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A Time to Die: The Untold Story of the Kursk Tragedy

A Time to Die: The Untold Story of the Kursk Tragedy

Scritto da Robert Moore

Narrato da Pete Cross


A Time to Die: The Untold Story of the Kursk Tragedy

Scritto da Robert Moore

Narrato da Pete Cross

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (11 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
10 ore
Pubblicato:
Jul 26, 2016
ISBN:
9781520021270
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

On a quiet Saturday morning in August 2000, two explosions--one so massive it was detected by seismologists around the world--shot through the shallow Arctic waters of the Barents Sea. Russia’s prized submarine, the Kursk, began her fatal plunge to the ocean floor. Award-winning journalist Robert Moore presents a riveting, brilliantly researched account of the deadliest submarine disaster in history. Journey down into the heart of the Kursk to witness the last hours of the twenty-three young men who survived the initial blasts. Visit the highly restricted Arctic submarine base to which Moore obtained secret admission, where the families of the crew clamored for news of their loved ones.
Pubblicato:
Jul 26, 2016
ISBN:
9781520021270
Formato:
Audiolibro


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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    The sad story of the Russian submarine The Kursk and the futile effort to save the men who managed to survive the initial explosion. How politics and Cold War intrigue failed the men and a nation.
  • (4/5)
    A Time to Die was published in 2003, not long after the Kursk accident in August 2000. I vaguely remembered it and wanted to reread the events with the perspective of time. Most disaster books follow a certain script, either with the disaster happening half-way through after pages of background, or in a braided narrative technique with alternating chapters of background and disaster to hold interest. A Time to Die surprises because the accident happens very early, in the second chapter, and unfolds chronologically from there. The tension becomes if they will save the trapped crew in time, meaning 90% of the book is thrilling. Excellent.However it's more than a thriller, it's insight into the death of an empire. Russia at this point was in the depths of its decay after the fall of the USSR. The Kursk disaster and their need to ask for outside help from the West was emblematic of how far they had fallen. It was like national suicide made flesh and steel. Putin had been in office for only a few months and it was the first test of his Presidency, another emblematic moment.Overall an excellent book. The moment in Russian history has past, but it still rewards.
  • (4/5)
    Life on a submarine - who would willingly choose it? Perhaps if you're living on one of the Arctic Russian military bases, the choice is easier, because the way of life portrayed here makes the social contact and conditions within a submarine seem almost cosy. This book was as much about the decline and changes within Soviet society that the Kursk disaster highlighted, but also the openness that the country was trying to awkwardly embrace. Okay, the Russians were slow to ask for outside assistance, but thirty years ago the submariners would have died in a veil of secrecy, and their suffering denied to the world. And the depiction of Putin being publicly interrogated by grieving relatives would never have happened pre-Gorbachev. Whether or not the West could have rescued the men in the Kursk even if they had been on the scene is a moot point, but there is no doubt that there would have been a better chance of it. Everyone tried their best under the circumstances, and it's strange to think that even as I sit and write this, there are probably hundreds of men submerged somewhere under our oceans, spying on one another. Rather them than me.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent telling of the story of the Kursk tragedy.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent, what else can I say? Heartbreaking, definitely. The author wrote a spell-binding book about a sad story that otherwise would have been just another sad tale. Highly recommend for anyone into human interest stories - don't need to have an interest in war or military to enjoy. But be ready to feel queasy about the suffering depicted - it's sad.