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Mrs. Everything: A Novel

Mrs. Everything: A Novel

Scritto da Jennifer Weiner

Narrato da Ari Graynor e Beth Malone


Mrs. Everything: A Novel

Scritto da Jennifer Weiner

Narrato da Ari Graynor e Beth Malone

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (326 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
16 ore
Pubblicato:
Jun 11, 2019
ISBN:
9781508251804
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

From Jennifer Weiner, the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Who Do You Love and In Her Shoes comes a smart, thoughtful, and timely exploration of two sisters' lives from the 1950s to the present as they struggle to find their places—and be true to themselves—in a rapidly evolving world. Mrs. Everything is an ambitious, richly textured journey through history—and herstory—as these two sisters navigate a changing America over the course of their lives.

Do we change or does the world change us?

Jo and Bethie Kaufman were born into a world full of promise.>

Growing up in 1950s Detroit, they live in a perfect "Dick and Jane" house, where their roles in the family are clearly defined. Jo is the tomboy, the bookish rebel with a passion to make the world more fair; Bethie is the pretty, feminine good girl, a would-be star who enjoys the power her beauty confers and dreams of a traditional life.

But the truth ends up looking different from what the girls imagined. Jo and Bethie survive traumas and tragedies. As their lives unfold against the background of free love and Vietnam, Woodstock and women's lib, Bethie becomes an adventure-loving wild child who dives headlong into the counterculture and is up for anything (except settling down). Meanwhile, Jo becomes a proper young mother in Connecticut, a witness to the changing world instead of a participant. Neither woman inhabits the world she dreams of, nor has a life that feels authentic or brings her joy. Is it too late for the women to finally stake a claim on happily ever after?

In her most ambitious novel yet, Jennifer Weiner tells a story of two sisters who, with their different dreams and different paths, offer answers to the question: How should a woman be in the world?

Pubblicato:
Jun 11, 2019
ISBN:
9781508251804
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Jennifer Weiner is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of eighteen books, including Good in Bed, That Summer, and an essay collection, Hungry Heart: Adventures in Life, Love, and Writing. A graduate of Princeton University and a frequent contributor to the New York Times Opinion section, Jennifer lives with her family in Philadelphia. Visit her online at JenniferWeiner.com. 


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Cosa pensano gli utenti di Mrs. Everything

4.3
326 valutazioni / 40 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    The narrators were spectacular!!! The story so real, beautiful message!
  • (5/5)
    Great development of realistic characters. Not much happens, but one is drown into the strong atmosphere of the book. One of those readings which leave it's taste for a long time.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic book! I listened to the audio and loved it . Another masterpiece from Jennifer Weiner.
  • (3/5)
    Very long and not a lot happened. At times hard to continue with, but still some good character arcs
  • (5/5)
    God! The feels! I think that many here who have siblings will be able to relate.
  • (5/5)
    Love Jennifer Weiner and this may be my favorite yet!
  • (5/5)
    The Character development, the witty writing, the touching relationships. I felt like I knew the sisters and could relate to many of their experiences both good and bad. Such a tender, special book. What a gifted author Jennifer is!
  • (5/5)
    This book was just amazing, I had a huge love and hate relationship with the sisters but as they get older I started t ok l to love them and understand their struggles and really relate to them, you wknt be disappointed with this one.
  • (3/5)
    This book was entertaining but a bit trite. And a bit long.
  • (4/5)
    Mrs. Everything is one of those books I chose to read because of the time period - two sisters growing up around the same time I did (they were "born" a few years before me). They grew up in turbulent times, and in part because of those times they ended up leading very different lives. When you put their lives together, the encompass so much of what so many women experienced during the 60s and beyond. Because I am around their age, some of the timing threw me a bit. There were definitely some anachronisms - the early 60s were much different from the late 60s and early 70s, and sometimes Weiner's 1962 was much more like the real-life 1969 than 1962. But overall I enjoyed the stories of Jo and Bethie, the two very flawed yet relatable sisters at the heart of the book.
    My thanks to Netgalley and Atria Books for providing a copy for an unbiased review.
  • (5/5)
    Very good story! I really enjoyed this book! Great story lime!
  • (4/5)
    Captivating story where I found myself laughing and crying and really getting to know the character fully. Sometimes I thought the book talked about too many different social problems, however the way of telling the story always brought me back. All in all I genuinly enjoyed listening and even learning a little from this book.
  • (5/5)
    Get passed the beginning and keep going! Great book about family and social events takes you on a journey back in time and to present.
  • (4/5)
    Liked it. Hated it. Cried. Liked it.
  • (4/5)
    I know when my co-worker was a quarter of the way through with this book she wasn’t enjoying it much, but liked Jo as a character. At first I want sure where the book was going, but, by the end, I grew to love many of the characters and see a bigger picture painted by the author about women in the last few generations and the changes that have and haven’t happened. I didn’t always like her style of writing and sometimes felt certain descriptions or pains to give full names to characters who only appeared once made certain sections harder to get through. But, the overall story of these women was well worth the read. Even though most of the actions that the characters took or where acted upon them are not ones I’ve experienced, I still was able to relate to they types or emotions they experienced and the ups and downs that life can take you on. Though, I would be curious to hear if people of the demographics of the main characters could relate. Were the characters pretty typical American Jews for the generations they represented? How about people from that generation who are LGBTQ?
  • (4/5)
    This novel was better than I thought it would be. It rather surprised me. The characters are very real. It's stories of lives of two sisters Jo and Bethie..They make wrong choices. they make lots of mistakes. They lose sight of who they are or who they want to be. But a strong sister bond rides talong with the strides women have made since the 1950s.
  • (4/5)
    A look at all that has happened for women from the 50s to now, as seen by two very likeable sisters.
  • (5/5)
    Best book I’ve “read” in a long time. The narrators were perfect. I was engaged in each twist and turn of their lives. Moved me to tears.
  • (5/5)
    Great book. Loved it. Jennifer seiner is a author I never grow tired of
  • (1/5)
    Not for me ! I have loved books by this author in the past, but this one was just not for me.
  • (4/5)
    Jo and Bethie Kaufman were born in Detroit in the 1950's when America, fresh from winning World War II was at the top of the world and everything seemed to point to a promising future for a couple of middle class girls from the newly built suburbs. Jo is the tomboy and the child who questions everything. At an early age she is attending civil rights protests and also questioning her sexuality. Bethie, on the other hand, is the girly girl who is her mother's favorite and is seemingly only interested in party dresses and boys. But them their father dies from an early stroke and the world starts looking very different indeed, and the girls discover that even the most carefully planned lives can be reversed in ways they never contemplated.Bethie ends up being the adventurous one, while Jo lives her life in a more traditional path. But all through the years, from the drug-fueled sixties, to the up-worldly mobile eighties, to our current twenty-first century world, the two sisters love and support each other, This book will make you laugh and cry and want to talk about these women in your book group.
  • (5/5)
    Highly recommend this for any woman who feels she has lost herself along the way in life’s choices...and whose sisters or girlfriends reminded her, and brought her back to herself...
  • (5/5)
    Amazing book!! Beautiful story about being a woman and a sister.
  • (4/5)
    It is a long saga but covered some interesting themes. The characters were a bit bland but at least there were some surprises
  • (4/5)
    Jennifer Weiner is known for her stories of sibling relationships. With her newest book MRS. EVERYTHING she brings us siblings Jo and Bethie Kaufman. However, where this book differs from all her others is the time span of the story. She gives us three generations of women over a 60-year span. The Kaufmans are a Jewish Russian immigrant family who assimilate well into their community while maintaining their Jewish identity. So it was refreshing to have these characters be a “typical” Jewish family in America. As the book opens in 1951 Jo is six years old and Bethie is four; the story ends in 2016. Jo is the sister that doesn’t care what other people think of her, while Bethie cares too much. Weiner’s description of the simple life for children in the fifties made me nostalgic for my childhood (although I was a decade later). I enjoyed reading of the different directions life took them, but how sibling loyalty was still there. We travel with them through the sixties and the time of “free love” and drugs. We feel the conflict as their sexual identity is explored. I think there is something in this book that will strike home for everyone. While I cringed over drugs and “free love” portions it did remind me of hearing all this on the news. I was sheltered from that but knew it was out there. So to a degree I could relate. As the next two generations came along I could relate to the traits that carry on in the next generations and the frustration and dawning recognition of seeing yourself in your own children. (And blessing your parents for letting you live!) While this is overall a more serious read that we are used to from Weiner she still gives us her special touches of humor. Example: Around page 40 she gives us a truly unique take on the Purimspiel. I dare you not to laugh!This is a very realistic family saga that I highly recommend. Thank you to NetGalley for the advance reading copy. Opinions expressed are my own.
  • (3/5)
    This could be anyone’s story. Anyone who has a sister or brother, who they love, dislike, hate, miss interminably depending on the moment, week, month, decade. I am sure many readers will relate to the family dynamics and dysfunction. It speaks to the issues of all times. As I was reading I kept thinking whether this was enough to sustain my interest, to care about the characters and their successes and failures. Probably not, but yet I continued reading and when I flipped the last page I sat back and thought it was definitely worth the time.Thank you NetGalley and Atria Books for a copy.
  • (4/5)
    "We lose ourselves...but we find our way back." from Mrs. Everything by Jennifer WeinerMrs. Everything by Jennifer Weiner is an emotional roller coaster about Baby Boomer sisters Jo and Bethie. Pop culture and political landmarks set the novel in specific times and places, beginning in 1950s Detroit. When their father suddenly dies, their mother Sarah struggles on her own, finding affordable housing and a job at Hudson's. Jo was the rebel, resisting girly dress and activities and early becoming involved in Civil Rights protests. She also falls in love with her best friend Lynnette. Lynnette buckles under social pressure unable to accept her sexual orientation. Younger sister Bethie was always the perfect Jewish middle-class girl, her mother's favorite. She becomes a victim of sexual abuse and begins to alternately binge eat and starve herself. She is in a school play with Harold, who is African American, but they do not act on their mutual attraction.Jo goes away to the University of Michigan, meeting the love of her life, Shelley. Bethie comes to visit where she is picked up by an older, drug-dealing, man who turns her onto drugs and sex, beginning a long spiral of bad choices. When Shelley elects to marry, Jo is devastated and allows a man to woo and marry her. She loves being a mom, but as the children grow so does the distance between Jo and her husband until he betrays and leaves her.Passivity allows bad choices to take the sisters further from their true selves while misunderstanding and anger drive a wedge between them. Meanwhile, Jo's three girls grow up and her youngest, Lila, makes her own series of bad choices.Their stories become a synopsis of women's history from 50s housewives to the women who juggle career and family to the last question of what kind of death to choose.As entertaining as the book was, for a long time I was not sure what its purpose was until near the end of the story when Jo summarizes a woman's struggle between expectations and self-fulfillment, how we find ourselves far from our deepest truths and struggle to come home again. I was offered a free ebook from the publisher through NetGalley. My review is fair and unbiased.Note: The story takes place almost parallel to my own life and the cultural references were a trip down memory lane. We moved to the Detroit area in 1963 and I enjoyed all the references to the places and stores and radio stations mentioned. But...I take issue with one thing in the book--The sisters go to Suzy Q's for burgers. Burgers! It was known for its chicken! Why would they go there for burgers!
  • (4/5)
    I've always enjoyed Weiner's novels and this one is no exception. It spans multiple decades following Beth and Jo, sisters with wildly diverging paths. Things were often fractious in the family but somehow it all works out. Well worth reading.
  • (4/5)
    A special thank you to NetGalley and Atria books for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.Growing up in 1950s Detroit, sisters Jo and Bethie Kaufman lived in a picture-perfect house. Jo was a passionate tomboy, with a love of books; Bethie was the pretty, good girl, with aspirations of being a star. She enjoys the privilege that comes with beauty.Things rarely end up how you imagine them to be. The sisters survive unspeakable trauma and life's tragedies. Coming of age in the time of free love, Vietnam, and women's lib, Bethie embraces the more free, hippy lifestyle, balking traditional roles. Instead it is Jo that becomes a mother, stuck on the sidelines of her life. Neither sister has the future they envisioned, but is it too late for them to live an authentic and purposeful life?Jennifer Weiner's newest work is her most ambitious to date and it is a risk that pays off. When a novel spans decades—in this case from the 1950s to present—there is a risk of the author losing the plot and also getting swallowed up in pop culture references, but Weiner doesn't suffer these fates. What happens instead is a remarkable journey of self discovery through the ages. Her writing is rich and fluid with deeply developed, layered characters.What is so remarkable is that in our ever-changing society, decade after decade, women are still facing the same issues. Especially with how we decide to live our lives—women are constantly berated for their own life choices whether it be to get married, to have children, or work outside the home when they are a mother. These are things that women are consistently being judged for and they are nobody's business. Let me repeat that for those of you in the back...your choices are nobody's business.Told in dual narratives, Weiner explores the complexities of female relationships, the difficulties woman face, as well as the expectations placed on women. She tackles some heavy issues: sexuality, racism, abortion, religion, drug abuse, etc., and because of this, both Jo and Bethie's stories are engaging and important.Jennifer, I applaud you for telling stories that so many can relate to. I understand that this book was also personal in that there is a little bit of your mother in Jo. This novel is not only timely, but incredibly moving and poignant. Appropriately titled Mrs. Everything, this book is a bit of everything for every woman.
  • (3/5)
    The blurb for this novel describes it as 'ambitious, richly textured journey through history—and herstory'. I would have called it overly ambitious. The story covers a woman's life from the 1950's to the present and touches on many of the major social changes during that tumultuous time period, including women's rights, abortion, interracial marriage, gay marriage, and the role of women in society. Although there were many scenes of this book that were well crafted and that I enjoyed, it seemed like the plot would take a twist to uncover the next social issue on a laundry list of topics. In the end it almost seemed predictable what hurdle would be encountered next. The premise of seeing how the role of women has changed from the 1950's to Hilary Clinton's nomination (yes, that's in the book), sounds like it would make an excellent novel, but the execution for this book felt forced and manipulated.