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Nine, Ten: A September 11 Story

Nine, Ten: A September 11 Story

Scritto da Nora Raleigh Baskin

Narrato da Piper Goodeve


Nine, Ten: A September 11 Story

Scritto da Nora Raleigh Baskin

Narrato da Piper Goodeve

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (20 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
3 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Nov 27, 2018
ISBN:
9781541449718
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

Ask anyone: September 11, 2001, was serene and lovely, a perfect day — until a plane struck the World Trade Center.

But right now, it is a few days earlier, and four kids in different parts of the country are going about their lives. Sergio, who lives in Brooklyn, is struggling to come to terms with the absentee father he hates and the grandmother he loves. Will's father is gone, too, killed in a car accident that has left the family reeling. Naheed has never before felt uncomfortable about being Muslim, but at her new school she's getting funny looks because of the head scarf she wears. Aimee is starting a new school in a new city and missing her mom, who has to fly to New York on business.

These four don't know one another, but their lives are about to intersect in ways they never could have imagined. Award-winning author Nora Raleigh Baskin weaves together their stories into an unforgettable novel about that seemingly perfect September day — the day our world changed forever.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Nov 27, 2018
ISBN:
9781541449718
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro

Informazioni sull'autore

Nora Raleigh Baskin is the author of What Every Girl (Except Me) Knows, Almost Home, and Basketball (or Something Like It). She grew up in Brooklyn and New Paltz, New York, and currently lives in Connecticut with her husband and two sons.


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4.5
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    Some Folks remember where they were when Pearl Harbor was bombed, more, when John F. Kennedy was shot and many more, when America was attacked on September11, 2001. That was 15 years ago and a whole new generation wasn't present when any of this happened. Nora Baskin Raleigh has written a book this generation can relate to. She begins by describing the kind of world children were accustomed to living in only two days before the planes crashed into the towers.

    The story follows the everyday lives of four families living their lives while not always perfect, but content. We are looking at the viewpoints of middle school students in different parts of the United States. One character named Will is from Pennsylvania and another character, Nadira, is a Muslim girl (born in the US) from Ohio. There is also Sergio from Brooklyn and Aimee who just moved to Los Angeles; however, Aimee’s mother is away on business in New York City. NINE, TEN gives the reader a taste of each character’s life before the planes hit. As expected, each middle schooler has their own problems and concerns at that particular point in their life --- worries about their love interests, their future, their parents’ relationship and even being bullied. It is a clear example of how no one saw the events of September 11th coming nor did they realize just how everything would change completely from that point on.

    To me this is a new take on the tragedy that caused a change in the entirely new environment we live in today.
    As the reader follows along the events of that fateful day for each student, they will feel so much anxiety for characters like Aimee, whose mom is on her way to a meeting in the World Trade Center; or Sergio, who worries about his new firefighter friend, Gideon; or Will, as he skips school that day; and finally Nadira, who wears her hijab every day to school. The drama builds and it is not until about the last third of the book before the terrorist attack begins. Initially people thought it a tragic accident until a few minutes later it happened again and America knew we were being attacked.

    After the attacks, the book flashes forward to Patriot Day at Ground Zero, exactly one year later. Here the reader is re-introduced to each character. The reader is reunited with the concerns each character had in the days leading up to the events of 9/11. Their problems have diminished or disappeared altogether as each character’s thoughts are about Ground Zero.

    I feel children who are unfamiliar with the tragedy will want to know more about what happened that day and how it drastically changed the environment we live in today.
  • (4/5)
    I read this book quickly because I couldn’t put it down. 9/11 happened when I was in high school, so I had clear memories of “before” and “after”. This book helped me realize how younger kids see the tragedy. It also helps them understand “before” and “after” - Baskin starts the book on September 9th, and introduces us to four different kids and what their daily lives are like. We experience the tragedy with them, and then check back in a year later. It’s a very moving book, and I think it is especially important to help younger children understand what changed because of that day.
  • (5/5)
    Will, Sergio, Aimee, and Naheed live in different parts of the United States, but their lives intersect at an airport on September 9th. They're all at the same airport, but each is caught up in their own worlds. Then we follow along through their daily lives on September 9th and 10th. Learning about their struggles and the things they’re worried about makes the reader care about each character. Will lives in Pennsylvania and has spent the last year trying to live without his dad, who died in a car accident. Sergio is angry at his absentee father, and the streets of New York City help him blend in when he decides to ditch school. Moving to California is hard on Aimee, who is upset that her mom is away in New York City on business and not there for her on her first day at a new school. Naheed has just started middle school in Ohio and, for the first time in her life, is feeling self conscious about the head scarf she wears as part of her faith. When the events of September 11th begin to unfold, each experiences what happens in a big way. How will their lives be impacted?


    Nine, Ten: A September 11th Story by Nora Raleigh Baskin is a book that tells the story of September 11th in a way that middle grade children can understand. You get to see the evens through the eyes of the four kids, and it’s told as tastefully as possible, while still giving the facts. I like how this book brought to light the historical events of September 11th because anyone who is 17 or younger has no memory of the events on that day. All of the kids seemed realistic to me and I liked getting to know each of them. Learning about the days leading up to the tragedy was a unique way to understand more about the events of September 11th. I would recommend this to kids and adults from fourth grade and up. I especially recommend it for parents and kids to read this one together and have some important discussions. I’ve read other books by Nora Raleigh Baskin and enjoyed them, and I look forward to reading more of her books.
  • (3/5)
    The days leading up to and including 9/11 are experienced through four characters: Aimee the new girl in CA, Sergio the math whiz in New York, Muslim American Naheed in Ohio, and Will in Pittsburgh, grieving his father's accidental death. Each child has something going on in their life at the time, from missing a parent to making amends with an outcast classmate. 9/11 throws a shadow over it all and nothing matters more than to be home. Young readers will feel the emotional impact of what happened that day; the book focuses more on those who bore witness and less on the terrorists or victims. No one close to the main characters dies although savvier readers will note the close calls.
  • (5/5)
    Whew. I finished this book an hour ago and I'm still crying a little. Let me see if I can stop this weeping and tell you about the story.Four kids with four separate lives in four different locations. It's a countdown format: September 9th, September 10th, and then, September 11th. The story shifts from person to person, with ordinary days for each child, leading up to the terrible day. Each child has his own problems---a new school, loss of a father, a terrible dad, issues over being Muslim---but none of these has any connection with 9/11, and each child's story is distinctive and compelling on its own. And then the terrible day comes, and each child suffers from the effects of the 9/11 in his own way. To close, the author brings all four children together a year later and they finally come together in a moving way.I can't say enough about this book. It's emotionally moving and thoughtful and brilliantly written. Wonderful. And now I really, really must stop crying.
  • (5/5)
    This is the story of four ordinary kids just prior to 9/11, how that historical event impacted them and how it brought them together in a unique way. One of the kids is a Muslim, so it was an insightful look at how members of that faith were treated by some Americans after it was learned who was behind these attacks. This book is filled with such insights, and while no one died in this story, it is obvious how deaths affected people worldwide from this story. This is a very appropriate and insightful look at this national tragedy for younger teens.
  • (5/5)
    This is the story of four teens from different parts of the country. Amy’s mom has a new job in New York City. They have just moved to California. She doesn’t fit in with the girls there. The girls in her new school assume that the reason her mom has a job in New York, and she and her dad are in California is because her parents are splitting up. This causes all kinds of anxiety for her. Sergio lives with his grandmother. He hates the father who left him and his mom. Will is angry because his father died trying to help a man along the side of the road. He is more angry because he learns the man was already dead and in his mind his dad died for no reason. Nadira is a Muslim girl who is proud of the scarf she wears. However, at her new school she is beginning to feel uncomfortable when someone asks her about her scarf. Even though these kids don’t know each other they all have one thing in common, 9/11.This is a must read book. You need to read it to see how each of their lives were changed on that day. Another great book to put on my shelves for my students.
  • (4/5)
    The main characters are these four kids from different parts of the U.S. but are somehow tied to the events that took place on 9/11. The book itself is a short read; chapters are from the perspectives of the different characters with the time and date slowly moving forward to that fateful day. Each kid is absorbed with their own lives; Will is dealing with the death of his father, Aimee is starting a new school and nervous that her parents are getting a divorce, Sergio is a math whiz with an absentee father and Naheed gets funny looks for wearing her hijab to school. As the book progresses and the date draws closer, you see just how their lives are going to be affected. I was the same age as these kids when September 11th happened and I can still tell you every detail of that day over 17 years ago. I had expected to not like this book because those memories are still fresh in my mind, but I found myself enjoying it. It's so interesting to read each character's story and see how wrapped up they are in their own lives yet they still have some connection to the events. This book could have easily been a depressing, ham-fisted story about an American tragedy and its aftermath (like the invasion of Afghanistan, Iraq) but thankfully it's not. I would recommend this for readers fourth grade and above because students in grades below that might have a tough time understanding it. It should definitely be a book read and taught in schools. I'm beginning to realize that students are now too young to remember 9/11 or weren't born yet and since they are technically living in it's aftermath, they should know what happened.
  • (4/5)
    Follows four middle school age students in the days leading up to 9/11. They are spread around the country and their paths cross in an airport in Chicago on 9/9/2001. The kids are diverse, but somehow all their lives are impacted by the events of 9/11 - one lives in Pennsylvania, one in NYC, a Muslim girl from Ohio, and the last a recent transplant to California whose mom was in NYC on business. The author made an intentional decision not to have the kids or any of their loved ones perish. Got difficult to follow when I picked up again between readings. Simplistic but might be right for younger readers .
  • (3/5)
    Four young people's stories are told, all middle school age students. There is a girl who has just moved to Los Angeles for her mother's big job, a boy in Pennsylvania who recently lost his father in a traffic accident, a Muslim girl in Ohio who is tired of being seen as "different," and a boy in New York City whose father abandoned him to his grandmother's care.The blurb in the dust jacket promises, "These four don't know one another, but their lives are about to intersect in ways they never could have imagined." I have always loved books that do this... tell seemingly unrelated stories and then tie them all together into one tale. Well - this isn't one of those and the line in the blurb is false advertising. (Publisher's fault, not the author's.) But in fact, other than all learning about the September 11 terrorist attacks in their own towns in their own way, they never have anything to do with one another. In the final chapter, one year later, they are all present at Ground Zero ceremonies and witness something there, but they never meet or interact with one another. This was a let down after the enticing suggestion in the dust jacket blurb.Each of the four main characters has their own interesting story. Simple, realistic, stories about believable kids who are about 13 years old, give or take. Each is affected differently by the terrorist attacks. Each individual story is decent middle-school level material, though not spectacular. But the book could just as easily have been written as four separate little novellas. I am well above the target audience age. I remember 9/11 well, and always will. I expected to be deeply affected emotionally as the events of the story unfolded, but I wasn't particularly. I cry easily when I read, but didn't shed a tear as I read this book. The horror of September 11 seemed to be kept at a safe distance in a way. None of the characters suffered a personal loss, even though two of them seemed to be setting up just that.Not a bad book... but one that fell well short of my expectations going into it.