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Hunted

Hunted


Hunted

valutazioni:
4/5 (254 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
9 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Mar 14, 2017
ISBN:
9780062661685
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

New York Times bestselling author Meagan Spooner spins a thoroughly thrilling Beauty and the Beast story for the modern age, expertly woven with spellbinding romance, intrigue, and suspense that readers won't soon be able to forget.

Beauty knows the Beast's forest in her bones-and in her blood. After all, her father is the only hunter who's ever come close to discovering its secrets. So when her father loses his fortune and moves Yeva and her sisters out of their comfortable home among the aristocracy and back to the outskirts of town, Yeva is secretly relieved. Out in the wilderness, there's no pressure to make idle chatter with vapid baronessas . . . or to submit to marrying a wealthy gentleman. But Yeva's father's misfortune may have cost him his mind, and when he goes missing in the woods, Yeva sets her sights on one prey: the creature he'd been obsessively tracking just before his disappearance. The Beast.

Deaf to her sisters' protests, Yeva hunts this strange creature back into his own territory-a cursed valley, a ruined castle, and a world of magical creatures that Yeva's only heard about in fairy tales. A world that can bring her ruin, or salvation. Who will survive: the Beauty, or the Beast?

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Mar 14, 2017
ISBN:
9780062661685
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Informazioni sull'autore

New York Times bestselling author Meagan Spooner grew up reading and writing every spare moment of the day while dreaming about life as an archaeologist, a marine biologist, or an astronaut. She graduated from Hamilton College in New York State with a degree in playwriting. She’s traveled all over the world, to places such as Egypt, Australia, South Africa, the Arctic, Greece, Antarctica, and the Galápagos Islands, and there’s a bit of every trip in every story she writes. She currently lives and writes in Asheville, North Carolina, but the siren call of travel is hard to resist, and there’s no telling how long she’ll stay there. She’s the coauthor of the award-winning Starbound Trilogy (These Broken Stars, This Shattered World, Their Fractured Light) and the Skylark Trilogy (Skylark, Shadowlark, Lark Ascending) as well as this “Beauty and the Beast” retelling. In her spare time she plays guitar, plays video games, plays with her cat, and reads. www.meaganspooner.com

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4.0
254 valutazioni / 30 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this retelling of Beauty and the Beast. I especially love that it is a stand alone and not a series. It has quite a lot of action and not really any romance. I also liked the different folk tale parts of the story even though I felt like the firebird aspect could have been explained a little more clearly. That is the main reason I only gave it 4 stars instead of 5. In the end the firebird was a pretty big part of it and it just didn't seem to fit quite right to me.
  • (4/5)
    The story really kept me guessing even though I love Beauty and the Beast retellings and have read quite a few. This retelling was very unique. Some parts were pretty gory, which is not my taste and why I gave it 4 stars, instead of 5 stars. The author's note at the end was 5 stars. The message of the book was great though I feel spoiler-ish in writing it out so I'd better add a spoiler alert- Don't waste your life looking for a happy ending but instead focus on living your life happily.
  • (5/5)
    I love Beauty and the Beast.
    Wonderful retelling of beauty and the beast.
  • (5/5)
    this was good for a retelling I enjoyed it. The narrator was great
  • (4/5)
    The book was so magical and the writing was insane!

    4.7

    REVIEW WILL BE UP SOON
  • (3/5)
    3.5 stars

    It’s a lovely retelling of beauty and the beast, with well thought out characters and plot. My main complaint is that it was too slow for me. It could of been a slimmer book but I understand the author wanted to truly build the understanding of the fairytale and curse. Enjoyable
  • (4/5)
    The writing style is exquisitely magical! It really felt like reading a fairy tale however, the plot seems to lack a proper climax. It was enjoyable still!
  • (5/5)
    This is actually my new favorite fairy tale retelling. It’s just so unique and well written.
  • (4/5)
    What a wonderful retelling of. Beauty and the Beast! Meagan Spooner struck at the heart of the story, what we want and what we think we want. This is a new favorite!
  • (3/5)
    At one point it just was a little too slow
  • (5/5)
    The story is very magical and well written.. such an enchanting trip!
  • (4/5)
    I have liked Meagan's writing ever since i read Sherwood, how ever i was a bit distracted when i was listening to this book... the pace was a lot slower and even though there were no word dump it felt long... still it grabbed me enough to make me want to know how it will end.. and boy that ending saved this book from the 3 stars i originally planned to give.
    This is a book that i would keep for those days that i just want to get lost in my own head and keep reality away.
  • (2/5)
    Not that great but passes the time. It was okay.
  • (4/5)
    I love it! I love beauty and the beast retelling. and this was beautiful.
    I feel many things for this and I'm glad I picked it up again. I like the fairy tales references in this.
    the romance was rather slow and I love it! her relationship with the beast was well developed and make my heart swoon.
  • (4/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    A unique, beautiful re-imagining of Beauty and the Beast which also incorporates elements from Russian tales like The Firebird and Vasalisa the Beautiful. Absolutely lovely.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    This was a lovely retelling of Beauty and the Beast. The setting seems to be somewhere in Russia. Yeva is the youngest of three sisters of a man who is now a merchant but who was once a famous hunter. When he loses his fortune in a risky venture, they go back to his long-abandoned hunting cabin deep in the forest. He resumes hunting but is losing his mind because he feels he is being watched. When Yeva, called Beauty inside her family, goes out to look for him she finds herself captured by a Beast who has the need of a hunter. During her imprisonment she shares stories so that she can hear the sound of a human voice and has Beast as her mainly unseen audience. Her stories recall his human side which had been getting lost in the Beast.I loved the language in this story. I loved that Beauty was always someone looking for something else -- that she never felt comfortable in any situation because she was always looking to the horizon for more. Beast was the same way which led to him being cursed by the elusive firebird. I loved the interludes when the Beast is the narrator. It is easy to see the conflict in his dual nature. Even if you know the story, this version is well worth reading for the twists and turns Ms. Spooner adds and the wonderful, descriptive language and the nuanced characters. I highly recommend it to all lovers of fairy tales.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    I bought this book for the dedication, and I'm happy to say the story lived up to it's promise. This is an excellent fairy-tale retelling that beautifully fleshes out and breathes life in the old, familiar story. This is my first work by Meagan Spooner, but will not be my last.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    It took this book 201 pages to finally get to the real deal: magic. It was clearly dragging, though I enjoyed the romantic bits here and there. But as soon as it picked up, it was excellent! Everything happened in a whirlwind of magic, love, friendship, and loyalty! I loved the ending - so much that I now need Hunted on my own shelves. Although I don't like hunting, I thought it was really well depicted and fitted this story. As for the heroine, Yeva (Beauty), she has such a strong will, yet has her heart in the right place. I had heard she was a strong heroine and I saw it for myself! I also liked how we sometimes saw things from the Beast's POV as in a secret diary only we could read.In conclusion, I didn't think much of the first 200 pages of the story (except for the great heroine and the emotional relationships she has with her family and prospect husband), but if you can push through it, I promise you the ending is mind-blowing. And if you're like me, someone who has a deep want in life (though you don't know for what) for something more, this book will hit right home. Because it did with me. I hope it does with you for never had I seen such a flawless description of that burning want.This is a retelling of the beloved tale of Beauty & the Beast and it does its job as a ''new'' fairy tale fantastically.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    very good.love it. mysterious. very much recommendable dkdksodhc jdjdj Fjdj

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    fantastic retelling of Beauty and the Beast The Firebird - intense, dramatic, and stunning, with the usual spectacular writing I expect from this author.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)
    Wanting leads to more wanting. Desire is a fire that is never satisfied. What is your fire bird?
  • (2/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    Really slow book and ALOT like others I have read. It was clean and an ok retelling of beauty and the beast.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)
    “She wept because she did not know what she wanted, and because she wanted everything.”Yeva has never been comfortable living among the town aristocrats but instead dreams of the stories her father would tell her when she was younger; of the forest and the magic contained within. When her father loses his fortune and they are forced to move back to his lodge in the woods, Yeva could not be more content knowing she can spend her days familiarizing herself once again with the woods even though she knows it’s not a reasonable way for her to spend her life. Her father also begins spending his days and nights in the woods, mentioning hunting a beast and when he fails to come home after weeks of being gone, Yeva sets out to help him only to be captured by the beast that her father was hunting.“She moves like beauty, she whispers to us of wind and forest—and she tells us stories, such stories that we wake in the night, dreaming dreams of a life long past. she reminds us of what we used to be.She reminds us of what we could be.”Hunted is told primarily from Yeva’s point of view but is interspersed with short snippets from the Beast, showing the constant battle between his animalistic side while he fights to retain a hold of his humanity. Yeva is kept in a cell for weeks on end, telling him stories of Ivan and the Firebird to the one on the other side of her cell door who brings her food every day, having no idea that he is also her captor. The Beast finally shows himself to her and reveals that he captured her for a purpose: she must train to be a more superior hunter than she already is because she’s the only one that can kill the creature responsible for cursing him.Hunted is a combination of the classic Beauty and the Beast fairy tale with the Ivan, the Firebird, and the Gray Wolf Russian fairy tale and it’s a slow to unfold type of story. There’s also a disassociation from any sort of emotional connection that was key in my own connection with the story. I found it to be a beautiful story in essence of a young girl not knowing what to do with her life, wandering aimlessly, and I really wanted to feel her adversity but I never quite felt like there is much at stake for our young heroine. The significance behind the Firebird plays a huge role in this tale, as well as storytelling in general, and the romantic building blocks were left feeling incomplete in the attempts at focusing on the bigger picture. There is a note at the end Spooner includes regarding the origins of this story and the lengthy process it took to come to fruition was a heartwarming story. Her dedication to all of her readers was unbelievably touching and made me wish I had loved this story more than I did.‘Male or female, young or old, if you’re reading this book, then you’re also that child reading by flashlight and dreaming of other worlds. Don’t be scared of her, that inner Beauty, or her dreams. Let her out. She’s you, and she’s me, and she’s magic.There’s no such thing as living happily ever after — there’s only living. We make the choice to do it happily.’
  • (4/5)
    Note: Some spoilers if you do not know the story of “Beauty and the Beast.”This is a retelling of the archetypical story of “girl meets bad boy with heart of gold,” i.e., "Beauty and the Beast."Yeva is the youngest of three daughters, and has always been called Beauty by her father. Her father, an excellent hunter, became a merchant to make a better living, and then lost his fortune. He was forced to return to a life of hunting, but seemed to go mad, claiming a mythical beast was tracking him and driving away all the game. And then one day he didn’t return.Yeva was taught to hunt by her father when she was young, and had always felt drawn to the forest. Now living in the city, she harbors a dissatisfaction with her life the origins of which she cannot herself articulate. She is restless and doesn’t feel she belongs somehow. When her father disappeared and she returned to the forest to look for him, she felt herself getting renewed. But then her joy turned to dismay when she came upon his body, and nearby, a fearsome beast. She tried to kill it, but instead, it captured her. Besides the narration of Yeva, there are also intermittent segments by The Beast, who is looking for a good hunter to help break the curse on him. Since he can no longer count on the father, he focuses his attention on the daughter. He finds he is fascinated by her: “She moves like an animal in a woman’s body. She moves like beauty.”Beauty can’t see in the pitch-dark place she is being held, but thinks the man who communicates with her behind the door and who leaves her food is a sympathetic rescuer. She feels like she is going crazy from the isolation, and begins speaking through the door of anything and everything that came to her mind, “to fill the hungry silence.”First she talks to her mysterious rescuer about her family, and then begins to relate to him the Russian fairy tales her father used to tell her.The man behind the door agrees to let her out of the dark dungeon but only if she promises to keep on her blindfold; he threatens to kill her if she removes it.With Beauty now outside the dungeon and in a warmer place, The Beast asks her to keep telling more stories. He seems particularly interested in the tale of Ivan, the young prince who tried to capture the Firebird. At one point though, Beauty manages to get the blindfold off, and realizes her “ally” is also her captor: he is The Beast. Since she believes The Beast killed her father, her feelings about him turn to hate, and to a desire for revenge. The Beast observes that now:“There is no animal in her. The way she speaks to us now, so full of fury, is more human than anything we have experienced in many long years. Animals don’t hate. That is the rightful domain of humanity.. . . . It is better this way, that she see us for what we are. We are pleased. She is strong still, despite her illness, and skilled. She will do what we require of her, and it will be done. We will be free.”She agrees to stay with him as he insists (threatening to harm her family if she does not), but does not agree she won’t try to kill him again. He glowers, “If you try to kill us again, make certain you succeed.”He does need her to kill someone, but he can’t say who it is, because that is part of the spell he is under. As Beauty observes, “In every fairy tale there were rules. Even monsters could not break them. And where, except in fairy tales, did there exist talking beasts?” She muses that “[s]he had never imagined the things her father told her might be reality.” The Beast wants to satisfy her curiosity, but resolves: "We will not break the terms of our sentence. We cannot explain, or we risk remaining trapped together for the rest of eternity.”He makes her practice hunting every day. Then he trains her to see the magic in his forest and hear its music. She can hear the music that The Beast emits too. He lets her see the castle where he lives as well, and to see more glimpses of his life there. She began to be less afraid of him, and at moments, to see his human side coming through.Still, she is determined to avenge the death of her father. One night she creeps up on him when he is sleeping and is sure she has delivered a death blow. But as she discovers, he cannot be killed. And she also learns he wasn’t the one who killed her father. “Tell me,’ The Beast said softly. ‘If you had known, from the start, that I could not be killed, that you would never have your vengeance . . . would you have stayed?” And indeed, now that she has nothing more to keep her there with The Beast, she feels she must leave to go back to her family. After she returns to them though, she apprehends - through her dreams - that the part of The Beast that is human is beginning to recede. Yeva decides she must go to The Beast again, and rescue him. She now realizes that "Her Beast was Prince Ivan,” and that, as per the fairy tale about the prince, she needs to find the Firebird to save him. But when she finds it, she learns another truth: the Firebird is the manifestation of an idea: it is the goal; the reward at the end of the quest; what everyone is looking for. As the Firebird explains, “I am the conclusion of your journey. All you’ve ever wanted. Magic. The music of the forest.” Yeva is trapped by the Firebird, with little hope of escape. Then The Beast arrives, but not necessarily to save her. He is more wolf than man now, and somehow Yeva must bring him back to humanity before he kills her. In the process, they both discover what the curse really is, and what it would actually take to break it.Evaluation: This retelling is well done, and quite romantic. I loved the slow simmering of the feelings for one another between Beauty and The Beast, and the self-awareness in each of them that these feelings induced. And of course like any fairy tale, this one is replete with thought-provoking metaphors - from the dual nature of humans, to the source of worth in a person, to the difficulties in identifying what you really want in life.
  • (4/5)
    A retelling of Beauty and the Beast that does so many things right, particularly telling its own story, something new and different, even as it keeps to the general shape of a tale as old as time.After Yeva’s father loses his business, he retreats to his old hunting lodge with his daughters. While he hunts for a way to reverse his fortunes, Yeva hunts for food to keep her family alive though the winter.When her father goes missing, Yeva looks for him… and she falls into the hands of the Beast.The Beast wants a hunter. And Yeva wants revenge.One of my favourite things in these sorts of stories is when knowing folk- and fairy-tales is useful. (I like meta commentary and genre-savvy heroines, and I suppose there’s also something appealing about the idea that reading these sorts of stories is useful). So I liked the connections between the stories Yeva tells - that her father originally told her - and the story she finds herself caught up in.I also liked Yeva’s relationship with her sisters, and the importance of her relationship with her dog Doe-Eyes. And the way the story explores the pitfalls of wanting more than what you have, wanting something which may be unattainable, was unexpected.Yeva’s father began making forays into the surrounding forest, learning the woods again. He’d taught Yeva that the key to being a good hunter was not to track a creature through the forest but to know the forest so well it was like tracking your prey through your own home. He rarely came back with much those early days, but he made imminent plans for trips deeper into the woods. Yeva begged him to let her come along. “You’re not a child anymore,” said her father with a sigh. “When I’ve paid my debts we’ll move back to town. By that time, I fear, you’ll have gone so wild that the confines of civilisation will break your heart.” “Please,” was all Yeva could think of to say. She had no argument against it - even years after the last time they had been hunting together, she still longed for the dark, cold, cathedral of the wood.I listened to most of this as an audiobook before switching to the ebook. Rather to my surprise, I discovered I preferred reading it to myself. Perhaps because Hunted isn’t filled with lively conversations, it isn’t the sort of story where hearing it read aloud highlights the humour and enhances the reading experience?Banter is possibly the only thing this retelling doesn’t have - which is not to say banter was needed. I enjoyed this as it is.
  • (5/5)
    This novel is a re-telling of Beauty and the Beast, which takes place in a Slavic land. I need to confess. I love retellings of Beauty and the Beast--I read pretty much all of them, so I will be biased on this book. I’m also learning a lot about Slavic stories that have escaped me for all of these years; these stories are darker and more magical than our stories. This novel was the perfect one to capture my attention.Beauty, otherwise known as Yeva, lives with her father and two sisters in a lovely house with a bright future, but Yeva is bored. She likes to hunt and has been trained to hunt by her father who has now decided that hunting isn’t ladylike and won’t get her a husband. Yeva now must hang out with the Baroness. Sewing and talking is just boring. The situation changes quickly when her father loses the family’s fortune, and they have to move to their old rundown cottage in the woods. Her sisters are dependent on their father and Yeva for food from hunts. When their father doesn’t return, Beauty is fearful of what could have happened. Their father often told Beauty (his nickname for Yeva) of the creatures in the forest--could one of them have done something to him?Yeva departs the cottage, despite her sisters’ pleadings that they need her and will starve without her. Perhaps this choice is selfish--they could very well die from starvation. They have one faithful servant and are awaiting one sister’s fiancé to even see if he’ll marry a poor girl now. If Yeva doesn’t return, what will happen to them? Yeva refuses to stay and enters the forest. After days, Beauty experiences the magic of the forest and finds her father’s remains next to the Beast. The Beast kidnaps Beauty and takes her to his home because he needs her hunting skills.The relationship between the Beast and Yeva is similar to our stories we know but very different in that it’s darker. You’ll have a dragon and a talking fox along with other unusual magic in this novel. I love how different it is and I really enjoyed their relationship. She is determined to kill the Beast--and he seems worthy of death. Like I said--darker! I suggest it for anyone who likes fantasy novels.
  • (3/5)
    HUNTED was a very unique spin on Beauty and the Beast, but it didn't quite pull me in like I wanted it to. In HUNTED, Beauty is the vengeful huntress looking for her missing father only to find herself a captive of the beast. I liked Yeva. She was fierce when she needed to be and I liked how she took care of her family. She had a lot of struggles to work through and it was easy to connect to them. I never really connected to the Beast, but I did enjoy the lore that was involved in telling his story.The romance—if you can really call it that— was very slow. It was one of those things were Yeva despised the beast until she was free of him and then she realized that she loved him in the end. I found the story very interesting, but the pace at times was extremely slow. The ending events felt weird. The writing felt different from the rest of the story and my interest kind of withered at that point. * This book was provided free of charge from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book! Beauty and the Beast will never be the same one dimensional childrens story again. This was a beautifully complicated journey that I thoroughly enjoyed.
  • (4/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    This is a retelling of Beauty and Beast with an obvious Russian influence. Yeva is the youngest of three sisters and is the most beautiful. As a young child she run the through the forest and hunt with her father. Now that she is a young women she is being sent to court as one of the baronessa's ladies, but Yeva would rather be out hunting. Eventually, Yeva's father loses his fortune and moves the family to edge of town that borders the woods. Yeva's father is convinced there is a "beast" in the woods and goes out to hunt him one day and never returns. Determined to get her father back, Yeva sets out to find him and hunt the beast. And she succeeds in tracking the beast back to the desolate valley he lives in. In the valley Yeva discovers a ruined castle and creatures she's only hear about in fairy tales. True to Beauty and the Beast tales, Yeva is captured by the beast and must figure a way out of the predicament. Along the way she is forced to interact with the surly beast and learns of his curse. Now she is determined to help him break it and return home to her family.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (3/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    I read this book in about 6 hours, almost one sitting. It was quite compelling, and I enjoyed the take on Beauty and the Beast. However, the characters were not as rich as I was hoping they would be. The world described was just kind of meh as well. The woods were really cool, but I found I wanted more from the descriptions and the world building. I liked that Yeva was a hunter, and that she could fend for herself. I did find though, that the way the author tried to tie in reading and books, was really weak.

    Overall, it was a fun book, but not my favourite retelling.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile