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The Keeper of Lost Things: A Novel

The Keeper of Lost Things: A Novel


The Keeper of Lost Things: A Novel

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (385 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
8 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Feb 21, 2017
ISBN:
9780062660541
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

A charming, clever, and quietly moving debut novel of of endless possibilities and joyful discoveries that explores the promises we make and break, losing and finding ourselves, the objects that hold magic and meaning for our lives, and the surprising connections that bind us.

Lime green plastic flower-shaped hair bobbles—Found, on the playing field, Derrywood Park, 2nd September.

Bone china cup and saucer—

Found, on a bench in Riveria Public Gardens, 31st October.

Anthony Peardew is the keeper of lost things. Forty years ago, he carelessly lost a keepsake from his beloved fiancée, Therese. That very same day, she died unexpectedly. Brokenhearted, Anthony sought consolation in rescuing lost objects—the things others have dropped, misplaced, or accidently left behind—and writing stories about them. Now, in the twilight of his life, Anthony worries that he has not fully discharged his duty to reconcile all the lost things with their owners. As the end nears, he bequeaths his secret life’s mission to his unsuspecting assistant, Laura, leaving her his house and and all its lost treasures, including an irritable ghost.

Recovering from a bad divorce, Laura, in some ways, is one of Anthony’s lost things. But when the lonely woman moves into his mansion, her life begins to change. She finds a new friend in the neighbor’s quirky daughter, Sunshine, and a welcome distraction in Freddy, the rugged gardener. As the dark cloud engulfing her lifts, Laura, accompanied by her new companions, sets out to realize Anthony’s last wish: reuniting his cherished lost objects with their owners.

Long ago, Eunice found a trinket on the London pavement and kept it through the years. Now, with her own end drawing near, she has lost something precious—a tragic twist of fate that forces her to break a promise she once made.

As the Keeper of Lost Objects, Laura holds the key to Anthony and Eunice’s redemption. But can she unlock the past and make the connections that will lay their spirits to rest?

Full of character, wit, and wisdom, The Keeper of Lost Things is heartwarming tale that will enchant fans of The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake, Garden Spells, Mrs Queen Takes the Train, and The Silver Linings Playbook.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Feb 21, 2017
ISBN:
9780062660541
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro

Informazioni sull'autore

Ruth Hogan describes herself as a “rapacious reader, writer, and incorrigible magpie” whose own love of small treasures and curiosities and the people around her inspired her first novel. She lives north of London.


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385 valutazioni / 61 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    Nice cover. Good story. I like finding lost things, but never thought to write stories about them, true or not.
  • (4/5)
    A pleasant little book; I suppose I’d call it a mild paranormal romance, with both the paranormal and romance parts understated. The protagonist is a recently divorced lady acting as a housekeeper for an eccentric London author collects and meticulously catalogs random objects he finds on his walks – the “Lost Things” of the title; there’s a parallel story of a publisher’s secretary; one of the fun things is how the two tales eventually merge. A little predictable but still fun. Can’t say too much more lest spoilers.
  • (4/5)
    A quirky, mostly gentle novel about a woman who needs to find her way again who is left a house and a collection of "lost things" (mostly small found objects like gloves and buttons) by her employer. He wanted her to return them to their owners. The story is peopled with the house's gardener (the love interest), a teenager from next door (a new friend), and a ghost (maybe?), and interspersed among the main narrative are the stories of many of the lost things. Pulled me along and was a pleasant diversion, but little of it has stuck with me.
  • (4/5)
    What a gentle, whimsical debut this book was. I adored the front cover and from the start I was drawn in. I loved the short stories Anthony penned about the lost objects he found, and I often found myself smiling at them. His attention to detail and the care he took to label and catalogue each item was touching, considering how inconsequential most of them were.I also enjoyed the two parallel stories with their charming range of quirky characters that were woven throughout the novel. Although I found Laura, Freddy and Sunshine's story more interesting, Bomber and Eunice's tale was still touching and I liked how the author brought the two stories together at the end.Sunshine, especially, was a wonderful character with her quiet wisdom and I loved how she called herself a dancing drome when she mean she had Down's Syndrome. Even her intuition about the owners of the lost things wasn't too bad and it did give a sweet element to the story.Then there were the dogs - Carrot, Douglas and Baby Jane - who brought humour and touching canine devotion to "The Keeper of Lost Things" and all three played an integral role. Actually, the only part of the story I didn't like was the ghostly element which played quite an important part, especially in the second-half of the book."The Keeper of Lost Things" was beautifully written with a little bit of everything - romance, mystery, magic, loss, hope and redemption. A sweet, feel-good read.
  • (3/5)
    My rating: 3.75

    This is a difficult one for me as I liked this a lot but didn't love it which was a bit of a disappointment. I loved the premise but found the characters a bit 'twee.' I preferred the second half of the book, in the first half my mind wondered off a bit. Nevertheless, it is well-written, funny and sad in bits too. Maybe just not quite my cup of tea!
  • (3/5)
    Anthony's story and Laura'a story were both intriguing, but Bomber's story didn't do much for me. I liked the ending. Worth a quick read, but not memorable.
  • (5/5)
    Not perfect in writing or construction, but really beautifully done. A story where the keeping of lost things compensates for loss, as the main character (a writer) collects things he's found. The writing simply ties together the people with the objects and their stories, without being overbearing, by focusing on Laura, a housekeeper who is left a house by her employer. Exceptional for a debut novel, with good characters and subplots that all tie together without fuss.
  • (5/5)
    A pleasantly tangled tale of different lives that may or may not be real, Ruth Hogan’s The Keeper of Lost Things invites readers to look through different eyes, at different lives and tragedies, and at the things we leave behind. Is a tiny ruby the reject from a broken engagement? Is the man watching movies related to the woman who dies outside a cake shop? And will the cleaning lady rise to meet the better life she deserves?The story’s told in an enthralling blend of different times and place, viewpoints and realities, making it truly difficult to put down. It might be moderately confusing at times, but it’s a satisfying sort of confusion, begging the reader to think and rethink answers and ideas. And it all holds together beautifully, jigsaw pieces falling into place or lying honorably discarded.The characters each have hidden depths, pleasantly and gently revealed with no artificial dives into backstory or motivation. Hidden connections are equally smooth and believable. And the whole is an absorbing story that leaves you delighted to have met these people, and maybe even a little changed, a little more open to meeting the strangers who enter our own lives.Disclosure: I borrowed a copy and now I want to buy my own to keep on my shelf!
  • (3/5)
    I would have liked this more without the supernatural/psychic aspects
  • (4/5)
    In Keeper of Lost Things by Ruth Hogan, the author explores the idea of reuniting people with the objects they have lost in the past. The story is built around an aging author, Anthony Peardew, who, forty years ago, lost an important keepsake on the same day that his beloved fiancé was killed in an accident. Since that day, Anthony becomes a ‘keeper of things’, as he collects found objects with the intention of returning them someday to their owners. When Anthony passes away, he entrusts the task to his faithful assistant, Laura, who has just completed an upsetting divorce. Laura pursues in this daunting task with the help of a new neighbor friend, Sunshine, who is a teenager with downs syndrome, and a handsome gardener named Fred. As Laura carries out Anthony’s will, she discovers an extraordinary friendship and love. This novel is also a dual story about Bomber, a book publisher, and his best friend and confidante, Eunice. Written as separate stories through most of the novel, it is only at the novel’s conclusion that the two stories merge to find a satisfying resolution. Within the novel, the story would often divert into other short anecdotes about how some of the lost things came to be misplaced. It is in these multi-page diversions where I frequently became distracted from the original story and felt that the story lost ground. For this reason, I am giving the book three stars, instead of four, although the writing is superior.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book. It was beautifully written (laughter, tears, suspense) and intriguing stories that interlinked with each other in all the right places. Looking forward to future books by Ruth Hogan. Book three of Blind Date with a Book Club.
  • (4/5)
    A special thank you to Edelweiss and William Morrow for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

    Forty years ago, author Anthony Peardew loses a keepsake from his fiancee, Therese, and on that very same day she dies. As a result, Anthony becomes the keeper of lost things. He picks up objects he finds, random things people leave behind, or have dropped, and writes stories about them. As he nears the end of his life, Anthony continues to catalogue the items and worries that he has not lived up to his undertaking of reuniting the items with their owners.

    Laura, Anthony's assistant, is a divorced middle-aged lonely woman that unbeknownst to her is one of Anthony's lost things. He bequeaths everything to her, including the daunting task of his life's mission of reconciling the lost items to where they belong. She moves into the house and with the help of the gardener Freddy, and the neighbour's daughter Sunshine, embarks on a remarkable journey of self-discovery, new beginnings, and of completing a final request.

    The characters are rich and warm and are all lost objects in one way or another. Hogan weaves them together in a wonderful tale. I absolutely adored this book and felt like I had lost a friend when it was over.
  • (4/5)
    Beautiful story with an intricately woven cast of characters.
  • (2/5)
    This really wasn't for me, which is a pity, because I liked the sound of it from the description on the back of the book. There was just too much going on: Laura and Anthony, Bomber and Eunice, the stories to go with the lost items. The disparate strands meant that there was no coherent linear plot, and I kept putting the book down and feeling nothing was calling me to go on with it. It did take a long time to get going in any case. Sunshine had her moments, but was very inconsistently portrayed, and I'm not a fan of even benign paranormal elements.
  • (3/5)
    Anthony has long collected 'lost' things, carefully labelled with where and when they were found. Laura becomes his assistant, but doesn't discover the lost things until after his death. It becomes her responsibility to try to reunite them with their owner - ably assisted by Sunshine and Freddy.Interwoven with this, rather confusingly and tenuously, is the story of Eunice and Bomber.This is an OK story, but with a strange premise, and even stranger development of the story and an obvious ending.
  • (5/5)
    Very satisfying and a good choice for those who liked The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper.I received an advance copy at the ALA Midwinter conference.
  • (4/5)
    What a charming book! I don't want to give away the story by telling too much of the plot, but the story centers around helping people find the things they've lost, and finding out the people's stories in the process. There's a bit of a metaphysical element that adds to the charm, as well. I enjoyed it.
  • (5/5)
    If you loved The Curious Charm of Arthur Pepper, if you believe in fate and synchronicity, if you need a great read about the good that exists in the world and the possibility of hope, then you must read The Keeper of Lost Things. It is a feel good story with a lot to say if you listen carefully. I loved it.
  • (4/5)
    I won this ARC in a GOODREADS giveaway - Unexpectedly sweet and funny - This was a pleasure to read. Thanks to William Morrow for the opportunity to receive this unique version of the book!
  • (4/5)
    When I lose something and cannot find it no matter how long I look, when I finally give up on it and consign it to memory only, it has always comforted me a little to think that the Borrowers, from Mary Norton's classic children's tale, have found it and are using it lovingly. But what if there was a person out there who collected and catalogued lost items with the aim of one day reuniting them with their owners and that person had my own lost object in his or her safe keeping? It would be comforting to think that my things were still out there, found and cared for, their stories preserved, until the time came for me to find them again. In a sense, that's the lovely premise of Ruth Hogan's novel, The Keeper of Lost Things. From a hair bobble to a single glove, a puzzle piece to a small, painted wooden house, these things and more are found and carefully kept, awaiting the day they can be returned to their rightful owners.Anthony Peardew is an older man, once a celebrated author, who has lived alone for forty years in a magical sort of house, having lost Therese, the love of his life shortly before their wedding. After Therese's death he realized he'd lost the small communion medallion she gave him to always keep them connected and although he didn't find the small and meaningful charm, it inspired him to collect and safeguard other people's lost treasures. In his twilight years, he hires Laura, damaged and adrift after her divorce, to be his housekeeper and personal assistant, warning her to never go into his locked study. Never tempted to defy this order, she works contentedly for him for a handful of years. After his death, she is surprised to discover that he's left the house and all of his possessions to her. His major request accompanying this bequest is that she now go into the study, behold the immense, carefully catalogued collection of lost items he's found over the years and attempt to return them to their owners because if even one item's return will ease a broken heart, it will all have been worth it. As Laura slowly ventures out of her self-imposed isolation and befriends first Sunshine, a young woman in the neighborhood with Down's Syndrome and a special sensitivity to the things and vibrations around us that others never feel, and then Freddy, Anthony's gardener, she has to figure out how best to find the lovingly kept items' original owners, how to placate the ghost of Therese, who still haunts the house, and how to open her own heart to all the possibilities of living life to the fullest. In a parallel narrative, a young woman named Eunice applies for a job at a small publisher and promptly falls for her handsome boss, Bomber, becoming his best friend and confidante but never anything more. She devotes her life to loving Bomber knowing that he loves her back only Platonically.The vast majority of the story is focused on Anthony, the past that led him to be the keeper of lost things, and then on Laura, who is herself very clearly one of Anthony's lost things. Each of the inanimate items highlighted in the book is given its own short story, but whether it is one written by Anthony or one contained in the item itself is left to the reader to decide. In order to cut some of the sweetness of the premise of the novel as a whole, these object stories veer from heartwarming to serious to desperately sad. There is a fair bit of humor woven into the novel to leaven it too. My favorite being after Laura hears neighborhood gossips in a local pub speculating on why Anthony left her the house. As she walks past their table leaving the pub, she informs them it was because of "Fellatio on Fridays." The fact that one of these nasty Nellys doesn't even know what this means makes it that much more entertaining. There are only very light touches (and a few hidden clues) almost connecting the story of Anthony with the story of Eunice and Bomber for the majority of the story and although they come together well in the end, a little more explicitness might not have been amiss so that the reader wasn't confused as to why these very different tales were together from the start. Both are thematically similar though, focused as they are on caring for and supporting those around you, accepting them for who they are and the struggles they face, and loving people, dogs, and the important bits and bobs of their life to the very end. Although there is a wistful sort of quality to the novel, it would be a perfect novel for those who are looking for a book to counter the dysfunction and unhappiness of so much of current literature. In the end, it is that elusive book that leaves a warm glow in its wake without resorting to sappiness or cliche. Very much a novel of love and loss, compassion and redemption, this is a gentle, charming, and thoroughly worthwhile read.
  • (5/5)
    I am a collector of 'things' - old things, interesting things and yes, things I find. I always wonder about the person who owned them, lost them or discarded them. I knew I was going to love Ruth Hogan's debut novel, The Keeper of Lost Things.Anthony Peardew also collects things - ever since the day his fiancee died and he lost the one thing that he promised her he would always cherish. His goal is the find the owners of those lost articles. But, his time is drawing near and he decides to bequeath his house and the lost things project to his assistant Laura. A parallel story with its own lost and found had me wondering if the two tales would eventually meet - and how they might tie together."She had been dead for forty years, but she was still his life, and her death had given him his purpose. It had made Anthony Peardew the Keeper of Lost Things."Oh there is so much to love about this book. The characters first and foremost. They're all eclectically (and wonderfully) a little left of center. Impossible not to like and not to root for.The premise is intriguing as I've mentioned. I loved the back stories that Hogan created for some of the lost items. Hair bobbles, an umbrella, a glove and more. Some happy, some tragic. The plots of some disastrous books written by an aspiring author had me laughing out loud.Hogan's writing flows so well and drew me into her story immediately. She weaves a delicious, heartwarming tale of love, loss, hope, redemption, romance and humour with a helping of magical realism that absolutely delighted me. I loved it!
  • (4/5)
    Anthony Peardew is the keeper of lost things. When he finds something on his walk - a button, a glove, an earring - he takes it home to his study and writes a note on where he found the item in hopes that he can somehow, someday connect the item with its owner. He is also a famous author who has written stories based on the items that he's found. He is getting old and feeble and decides to turn his house and his quest for the owners of lost things to Laura when he dies. Laura, Sunshine (the girl across the street who has down's syndrome) and Freddy, the gardener, work together to give the lost things back to their owner and to lay the ghost in the house to rest. The novel tells two main stories - that of Anthony, Laura, Sunshine and Freddy and an earlier story about Bomber and Eunice. The reader gets clues along the way but doesn't know if the two groups of people are connected and how they are connected.This is an interesting debut novel by an author that I expect to see great books from in the future.
  • (5/5)
    Loved this novel. Laura is left with the task of finding the original owners of small lost things that her employer has found on the streets. The search for the truth of behind the things leads her to find the truth in her own life. A gentle love story.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed this book, it's numerous stories and grew to like the characters immensely. Eunice, in particular, has got into my head, and I'm writing this review with an English accent (I'm Australian). It feels like such a long time since I've read something (actually I listened to it) that I haven't been able to put down - there was so much to discover. Most of the characters were thoroughly decent (which is refreshing) and Sunshine, in particular, was gorgeous. I loved the stories within the stories, they provided a check on the sweetness.
  • (5/5)
    This book starts with a very intriguing first line and never lets up on quirky elements all the way to the end. Anthony Peardew is an author of short stories but he also is a collector of lost things, labelling each and every item that he finds. Laura is his assistant/housekeeper, a woman who is damaged by her past but who finds solace in her employer and friend. When Anthony realises that he must find somebody to pass his collection onto he chooses Laura, somebody who he can trust to carry on his work.Ruth Hogan has a wonderfully descriptive style of writing and this is a charming book. It started quite slowly but crept up on me and drew me in, engulfing me in the story. I really cared about the characters: Laura and Freddy, Anthony's gardener; Sunshine, who is 'dancing drome' (say it out loud); and Eunice and Bomber, whose link to the story becomes clear as the book progresses.This is the sort of book I love. It has a mystery at its heart but it features ordinary people in an unusual situation. I enjoyed all the little details, about the lost items and Anthony's house, Padua. It almost has an old-fashioned and nostalgic feel and I could easily have believed it was set in another era, but for the obvious references to the modern day.I think this book will do really well as it's just so appealing and evocative.
  • (1/5)
    Such a boring, middle aged woman’s wet dream. Main story weak, stories within the story were horrible and we are supposed to believe they were written by a talented author. Skip it.
  • (5/5)
    Stunningly beautiful and bittersweet. My heart aches for the characters through time but that’s how life goes.
  • (5/5)
    It is a beautiful story that intertwines many storylines. But it’s true charm is that the plot only seems to work it’s magic due to the decidedly British way of writing. I have truly fallen in love with this book.
  • (5/5)
    A beautiful story! One of my new favorite books.....such s fun and poetic book about love, loss and friendship.
  • (5/5)
    Anthony keeps every lost thing he finds, no matter how small. The things he's looking after mean something to someone. He knows he doesn't have much time left and when he dies he leaves his assistant Laura his house with all the lost items. He wants her to take care of them and he hopes she'll be able to find the owners of the treasures he's lovingly kept for them. Will she be able to fulfill his last wish?

    Laura needs a second chance. After a bad marriage she's ready for happiness in her life. It's something she's almost forgotten about and Anthony's legacy brings her exactly what she'd been missing for a very long time. The company of Freddy, the gardener, and Sunshine, a girl from the neighborhood, is doing her good. Will Laura be able, with some help from her wonderful new friends, to return Anthony's lost things to their owners?

    The Keeper of Lost Things is a beautiful story. Ruth Hogan describes Laura's new task and the changes she's going through in a great vivid way. She also tells the possible stories behind the things Anthony has collected over the years. There are several items and histories that are somehow connected and their main purpose becomes clear at the ending of the book, which is something I absolutely loved. Ruth Hogan combines gorgeous words with cherished memories. I especially loved that she shows her readers that something that might seem insignificant in the grand scheme of things can mean the world to someone.

    Ruth Hogan has written a fantastic creative novel. I was impressed from the first sentence and liked every chapter. Some stories made me smile and others made me tear up. Every single one of them is valuable and precious. The Keeper of Lost Things is a special story. It's original, compelling and entertaining. It made me curious and it sparked my imagination. I really enjoyed reading this amazing book.