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The Stars My Destination

The Stars My Destination

Scritto da Alfred Bester

Narrato da Gerard Doyle


The Stars My Destination

Scritto da Alfred Bester

Narrato da Gerard Doyle

valutazioni:
4/5 (67 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
8 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Dec 5, 2017
ISBN:
9781541484191
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

Marooned in outer space after an attack on his ship, Nomad, Gulliver Foyle lives to obsessively pursue the crew of a rescue vessel that had intended to leave him to die.

When it comes to pop culture, Alfred Bester (1913–1987) is something of an unsung hero. He wrote radio scripts, screenplays, and comic books (in which capacity he created the original Green Lantern Oath). But Bester is best known for his science fiction novels, and The Stars My Destination may be his finest creation. With its sly potshotting at corporate skullduggery, The Stars My Destination seems utterly contemporary, and has maintained its status as an underground classic for over fifty years.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Dec 5, 2017
ISBN:
9781541484191
Formato:
Audiolibro

Informazioni sull'autore

ALFRED BESTER was born in New York in 1913. After attending the University of Pennsylvania, he sold several stories to Thrilling Wonder Stories in the early 194s. He then embarked on a career as a scripter for comics, radio, and television, where he worked on such classic characters as Superman, Batman, Nick Carter, Charlie Chan, Tom Corbett, and the Shadow. In the 195s, he returned to prose, publishing several short stories and two brilliant, seminal works, The Demolished Man (which was the first winner of the Hugo Award for Best Novel) and The Stars My Destination, In the late 195s, he wrote travel articles for Holiday magazine, and eventually became their Senior Literary Editor, keeping the position until the magazine folded in the 197s. In 1974, he once again came back to writing science fiction with the novels The Computer Connection, Golem1, and The Deceivers, and numerous short stories. A collection of his short stories, Virtual Unrealities, was published in 1997. After being a New Yorker all his life, he died in Pennsylvania in 1987, but not before he was honored by the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America with a Grandmaster Award. ROGER ZELAZNY Roger Zelazny authored many science fiction and fantasy classics, and won three Nebula Awards and six Hugo Awards over the course of his long and distinguished career. While he is best known for his ten-volume Amber series of novels (beginning with 197’s Nine Princes in Amber), Zelazny also wrote many other novels, short stories, and novellas, including the award-winning Lord of Light and the stories “24 Views of Mount Fuji, by Hokusai,” “Permafrost,” and “Home Is the Hangman.” Zelazny died in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in June 1995.


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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (2/5)
    This novel, a landmark text in the history of science fiction, holds little to no interest for casual fans of sci-fi (among which I consider myself).Published in 1956, the story of Gully Foyle—an intergalactic rogue hellbent on revenge—reads like pulp detective fiction. Throughout his adventures, an intricate web of intrigue involving explosives and government/corporate malfeasance peppered with numerous episodes of space-and-time-hopping called “jaunting,” Foyle encounters many “dames”—stereotypical female characters that do little more than spark his rage and stir his loins.I found the story tedious, yet I acknowledge that more sophisticated fans of the genre revere this novel. If you’re a sci-fi aficionado, dive in. If you’re not, avoid it.
  • (3/5)
    Average. This novel is credited with kick-starting the cyberpunk movement, and many consider it one of the best science fiction novels of all time. I differ on the second point. The premise is fine. An ordinary man abandoned in space develops an all-consuming rage. In his mission to satisfy his anger, he meets everything from an underdeveloped society in the asteroid belt to powerful movers-and-shakers of the time. The backdrop is a futuristic dystopia where humans can "jaunt" (teleport) and an ongoing war between the inner planets and outer satellites. The beginning and end are sentimental, but the action-packed middle leaves so little room to breathe you lose any real connection.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed the book, I just don't quite understand why it ended when it did. Like much science fiction to me, it just didn't have a very satisfying ending.
  • (3/5)
    Mentioned frequently by great Sci-Fi authors as one of the top Science fiction novels of all time, I was entertained but somewhat disappointed. I was not disappointed by the dated nature of the science, but by the disjointed way the story climaxed.
  • (4/5)
    This book is a window in the beginnings of modern science fiction. When reading it I was constantly surprised that it was written in 1956. Drawing from elements of The Count of Monte Cristo, it combines the best of a revenge tale with a startlingly imagined world.
  • (2/5)
    It's a shame, I'd have liked to stick it out through this book. Apparently it was Jasper Fforde's inspiration, and I love his work. Somehow though this book just bored me. I don't like too much sf with my fantasy, and this was too sf-like for me. It's a bookcrossing ring book, so I'll be passing it on and hoping other people enjoy it.
  • (4/5)
    Exciting, violent, intense, insane, imaginative, driven.It's been compared to a future re-telling of the "Count of Monte Christo" but Dumas never had this much imagination or inventiveness.Bester has a great writing style which does not lock it into the period it was written. Also his story was timeless. It reflected several time periods in the past and a strange future. It could have been written today with no changes. With a better ending I would have given it five stars.
  • (2/5)

    6/10.

    One man out for revenge moves heaven and earth to get it...

  • (4/5)
    (2nd reading)Gully Foyle of The Stars My Destination is a freak in a world of freaks. Like Paul Atreides (Dune) and Jack Remillard (Jack the Bodiless), Foyle has powers which make him the agent of evolutionary change for humanity.This book rollicks along through the bizarre and sometimes brutal Solar System of the 25th century, following Gulliver Foyle on his vengeful and apocalyptic path. It's obvious that cyberpunk novels such as Neuromancer owe quite a debt to this book. Its language is fresh and clean, characters larger than life. Parts of it also reminded me of Jack Vance's 'To Live Forever' (not sure which came first).The only thing which didn't quite convince me this time (although I can see how integral it was to the plot) was Gully Foyle falling in love with Olivia Presteign. Gully seemed incapable of love up to that point; his rage against Vorga was too much. But otherwise, a ripper of a book.
  • (3/5)
    Didn't realize it was written in the 1950's and it's fascinating from that point of view - what did someone in the 1950's think would be the cultural changes of the far future. Jaunting (psychic teleportation) was the new transportation and it's impact on society was fascinating. But Gully Foyle didn't work so much for me, we kept being told how all the characters felt rather than meeting them as flesh and blood people. It's dated in it's style but worth reading (or skimming) nonetheless.
  • (5/5)
    The age in Science Fiction was Space was Outer Space, and travel was by Rocket. But in essence, that is still true today. Just watch a NASA launch. The psychological traps laid by the players as they seek to find the elusive Gully Foyle are the core of this story.
  • (3/5)
    For one who doesn't go in much for science fiction, I found this book quite entertaining. Maybe because the well-worn tropes (as one other reviewer discussed) and memes were still new and fresh for me. I understand that this book was sort of a ground breaker for the genre, and that many of the concepts introduced here have been greatly expanded upon by other authors. I don't think that even Star Trek has caught up to the style of teleportation, or jaunting, described here.
  • (4/5)
    This book by Bester was first published in 1956 (and has been called one of the best sci-fi novels of the 1950's and seems perenially to be on everyone's top 100 lists ...) which I didn't realise until about halfway through the book. I was very surprised! This book seems to pre-empt, take into new directions and surpass some many of the themes and ideas in contemporary sci-fi that it is still remains as original today as it no doubt did in 1956. Set against the backdrop of war against 'inner' and 'outer' planets this book truly has something for every sci-fi fan; teleportation (something that Bester deals with, for me, very intelligently. He doesn't simply say it exists he also demonstrates how society has and has had to change to deal with this), rockets, inter-planetary wars and spies, telepathy, a mysterious (and world-shatteringly) chemical substance, races against both time and enemies, improsement and escape and shady doctors in 'back-alley' surgeries to help with unwanted tatoos (... you'll have to read the book, I don't want to spoil it ...). The hero (if you can call him that) Gully Foyle is abondoned in space, his ship nearly destroyed by an enemy attack, when he sees another spaceship called the Vorga coming he thinks he is saved but when it flies by ignoring his signals his rage transforms him and drives him on to not only survive but to track down the ship and crew of Vorga with only one thing on his mind ... vengeance!4 stars - a book I look forward to re-reading.
  • (4/5)
    Possible spoiler alert. Good writer. Even though it was written in the 50's, Tiger Tiger! is not dated. Bester was ahead of his time, and should maybe be considered the first 'cyberpunk' author. The protagonist is dark predator, who finds his conscience after being confronted with his nemesis. Even though there is nothing likeable about Gully Foyle, it is hard to put the book down. Haunting, dreamlike ending. Negatives: Gullys tranformation into Geoffrey Fourmyle seemed out of character, and the end leaves you wanting, needing closure. Features: 'jaunting' (teleporting), as well as telepaths and telesends.
  • (5/5)
    Bester created here a classic story of revenge spun in an entirely amazing and creative setting with gritty and fantabulous characters. This story follows Gully Foyle, "the stereotype common man", down to the depths and up to the stars and to all the emotions and mindsets in between.
  • (3/5)
    Gets a little goofy toward the end but still entertaining.
  • (5/5)
    I was spurred to reread this book through participation in a Science Fiction reading group that started as an offshoot of a class I took last year. This book is one of the best that the group has read yet and it remains one of my favorites for a varity of reasons. The first of these reasons is the source material for the plot, since Bester adapted Dumas' The Count of Monte Cristo. This is also one of my favorite novels from my early years of reading and the revenge aspect of the Bester's novel rivals that of Dumas' romance. However, it is his imagination that soars and surprises the reader at every turn of the The Stars My Destination.The opening section depicting the discovery of "jaunting", a form of teleportation, is brilliant both in imagination and execution of the idea. It is followed by the elements of what would become, more than a decade later, known as "cyberpunk", along with mythic references, sensational satire, and a touch of synesthesia for extra effect. The hero Gully Foyle, at the beginning ("Education: None. Skills: None. Merits: None. Recommendations: None." on his Merchant Marine Card) is unremarkable in almost every aspect. His growth, however, is made interesting and more than exciting by both his exploits and his interplanetary travels. The characters he meets from "The Scientific People" to the exotic Jisbella McQueen, "hot-tempered, independent, intelligent" and someone who liked to "smash all the rules"(p 74), are further demonstration of the imaginative heft of the story.Reading this book reminded me why I enjoy science fiction. Whether it is "the greatest single SF novel", as Samuel Delaney claimed (he modestly excluded his own Dahlgren which could be considered a contender for the title), it is certainly a magnificent representative of the genre. I will end with the motto of Gully Foyle, or is it his epitaph?Gully Foyle is my nameAnd Terra is my nation.Deep space is my dwelling place,The stars my destination.
  • (3/5)
    A strange, modern take on The Count of Monte Cristo. Rather interesting, but I supposed I would have enjoyed it better if I were more familiar with the Dumas work.
  • (4/5)
    Enjoyable reading! This review is conducted about three-quarters of the way through, so I can't spoil the ending for anyone, as I don't know it yet myself.Very much in the vein of Count of Monte Cristo, this book dispenses with that novel's innocuous beginnings, and goes right to the revenge, giving us an anti-hero as a protagonist. It introduces also the concept of "jaunting", which is just self-willed teleportation, of which people in society are more or less gifted for, and spends some time at the beginning describing the societal upheaval that results from this innovation. It took awhile for me to get behind this story I'll admit, in part because the main character is so reprehensible. It's proving worthwhile sticking with it, though.
  • (2/5)
    I read this due to its inclusion on several "best-ever sci-fi" lists recently. It was written at the tail end the Golden Age, and there are oddities that read skewed to the modern eye. A female character named Jiz, for example. Yes, I giggled 3 out of every 4 times her name came up. Apparently I'm a twelve-year-old boy.

    The story is timeless- inner moral wrestling always is. The protagonist is thoroughly unlikeable. The world-building felt pretty incomplete to me, but the worlds were far less important than the geography of Gully's psyche, which was explored in detail.

    I can imagine how every sci-fi book that came out in the Golden Age must have been limned in letters of fire, the fans rabid and amazed. I can imagine this book was extraordinary when new. But for me it doesn't have the resonance of Sturgeon, Bradbury, Asimov or Heinlein. I can't say I liked it. I am glad I read it, but I won't re-read it.
  • (4/5)
    Alfred Bester's The Stars My Destination is usually considered one of the finest works of science fiction ever created. Although largely forgotten now, it is a highly imaginative piece of work which involves a sort of futuristic dystopia and a man named Gully Foyle who tries to change things based on a questionable frame of mind.Alfred Bester stands in a position on the platform of Science Fiction Greats similar to that of Ray Bradbury, Jules Verne and H.G. Wells. The only difference is that he is standing behind them and as such, is largely unheard of.The Stars My Destination is about a fictional Earth that has become controlled by the huge conglomerate corporations. The planets in the Solar System are all at war and there is much havoc associated with the Human race. The novel deals with the dark nature of people, how technology advancement can lead to a very possessive and materialistic society with an emphasis on classes and minorities and how a lack of real education brings out various powerful yet primitive factions.An interesting feature in this novel is the use of an evil hero. Gulliver (Gully) Foyle is a criminal, murderer and rapist but manages to attack the present situation he lives in because of past wrongs done to him and although he is a criminal, you still find yourself rallying on his behalf throughout the novel.This story turned out to be worthy of all its acclaim and is a fun and interesting one to read. The reader should note the curious aspects between the historical situation Alfred Bester lived in and how what he has written is very similar to a path our present society is following in many ways.
  • (4/5)
    I remember loving it when I read it as a teen. Decades later? Well... There are still things I love about it, but for everything I do love, there's a side of it I dislike. I love a lot of the imagination in this book of a world where everyone "jauntes" ie, teleports, hundreds, even a thousand miles, with a thought. (Think Apparates--the amusing thing is even how it's taught, with three buzz words, makes me think of Harry Potter.) Bester's 25th Century is worldbuilding in the best tradition--exotic and thought-provoking--but some aspects strike me as just silly. Unlike most science-fiction, which centers on an idea or ideas, the novel is just as heavily centered on character, and that's another source of my ambivalence. The story unfolds along the lines of the classic revenge plot, and the man determined to gain that revenge at all costs, Gully Foyle, is one of the most memorable protagonists in science fiction (and contrasted with and pit against some of the strongest and memorable, if problematical, secondary female characters in science fiction, especially remarkable given this book was published in 1956.) Foyle isn't a conventional hero--he starts as a beast. The original and UK title was Tiger! Tiger!, after Blake's poem The Tyger, the first verse of which heads the novel; it fits Foyle. I think how much you might or might not like this book hinges on whether you can buy Foyle's transformation into a thinking creature or empathize with him in any way. In my case, at least at second read, that's a no. The book is very influential; I've seen claims (including from Neil Gaiman in an introduction) that it's the first cyberpunk novel.
  • (4/5)
    It's easy to understand why The Stars My Destination is a landmark sci-fi novel. Like the Demolished Man, Bester helped form what we think of as modern sci-fi, with a focus on story elements rather than on fantastic technology. The Stars My Destination is the story of Gulliver Foyle, an average man in almost every way, who is trapped on a destroyed starship, the last survivor onboard. Foyle struggles to live, slowly unraveling as he ekes out his existence. Then finally he sees a ship fly close by. It seems rescue is at hand, until the ship sees him, and keeps going. Foyle vows to survive somehow, and to have his revenge.Sounds like a great premise right? And it is. Bester, however, doesn't quite live up to it. The beginning sequences are amazing, detailing Foyle's daily life on this destroyed vessel. The tension in these scenes is amazing. You really want to see how he's going to escape, and kill those that abandoned him. As the story progresses however, this quest of vengeance becomes almost secondary as Foyle gets embroiled in solar system politics. The new direction is not uninteresting by any means. Still, I was a little let down that this novel was not a sci-fi Counte of Monte Cristo.Bester throws a lot at you as well. Space travel isn't the only marvel of the future. ESP, teleportation, genetic engineering, etc. are all part of Bester's future world, some of them with thin explanations. The story gets a little messy at times, although it is never difficult to follow. Bester likes fast-paced action, which allows you to ignore some of the flaws in the story. Given the time in which it was written, Bester put together a pretty great novel, and I can see why it was so popular when it was written, given the type of sci-fi written just before this period.The only part that I could not forgive was the ending. There wasn't one, at least, not one that made any sense or gave the story closure. I won't reveal it, but be prepared for a great ride that ends in disappointment if you read this book.
  • (5/5)
    After my now ex-wife read this book (after I literally devoured it in a few sittings) she was surprised when upon completion she read the introduction and found it was written in the sixties. It reads just like a modern Gibson-style cyberpunk thriller from the postmodern era and is far ahead of its time, thematically. It has all the staples of the genre: a sexy female hit man, far off space colonies warring with an earth that has forgotten them, an apocalyptic dangerous technology. It could also be considered a pulp novel pastiche because of its hard boiled leading man. Gully Foyle is alternatively brutal and sophisticated at various points in the novel, and he shows some real character development. Highly recommended.
  • (5/5)
    I loved these stories of how anger could drive you and enable you to beat all odds. Given my family circumstances was within the Angela's ashes genre(without the positive members of the family) I had no illusions about talent and networks getting you out. It was drugs and violence or self destruction. Anger made me challenge the "system" of poverty and use education in my late 20's to give me choices that the world didn't. Books gave me a language and window into experiences that the world didn't. Gully Foyle was a hero and mentor for me!
  • (4/5)
    Very entertaining space opera. Didn't find it particularly believable however.
  • (4/5)
    A re-reading, several years after my obsesive science fiction binge, of a classic future novel of space travel and psycohkinesis. The complications of a society that can jaunte, transport through space by knowing where the start and end points are, are worked out in detail. The protagonist, Gully Foyle, in his maniacal pursuit of revenge for being left to die in a wrecked spacecraft, is a great creation
  • (5/5)
    A read a second hand copy of this when I was a kid. Threw it away once read. Didn't remember author or title. But it changed the way I thought.
  • (4/5)
    The Stars My Destination is classic 50's Sci-Fi.  A gritty everyman anti-hero in love with the woman who would destroy him and in a loners fight with those who rule the world, or in this case the Solar system.  It reminded me very much of Philip K. Dick, but slightly more literate and based on ideas that were not quite as outlandishly interesting.  The novel was heavily plot driven with little internal character development.The story is set very loosely on the back drop of a developing inner planetary system war.  The leitmotif of the plot narrative as the story shifts through its various segments is the vengeance of Gully Foyle.  Revenge for being left to die in the the cold emptiness of space.  The closer he gets to his goal the more and more singularly obsessed he becomes with it.  Intertwined with this obsession driven revenge, is the growth of Foyle from a passionate instinct driven animal, to a cold calculating reason driven man.  The transformation from the idealistic to the realistic.The culmination of the narrative produces in straight forward language the basic philosophical point Bester is trying to make.  Society is propelled forward by those rare few individuals who for whatever reason, become obsessively driven.  There is nothing special about these people.  Anyone can become one of them given the sufficient desire.  Enough obsessive passion to pursue that desire heedless of everyone and everything else.  Often these people realize and use the power of their passionate drive to purposefully manipulate society for its own protection.  To prevent the ignorance and animal nature of the everyman from destroying the society to which he belongs.  In prose that turns the individual liberty ideal of Mills on its head, Bester proposes that society needs no protectors and that it should control its own destiny, even if that destiny is its own destruction.
  • (3/5)
    This is a work of fantasy, not science fiction. In my eyes, its only redeeming feature is a short-circuited android in the concluding chapter.