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Gunpowder Moon

Gunpowder Moon

Scritto da David Pedreira

Narrato da Jeffrey Kafer


Gunpowder Moon

Scritto da David Pedreira

Narrato da Jeffrey Kafer

valutazioni:
4/5 (59 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
7 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Feb 13, 2018
ISBN:
9780062800411
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

A realistic and chilling vision of life on the Moon, where dust kills as easily as the vacuum of space…but murder is even quicker—a fast-paced, cinematic science fiction thriller, this debut novel combines the inventiveness of The Martian, the intrigue of The Expanse, and the thrills of Red Rising.

The Moon smells like gunpowder. Every lunar walker since Apollo 11 has noticed it: a burnt-metal scent that reminds them of war. Caden Dechert, the chief of the U.S. mining operation on the edge of the Sea of Serenity, thinks the smell is just a trick of the mind—a reminder of his harrowing days as a Marine in the war-torn Middle East back on Earth.

It's 2072, and lunar helium-3 mining is powering the fusion reactors that are bringing Earth back from environmental disaster. But competing for the richest prize in the history of the world has destroyed the oldest rule in space: Safety for All. When a bomb kills one of Dechert's diggers on Mare Serenitatis, the haunted veteran goes on the hunt to expose the culprit before more blood is spilled.

But as Dechert races to solve the first murder in the history of the Moon, he gets caught in the crosshairs of two global powers spoiling for a fight. Reluctant to be the match that lights this powder-keg, Dechert knows his life and those of his crew are meaningless to the politicians. Even worse, he knows the killer is still out there, hunting.

In his desperate attempts to save his crew and prevent the catastrophe he sees coming, the former Marine uncovers a dangerous conspiracy that, with one spark, can ignite a full lunar war, wipe out his team . . . and perhaps plunge the Earth back into darkness.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Feb 13, 2018
ISBN:
9780062800411
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro


Informazioni sull'autore

A former reporter for newspapers including the Tampa Tribune and the St. Petersburg Times, David Pedreira has won awards for his writing from the Associated Press, the Society of Professional Journalists, the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association, and the American Society of Newspaper Editors. He lives in Tampa, Florida.

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Cosa pensano gli utenti di Gunpowder Moon

4.0
59 valutazioni / 9 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (3/5)
    This seems to be Pedreira's first novel after a successful career as a journalist. Pretty good first effort.After the Thermal Max (global warming gone wild) caused much destruction on Earth, civilization is again making progress. The key to the future is fusion power which needs a source of helium 3. Wikipedia claims that the moon should be a good source of helium 3. The story mainly take place in an American mining base on the moon. The other main presence on the moon is the Chinese. A few other countries are trying to gain a foothold. Since the moon is a harsh mistress (or so Robert Heinlein said), there is peace on the moon even though tensions between the US and China are increasing on Earth. But then one of the American miners dies in what at first appears to be an accident but the investigation reveals that it was murder.The story is mainly about the US station commanger, Dechert, trying to figure out what happened to his man (plus other random acts of sabotage) while tension between the US and China rises. The story was told well. A good blend of technical stuff with interpersonal relations in the small station. A pretty good read even if there were things that bugged me. First off, I'll say I was real happy that the story got resolved. Not that Pedreira didn't leave room for a sequel (Jupiter, anyone?) but at least he did wrap up the story. I'm not giving this book any higher than a 3 because although it was a good read, I thought it ended a bit too abruptly. I'm not sure that Dechert's actions in the last 10-15 pages would have the effect they did in real life.From a technical side, several things bugged me. First, the author refers to the surface of the moon as having micro-gravity. Not just once, but a number of times throughout the first half of the book. Later he refers to low gravity and even 1/6th gravity once. An effective eidtor whold have helped here. Micro-gravity is weightlessness you'd get in orbit, not on the surface of the moon. I'll give him a pass on the flaming meteor as he makes an attempt on how that might be possible (although I don't really buy it).One other point. The miners are digging for helium 3 (adequately explained as to why), water (also explained and perhaps self evident) and something called ilmenite. This ore was mentioned numerous times with no explaination of what is was or why it was important. It is a titanium and iron containing ore (thanks again Wikipedia) which presumably would be useful in building on the moon.
  • (5/5)
    I was provided a galley of the book by the publisher.A murder mystery on the moon. It's as simple as that, and as awesome as that. Dechert is the chief of a lunar mining operation. He's not young. He's had substantial military experience. He's on the moon to get away from that past and to be the gruff father to his eccentric crew of misfits. But when incidents of sabotage crop up and one of his miners is killed in an explosion, the higher echelons of American forces blame a rival Chinese mining operation without genuine evidence, drawing the two nations to the brink of war--a war both sides seem to want. Dechert investigates a murder that could be the first of millions.This book is everything that I hoped Andy Weir's Artemis would be. It's smart and savvy, based solidly in real science but still totally approachable to laymen. Dechert is easy to relate to as a protagonist, and you can't help but love his strong bonds with his quirky crew. His experience makes him a fantastic investigator like the greats of the genre. The book is a fast read, too. It hooked me from the start and I had to read through in about a day.
  • (2/5)
    Dreadful narration. Sounds like a bad movie trailer. No nuance - just gruff testosterone. Hard to tolerate for more than a minute or two.
  • (5/5)
    great book that was very well written. the audio production seemed a little off and it seemed like they compressed or sped up The narrator's Voice to shorten the time. it was still very enjoyable and the story was very compelling.
  • (5/5)
    Very well done. Kept my interest throughout the whole book.
  • (5/5)
    The reader rushed through the explanation’s a little in the heated up moments but a good book and a look at how our future might look
  • (3/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    I used to like Asimov as a kid but grew out of him. All of his characters sound the same ('Now see here') with the worst example being his later "Foundation" books where Asimov-as-he-is and Asimov-as-he-wishes-he-was fly around the universe searching for Earth and meet a shared-consciousness lass with a nice bottom. All of his books are detective novels and end with the hero spending three chapters explaining how he cleverly worked out the mystery to an incredulous antagonist who then throws an extra twist in there ('Ah but we are the Second Foundation/Mule/mind controlling robots'). Fun for a while but silly. Ask any SF fan why they like the genre and you often get the pat and crappy answers about wanting to expand the mind or explore new frontiers but Asimov's a good example of the kind of cosy SF which seems the antithesis of this.I admire Pedreira though (in Portuguese it means "Quarry"; does Pedreira have Portuguese roots?) for the balance he's bought to an old SF prop. And he really seems to stick to the "What's possible" law whereby you push vintage props, models and sets to the absolute limit of what you can get away with visually without having to bring in the "CGI" (aka more literary SF devices). Pedreira's Moon's self-consciously-retro vistas felt a teensy bit like a safe gambit to me, one which barely worked but... I guess I like it better when SF pushes a look, even if it's cheesy or dates quickly - that's part of the joy. If you are capable of having an imagination and a sense of disbelief, you can have it either way. It all depends on how much you're willing to lose yourself in the story. It's true that some technologies haven't gone as far as the Golden Age authors thought they would (the way Pedreira writes I think of him as an Golden Age SF author), but others have advanced further than almost anyone imagined - look at the way that computers permeate everyday life now. The thing that dates a lot of classic SF isn't the space travel, it's the computers (or lack of them). In James Blish's 'Earthman Come Home', the characters spend months working out complicated equations with slide rules, before feeding the results into the city's computer (which consists of vacuum tubes). I think that's one reason why Jack Vance still seems so fresh - although his stories are often set on alien worlds, his stories typically concern societies, language and personality, rather than specific technologies. On the other hand, while I admire the gumption of writing stuff that resembles Vintage SF, the result seem quite stale. It's already done before a zillion times.Bottom-line: 3 stars because I’m a sucker for SF novels set on the moon.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)
    Review of Uncorrected ProofCaden Dechert, chief of mining operations on the lunar Sea of Serenity, loses one of his crewmen in a deliberate act of murder, a first on the moon where, until now, the primary rule had been safety for all. Desperate to prevent a catastrophe, he sets out to solve the mystery of the murder and uncovers a conspiracy that holds the potential to bring all-out war to the lunar surface, wipe out his team, and perhaps even send Earth back into darkness. Can Caden find the murderer and avert the catastrophe that threatens to destroy Man’s lunar settlements?An all-too-believable political maelstrom creates a sense of dread in this credible near-future narrative. Well-developed characters, grounded in believable technology, populate the desolate lunar surface and a camaraderie between the various mining groups is far more civilized than the political machinations that continue to plague the nations of Earth. Realism elevates the tale and pulls the reader into the story as the unfolding events build the tension and keep the pages turning.Recommended.
  • (4/5)
    ** Full disclosure: I received this book in exchange for an honest review**After the first murder on the moon the crew of a U.S. led mining operation races to prevent even deadlier events from happening. This was a fun read, a good blend of thriller and hard SF with excellent pacing and characters I grew to like and be invested in quite quickly. The author did a great job invoking the isolated atmosphere, the combination of living in tight quarters and the huge expanse of space, the mundanity and constant risk that I imagine living on the moon would be like. I can’t speak for the full accuracy of the science but it felt right, and added to the overall realistic feeling of the story and the location. I became attached to the characters pretty much right off the bat, so much so that when new characters were introduced that I felt could be a threat to the main ones I found myself resenting them and rooting against them. I found myself picking sides and judging accordingly. One slight weak point, while I found the politics of this world pretty much believable, things were a bit black and white and I can’t say as I found the overall plot much of a surprise. And the ending felt a bit telegraphed but overall that didn’t really bother me since I didn’t get the feeling that this was supposed to be a mystery we had to solve so much as the experience of watching the crew get from Point A to Point B. The characters were engaging if a bit clichéd and standard for this type of story, the pacing was tight, the science was believable and I had a fun time reading it. I’m looking forward to reading more from this author.