though, is a doomed relationship so powerful that it could result in both Hetty and Walter confined to concentration camps as punishment for daring it. The greatest sin a German woman can commit in the 1930s is to pollute her pure German blood by mixing it with that of a Jew. No excuses, no exceptions. Hetty knows exactly what will happen to her and her family if her relationship with Walter is exposed. It will mean the ruination of them all. And Walter knows that exposure would almost certainly end with his death in one of the country’s new concentration camps. But for the next six years, the couple will risk everything in order to keep their relationship alive, hoping all the while that war will end before they are exposed. Soon enough, they learn that this will not be the case. Bottom Line: Daughter of the Reich is a well-researched combination of historical fiction, psychological thriller, and coming-of-age novel that largely makes for riveting reading. It, however, suffers a bit from the relatively slow pace at which things finally come to a head for the novel’s two main characters – even to the degree that it all starts to seem a little over-repetitive. Too, the novel would have had, I think, a stronger emotional ending (even though it would have been an open-ended one) if its epilogue had been eliminated. Still, Daughter of the Reich has plenty to say about the ease at which politics-as-usual can go bad, and that’s an important message in today’s world.
  • (5/5)
    I received this book as part of the Early Reviewers group. I couldn't put it down. This story of young people caught up in the rise of Hitler and the Nazis was a gripping, suspenseful tale. The characters are well written and the reader gets to see this awful period through the eyes of the all believing daughter of a high ranking Nazi as well as through the eyes of her love, a young Jewish man whose family are persecuted. At first, she, Hetty, cannot believe the things her young man, Walter is telling her. Once she sees the chinks in the armor her father has built, things change. One thing that struck me is that many of the conversations the characters have in 1938 are all too similar to conversations we have and hear about in 2020. What is true, what is not, whom to believe and racism are timeless themes. The way the Nazis lied to the people is similar to the so called "fake news" that still exists today.This was an excellent book; and I recommend it for students of history. It is fact based fiction, but it hits the mark.
  • (4/5)
    Hetty Heinrich lives a seemingly ideal childhood in 1930's Germany. The daughter of a pro Nazi newspaper publisher, Hetty lives a comfortable existence with her parents and older brother, soaking in the belief that Adolf Hitler is an ideal leader. That the German people and herself are destined for greatness. As Hetty becomes a teenager though, she cannot help but notice the hostility and even cruelty directed towards the preserved enemies of the German state. In particular she cannot forget the boy, Walter, who saved her from drowning as a child. As Hetty ages, her childhood crush on the Jewish Walter only intensifies, causing her to question everything she has been taught to believe. Eventually Hetty is forced to decide between her loyalty to her family and her love for Walter.
  • (3/5)
    I have mixed emotions about this read. I thought Hetty's inner struggle was interesting, but this book had a juvenile feel to it. Hetty was a younger character than I expected going into this, and the first person point of view made her seem even more childish. I also didn't like the fact that she was not at the age of consent when she was having her relationship with Walter. I did find the ending moving. Thank you to LibraryThing's Early Reviewer program for the ARC.
  • (4/5)
    This novel is set in Germany right before WWII. Hetty Heinrich lives with her mother, her brother, Karl,, and her father, a high-ranking SS officer. Germany is captivated and enthralled by the maniacal, racist rantings of Adolf Hitler. As children, Karl's best friend is Walter, who is Jewish. Hetty, a few years younger, develops a crush on Walter that lasts into their adolescence despite his not being of Aryan descent. Their relationship develops to a point that is dangerous for both of them when people are spying on their neighbors in order to report their "transgressions" to the authorities, and no one is safe from the terrors inflicted by the Nazis. This novel showcases the horrors of the Reich and the brainwashing of the German people. It is also a testament to people with the courage to try to save those who were being persecuted.I am grateful to LibraryThing and to the publisher for the opportunity to read an advance copy of this well-written book.
  • (4/5)
    This book was well-researched and written. Historical fiction is my favorite genre, and it was quite interesting to read a novel set just before WWII, and told from the perspective of a young German girl who is a Nazi, or,is one until her eyes are opened to the realities of Hitler's plan for the total annihilation of the Jewish people, in his quest for a pure German race and world dominance. It's disturbing, and a good reminder of how all people are just that.....people, human beings who deserve to live their lives without fear of persecution.Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it. -Winston Churchill
  • (3/5)
    This is quite different from what I expected. This is much more of a historical romance told in first person pov which isn't my favorite storytelling tense. There are some things in here I fond uncomfortable such as a 15-year old having sex and pregnancy. It was brave of the author for writing a story featuring a German heroine in WW2 living among Nazis. I didn't find the storytelling and writing all that compelling and little bit superficial however I think a lot of people who enjoy mainstream historical ww2 fiction will like this. It does make for an interesting change of pace from the spy heroines in ww2 fiction I've been seeing lately being published.
  • (4/5)
    I read a lot of World War II fiction and this is a different look at the war than what is normally written. This book takes place in Germany before the war and gives a view of how many of the German people revered Hitler and thought that he was the only person that could save their country. Most of the people who disagreed with this opinion were sent to 'work camps' or murdered on the street.Hetty is the daughter of a high-ranking Nazi official. She lives in a huge house with her father, her mother who spends her time working with charities and her brother. The novel begins in 1933 when Hetty is 12. She attends BDM (The League of German Girls or Band of German Maidens (German: Bund Deutscher Mädel, abbreviated as BDM) was the girls' wing of the Nazi Party youth movement, the Hitler Youth.) meetings and believes her father that Hitler is the only way for Germany to be saved. She wants to do whatever she can to help Germany succeed and is enthralled with Hitler as a leader. UNTIL... she sees Walter again. Walter had been a friend to her brother and she had a crush on him after he saved her from drowning when she was very young. When she finds out that Walter is really Jewish, despite having Aryan features, she knows that he is an enemy to her beloved country. When she sees him again and starts to talk to him, her world is turned upside down and she begins to wonder if all she has been taught has been a lie - are Jews really being prosecuted, are people being treated cruelly, are Jewish people starving? All of these questions begin to prey on her mind as her relationship with Walter grows stronger even though she knows that she will be severely punished if they are ever seen together. As she decides who to believe and tries to save Walter and his family, her life at home is becoming more difficult and the possibility of exposure is getting stronger as she realizes that someone is following her. Will hatred cause the end of Hetty's love for Walter or will love overcome all of the hate?Thanks to the publisher for a copy of this book to read and review. All opinions are my own.
  • (4/5)
    Another book that leaves you thinking. How could this happen? What would you do?Hetty and her brother Karl as children were friends with Walter, a Jewish boy. Then Nazi Germany starts it's rise to power and friendships are broken and forbidden. Hitler takes hold of the German people and all the evil spews forth.Hetty's father is part of the Nazi movement and she too believes the Nazi propaganda. Hitler's pull to brainwash the youth. To control their thoughts and where to direct their hatred. Hetty and her family are "good" German's. But at some point things start to change in Hetty's way of thinking. She runs into Walter and remembers his saving her from drowning as a child. How could Walter, a childhood friend be the "enemy" just because he is Jewish?Hetty begins sneaking out to meet with Walter, knowing what will happen to both of them if they are found out. And so the story begins...The author tells a very good story in that I got lost in the book. I could feel the tension, the fear,the sadness, the terror of what was happening. Putting the book down I still had this sense of dread and it was because I was caught up in the story.A good book about a very hard subject to read about.
  • (4/5)
    With thanks to LibraryThing for the chance to read and preview this book. Daughter of the Reich is about Germany and the rise of Hitler taking place in Leipzig. It is a moving and well researched book,although the book began with writing that seemed very juvenile. I realize that it was a young girl speaking but it tainted the beginning of the book for me. The story started to mean more to me as Hetty grew up and started to see the chaos that Hitler was creating around her. How easy it is to brainwash children and create deep divisions amongst the people that need scapegoats to blame.Joseph Goebbels famous quote “If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it,people will eventually come to believe it” was evident in the story. Also from Goebbels,” A lie told once remains a lie,a lie told a thousand times becomes the truth”. Both statements are being used in today’s political climate. There was lots to think about in this book and would create great book club discussions. I highly recommend it.