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The Survivor's Guide to Family Happiness

The Survivor's Guide to Family Happiness

Scritto da Maddie Dawson

Narrato da Amy McFadden


The Survivor's Guide to Family Happiness

Scritto da Maddie Dawson

Narrato da Amy McFadden

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (36 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
13 ore
Pubblicato:
Oct 25, 2016
ISBN:
9781531830625
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

Three women, three lives, and one chance to become a family…whether they want to or not.

Newly orphaned, recently divorced, and semiadrift, Nina Popkin is on a search for her birth mother. She's spent her life looking into strangers' faces, fantasizing they're related to her, and now, at thirty-five, she's ready for answers.

Meanwhile, the last thing Lindy McIntyre wants is someone like Nina bursting into her life, announcing that they're sisters and campaigning to track down their mother. She's too busy with her successful salon, three children, beautiful home, and…oh yes, some pesky little anxiety attacks.

But Nina is determined to reassemble her birth family. Her search turns up Phoebe Mullen, a guarded, hard-talking woman convinced she has nothing to offer. Gradually sharing stories and secrets, the three women make for a messy, unpredictable family that looks nothing like Nina pictured…but may be exactly what she needs. Nina's moving, ridiculous, tragic, and transcendent journey becomes a love story proving that real family has nothing to do with DNA.

Pubblicato:
Oct 25, 2016
ISBN:
9781531830625
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    Nina Popkin's mother has recently passed away and she's also freshly divorced. Adopted as a child, her mother's death rekindles Nina's desire to search for her birth mother. She's always felt as she's never belonged anywhere, searching strangers' faces and eyes for her potential birth mother. Amazingly, Nina manages to find her biological sister, Lindy, whom she actually knew as a kid from her neighborhood. But Lindy, who is obsessed with creating a perfect house and life, isn't too thrilled about her wayward sister bursting into her life. Lindy has three kids, a busy salon to run, and a lot of (hidden) anxiety to deal with. But Nina is force to be reckoned with and she's determined to bring Lindy on her journey to find their mother. But will this journey finally bring Nina the sense of peace and belonging she's always desired?

    Dawson's novel is told from the varying points of view of its main women: Nina, Lindy, and their biological mother. It's a humorous--and sometimes heartbreaking--look at family and the different forms it can take. Dawson has created a cast of characters who seem incredibly real. She captures the little details just right, from family life with kids, to Nina's romantic woes. Nina is a trip: you can't help but love her and her relentless optimism. Even when the novel drags a bit in the middle, when you feel like Nina and the plot need a bit of a push, it recovers through its humor and Nina's personality. Perhaps the only part I found slightly weird was that Nina and Lindy's childhood neighborhood was so full of adopted children that they grew up knowing each other (though not knowing they were sisters), but perhaps that was truly par for the course for the era... who knows.

    In the end, I really enjoyed this novel. It combines several other supporting characters, including the children of Nina's boyfriend, into a great read. At times it's truly laugh out loud funny, even if it gets a bit preposterous. But it's also heartfelt and touching and a lovely look at the bonds of family.

    I received a copy of this novel from the publisher and Netgalley (thank you!); it is available everywhere as of 10/25/2016.

  • (5/5)
    I loved the entire concept. As a person who comes from a non-traditional family it was refreshingly relatable. I would love to have a spin off that dives into Phoebes life experiences. Great book!
  • (4/5)
    The Survivor’s Guide to Family Happiness explores the importance of family and the many forms family can take. Nina Popkin is 35 years old, recently divorced and newly orphaned. Feeling adrift after her numerous significant life changes, she begins to search for her birth mother (she was adopted when she was very young). Not only does she discover her birth mother, but Nina learns that she has a sister related by blood that was also given up for adoption. Lindy McIntyre, Nina’s newly found sister, leads a very structured life and is initially very unhappy to learn she has a sibling she knew nothing about. With her enthusiastic and delightful personality, Nina attempts to win Lindy over and enlist her to help locate their birth mother, Phoebe Mullen. Meanwhile, Nina has also met Carter, and they have begun dating. Carter has two children that enjoy and appreciate Nina and the structure she has brought into their lives. At first, I was not sure that part of the story seemed very realistic, but as it developed I decided it made sense because Carter and his ex-wife provided very little support or attention to their children, and Nina provided just what they needed.The story is told through alternating viewpoints, Nina’s, Lindy’s and Phoebe’s, which works very well for the plot. Hearing the story through each woman’s eyes really added to the book and helped the story progress. I also felt I understood each individual better after reading a chapter told from that character’s viewpoint. Maddie Dawson crafts realistic, likeable characters that will stay with me for a while. I particularly liked Nina – her positive attitude and relentless attempts to ascertain where she came from were very appealing and carried the novel along.The one section I found a tad unrealistic was the part where Nina moved in with Carter and his children and just assumed the role of a pseudo-stepmom. While his kids clearly needed a Nina in their lives, this section just did not ring very true with me. However, this small blip did not keep me from liking the book. The Survivor’s Guide to Family Happiness was a fun and entertaining read. Thanks to NetGalley and Lake Union for the chance to read this ARC in exchange for an honest review.