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Alma and How She Got Her Name

Alma and How She Got Her Name


Alma and How She Got Her Name

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (14 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
8 minuti
Pubblicato:
Aug 6, 2019
ISBN:
9781974974856
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

If you ask her, Alma Sofia Esperanza José Pura Candela has way too many names: six! How did such a small person wind up with such a large name? Alma turns to Daddy for an answer and learns of Sofia, the grandmother who loved books and flowers; Esperanza, the great-grandmother who longed to travel; José, the grandfather who was an artist; and other namesakes too. As she hears the story of her name, Alma starts to think it might be a perfect fit after all—and realizes that she will one day have her own story to tell.

Through Alma’s vibrant story, Juana Martinez-Neal opens a treasure box of discovery for children who may be curious about their own origin stories or names.

Pubblicato:
Aug 6, 2019
ISBN:
9781974974856
Formato:
Audiolibro

Informazioni sull'autore

Juana Martinez-Neal is the Peruvian born daughter and granddaughter of painters. Her debut as an author-illustrator Alma and How She Got Her Name, was awarded a Caldecott Honor and was also published in a Spanish edition as Alma y cómo obtuvo su nombre. Her second author-illustrator book, Zonia's Rain Forest, is available in a Spanish edition La selva de Zonia. Juana has also illustrated numerous picture books including La Princesa and the Pea by Susan Middleton Elya, for which she won the Pura Belpré Illustrator Award, and Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story by Kevin Noble Maillard, which won The Robert F. Sibert Medal.  Website: juanamartinezneal.com Instagram: @juanamartinezn Twitter: @juanamartinez


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4.4
14 valutazioni / 13 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    This is a beautifully illustrated book, done in subdued tones.Alma is a little girl who has a long name ... actually six names! She thinks that's too long and she complains to her father that it doesn't fit her (or on paper when she tried to write it all down). Her father explains to her where each of those names comes from, who she is named after, and why having their name is important and special.A sweet story.
  • (4/5)
    Alma has a very long name. Her dad tells her the story of the ancestors for whom she was named. The illustrations are charming and deserving of the Caldecott honor received.
  • (4/5)
    Alma Sofia Esperanza José Pura Candela thinks that her name is too long, and complains to her father that it doesn't "fit." He sits her down and tells her the stories of all the family members she is named after, from her grandmother Sofia to her great-aunt Pura, and as she comes to appreciate these ancestors, Alma becomes more appreciative of her name. In the end, her father tells her that her first name, Alma, is hers alone...Although author/illustrator Juana Martinez-Neal has provided the artwork for a number of other picture-books, most notably, La Princesa and the Pea and La Madre Goose: Nursery Rhymes for Los Niños, this is her debut as both writer and artist. And what a debut it is! Alma and How She Got Her Name is a lovely book, one which pairs a gentle, heartwarming tale of family tradition and naming with beautiful, immensely appealing illustrations. As someone with an interest in names, their meanings and the stories behind them, I was bound to find this story engaging, but I was also won over by the poignant and yet uplifting nature of Alma's family narrative. The artwork, done in graphite, colored pencils and prints on handmade paper, is incredibly cute and quite expressive, perfectly capturing the emotional pitch of each scene. Recommended to anyone looking for picture-books about names and naming in general, or with a Latino cultural outlook in particular.
  • (4/5)
    What a lovely book! I received an early reader copy of this book from Goodreads, and what a privilege it will be to have it in our library! The story of Alma's name is really delightful, and I love the prompts in the back to have children tell the stories of their names! I can imagine using this book with an inter generational gathering to have adults, teens and children share their stories., Sweet illustrations compliment the text well.
  • (4/5)
    This adorable book is a tribute to the importance of names when you are named after significant people in your love. Lovers of family history will enjoy how this little girl learns to love her heritage and the people who helped contribute to who she is. The illustrations are soft and adorable, and the story will warm your heart.
  • (5/5)
    How did you get your name and what is your story?
  • (5/5)
    I love this beautifully written and illustrated picture book about how Alma Sofia Esperanza José Pura Candela got her name. Her dad tells her the story behind each name -- members of her family who represent all the qualities that Alma aspires to, curiosity, love, creativity, spirituality, righteousness, and more. This book would be a great way to start a conversation with both children and adults about how they got their names, really the beginning of the story of all our lives.
  • (5/5)
    Beautifully realized story of family history and personal identity. A young girl, stressed about her super-long name, gets the story of each entry from her father, ending by telling her 'Alma' was a name that was chosen just for her, so she could make her own story. Soft illustrations cushion the sweet story, and the overall effect is very heart-warming.
  • (4/5)
    Alma and How She Got Her Name is a charming picture book. The pencil drawings with splashes of color and the distinctive fonts used for the different names are lovely. Alma herself is a cute little girl. I read this with my four-year-old granddaughter, and the story kept her interest as we read all of Alma's names - Alma Sofia Esperanza José Pura Candela - and the story of where each one comes from. My granddaughter has only two names, but both have stories behind them, so I wouldn't be surprised if she asks about them now. I think it's great that the names are Hispanic; it allows Hispanic kids to see themselves in picture books. However because of this, the story might not have the same appeal for families without any Hispanic background. We enjoyed it; in fact several of the names are family ones.
  • (4/5)
    Alma asks her father why she has such a long name and he tells her about the important family members she was named after. Pair this with "René Has Two Last Names" by René Colato Lainez.
  • (4/5)
    A sweet book for children who are interested in where they come from and their family history, especially those with unique names that may or may not have been passed down. It's adorable, multicultural, and the illustrations are as light-hearted and hopeful as the story. LT Early Reviewer
  • (4/5)
    This book is about a little girl who struggles to write her long name. She challenges her father about how difficult it is for her to write such a long name, and he unfolds to her the story of each part of her name. As her father tells her the stories, Alma realizes that her name is special and that the names have value. While the story clearly comes from a Hispanic or Latino point of view, names have value and stories, no matter what your ancestry is. I would recommend this book for parents of early elementary school students, to initiate a conversation about their own name's story. It could also become a project to create a book of your own about how you got your name. Very solid book. Great message.
  • (5/5)
    Alma's full name is very long but when she protests that, her father sits her down and explains how she is named after many family members who had stories to tell.This is a short and sweet book about a little girl learning her family history. The gentle illustrations fit perfectly with the tone of the entire book. This is a perfect read for a cozy family storytime, and in particular for children who may be unhappy with their own names. For the latter, this book could be paired with Chrysanthemum by Kevin Henkes and Thunderboy Jr by Sherman Alexie.