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Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow

Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow

Scritto da Yuval Noah Harari

Narrato da Derek Perkins


Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow

Scritto da Yuval Noah Harari

Narrato da Derek Perkins

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (1,199 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
14 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Feb 21, 2017
ISBN:
9780062657299
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Nota del redattore

What the future holds…

Few authors have the power to truly expand or alter your worldview, but Yuval Noah Harari is certainly among those few. Where Harari’s “Sapiens” gave a unique look at humanity’s evolutionary past, “Homo Deus” postulates on our possible futures.

Descrizione

Yuval Noah Harari, author of the critically-acclaimed New York Times bestseller and international phenomenon Sapiens, returns with an equally original, compelling, and provocative book, turning his focus toward humanity's future, and our quest to upgrade humans into gods.

Over the past century humankind has managed to do the impossible and rein in famine, plague, and war. This may seem hard to accept, but, as Harari explains in his trademark style—thorough, yet riveting—famine, plague and war have been transformed from incomprehensible and uncontrollable forces of nature into manageable challenges. For the first time ever, more people die from eating too much than from eating too little; more people die from old age than from infectious diseases; and more people commit suicide than are killed by soldiers, terrorists and criminals put together. The average American is a thousand times more likely to die from binging at McDonalds than from being blown up by Al Qaeda.

What then will replace famine, plague, and war at the top of the human agenda? As the self-made gods of planet earth, what destinies will we set ourselves, and which quests will we undertake? Homo Deus explores the projects, dreams and nightmares that will shape the twenty-first century-from overcoming death to creating artificial life. It asks the fundamental questions: Where do we go from here? And how will we protect this fragile world from our own destructive powers? This is the next stage of evolution. This is Homo Deus.

With the same insight and clarity that made Sapiens an international hit and a New York Times bestseller, Harari maps out our future.

A HarperAudio production.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Feb 21, 2017
ISBN:
9780062657299
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

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Informazioni sull'autore

Prof. Yuval Noah Harari is a historian, philosopher, and the bestselling author of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, and Sapiens: A Graphic History. His books have sold 27.5 Million copies in 60 languages, and he is considered one of the world’s most influential public intellectuals today. The Guardian has credited Sapiens with revolutionizing the non-fiction market and popularizing “brainy books”. In 2020 Harari joined forces with renowned comics artists David Vandermeulen and Daniel Casanave, to create Sapiens: A Graphic History: a radical adaptation of the original Sapiens into a graphic novel series that is bursting with wit, humour and colour (to be launched fall 2020). This illustrated book casts Yuval Noah Harari in the role of guide, who takes the reader through the entire history of the human species, accompanied by a range of fictional characters and traveling through time, space and popular culture references. Born in Haifa, Israel, in 1976, Harari received his PhD from the University of Oxford in 2002, and is currently a lecturer at the Department of History, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He originally specialized in world history, medieval history and military history, and his current research focuses on macro-historical questions such as: What is the relationship between history and biology? What is the essential difference between Homo sapiens and other animals? Is there justice in history? Does history have a direction? Did people become happier as history unfolded? What ethical questions do science and technology raise in the 21st century?

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Recensioni della critica

  • Two YC partners — La La Media CEO Geoff Ralston and scientist Joe Betts-Lacroix — chose "Homo Deus." Ralston says on the YC blog, "Harari continues his masterful exploration of the human story. … The book makes you rethink what it is and will be to be a human being."

    Scribd Editors

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    This was a spellbinding, captivating book. The problems of tomorrow, interrelated with the outcomes of the day, permeate this book and facilitate comprehension of what it is to be in a world full of humans who no longer understand their place. Harari's work is commendable, multilayered, and written eloquently. The questions that he poses, his answers, and the possible scenarios are desirable, yet left open-ended at the same time. This is one of the best recent non-fiction books I have read in some time. I recommend it for everyone.5 stars-- and well deserved.
  • (5/5)
    This book, a follow up to Sapiens, is just about as much a page-turner as Harari, better than anyone I can remember recently, is able to make the most complex ideas and subjects clear in his writing. The story here, however, is even more depressing than that of Sapiens. Essentially, now that Sapiens, that is Man, controls everything, what will he do with it? Harari stresses that these are only "possible" futures, but there is little doubt that the super-rich and super-powerful will take advantage of medical advances to extend their own lifespans and further increase their dominance over the rest of us. In Harari's worst scenario, most human beings simply don't have any reason for existence in the brave new world that is coming closer every day. And when that happens, will the rich even care to feed us? Or will they think of us the same way we think of cows and pigs, merely lower animals to be exploited? Yes, it's bleak, and my summary doesn't begin to do it justice, but you need to read it. Yes, Harari can be a bit annoying at times. He is so sure of so many things, and he makes broad sweeping statements indicating that religion really doesn't count for much these days. Obviously he doesn't live in the United States.
  • (5/5)
    Few Thinkers today - have such a broad and deep grasp of where the future can go.Harari is a MUST READ - even if you don't agree with him - he will deepen your understanding of the forces at work today that are shaping the future we are creating. His grasp of the future is based on a deep understanding of the past and the emergence of humans.
  • (5/5)
    This, at many levels, is a disturbing book. It is indeed disturbing if the gentle reader pauses to contemplate the future. The thoughts he leaves us with are not new. They have been predicted by science fiction writers, and if you apply the Big Brother concept of 1984 to today's world, you will get an idea of how disturbing this can be. Indeed, in today's world of big data, electronic eavesdropping, AI, genetic research etc, indeed the possibility of a race of 'superhuman', with the mass of humanity being stooges of the same, is not that remote a possibility. The question then becomes, what happens to nations? The book is indeed well written, and is quite accessible in its style. You could argue some points. I personally believe that, despite our data and the modern rush towards algorithms, we are not algorithms. We are emotional beings who will burn the planet (and ourselves) to extinction. Having said that, he raises many pertinent issues, and it would be a mistake to dismiss them as mere speculation. An excellent book, and one that we should all read, and ponder over.
  • (2/5)
    I lost my review of this awhile back, so adding another. I think I was nicer right after I finished reading this book, but it didn't age well over time, on me. There were some interesting suggestions brought up (albeit nothing very original), and I enjoyed considering what the future of humanity and technology might look like. Now, what I remember from reading the book, is that it was long-winded, presumptive, and rather generous as far as logic goes...meh.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting and engaging look at social forces that have shaped currently politics and philosophy with hypotheses for what the future may hold. Forecast is concerning and thought-provoking.
  • (5/5)
    A fantastic and very readable follow up to "Sapiens", in which the author explores where humanity goes from where we are at the moment. How will technicological advances effect our work enviroments, are we going to make ourselves redundant are some questions I came out of reading the book asking.
  • (3/5)
    Basically, technological advances will challenge liberal ideas of self and human importance. Some entertaining factoids, but if you're familiar with transhumanism you can skip the first two-thirds.
  • (4/5)
    This was as well written and easy to read as "Sapiens". And equally thought provoking. Of course most predictions of the future are seen as laughable when you reach the future but I think I'm kind of glad that I'm not going to live to see some of these possibilities. I don't want to be "superhuman" though I'd be very happy for someone to solve the need for reading glasses past 45. Oh and to invent the dentbots of "Long way to small angry planet".
  • (5/5)
    Fabulous book with an ocean of insights and possibilities where we might end up. My key take away is that everything - (eg. democracy, money, capitalism) is a religion / story and it works smooth only if everyone believes in the same story.
  • (4/5)
    the first book is much better but this book is very good as well
  • (4/5)
    After finishing this book I realize that I would be negligent if I failed to leave a rating and review and thus contribute to the ever-growing stream of data fueling our future revelations. Harari's insights are keen and his ability to identify and elucidate patterns makes for compelling, if at times noncommittal, arguments. Here he applies this ability, showcased so well in his earlier and more impressive work, Sapiens, to extrapolate a possible course the future could take. He does so by identifying the most recent significant global human shift (technology driven increases in data processing power and human connectivity) and imagining the future bottle necks in this form of human progress (i.e. more data are good but too much compromises our decision making). He then imagines how this problem may be solved and the implications of this solution for our future (or the future of the augmented super-humans we create).
  • (3/5)
    Interesting, the biggest problem I had with this book was that he portrays everything black and white and that his points are infallible. You have to read/listen to this book with a pinch of salt...
  • (5/5)
    The book introduces interesting developments of human society and names a few “trigger” questions, which really shake my perspective.
  • (5/5)
    One amazing and comprehensive view over the world of tomorrow.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic insight into human's progress and path. Reads like a modern day bible
  • (5/5)
    Amazing book. The thought process of its writer is simply beyond anything I ever crossed paths with. It helped out greatly to understand the world we are lining in, and reduce the amount of day-to-day anxiety caused by things not so clear to us. Everyone should read/listen to this book.

    Great stuff Yuval!
  • (4/5)
    This book is more than about Homo Deus; an advanced and upgraded future version of Homo Sapiens, Mr. Harari also analyzed technology in provocatively detail, including sophisticated algorithms that managing the world of today and the potential future. Like science fiction, this book is speculative, but He explains many aspects and facets on the world of tomorrow, how it may looks like, and how it works, how we response to it; sometimes it’s quite convincing. Algorithms and datas are important aspects of our life today, and we can foresee even more development very soon, and it can be quite scary.

    If you read his early book ‘Homo Sapiens’, which is terrific, ‘Homo Deus’ is a good companion.
  • (5/5)
    Well written and narrated, triggering deep contemplation of human and life phenomena
  • (5/5)
    The narrator is great not only for the book but in general. Regarding the book itself, its definately a must read.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic book. Makes you fly high and look beyond the horizon.
  • (5/5)
    Very advanced thinking. Kind of Marvin Toffler but better. I received the hard cover book for Christmas but I liked the audio version much more.
  • (5/5)
    Enlightening and very informative. Makes one think about our relationship with life.
  • (5/5)
    Adorei. Muito bom mesmo. Gostei mais deste do que Sapiens.
  • (5/5)
    put the mind to work and go troug a reflection process!!
    awesome!
    Longo
  • (5/5)
    Su extraordinaria,entendible y brillante visión del Mundo actual y futuro acompañada de sus constantes
    Vueltas a los orígenes y la evolución del fantástico sistema “Homo Sapiens” y sus ya concebibles siguientes pasos ....
    Un verdadero genio pedagógico y ciencio- futurista
    cuyo cuarto libro estamos ansiosos de recibir y poder entender todavía desde una mente “humana” las mas profundas esencias de la vida humana y como entender y afrontar mejor los rumbos que pueda seguir nuestra especie.
    Valga decir que su estilo ameno y su extraordinario
    Humor sarcástico al mas puro estilo inglés nos permite fluir con ligereza y buen humor, con alegria y risas a través del fantástico viaje del Homo Sapiens en los últimos 70,000 años...
    Gracias Yuval!!!!
  • (5/5)
    A Though provoking book. My absolute favorite. Enjoyed the audiobook.
  • (5/5)
    the implications in this book makes you think about your present and, more scary but important, about the future as a specie. it should be spread in every school and college across the world
  • (4/5)
    Really thought provoking book. Will definitely make you think a lot about your mortality and your place in history and the universe.

    My only criticisms are, it is a bit long, I feel like the overall themes could be shared more concisely. Also, there is a lot of speculation in this book compared to Sapiens, but it does at least own up to this fact in the end.

    Overall, definitely worth the listen.
  • (5/5)
    this is a well organized view the our, the so called human beings future. Everyone must read this.