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The Long Winter

The Long Winter

Scritto da Laura Ingalls Wilder

Narrato da Cherry Jones


The Long Winter

Scritto da Laura Ingalls Wilder

Narrato da Cherry Jones

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (107 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
7 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Feb 7, 2017
ISBN:
9780062657015
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

The sixth book in Laura Ingalls Wilder’s treasured Little House series, and the recipient of a Newbery Honor.

The town of De Smet in the Dakota Territory is hit with terrible blizzards in the hard winter of 1880-81, and the Ingalls family must ration their food and coal. When the supply train doesn’t arrive, all supplies are cut off from the outside. Soon there is almost no food left, so young Almanzo Wilder and a friend must make a dangerous trip in search of provisions.

The nine Little House books are inspired by Laura’s own childhood and have been cherished by generations of readers as both a unique glimpse into America’s frontier history and as heartwarming, unforgettable stories.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Feb 7, 2017
ISBN:
9780062657015
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Laura Ingalls Wilder (1867–1957) was born in a log cabin in the Wisconsin woods. With her family, she pioneered throughout America’s heartland during the 1870s and 1880s, finally settling in Dakota Territory. She married Almanzo Wilder in 1885; their only daughter, Rose, was born the following year. The Wilders moved to Rocky Ridge Farm at Mansfield, Missouri, in 1894, where they established a permanent home. After years of farming, Laura wrote the first of her beloved Little House books in 1932. The nine Little House books are international classics. Her writings live on into the twenty-first century as America’s quintessential pioneer story.

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Recensioni

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4.7
107 valutazioni / 52 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    This one was intense! The small community where the Ingalls live is stranded in a seven month blizzard. No trains with supplies are coming and everyone is beginning to starve. I know I’ll remember the vivid picture of Pa twisting hay to make logs for the fire and the girls using the coffee grinder on the wheat. The scene where the students head from school into town in the midst of a blizzard was harrowing. I loved getting to know Almanzo better.
  • (4/5)
    Well, the title sort of gives the main plot of this story away, but it's still a good read! The Ingalls family is in the town of De Smet in the Dakota Territory, and they are hit hard by the brutal winter of 1880-1881. Like running out of food hard! The heroic efforts of Almanzo Wilder and Cap Garland (and their horses) are pretty amazing to read, and the Christmas in May is as heartwarming as can be! A bleak story throughout, but as you can guess by the numbering of these books, they make it through! On to #7!
  • (4/5)
    I can only imagine how hard that winter was. Going months without ever really being warm.I had forgotten what a rough life Laura had.
  • (5/5)
    The Little House books were some of my favorites and The Long Winter was at the top of the pile. A long, treacherous winter tests the Ingalls family in new ways and they rise to the occasion. I'm re-reading it at the moment. Somehow the Little House books (except Little House on the Prairie which was my least favorite) never get old.
  • (5/5)
    Once the Ingalls family is settled in the new town of De Smet, they settle in for The Long Winter. The town is ill prepared for the winter that is to come, with temperatures lower than the thermometer can register and blizzards blowing more often than not. Supplies run low and people start to stretch what little they have as far as it will go. This is one of the more serious of the stories, and it highlights what kind of chances the settlers were taking by moving out to areas where the weather was unpredictable and likely unfamiliar to many of them, without the advantage of having time to have settled in and stored up in preparation for something like this happening. The events are well-told and it is interesting to read about the ingenuity that many of the townsfolk utilized to help get their families through the hard wintertime.
  • (4/5)
    It's been insanely cold for an insanely long period of time (after Danish standards anyway), so I figured it was quite appropriate to reread this now. I read it in one sitting and enjoyed it as much as always. Definitely made me realize how lucky I am to live in a day and age where electricity, heat and transportation are things we can take for granted.My mum used to say that this was the most boring book of the lot. Perhaps for that reason alone I never felt so. I realize it's quite repetitious, but you get to follow an entire town during a difficult time, and get lots of survival tips... should you ever be in a situation where they're actually needed ;) If I remember correctly it's the only book not told solely from one person's POV which I think was a good choice as there would otherwise have been far too much telling and not enough showing.
  • (5/5)
    This whole series is just wonderful!
  • (4/5)
    When we meet up with Laura and her family in The Long Winter Laura is now 14 years old. The year is 1880 and it is the family's first year in De Smet, South Dakota. Pa has learned that the upcoming winter will be a particularly brutal one and since his homestead isn't finished he moves the family into town. Laura isn't thrilled with this move. She likes the wide open prairie land. But, as the snow starts to fly and continues to fly, storm after storm, she and the family have more to worry about. When the trains cannot get through food and supply shortages start to occur. All housebound families have little to eat and find themselves on the brink of starvation. Keeping the house warm is another problem. In the end, Laura's future husband, Almanzo Wilder, and a friend save the day by finding a supply of wheat that lasts the town through the rest of the long winter.
  • (2/5)
    This is my least favorite Little House book. I'm not sure why, but I hated reading about the long winter. It just seemed boring to me.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book again. We (My three girls and I) just finished listening to this on tape in the car. It has infiltrated me. When we had a cold spell the other week I thought of it in terms of the cold Laura experienced. When I eat food I think how much Laura would have enjoyed it if she had gotten to eat it during that long hard winter. Laura gave us a real gift with her books. I love that we get to experience her life through her writing.
  • (4/5)
    This book describes the Ingalls' family's daily activities during a season of multiple blizzards that threaten their town's survival by cutting off food supplies. The story is less interesting in terms of narrative things but works wonders with its vivid descriptions. I read this on a warm spring day and couldn't help but feel cold. While the day-to-day struggle seems repetitive at times, this serves as a poignant reminder that nature affected every aspect of daily life for these settlers, from whether they went to school to where in the house they ate their meals to how early they went to bed. A lifestyle so far removed from our modern conveniences really transports readers back to a different time and place. This book might work well if taught or read in conjunction with historical lessons on pioneer settlement to highlight another aspect of the dangers and risks of westward expansion.
  • (4/5)
    Substance: The prediction of an unusually long and severe winter persuades the Ingalls family to move from their claim shanty out by the Big Slough into their empty office building in town. It was a wise decision. The hardships endured by all the pioneers are incredible and unbelievable if this were not an attested autobiographical work, and not out of the norm of other reminiscences.Style: I continue to be impressed by the author's lyrical descriptions of even negative environments, and her character insights and descriptions.I only wish I knew more of Pa Ingalls's songs.Laura is going on 14 years when the book starts.
  • (5/5)
    I re-read this one a couple of times. It was intense. Probably the best of the lot - had plenty of socio-political commentary, too.
  • (4/5)
    Laura and her family are trapped in their town by a succession of blizzards, and the food is rapidly running out. Laura does an excellent job of capturing both the claustrophobic despair of their situation and the never-say-die outlook of her family.
  • (3/5)
    The first Little House novel to get badly repetitive, which I guess is inevitable in a story about seven months of blizzards, but still a little boring for a children's book.
  • (4/5)
    Somehow when I recall this book, it's very 'sensory' - there's so much detail in Ingalls-Wilder's descriptions of everything from the way the cold felt, to the texture of fabrics and the sounds of the growing town around them. In this novel, Ingalls-Wilder begins to offer increased observations of interactions with her future husband, Alonzo Wilder. While not idealized in any way, the descriptions of the day-to-day accomodations that the settlers needed to make in order to survive an unexpectedly harsh winter hearken back to a time when the activities of day to day life took up much of the time in any given day. It always makes me wonder, since we have so much more technology available to us, all supposed to make life more efficient, to "save" us time, what are we doing with it?
  • (4/5)
    The Ingalls family and the rest of the town face 7 months of blizzards, food shortages and cabin fever. Once again, a really descriptive Laura makes you feel the cold and hunger pains in this tale. I loved it. She portrayed the family's strength and love that made the survive the Long Winter.
  • (5/5)
    Like all of the books in the series, "The Long Winter" tells the story of Laura Ingalls Wilder's days living in the American West. This volume is one of my favorites -- it tells the tale of the family's second winter living near De Smet, South Dakota and a winter that raged with blizzard after blizzard.While the family moved to town, the family rarely saw other people because so much snow was dumped on the area from October to April. Families ran out of food and fuel, including the Ingalls, and had to get creative to survive.The book is filled with heartwarming stories as the family works together and has some fun days along the way -- celebrating Christmas and trying keep themselves warm and happy.
  • (3/5)
    This book is a beautiful illustration of the love and support that is possible in family life. the characters seem very realistic and children can relate to the struggles that they go with.
  • (5/5)
    The saga continues. Laura and her family are now settled in De Smet with no more plans to move. But their shanty is ill-prepared for the blizzard which hits in early October and the family has to move to their storefront in town. A man from one of the local Nations had come by to tell the settlers that this would be an especially bad winter--every 21 years, there is 7 months of winter. This is that 21st winter. The family spend almost all of that time indoors; the snow is piled too high to think about going outside except for the necessary chores of tending to the animals.The family, and most of the town, come close to starving to death due to lack of food, because the trains could not get through to deliver enough supplies. It takes the bravery of Cap Garland and Almanzo Wilder (Farmer Boy himself) to get enough to keep the people of the town going enough to last until the Spring.As always, Wilder delivers such a vivid tale that the cold, late fall days felt even colder than they were, and I wished for anything to eat which was not dry bread or potatoes.
  • (4/5)
    This is probably my favorite of the Little House books. I admire the tenacity of the Ingalls family, and that of the others who founded De Smet. When I was small, I had a crush on Almanzo, risking his life to get the wheat and save everyone. As I said in my review of 'On the Banks of Plum Creek', a modern reader can still take away a lesson of never giving up, no matter what life throws your way. Modern Americans don't have the same challenges to tackle that the Ingalls (and Wilder!) families experienced, but we have our own problems to solve. Pa's right. Never give up until it's licked.
  • (4/5)
    A very long winter in which the characters come close to starvation. A harrowing reminder of the challenges of pioneer life.
  • (4/5)
    It was a little disheartening to read this book during our own long, interminable Minnesota winter, but as I read about Laura's struggles twisting straw to feed the fire after the coal ran out and nearly starving to death, I was more grateful for my cushy middle-class life.
  • (5/5)
    The best of all the Little House Books! This book tells of the struggles of surviving under the brutal weather conditions without supplies. Both Ma and Pa are very creative in coming up with with ways to make food and fuel last longer.
  • (4/5)
    I really didn't like this book as much as other people seem to. I never read the Little House series books as a young girl, this is the first one I've read.
  • (4/5)
    Part of the Little House series, the Long Winter details the difficulties that the Ingalls family faced during a months long blizzard.
  • (5/5)
    I'm enjoying all of the Little House books, but this one has been the best to date.

    First, Laura's a teenager here. She's assumed many more grown-up responsibilities around the Ingalls' home. Not only is her work becoming more critical to the operation of the household, she's starting to be let in on the dangers of her family's life in a way that she's not been before. In The Long Winter, Laura faces the very real possibility of losing her family and her own life. She witnesses her parents shift their ideals, strange as they seem to modern audiences, to suit the needs of the family. Ma lets Laura help Pa with the summer haying despite her claim that only immigrants let their daughters do such work. Laura's assistance not only helps Pa avoid sunstroke, but it contributes greatly to their survival in the long winter.

    One thing I love about this book is that Ma finally loses it. She doesn't go completely ape, but she snaps at Pa and just in general acts much more like I do on a daily basis (but without the profanity). I feel like I can relate to her better now, even though the hardships that cause her to lose it are relentless blizzards and the impending starvation of her family while I lose it when over something like my husband leaving the empty cat food cans in the sink rather than rinsing them out immediately and putting them in the recycling. Still, the proof that Ma ever loses it at all helps me feel a greater kinship to her.

    I also really enjoyed the bits of discussion in this book about the double-edged sword of technological advance. Whether it's Ma complaining about their reliance on kerosene or Pa concerned about their reliance on the trains, the point is that while technology brings us great gifts, we quickly become dependent upon their fruits and find we can't live without them.

    I find that I often use the Little House books as a model for how I ought to live my life. We experienced a four-day power outage in our New England home after the freak snowstorm last October, and listening to The Long Winter (I listened to the audiobook read by Cherry Jones), I constantly thought back to just how ill-suited our home (and our family) is to inclement weather. When we're cut off from electricity, we can do nothing. Our food spoils, we can't heat our home, we can't cook, we have no hot water. Luckily we're on city water and sewer and don't rely on a sump to flush our toilets and run the taps, or we'd not have been able to stay in our home during that cold, dark four days. My thoughts turned to how to make our home less reliant on the "grid" and I realized (yet again) how little my husband and I know about the workings of our dwelling. While I wouldn't want to live in a 250-square-foot home with my family, I can certainly see how doing so would (could) simplify our lives. I find myself yearning for knowledge about sustainable energy sources and uber-insulation and woodstoves, but in the end, daily life intercedes and I get tied up once again in the daily tasks of doing dishes and washing clothes. That and the knowledge that the longest we've lived in any home in our adult lives is two years is enough to discourage us from any major renovations, regardless of the purpose.

    In the end, though, the thing that struck me was how close their family is. They have restraint and concern for the other family members and don't just blurt things out whenever they think of them. They don't yell at each other. They don't clamor for the bigger share of possessions or food or parental affection. When they're down (and they're not down unless the wolf's not just slavering at the door but has pulled up a chair for supper), they sing together or read together or just sit together and tell stories. Maybe learning how to make hay or how to ground wheat in a coffee grinder aren't the lessons I should be getting from the Little House books.

    But then, our coffee grinder is electric, too.
  • (5/5)
    (The long winter) shows one of the most humanity ethic which is (cooperation) with other people especially your family. Seven months winter with heavy snow and blizzard after blizzard let the movement of any train very difficult. They could not bring food or going to school. That was the hardest winter on that town.
  • (5/5)
    I love all the Little House books, but this has always been a special favorite. As with the other Little House volumes, it is a beautiful illustration of the love and support possible in family life; the beauty and humor that can bring joy every day. And yet, the characters are completely human, showing frustration and irritability with each other as well as the more uplifting emotions. What makes Long Winter different is its suspense and drama. It showcases skills that Laura Ingalls Wilder didn't demonstrate in the rest of the series. She is able to move seamlessly from lazy end-of-summer days, to the challenge of making friends and finding a place for yourself in a new town, to a gradual recognition of trouble, to life-or-death struggle, to a heroic rescue and stalwart determination to survive. And then, life goes on, much the same as it did before. No one gets killed; no enemies fight pitched battles. This may be an old-fashioned pleasure, but it still has a lot to tell us.
  • (4/5)
    Laura and her family are stuck in the worst winter they've ever seen. It seems as if winter will never end, and food starts running short.