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Cosmos: A Personal Voyage

Cosmos: A Personal Voyage


Cosmos: A Personal Voyage

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (209 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
14 ore
Pubblicato:
May 30, 2017
ISBN:
9781531888046
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

Cosmos is one of the bestselling science books of all time. In clear-eyed prose, Sagan reveals a jewel-like blue world inhabited by a life form that is just beginning to discover its own identity and to venture into the vast ocean of space. Featuring a new Introduction by Sagan’s collaborator, Ann Druyan, and a new Foreword by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, Cosmos retraces the fourteen billion years of cosmic evolution that have transformed matter into consciousness, exploring such topics as the origin of life, the human brain, Egyptian hieroglyphics, spacecraft missions, the death of the Sun, the evolution of galaxies, and the forces and individuals who helped to shape modern science. Includes introductory music: Heaven and Hell by Vangelis from Cosmos: A Personal Voyage used with permission from Druyan-Sagan Associates, Inc. All rights reserved.
Pubblicato:
May 30, 2017
ISBN:
9781531888046
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Carl Sagan was Professor of Astronomy and Space Sciences and Director of the Laboratory for Planetary Studies at Cornell University. He played a leading role in the Mariner, Viking, and Voyager spacecraft expeditions, for which he received the NASA medals for Exceptional Scientific Achievement. Dr. Sagan received the Pulitzer Prize and the highest awards of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Science Foundation for his contributions to science, literature, education, and the preservation of the environment. His book Cosmos was the bestselling science book ever published in the English language, and his bestselling novel, Contact, was turned into a major motion picture.

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Cosa pensano gli utenti di Cosmos

4.7
209 valutazioni / 33 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    As a B. Dalton science book buyer, this was one of my few "bestsellers"! Gotta love that!
  • (5/5)
    I can remember watching the TV series when it was first shown on UK TV and being awe-struck. It was around the time of the Voyager or was it Pioneer pictures of the outer solar system and really made me think about life the universe and everything.I think I saw the last two episodes on a tiny black and white set, equipped with a very poor arial, in the kitchen of a caravan in Cornwall, surrounded by snoring relatives, nearly all of whom are now dead BTW. Tempus Fugit.I got the book for Xmas and it still has my name and address and a very short phone number written inside the cover.I was slightly apprehensive about re-reading this book after all these years just in case it disappointed me thanks to a combination of 30 years of scientific progress and the golden light of memory. No a bit of it, still a wonderfully approachable introduction to Life the Universe and Everything, told with respect for the readers intelligence and a sense of the awe and sheer enjoyment that can be had in understanding the world we live in which I find infectious. Not many books can include a reference to a mathematical proof as an appendix which actually provides enjoyment.I heartily recommend this book especially, to 10 to 14 year olds.
  • (5/5)
    Cosmos tells the fascinating story of how fifteen billion years of cosmic evolution transformed matter and life into consciousness, of how science and civilization grew up together, and of the forces and individuals who helped shape modern science.
  • (5/5)
    Reading Carl Sagan's book is just pleasure, I wish my textbooks were like this! Once you start reading the book, its difficult to keep it down.The book talks about variety of topics about cosmos and it's cousins. The scope of the book is just too vast making the book a must read. The book starts with some of the very basic concepts and stretches to the deep corners of the universe.As always, his language is simple makes even complex subjects easily understandable."Biology is more like history than physics. You have to know the past to understand the present."
  • (5/5)
    The book follows the 13 episode series in content. Nevertheless, I believe that this is a worthy read even for those that have watched every episode of Cosmos. The book allows Sagan to go into a bit more detail on certain topics (e.g. the planetary orbits in our solar system). Yet there are many insights in the series that were not present in the book.I suppose what it comes down to is this: although the series and the book are very closely aligned, they are not in perfect alignment. Something can be gained from the book that is not available in the series, and vice versa. A true Sagan fan should embrace both.
  • (5/5)
    Possibly the first 'Scientist' who was able to popularise Astronomy/Science to the mass audience and his book descibes in a very 'layman' fashion which was mostly why it was a success around the world. Carl Sagan - he who brought the Heavens back 'down to earth'.
  • (3/5)
    Interesting and not written too deep or over my head. Nice way of describing our place in the universe.
  • (5/5)
    I read this book once as a child, I was perhaps 12, and looking back, seeing the influence it has asserted on western culture since that time, is amazing. So much of myself I can trace directly back to his books, and this one book in particular. To those of you out there who had a chance to meet him, I envy you.
  • (4/5)
    A fun read especially after 20 years (maybe 30 soon?). I found my mom's copy. If you are going to read this book, find the hardcover edition with the full page color pictures. This is where Sagan ties everything together beautifully.
  • (5/5)
    It is an older book,and much has been done in astronomy since 1980. He mentions the supernovae observed by Brahe in 1572 and by Kepler in 1604, and laments that there have been none since. He talks about no observation of a comet colliding with a planet.Since the publication, both have been observed.But it is not so much the specifics of astronomy that make this a must read book, even today with the retiring shuttle program, the coming replacement of Hubble evidencing the age of the book.That said, the science in the book remains true, and the presentation is an excellent help for any who are new to the study of astronomy. There is the additional benefit today of looking back to appreciate the vision that Carl Sagan had in 1980.Sagan covers the cosmos in this book. He offers a modern perspective, informed with scientific method and scientific knowledge of multiple fields, an understanding and an appreciation of faith, a hope and a challenge for us all.This with the added benefit that Carl Sagan writes well. His understated irony will provide you with many powerful and memorable quotes, as well as many opportunities to smile.Enjoy his knowledge, his perspective, his hope, and his challenge for us.
  • (5/5)
    While this book is now somewhat dated, it is still worth reading for an excellent view of our place in the universe.
  • (5/5)
    it is a classic but still a great book to listen to.
  • (5/5)
    Beautifully written history of mans greatest achievement, the scientific method. It delves into the major players of history to which got us to the modern age. Characters that were a detriment to science and figures that were key in unlocking new truths of the universe. It also gives us a cosmic perspective of the responsibility we have as earths conscious arbiters of change. Whether we will self destruct or continue to venture as curious creatures of the cosmos to reach deeper truths.
  • (5/5)
    What an inspiring book. Very clever guy that Carl Sagan. Will definetly listen to his other books..
  • (5/5)
    Incredible book! I’m absolutely awestruck. Loved every second of it plus the fact it was written over 40 years ago makes it that much better.
  • (5/5)
    Carl Sagan wrote COSMOS with his partner to promote human potential. At the end of his vast exploration of incredible world(s), he makes an aside: "Only once before in our history was there the promise of a brilliant scientific civilization." [333] We have lost civilization, perhaps many times. We start to get the excitement, the brilliance gets expressed as beauty and grace, and then greedy idiots waste, kill, and take stuff. Sagan published several books that helped regular people understand ideas about the universe, including Dragons of Eden: Speculations of the Evolution of Human Intelligence (1977), which won the Pulitzer Prize, and this one. According to TWA, "Cosmos" is considered the best-selling science book ever published in English.
  • (5/5)
    I remember Carl Sagan lecturing in this series on PBS. I wish this audiobook had his voice recorded, his soft, calming voice was one of the best parts of the series.
  • (4/5)
    The Cosmos TV series of 1980 seems to have been a life-transforming experience for a lot of people I know, but I somehow missed out on it at the time: I think simply because it was shown on the BBC while I was a physics undergraduate, and we didn't really get the chance to watch TV at all during term-time, even if it was physics-related (too much other stuff going on).Anyway, the book has now popped up on audio, so I thought I'd give it a chance and find out what all the fuss was about.As the title implies, it's an attempt to describe everything, to the extent that it was known in 1980, with the emphasis on astrophysics and planetary science, but a lot of excursions into the history of science and philosophy, biology and the origins of life, prospects for finding other intelligent life elsewhere in the galaxy, and so on. All ground that has been gone over by a lot of other people since then, but still very nicely presented, in a way that should be accessible to most people, but without much obvious dumbing-down. Obviously it has the limitations of when it was written and the way it was written as a companion to a TV series: there's a lot of full-on science-evangelism and some very elated passages of awe-and-wonder that haven't aged as well as they might have. But on the whole it still struck me as quite readable, and I'm sure I learnt one or two things I didn't know in between all the recapitulation of things I once knew about the Solar System. Interesting to see how the balance of optimism and terror has shifted since 1980: we don't seem to be as worried about nuclear weapons and population growth as we were forty years ago (even though neither threat has gone away), and equally we seem to have lost a lot of the interest we had in exploring space, but climate-change now has moved from a speculative footnote to centre-stage. I suspect that Sagan, were he still with us, would have been revising down his estimate for the likelihood that intelligent civilisations would achieve interstellar travel before destroying themselves.
  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    It's safe to say this book changed my life. I'm so lucky to have found this book at the age of 13 when all my powers of curiosity were heightened and searching. Once you view the world from the perspective of Cosmos, you feel incredibly lucky to be a part of history.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    Much better than the TV show

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)
    First of all, I find the style employed by Sagan very readable. He does not dumb down what he is talking about, but he makes it accessible for someone without an intense background in science courses. I also like that much of the foundation of the book is comprised of concepts and ideas that I have already learned about and understand. Such a jumping off point made for easier comprehension of more in depth discussion. As for the subjects he treated, they ranged a wide spectrum, including biology, astronomy, evolution, and genetics. In tackling these topics he refers to many instances in history, philosophy, religion, and folklore, which adds a particular richness that most people at first glance might not assign to science. The one pitfall of this book is that it was written over twenty years ago—so it is dated. Despite this, much of the book is still pertinent, and the insights packed in every page made it a worthwhile read for me. Reading Carl Sagan is like having a passionate conversation with a friend that happens to be a scientist. He is completely amiable in every sentence that he writes. Not only did I find that this book educated me on a range of topics that I was interested in, but it made me feel better equipped in my knowledge of the planet I live on and the universe around me.
  • (5/5)
    Clearly yet eloquently, astronomer Carl Sagan takes the reader on a magnificent tour of fourteen billion years of cosmic evolution. Focusing on the stars, on history, on the human condition, he weaves a mesmerizing tale of what was, what is, and what may one day be. It’s a dazzling tour de force; this book should be on everyone’s must-read list.Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    This is a book about the history and basic concepts of science--and above all about wonder and the “exploration” of the “cosmic perspective.” We get a guided tour through the solar system and beyond. The back of the book boasts this is “one of the best-selling science books in the English language” and we’re told its companion 13-part television series, which aired in 1980, was “the most widely watched series in the history of American public television.” In the 1984 introduction Sagan tells us that “the book and the television series evolved together;” the 13 chapters of the book correspond to the 13 episodes of the series. A book however, allowed Sagan to go “more deeply into many topics.” This isn’t simply the script to the series--it’s much more; it’s own entity. Sagan says in the 1984 introduction to the book that little of the science in the few years since had become “obsolete” despite “new findings.” Over two decades has gone past since and I’d say from what I know that’s still true--of the science. His politics, mostly hammered upon in the last chapter, struck me as not just preachy and out of place but in its moral equivalency of the old Soviet Union and the United States as dangerously naive as the Noninterventionist "America First" Movement that sought to appease Hitler. If today global warming is all the rage, Sagan’s bete noir then was the prospect of a nuclear winter. Sagan can also be “scientist-centric” in ways that sometimes annoyed me, as when he complained that our consumer culture is cluttering the radio waves which he needs to seek extraterrestrial life! In any case, the Soviets are a thing of the past, and what annoyed outweighed by what was enjoyed.And even if some of its facts are no longer true--Pluto, for instance, being demoted from a planet (and little here involving quantum mechanics)--I’d say there’s still some value in the book in sparking an interest and understanding of science. Sagan isn’t just lucid, with the ability to make an ordinary person understand difficult concepts and immense scales (although not even he, Hawking or Einstein can make Relativity explicable to me) but he can write poetic prose that inspires awe in the workings of the universe. And I do find some of his social speculations interesting--for instance the possible connection between slavery, the mind/body estrangement promoted by philosophers such as Plato and the extinguishing of the incipient scientific revolution of the Hellenistic Age. One major caveat though is that if you buy it, do so in trade paperback or hardcover form. Not only does the mass market paperback stint on the spectacular photographs included in those editions, it features eye-killing tiny font. Although truth to tell, I loved Sagan’s Dragons of Eden and The Demon-Haunted World a lot more than Cosmos. Maybe because in the end, too much of the material in Cosmos was already familiar to me. And given the intervening years dating much of the material, I'd recommend books by Hawking, Bill Bryson or Brian Greene on this theme over Cosmos.
  • (5/5)
    A wonderful introduction to science. Some parts were a bit dated.
  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    I remember this PBS series from when I was a kid. The shots of space and interviews with well spoken scientists stuck with me as I grew up and had a continued casual interest in physics and astronomy. While neither of these academic disciplines were ever my strong suit I still like to read up on the Hubble Space Telescope and whatever NASA is up to these days.Sagan's companion to the TV series goes much further than what I remember. I did not expect the spiritual direction in which he takes the big ideas in science that he presents. The book presents the love of science that has driven humanity to continue to ask questions of the universe around us. I found this book to be as informative in its exploration of learning and inquiry as it is about the actual findings concerning the universe. It presents a truly awesome view of the universe that even delves into the way that we can use our knowledge of the physical world to live better social and spiritual lives. Good freakin' stuff!

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    When you truly understand Carl Sagan's views of the Cosmos, it will become very clear that we are only just beginning our journey. It is no wonder that this book is a classic for all of time. Carl Sagan was truly one of the higher forms of intelligent life

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    I watched the Cosmos series about 16 years in High School. I was one of the few who actually enjoyed it, but never got around to reading the book until now. It brought back some good memories of the wondrous historic detail and and the exciting scientific facts and theories about this universe of which we are lucky enough to be floating around. Even many years later this was a fresh new view into the Cosmos. My only wish would be to be around long enough to actually witness some of the great discoveries that are bound to be had...probably many many thousands (or millions) of years from now. Excellent book!

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    Read this back when it came out. I remember watching the TV show. It was good. I remember one episode when he wondered what would happen when Voyager left the solar system. Then the 1st Star Trek movie came out & said an alien civilization would build a giant complex & send it back to earth. Great timing.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    Written in 1980s, Cosmos is a comprehensive general science book dealing with history of astronomy and evolution. Book provides a overview of our universe and planet, regarding laws that govern them, how they were discovered, and what lies ahead. Information is well researched and well written in captivating way.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    The classic introduction to astronomy and cosomolgy. I remember watching the TV series with Carl Sagan as a teenager, it was very inspirational.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile