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Her Every Fear: A Novel

Her Every Fear: A Novel

Scritto da Peter Swanson

Narrato da Eva Kaminsky


Her Every Fear: A Novel

Scritto da Peter Swanson

Narrato da Eva Kaminsky

valutazioni:
4/5 (132 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
10 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Jan 10, 2017
ISBN:
9780062658531
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

The author of the wildly popular The Kind Worth Killing returns with an electrifying and downright Hitchcockian psychological thriller-as tantalizing as the cinema classics Rear Window and Wait Until Dark-involving a young woman caught in a vise of voyeurism, betrayal, manipulation, and murder.

The danger isn't all in your head . . .

Growing up, Kate Priddy was always a bit neurotic, experiencing momentary bouts of anxiety that exploded into full blown panic attacks after an ex-boyfriend kidnapped her and nearly ended her life. When Corbin Dell, a distant cousin in Boston, suggests the two temporarily swap apartments, Kate, an art student in London, agrees, hoping that time away in a new place will help her overcome the recent wreckage of her life.

But soon after her arrival at Corbin's grand apartment on Beacon Hill, Kate makes a shocking discovery: his next-door neighbor, a young woman named Audrey Marshall, has been murdered. When the police question her about Corbin, a shaken Kate has few answers, and many questions of her own-curiosity that intensifies when she meets Alan Cherney, a handsome, quiet tenant who lives across the courtyard, in the apartment facing Audrey's. Alan saw Corbin surreptitiously come and go from Audrey's place, yet he's denied knowing her. Then, Kate runs into a tearful man claiming to be the dead woman's old boyfriend, who insists Corbin did the deed the night that he left for London.

When she reaches out to her cousin, he proclaims his innocence and calms her nerves . . . until she comes across disturbing objects hidden in the apartment-and accidently learns that Corbin is not where he says he is. Could Corbin be a killer? And what about Alan? Kate finds herself drawn to this appealing man who seems so sincere, yet she isn't sure. Jetlagged and emotionally unstable, her imagination full of dark images caused by the terror of her past, Kate can barely trust herself . . . So how could she take the chance on a stranger she's just met?

Yet the danger Kate imagines isn't nearly as twisted and deadly as what's about to happen. When her every fear becomes very real.

And much, much closer than she thinks.

Told from multiple points of view, Her Every Fear is a scintillating, edgy novel rich with Peter Swanson's chilling insight into the darkest corners of the human psyche and virtuosic skill for plotting that has propelled him to the highest ranks of suspense, in the tradition of such greats as Gillian Flynn, Paula Hawkins, Patricia Highsmith, and James M. Cain.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Jan 10, 2017
ISBN:
9780062658531
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Informazioni sull'autore

Peter Swanson is the author of seven novels, including The Kind Worth Killing, winner of the New England Society Book Award, and finalist for the CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger; Her Every Fear, an NPR book of the year; Before She Knew Him, and Eight Perfect Murders. His books have been translated into 30 languages, and his stories, poetry, and features have appeared in Asimov’s Science Fiction, The Atlantic Monthly, Measure, The Guardian, The Strand Magazine, and Yankee Magazine. He lives outside of Boston, where he is at work on his next novel.

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3.9
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (3/5)
    ‘Her Every Fear’ started strongly but unfortunately petered out at the conclusion, not due to a lack action as much as an absence of believability. Just an opinion on my part, but the turnabout of one of the key characters doesn’t pass the smell test.This novel asks an interesting question: what if 2 clean cut young men conspire to commit a seemingly unsolvable murder, decide to do it again, but then one of them opts out? The story line’s an interesting one, the writing is strong, the characters are decently drawn, and the pacing is good. As mentioned previously, my problem is with the behavioral change in one of the murderers. I won’t go any further to avoid spoiling the conclusion, but judge for yourself. It’s a very worthwhile read.
  • (3/5)
    Neurotic, anxiety-ridden Kate Priddy, subject to panic attacks following her long-ago kidnapping, trades apartments with her cousin, Corbin Dell, and moves to Boston for six months while Corbin takes up residence in her London flat.But the murder of Audrey Marshall, in her home right next door to Corbin’s apartment, leaves Kate shaken and wary. There’s neighbor Alan Cherney with his own secrets, a suddenly-appearing cat, and her own fears, all combining to keep her on edge. Then Audrey’s tearful . . . and unsettling . . . boyfriend claims Corbin is the murder.When Kate accidentally discovers that Corbin is not where he says he is, and she finds some disturbing things in his apartment, she begins to wonder if her cousin could be the killer. Or perhaps it was Alan? Or the brokenhearted boyfriend? Kate doesn’t know where to place her trust . . . and it may cost her everything.Well-drawn characters populate this psychological thriller that is strong on character development. Kate, Corbin, Alan, and Audrey’s maybe-boyfriend take turns telling the tale, a conveyance that has an unfortunate tendency to rehash the same events as each character takes on the role of narrator. While this allows for some surprising epiphanies, it also has the effect of stopping the forward motion of the story. Nevertheless, with unexpected plot twists and unforeseen revelations, there is enough suspense to keep the tension building, even if Kate’s repeated reiteration of her fears grows a bit wearisome as the story progresses. Astute readers will identify the final twists before their reveals, but the narrative’s pedestrian ending is likely to disappoint.
  • (3/5)
    Flat swap NY and London. 2 killers
  • (4/5)
    Peter Swanson had me very entwined with these characters and I am unsure exactly how that happened. This wasn't a particular topic I really wanted to read about at the time but I certainly became completely absorbed and kept postponing "daily life" as to finish this suspense. I quite like the female lead was written to have had a traumatic experience but she keeps trying to become strong and independent even so. Nice. Her nightmares were understandable and I also quite like that they came across well..nightmarish, not making sense and the one with statement about George's teeth in the nightmare...well done! That gave me the creeps in daylight!
  • (5/5)
    Her Every Fear has to be about the creepiest book I have ever read - I mean it was scary! It made me fear for every woman out there on the dating scene, and every young woman living alone! Very well written, I thought. It was never a who-dun-it - the reader knows that from the start - but more of a psychological mystery, how long can this go on and how many victims is it going to take? Really, quite an intriguing book with the poor harried main character, Kate, already (and for good reason) a very fearful person having every fear come true. Can she possible survive a second time? I particularly appreciated the Kindle edition having several essays about the book and other books by the author - very interesting! And illuminating on the plot and characters in this book.
  • (2/5)
    I wasn't very impressed with the writing. I found there was just too much filler when it could have been sharper. Very gory and overall not a satisfying story.
  • (4/5)
    Scary, gory and disturbing tale of serial killers in a post Boston neighborhood. High-end commercial- writing is good but not great, too much blather and backstory but overall a page-turner for sure.
  • (4/5)
    This author's specialty is starting out with damaged characters and having them inflict even more damage. He ably speaks in the voices of women and men, and just as in his earlier "The Kind Worth Killing", his familiarity with local Boston landmarks (in this case, a sumptuous vintage apartment building on Beacon Hill) renders the stories particularly comfortable for local residents. This novel focuses on Kate, who was previously the victim of a hostage taking by a former boyfriend back in England. She exchanges apartments with her cousin Corbin, who leaves Beacon Hill for London, and who has some pretty horrible activity in his own past. The plot motors along, with reveals at appropriate places. Another good read, if not pretty creepy.
  • (4/5)
    Not bad. The protagonist, Kate Priddy, is a nervous, anxious person who believes bad things are always going to happen to her. In her need to get out of England for awhile, she switches apartments with her cousin Corbin, only to discover that the next door neighbor has been murdered. Did Corbin do it? Some unexpected twists and suspense. Creates some nervous tension in the reader, but not quite enough. That being said, I enjoyed reading the tale and would read this author again.
  • (3/5)
    Just how unlucky can one woman be? Kate Priddy crosses paths with two psychopaths, a murderer and another probable bad choice at the end. It seems pretty implausible to me. I gave it 3 stars because it did hold my interest, even while I was scratching my head.
  • (3/5)
    Kate Priddy suffers from anxiety. Neurotic since childhood, her recent fears have good reason: in college, Kate was attacked in a horrific incident by her boyfriend. It's taken Kate years to recover from that day. So when her parents tell her that her distant cousin, Corbin Dell, is looking to move to London and wants someone to switch apartments with for six months, Kate jumps at the chance. Six months in Corbin's spacious apartment will give her a chance to start her life over on her own. But shortly after arriving in Boston, Kate receives some unsettling news: the woman who lived down the hall, Audrey, is missing. She soon discovers that Audrey was murdered. Even worse, she realizes that Corbin is a suspect in Audrey's death. As Kate tries to adjust to life in Boston, she meets another fellow apartment-dweller, Alan Cherney. Alan claims he didn't know Audrey, but he seems to know a lot about her. Kate suddenly regrets her temporary move to the States, and soon she finds herself wondering if she's even safe there.

    This novel was the first Swanson I've ever read. It starts off from Kate's perspective, but switches over after a couple of chapters to Alan, and we hear from Corbin and others throughout the story as well. While doing this, the story sometimes double backs to get the same perspective from a different character. While it's effective in showing different sides to one plot element, it seems to drag the story on, and make things repeat unnecessarily. I enjoyed the character of Kate, though couldn't always find myself attached to her. She was probably my favorite of the group, though. For me, I found some bits of the plot a little over the top (the list of things that have happened to Kate seems extreme, for example).

    I guessed a good part of the mystery plot early on, but was still confounded by other pieces, so I did find it interesting, and it certainly had creepy pieces. Still, I wasn't incredibly invested in this one -- either the plot or the characters. Things just seemed a little "too much" at times, and then by the time we did get to the dramatic ending, it tied up really quickly, which was a little anticlimactic. Overall, this was a good thriller, but not great.

    I received a copy of this novel from the publisher and Edelweiss (thank you!); it is available as of 1/10/2017.
  • (4/5)
    Kate Priddy is still recovering from her kidnapping at the hands of an ex-boyfriend, and an apartment swap with her distant cousin seems like the ideal way to get away from it all. Traveling from London to Boston, Kate hopes this is the key to getting over her fears. But when her new next-door neighbor is murdered, Kate realizes her fears may be hitting all too close to home.This is a book full of twists and turns, and some highly creepy characters. In fact, this is a really creepy book, one of those eerie ones that has you second-guessing everything you're reading. There's a part towards the end that is downright terrifying.Swanson is constantly turning what you think you know on its head, which is something I really appreciate in any mystery or thriller I'm reading.The last third of the book feels too rushed. Swanson has done a great job building up all this nail-biting suspense, and then everything just kind of happens at once. Everything that happens is creepy, and surprising, but it all gets a bit mushed together, and seems less plausible, due to the speed at which the plotting suddenly moves.I really enjoyed The Kind Worth Killing, and thought it was absolutely brilliant, especially the way Swanson expertly flipped around everything readers were taking for granted in his story. He does something similar here, but not to the same effect. Her Every Fear would have benefited from a few extra pages, and some time to let Swanson's great twists really sing.
  • (3/5)
    This book was very disappointing. I really enjoyed The Kind Worth Killing and The Girl with a Clock for a Heart, but this book devolved into a serial killer thriller, and I was not pleased by this. The author's previous books were excellent, twisty thrillers in which you couldn't tell what would come next. In contrast, in this book the villain became obvious very early on and from then on there were no surprises.Kate, suffering from ptsd after surviving an assault from a former boyfriend, exchanges apartments with her second cousin Corbin because he has a temporary job in London and she thinks it would be good to spend some time away in Boston. As soon as Kate arrives in Boston, it turns out that Audrey, Corbin's next door neighbor, has been murdered. Kate also encounters Alan, a creepy peeping tom, and Jack, Audrey's creepy ex boyfriend. Added to that mix is Corbin, who had a secret relationship with Audrey, and Henry, an old friend of Corbin's who is just generally creepy. Obviously, there are 4 suspects - narrowed down to one pretty quickly.I don't like thrillers where the motivating factor of the perpetrator is that they're crazy. It just seems lazy. That's one of the reasons I avoid serial killer plots. Also, Kate is an idiot with such awful taste in men that I have no hope for her. I was expecting more from this book and I hope the author does better next time.I listened to the audiobook and I don't think the narrator did a particularly good job with either the English accents or the male voices.
  • (4/5)
    Have you read Peter Swanson yet? No? Well, if you're a fan of twisty, turny suspense novels like I am, you'll want to add him to your 'must read' list.Swanson's latest book is Her Every Fear.Brit Kate Priddy suffers from anxiety, panic attacks and OCD. Her bouts and symptoms got even worse after surviving a horrible relationship with ex-boyfriend George. When the opportunity arises to switch apartments for six months with her distant cousin Corbin in Boston, she decides it's a great opportunity to reclaim her life.But when a neighbour of Corbin's goes missing the day she moves in, Kate begins to wonder if she's made the right choice. And then the neighbour is found dead.....A fantasic premise with loads of places to go - and an uncertain narrator to tell the tale. Love it!Swanson has the reader knowing much more than our poor Kate. There are three other voices - Corbin, a friend of Corbin and another resident of the apartment building in Boston. We know what's happened, what's happening and the danger that Kate is in. Kate tries to downplay odd incidents.... she let the cat out didn't she? How did he get back in? Is someone watching her from the window across the way? (nice little Hitchcockian plot device) Has someone changed one of her sketches? Or is it her own anxieties causing her worries and suspicions?The narrative switches between then and now and only serves to heighten the tension as we learn more about the characters and their secrets. Swanson has painted one heck of a scary antagonist in one of the three characters His inner dialogue is truly frightening. So, while we know the whodunit long before the police, it's the journey there that makes for a deliciously creepy read.Swanson's last book, The Kind Worth Killing, had a fantastic 'gotcha' in the last few pages. I was looking (and hoping) for a similar ending. It's there, but subtle. One line in a paragraph near the end has me thinking that Kate may be making another bad choice......
  • (5/5)
    Kate suffers from an extremely traumatic event that causes her to live in fear. However, she does take a brave step and leaves her home and family in London to move to Boston for six months. She agreed to change apartments with a cousin she never met who had an opportunity to work in London for six months. However, the day she arrived in Boston, she discovered that the woman who lived next door to her cousin was murdered. From there, the action commences, dragging Kate along. This was a great, scary read!
  • (4/5)
    Peter Swanson proved he has an unnerving ability to get into disturbed minds in his previous novel, The Kind Worth Killing. This story is not as twisty but just as engaging and entertaining if the finale occurs a bit abruptly - as long as you don't mind seeing a very ugly side of humanity.
  • (4/5)
    Two cousins trade homes and the first thing one discovers is the next door neighbor has been found dead. And it gets worse from there. While this book was a little predictable, I enjoyed the read. Recommend for thriller fans.
  • (4/5)
    Second of Swanson's novels I have read and enjoyed. Suspense/thriller category though it doesn't have you on the edge of your seat. The two intertwined stories are compelling and I found myself having feelings for the characters. Almost couldn't put it down!
  • (4/5)
    Kate Priddy was almost killed by an ex-boyfriend. Now she has bouts of anxiety that could lead up to panic attacks. When a distant cousin from Boston, Corbin Dell, suggests they swap apartments for six months Kate agrees in the hopes that time away will do more good than harm for her. But after arriving to her new apartment on Beacon Hill, Kate learns that the young woman next door has been murdered. When the police question Kate about Corbin, she has few answers since she doesn't personally know him but has many questions of her own. After meeting another tenant in the building named Alan and a tearful friend of the victim outside the building named Jack, her curiosity is piqued. Did Corbin do it? She emails Corbin, who insists he did not murder his neighbour; he barely knew her. But after coming across objects that link him to the victim, she wonders if Corbin is in fact a liar and murderer.

    A compulsive, easy-to-read, well-written, suspenseful book. Not a whole lot happens, it's more character-driven with characters that are real and believable. The only disappointment for me was the ending.
  • (5/5)
    Never having read any of Peter Swanson's books I didn't know what to expect. This book had me hooked from the very first page. The story was gripping and kept me on the edge of my seat. I can see this book made into a great movie.I'm not a psychological thriller fan but there was something about the blurb that made me want to try this book and I'm glad I did. The characters were well developed and the story was well written. I highly recommend this book.I won a free copy of this book from Goodreads and voluntarily chose to write a review.
  • (4/5)
    I don't normally read thrillers, and I've never read any of Swanson's previous work, so I had no idea what to expect from this novel. The chapters show a variety of perspectives, but the most prominent voice is Kate Priddy, a British woman with some serious anxiety issues, who is attempting to regain control over her life after being kidnapped by a possessive ex-boyfriend. To this end, she agrees to a six month apartment swap with an American cousin she's never met, and the book begins with her attempting to stave off a panic attack after getting caught in a traffic jam in a tunnel on her way to her cousin's Boston apartment. When she wakes on her first morning in the States, Kate learns that the young woman who lives in the apartment next to her cousin's has been murdered.I think having an anxious main character was an interesting choice for a thriller- I feel like it made it a bit harder to tell whether things were actually happening, or if her anxiety was causing her to overthink things, to imagine things. Kate's vivid imagination helped with that too. I did feel like a chunk of the plot was pretty implausible, and I'd guessed who the murderer was pretty early on. I think my biggest critiques would be that Kate seems to subsist entirely on bread and cheese for days on end without any impact on her energy, and that the introduction of some characters' perspectives come in so late just to impart specific information that it feels like a bit of a cop-out.
  • (4/5)
    This was another great mystery from Peter Swanson. It's the story of two cousins, Kate who lives in England and Corbin who lives in Boston, who decide to swap apartments for 6 months. Both are dealing with personal issues they are trying to escape. Shortly after Kate arrives in Boston, the girl who lives in the apartment across from Corbin's is found murdered. From there the mystery begins to unfold - I don't want to give anymore away. If you are looking for a good mystery, you won't be disappointed. I won an ARC of this book from Goodreads.
  • (3/5)
    Kate suffers from crippling anxiety, a disorder that exploded after a terrifying incident at the hands of an ex-boyfriend. After her cousin Corbin, a cousin whom she has never met, takes a job in London , they agree to exchange apartments, which will bring Kate to the states,,and an opportunity for a new start, The night she moves into Corbin's gorgeous apartment, a young woman is found murdered in the apartment next door.While this book was fast paced, caused me to shudder many times, it also caused me to roll my eyes. I found some this book, implausible, overkill, I mean how many psychopaths can be found in one young woman's life? Plus, I found many of Kate's actions did not make sense for a person suffering a severe anxiety disorder. Still, if you are looking for a creepy read, this one is that. Just leave your inner critic at home.ARC from publisher.
  • (3/5)
    The story was ok there were no major twists in the story seemed like an old Hollywood thriller movie. But, I would recommend it to new book readers. And the vocabulary was simple.
  • (4/5)
    Recently discovered Peter Swanson and I really like his style. This book was good, maybe a little long but worth the read/listen!
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed it and it would definitely get 4 stars if it wasn't so drawn out... The story really was made way less exciting by the slow-pace and EVERYONE'S perspective lol. I felt myself waiting for Henry's/jack's part to just end. Overall good one , in tune with his other books.
  • (4/5)
    It's an original spin of the attention-gripping story of Peter Swanson. It is not unusual that there are some psychopaths walk among us everyday. Superficially they are just like us but we have to be wary every now and then even with the people that (we thought) we have known them very well. The story started out good and keep one on edge through most of the time... however, it's kinda of wrap up too brief and too soon toward the end of the story. Nonetheless, it's entertaining and a good read.
  • (4/5)
    I think it becomes a typical trademark of Peter Swanson's work that we're gonna get revealed who's the killer/mastermind behind all this around the middle or even might be earlier part of the book, instead of the usual typical thriller book that drops the big bomb at the end. Still need to get use to that because I feel like I wanted to get build up for a little bit longer. But what do I know, I enjoy this nonetheless. Such a creepy story. And my God, how I feel blessed for not ever meeting pshychos ex-boyfriends or butthurt ex-onenightstands.
  • (4/5)
    A perfect chilling thriller. The atmosphere was very dark and gory. The characters are messed up in a psychotic way, it plays with your mind and force you think in many ways. I felt the character in this novel are more messier than the characters in "The Kind worth killing" but the only thing was missing in this tale was a twist. Everything was expected after Henry came to the frame ,but still the writing style hooked you up. But the novel really misses a kick or a shock I should say , which "The Kind of Worth Killing " had in it. But still I enjoyed the novel. Peter Swanson is one of my favorite authors because of his deep insight into the mind of the psychopaths and characters in his novels are creepy and very dark, just like I love and the narrating was also good.
  • (5/5)
    Very Good Read... Well Listen! LOL!!!
    With A #HappyEnding To A #CrazyBeginning & #InsaneMiddle!
    Let's Just Hope Kate's #PyschopathRadar Is Immune To Alan Churney... ??‍♀️