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The Cabin at the End of the World: A Novel

The Cabin at the End of the World: A Novel

Scritto da Paul Tremblay

Narrato da Amy Landon


The Cabin at the End of the World: A Novel

Scritto da Paul Tremblay

Narrato da Amy Landon

valutazioni:
3.5/5 (290 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
9 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Jun 26, 2018
ISBN:
9780062849588
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

The Bram Stoker Award-winning author of A Head Full of Ghosts adds an inventive twist to the home invasion horror story in a heart-palpitating novel of psychological suspense that recalls Stephen King's Misery, Ruth Ware's In a Dark, Dark Wood, and Jack Ketchum's cult hit The Girl Next Door.

Seven-year-old Wen and her parents, Eric and Andrew, are vacationing at a remote cabin on a quiet New Hampshire lake. Their closest neighbors are more than two miles in either direction along a rutted dirt road.

One afternoon, as Wen catches grasshoppers in the front yard, a stranger unexpectedly appears in the driveway. Leonard is the largest man Wen has ever seen but he is young, friendly, and he wins her over almost instantly. Leonard and Wen talk and play until Leonard abruptly apologizes and tells Wen, "None of what's going to happen is your fault". Three more strangers then arrive at the cabin carrying unidentifiable, menacing objects. As Wen sprints inside to warn her parents, Leonard calls out: "Your dads won't want to let us in, Wen. But they have to. We need your help to save the world."

Thus begins an unbearably tense, gripping tale of paranoia, sacrifice, apocalypse, and survival that escalates to a shattering conclusion, one in which the fate of a loving family and quite possibly all of humanity are entwined. The Cabin at the End of the World is a masterpiece of terror and suspense from the fantastically fertile imagination of Paul Tremblay.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Jun 26, 2018
ISBN:
9780062849588
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Paul Tremblay has won the Bram Stoker, British Fantasy, and Massachusetts Book awards and is the author of Growing Things, The Cabin at the End of the World, Disappearance at Devil’s Rock, A Head Full of Ghosts, and the crime novels The Little Sleep and No Sleep Till Wonderland. His essays and short fiction have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Entertainment Weekly online, and numerous year’s-best anthologies. He has a master’s degree in mathematics and lives outside Boston with his family.


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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    If countless horror movies haven't convinced you that it's never a good idea to vacation in a remote cabin in the woods, this book surely will. Married couple Eric and Andrew are vacationing with their adopted daughter Wen in the New Hampshire backwoods when four very creepy people show up, break in, and tell them that the world is going to end imminently if they don't make a horrendous choice. The action takes place over the next couple of days as the suspense ratchets up to unbearable levels--and Tremblay does not take the action in expected directions. Some readers may not care for the ending, but I thought it was perfect, because the novel captured so well the existential uncertainty we all live in, having to make choices without knowing what the potential consequences may be and having to continue moving forward no matter what--a theme that elevates this above a mere thriller. Paul Tremblay is fast becoming one of my favorite horror writers, and his latest did not disappoint.
  • (3/5)
    Tremblay had a brilliant idea for a completely terrifying storyline, and the tension just kept ratcheting up and up throughout. The combination of the switching narratives (between several characters and from first to third person) and not knowing what the hell is happening made it nearly impossible to stop reading.
  • (5/5)
    5 StarsThe Cabin at the End of the World is, without a doubt one of the most talked about novels of the year, with nearly equal amounts of love and hate for the latest work from Paul Tremblay. This is my third book by this Massachusetts writer. I loved A Head Full of Ghosts and liked Disappearance at Devil's Rock and fall squarely in the love column for this brilliant take on the apocalypse. I took the time to read several of the one-star reviews and they actually have legitimate complaints, I just happen to have a difference of opinion. I actually liked the open ending. It left me pondering the possible outcomes. Something I'll be thinking about for some time to come.The whole story is thought-provoking, start to finish. Andrew and Eric are spending time at their secluded cabin in the woods. Their little girl, Wen, is in the yard catching grasshoppers and putting them in a jar. She knows all about stranger danger, but sometimes a child just gets caught in the moment. That's what happens when the kind and gentle Leonard starts to engage her about the art of catching the insects.Before we know it Leonard is joined by Redmond, Adriane, and Sabrina. Their story about the end of the world and the part Andrew, Eric, and Wen are to play is unfathomable and the solution untenable.The writing is wonderful..."Too many people have smiles that don't mean what a smile is supposed to mean. Their smiles are often cruel and mocking, like how a bully's grin is the same as a fist."I found The Cabin at the End of the World to be an imaginative "What would you do?" story. I asked myself that very question, again an again, as I read the story. I could easily see this as a feature film.Strongly recommended, but be prepared to love it or hate it. There is little middle ground.Cabin at the End of the World is published by William Morrow and is available in all formats.From the author's bio - Paul Tremblay is the author of Disappearance at Devil’s Rock, A Head Full of Ghosts, and the crime novels The Little Sleep and No Sleep Till Wonderland. He has won the Bram Stoker, British Fantasy, and Massachusetts Book Awards and is currently a member of the board of directors of the Shirley Jackson Awards. He has a master’s degree in mathematics and lives outside Boston with his wife and two children.
  • (3/5)
    A quick read, but not well written.
  • (3/5)
    Four strangers torment a family on vacation, saying they need their help to stop the end of the world.
  • (2/5)
    I can't finish this. It is way too violent and disturbing for me, for no discernible reason. I thought about finishing to try to find out the reason, but it's too brutal. I love a scary book, but not a gory one.
  • (4/5)
    I read A Head Full of Ghosts last summer and loved it. It was one of my favorite books of the year. So I was very excited when I heard about The Cabin at the End of the World. I was able to get it from my library and eagerly began reading.

    First off, the character Wen is adorable. I love that we are inside her mind for the first chapter. It felt like an authentic 7 year old's voice to me. She idolizes her parents, Eric and Andrew. And although not as perfect as Wen believes, they are still good and loving parents.

    The three of them are vacationing in an isolated cabin, with no cell reception. Then four strangers arrive and hold them hostage, telling Eric and Andrew that they have a choice to make, one that will save the world from the impending apocalypse. Throughout the book, the reader is left wondering if the world really is about to be destroyed, or are the four strangers crazy.

    This book was exciting and tense. It takes place over the course of couple days, and I was very anxious to see how everything would turn out.
  • (3/5)
    Andrew and Eric take their eight-year-old daughter and go on vacation in an isolated cabin on a scenic lake in New Hampshire they're anticipating nothing more than time to unwind, to live without wifi or their phones, to let Wen goof around outside without constant supervision. But they've barely settled in when a man shows up on foot and starts a conversation with Wen, who is in the front yard catching grasshoppers. By the time she runs to tell her parents about the man outside, it's too late. I picked this up after seeing mentions of how very scary this book is. Horror is hit or miss with me, and usually it misses. It's either so over the top I stop being scared and start to roll my eyes, or it's just not that scary. This novel leans towards both simultaneously and so sort of worked for me. Not in the sense that I was scared, but I was interested in what was going to happen next that I kept turning the pages. This is a home invasion story with a twist; the four intruders come armed with the most terrifying weapons imaginable (kudos to Paul Tremblay for thinking up those nightmare-worthy objects) and they are utterly convinced that the world will end unless the family does a horrific thing. These aren't monsters taking pleasure in causing pain, these are true believers. Tremblay does a good job of walking the fine line between presenting the intruders as delusional and of presenting them as being correct. He leaves enough room for the reader to interpret the events how they choose and he ends the book at the exactly right moment. If your secret fear is of being the target of a home invasion, this book will probably be terrifying in all the right ways.
  • (3/5)
    My gut tells me the ending will polarize readers -- a love it or hate it type situation. If you're the reader who requires the mystery revealed by story's end, you'll probably throw the book when you reach page 270. The mystery here being, well, that's kinda spoilery is the apocalypse really happening? or are the "4 horsemen" simply delusional cultists. Thankfully, the home invaders reveal their motives right away.No, the biggest disappointment for me was the story as a whole. tTe premise and its potential kept me turning the pages, but I wasn't really invested in Wen, Andrew or Eric as individuals. When it became obvious this wasn't going to be something I hadn't read or watched before, I detached.By the final chapters, though, I couldn't not turn the pages to find out what the Dads would do. What the ending would reveal, if anything.The tension was masterful.3 stars
  • (4/5)
    I have read several of Paul Tremblay's books and have really enjoyed them. They have just enough of the supernatural element to make them interesting and slightly chilling. [The Cabin At The End of The World] opened with a home invasion by a seeming harmless stranger that befriended a 7 year old girl. The reader has to ask themselves what would they do if presented with something as unbelievable as this family was. It's disturbing...it's extremely unsettling...and at the same time simply a terrific story from an author that always writes a thought provoking tale.
  • (4/5)
    Oooh, the first chapter is so creepy! It gave me that feeling of "No! Don't do that! Run away! What are you doing? This ain't right! Run, run, run!"! And then...Basically, 8 year old Wen is on vacation in a remote cabin with her two dads, when four strangers show up. Ugh. Basically, I was freaked out the whole time I read this! What the strangers want, what the consequences may, or may not, be, and what decisions the family must make just kept me ill at ease. This is almost a five star, but I'm not sure how I totally feel about the end. I just know that for me, getting to that ending was a bit like going through the wringer! Whooooo...
  • (5/5)
    This book seems to be polarizing a lot of readers. Or at least the Amazon reviews which seem to mostly love the book or hate it. I don't know why. Personally, I would rank it as awesome! A HEAD FULL OF GHOSTS was just a tad better in my opinion but they are photo-finish close in that ranking.The story: seven-year-old Wen and her parents, Eric and Andrew, are vacationing at a remote cabin. One afternoon four strangers arrive carrying menacing weapons and needing their help to save the world. The story the strangers tell is crazy; their actions are even crazier. Or are they sane behavior from people who have no choice. Suddenly Eric, Andrew, and Wen must make some difficult choices in order to survive.I found the story amazing. It was scary and terrifying but in part because it was so thought provoking. What would I have done if I was in their place? Would I have made the hard choice earlier? And if so, when? Because Tremblay made the characters so real, it made everything have more impact. The hardships and pain yanked hard on my heart. I felt for both the family and the strangers. One of the other things that Tremblay does with his novels (or at least the three I've read so far) is end them all with a touch of mystery. Was there really something supernatural that occurred or not? In this case, strangers claim the family needs to help save the world. So by the story's end, the world either has to be saved or be destroyed. But if the strangers are crazy, was the world really saved? Or were the claims deluded ravings from a madman? Unless the book ended with "The world then blew up.", you can never be sure. And that's what makes the story even better, that element of faith. Eric, Andrew, and Wen must have faith that the story is real, even if the messengers are crazy or demented. And as readers, we must decide who we want to believe. Taking Tremblay's story at face value is easy; seeing possibly demented motives makes it scarier. These are the type of books that will leave me pondering for days afterwards. And that is why I loved it.
  • (4/5)
    This book was terrifying and definitely isn't for the faint of heart. While I liked this book and read it in two sittings, I would hesitate to recommend it to some of my more tender hearted friends. Seven year old Wen is playing outside the very remote vacation cabin where she and her fathers are staying when a friendly stranger comes up and helps her to catch grasshoppers. Then, three other strangers come up the driveway with strange weapons and an even stranger story about needing their help to save the world. This was very thought provoking, are the strangers telling the truth or are they completely insane? And, what difference does it make when they need your help to save the world?
  • (5/5)
    Oh Paul Tremblay, you stress me out. You have me wasting my day away anxious with a beating heart. You are smarter than you should be. You can weave a story better than you should. All of this makes Cabin such a rewarding read. There is heart. There is what-the-hell-is-going-to-happen. There is more to say but I do not have the time. Stephen King likes it. There. That is reason enough to pick it up. Also, the cover is beautiful. It looks great on a bookshelf.
  • (5/5)
    Wow. Talk about a truly terrifying book. A little girl and her two dads find themselves hosting a party of four lunatics in a remote cabin in the woods. The family is told they have an important decision to make - that will save the entire world. And...I cannot say much more than that without giving away what I think are important plot points.

    At least twice while reading I said, out loud, "oh my god."

    Just a heartbreaking and horrifying book crafted around the themes of loyalty and family.

    Dang.
  • (2/5)
    While the prose is lovely, this book takes a long time to get much of anywhere. Conversations tend to go around in circles, having the same back and forth dialogue framed differently and repeated. This stretches what could have been scenes into entire chapters, which drags the pacing to a screeching halt.

    Some of the characters are very enjoyable, though. Wen feels like an eight year old. Her fathers feel like a married couple in ways that many other books don't necessarily manage to convey. I like them as characters a lot. The framework they were set in was simply dragged out too much.

    I did DNF this. Not because it was awful or that I couldn't finish it, but because I do have a good number of other books I want to get to. This one simply isn't holding my attention. Perhaps one day I'll come back to it.

    *This book was recieved from the publisher through a Goodreads giveaway.*
  • (5/5)
    I won this book on Goodreads and I am grateful.If this were to be a one-word review, I would be stuck between Wow! and Awesome!This is the first Paul Tremblay book I have read, and it will not be the last. The writing is flawless. I do not say that about many authors (no offense authors) but there are certain writers that you just know have the knack to begin with and the talent to pull it off effortlessly. It's a feel. The subject matter of this book is both horrifying and current on many levels. It covers so many bases in such an emotional way that it is difficult to be explicit here without giving too much away. I can tell you that you will be hooked and locked in by the end of the first page. You will sometimes have to close the book for a moment to ponder. You won't be able to keep it closed long enough to accurately ponder. You will have to read on. It is emotional, intense, and wonderful. I would consider it a must read.Incidentally, when you are done reading it, you will not be done with it. It will stay with you for awhile.
  • (2/5)
    It was a very slow book. I thought there would be a lot more to it. I was disappointed when the ending came.
  • (2/5)
    the action kept me a lil entertained but not sure what caused all of that in the first place
  • (2/5)
    What happened with the ending?? Too open ended for that much buildup.
  • (5/5)
    I really liked this book. It is anything but predictable and rarely goes where you expect it to. The nearly constant fear that doom is seconds away from striking Wen and her dads makes it very hard to put down. Especially when you're putting it down to complete one of the many necessary but uninteresting tasks we all have permanently marked on our daily agendas. Telling myself I was just going to read one more page, or get to a good place to stop for a while, often turned into an extra hour.
  • (5/5)
    Unlike anything I’ve read. A whirlwind of mystery, emotional, brutality.
  • (4/5)
    A wonderfully terrifying story almost ruined by the awful narration. I struggled to keep going through this audiobook because the narrator was so bad. Yet it's a tribute to the terrific story that I actually finished. Haunting, creepy, and confounding. If you can make it past the ridiculous tone deaf narration.
  • (2/5)
    Kind of pointless. Very draggy. Need 5 more words five
  • (4/5)
    Thrilling read. However the ending could have been better. Feels like it's missing the last chapter!
  • (4/5)
    The narrator's voice made it difficult for me. Her inflections were odd. It made listening a chore in the beginning. I soon got accustomed but I never grew to like it. So I deducted a star.
  • (2/5)
    I hate non-endings. Not really a cliff hanger, or even one of those, "up to your interpretation" bits. Just like 95% in, the author quit writing.
  • (3/5)
    Not sure I cared for this audiobook. There was a point where I thought mans beliefs and religion might be being tested, unfortunately it went no where. Andrews realizations started to pull dramatically on Eric's religious beliefs making more sense than the group's sacrificial malices. What forces were at work...man made, devine or supernatural, I'm not sure but there was too much loose ends and the end offered no
    answers. I was disappointed.
  • (2/5)
    Can't remember the last time I almost ditched a book because of the narrator's inability to reflect the emotion and the overall wrong pacing. I usually like the works of Harper Audio, but this one really sucks. On the other hand, I'm glad I sticked with it to the end because I really liked the book itself. It is hard, on point and well nuanced.
  • (5/5)
    Very well written and with great pace! The book has you asking yourself what is really going on from page 1 to the ending. Definitely recommended IF you are ok with open endings.